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Title: Poultry fancier, vol. 14 



Place of Publication: Chicago, 



Copyright Date: 1910 



Master Negative Storage Number: MNS# PSt SNPaAg122A.2 



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Barred Rocks 



EXCLUSIVELY. R^j^al Hliie is the name. Bred in line for 
1) years and orij^inally from the best blood lines in the world 

Show TiRfr^if .tn f ^*»<^''e unequalled record of five first-premiums at Mich. Slate 

Show, Detroit, st 11 remains for some one to duplicate. No room to tell vou of hundreds of other 

bi?ds o'f rarUFtSni P^'^V'^'-^-l?^'" "°" ^^°''"' 'l^f'''^ '''^'^'- ' "orha?e in nw anls ?hm 
birds ot rarest type and color with narrow, deep and distinct barring aI.so breeding stock thai 

r otXxne '«^?LT'^ r^""^ l^T^^- "^^^"'^ °^^7^"^ remember I^io not require v?u to pavS 
nu%?!r ^^Pf"^'^'e advertising, but ship you as good as can be found at reasonable prices. 'The 
?, o^ .- ^! ^' ^X^'^K'^Jl^ increa.sing demand warrants me in advancing the price of eges(for hatch- 
iua) t(),>,4 per 15. Address A. L. EMp:RSON INKSTER, MICH U"r naicn 



FOR SALE 



I offer Stock and Eggs for Hatcliing from 
the following: Single Comb White Leg- 
horns, Brown Leghorns, Black Minorcas, 
Buff Orpingtons, Light Brahmas, White Rocks, Wliite Wyandottes Columbian 
Wyandottes also day old Chicks, get my prices. My stock is of the best strain's 
and will please the most particular buyers. I have over 700 head of birds that 
must be sold at once to make room and they will go at bargain prices. 

JOS. M. FAY, - 808 Howard Ave., ALTOONA, PA. 



LONG'S ORPINGTONS 

IMating list on request. Stock for sale. 
E. M. LONG Box P. F. Osceola, Ind. 

Raise chicks EVENTUALLY Always one story, 
just nature's Always warm and 

way. Always CLOUGH'S dry; fits all sizes 
dry from chick chicks or fowls, 

heat and perfect LAMPLESS |< dozen to 200 
ventilation. En- size, only $5. 

dorsed by all that BROODE»S! Principle and 
use them, even ex- 
perimental stations. WHY NOT 
A perfect remedy for 
all chick diseases. To NOW? 

be used out or indoors. 

It will not make ash piles of the home or the chicks. 
50 per cent, better than the average mother hen. 
Free literature. Address 

CLOUGH'S LAIWPLESS BROODER, Aurora, ML 



results are 
right; raises 
95 to 100 
per cent of 
the hatch. 



"HAL 




ROCKS" 



'■^Msmj ^m >i^mm^i,i'--.i^ ■li.-i^m; 



AawuMUHin 



Established a BIG RECORD by winning 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO JANUARY, 1907 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO DECEMBER, 1908 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO DECEMBER. 1909 

me Jh'^t^u^^'^f ^^ ^"r^^nfr" '^!Jr' ^^^^ "' ^'^'''''°" ^° '^'""'"S y^^"" ^"er year, birds purchased from 
ine or hatched from EGGS I sold have won at the largest shows in the country. I could mention show 
after show, where my b.rds have won the BEST PRIZES but I honestly believe this honor belongs to 
me purchaser. So, when you buy birds from me you need not be afraid that I will pmblish your winnings 
as mine For the season of igro I have mated 15 grand pens. Write for mating li.st, which describes niv 
pens and contams pictures of "LEADER" my ist CHICAGO COCKEREL and other famous Wrdr A 
choice lot of breeding cockerels left at $3 to $10 each. H. W. Halbach, Box 7, WaterforXwis^ 



A CL 






SWEEP 

BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS 



Win all First Prizes at the Michigan State Fair, Detroit, Mich., September 2 to 10, 1909. 
Winning ist and 2d cock, ist and 2d hen, ist, 2d and 3rd cockerel, ist, 2d and 3d pullet, 
ist pen. At the Dearborn, Michigan Show, December, 1909, in a class of 87 birds, one of 
the strongest ever gotten together in the West, I won ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th cocks, ist and 
3rd pullets, 2nd and 3rd cockerels, ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th hens, with birds scoring to 94 
by Tucker. 



ONE THOUSAND BIRDS FOR SALE 



including some of the cream of my old stock and the cockerels and pullets of last spring's 
production. I can mate up pairs, trios and pens that will win and produce winners. Also 
single birds both sexes in lots to suit. Write for prices on eggs from my choicest matings. 
They will put you in the lead. 



DO 



DELAY, WRITE TO-DAY 



20 young Toulon.se Geese from Chicago and Detroit winners (never beaten.) Write for 
prices. Catalogue free. Please mention this paper when writing. 

DEARBORN POULTRY YARDS. S. D. LAPHAM. prop., Box P, Dearborn, Mich, 



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I 



• 





• 




Vol. XIV 



CHICAGO, ILL, JANUARY, 1910 



No. I 



Amusing, Interesting and Instru 



C 1 I VP 




A Talk About Past and Present Advertising. It 
Ought to Interest All Fanciers and Especially 
Advertisers, Big and Little 

By C. E. PETERSEN 

ANY pe()])le assume that advertising is 
an institution entirely of modern ori- 
.i^in, possibly because the encycloped- 
ist has given little attention to the 
subject, and as time begets difficulties 
in research, we are almost driven to 
regard the first advertisement with which we are 
accjuaintcd as the actual inaugurator of a system 
which now has hardly any bounds. Advertising 
has, of course, within the last fifty years developed 
entirely new courses and has become an institution 
of So great importance that it would hardly be pos- 
sible to conduct any kind of business without it. 
Henry Sampson in his "ffistory of Advertising," 
from which I will quote frcfiuently, says that inves- 
tigation shows that advertisements were pul)lished 
in (ireece and Rome in reference to the gladiatorial 
exhibitions, so important a feature of the ancient 
(lays of those once great countries. That these ad- 
vertisements took the form of what is now generally 
known as "billing" seems most probable, and from 
the way the excavated walls of Pompey look, giving 
pictures of the gladiators and times of exhibition, 
Rome must have often looked like a modern country 
town, when the advent of a circus or other traveling 
company is first made known. Both the Greeks 
and the Romans had on their houses a piece of the 
wall whitened to receive inscrij)tions relative to 
their affairs. To give an idea of their style of ad- 
vertising I will (|note one or two taken from the 
walls of P(»mpe\ and written 2,()()() vears airo. 

"X. FESTI AMPLIATl 
I'aniilia ( iladiatoria. Pugna iterum 
Pugna XVI. K. Jvn. Venat. Vela." 

That is **The troop of Gladiators of the C^dil will 



tight (,n the 31st of May. There will be fights with 
wild animals, and an awning to keep off the sun." 
r.anuim could not have done much better than that. 

Here is another: ''Traveler go from here to the 
Twelfth Tower, there Sarinus keeps a Tavern. This 
is to request you to enter. Farewell." 

Mediaeval advertising was done by "criers," who 
would walk through the streets proclaiming the 
news of the day, and where different kinds of com- 
modities were to be found. 

After the inventing of the i)rinting press adver- 
tising by hand bills became the custom, but no 
newspaper was in existence before the reign of 
Queen I<:iizal)eth, supposed to be issued by Chris- 
topher Barker, Her Highness' printer, 1583. This 
l)aper was said to be started for the prevention of 
tile fulmination of the false rei)orts, but it was more 
like a succession of extraordinary gazettes, and had 
by no means the ai)pearance of a regular journal, 
as we understand the term. Periodicals and papers 
really first came into general use during the civil 
wars of Charles the First, and from that period rapid 
jH-ogress was made in journalism and advertising. 
The first newspaper acixertisement was found ac- 
cording to "Notes and (Jueries," in Mercurius 
l^lencticus of October, 1(;4S. Boston was the first 
city in America that published a local paper; this 
was done in 1681). 

Advertising, derived from the Patin word adver- 
tere, to turn the nu'nd to, to notice, is not an exjieri- 
mental luxury, but a necessary adjunct and invalu- 
able assistant, to be paid for as logically as any other 
legitimate exi)ense, not a new thing,* either,' but a 
nieans by which the producer of commodities has 
disseminated information regarding them from the 
earliest beginnings of history, though here as every- 
where else the advancement of progress and science 
has given enlarged opp<^rtunities for the seller who 
before the invention i^ the printing press was lim- 
ited ^o his vocal organs, and it was a matter of who 
could cry the loudest, who got the most attention 
from the purchasing pnblic. 

America is par excellence the countrv of the ad- 



Barred Rocks 



EXCLUSIVELY. R"j4.il Hliie is the name. Hied in line for 
1) years and originally from the best blood lines in the world 
Shnur Twr^if ..ill ." ' li^^e Unequal led record of five first-premiums at Mich . State 

reirnT^r «n^ «L^i remains tor some one to duplicate. No room to tell you of hundreds of other 
b!?ds of r«i«f fS.fi prizes they have won at other leading shows. I now have in my yards show 
wi'l n?er^f ^hin^.^^. ? ^f""' "^/^'^ "arrow deep and distinct barring. Also breeding stock that 
r ^f ^f 1 ^!^ approval of any fancier. When ordering remember I do not require you to pay for 

m^m,;^f^^"T^^''^Y-''''"^-'"^f"f'y°"''^^"«^^ ^•'^'^«" ^^*^ fo""^l at reasonable prices. The 
cjuaiityot my stock and nicreasmer demand warrants me in advancing the price of eggs (for hatch- 
ui«) to ^4 per 15. Address A. L. EM^RSPN INKSTER. MICH. o e^gs ^roi narcn 



FOR SALE 



I offer Stock and Eggs for Hatching from 
the following: Single Comb White Leg- 
horns, Brown Leghorns, Black Minorcas, 
Buff Orpingtons, Light Brahmas, White Rocks, White Wyandottes Columbian 
Wyandottes also day old Chicks, get my prices. My stock is of the best strain's 
and will please the most particular buyers. I have over 700 head of birds that 
must be sold at once to make room and they will go at bargain prices. 

JOS. M. FAY, . 808 Howard Ave., ALTOONA, PA. 



LONG'S ORPINGTONS 

Mating list on request. Stock for sale. 
E. M. LONG B ox P. R Osceola, Ind. 

Raise chicks EVENTUALLY Always one story. 

just nature's Always warm and 

way. Always CLOUGH'S dry; fits all sizes 

dry from chick chicks or fowls. 

heat and perfect LAMPLESS K dozen to 200 

ventilation. En- size, only $5. 

dorsed by all that BROODErtS! Principle and 

use them, even ex- results are 

perimental stations. WHY NOT 

A perfect remedy for 

all chick diseases. To NOW? 

be used out or indoors. 

It will not make ash piles of the home or the chicks. 

50 per cent, better than the average mother hen. 

Free literature. Address 

CLOUGH'S LAMPLESS BROODER, Aurora, III. 



right; raises 

95 to 100 
per cent of 
the hatch. 



HALBACH'S WHITE ROCKS" 



Established a BIG RECORD by winning 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO JANUARY, 1907 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO DECEMBER, 1908 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO DECEMBER. 1909 

me n7h^ JhTh'^ ^^ ' pfe'^r" ^.T^"' *^^' '" ^'^'"''°" ^° ^''""'"^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ y«=*^- ^rds purchased from 
me or hatched from EGGS I sold have won at the largest shows in the country. I could mention show 

tW^cTa;;: %^'"\'"'^' '^T "f " Vn ^^^"^ PRIZES but I honestly believe this honor bZgst" 
me purchaser. So, when you buy birds from me you need not be afraid that I will publish your winnings 
as mme For the season of igro I have mated 15 grand pens. Write for mating list, which describes mv 
?hoL'"lntTh"" '/"'"'r^ "LEADER" my ist CHICAGO COCKEREL an^d other famous biSn 
choice lot of breeding cockerels left at $3 to $10 each. H. W. Haibach, Box 7, Waterford, Wis. 



A CLEAN SWEEP 

LAPHAM^S BUFF PLYMOU TH ROCKS 

Win all First Prizes at the Michigan State Fair, Detroit, Mich., September 2 to 10, 1909. 
Winning ist and 2d cock, ist and 2d hen, ist, 2d and 3rd cockerel, ist, 2d and 3d pullet, 
ist pen. At the Dearborn, Michigan Show, December, 1909, in a class of 87 birds, one of 
the strongest ever gotten together in the West, I won ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th cocks, ist and 
5rd pullets, 2nd and 3rd cockerels, ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th hens, with birds scoring to 94 
by Tucker. 

ONE THOUSAND BIRDS FOR SALE 

including some of the cream of my old stock and the cockerels and pullets of last spring's 
production. I can mate up pairs, trios and pens that will win and produce winners. Also 
single birds both sexes in lots to suit. Write for prices on eggs from my choicest matings. 
They will put you in the lead. 

DONT DELAY, WRITE TO-DAY 

20 young Toulonse Geese from Chicago and Detroit winners (never beaten.) Write for 
prices. Catalogue free. Please mention this paper when writing. 

DEARBORN POULTRY YARDS, S. D. LAPHAM, prop.. Box P, Dearborn, Mich. 



INTENTIONAL 2ND EXPOSURE 



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%1 -• 



j 




• 



m\ 



• ' • 



li 



J. 




Vol. XIV 



CHICAGO. ILL. JANUARY, 1910 



No. 1 



Amusing, Interesting and Instructive 




A Talk About Past and Present Advertising. It 
Ought to Interest All Fanciers and Especially 
Advertisers, Big and Little 

By C. E. PETERSEN 

ANY people as.sume that advertising is 
an institution entirely of modern ori- 
gin, possibly because the encycloped- 
ist has given little attention to the 
subject, and as time begets difficulties 
in research, we are almost driven to 
regard the first advertisement with which we are 
acquainted as the actual inaugurator of a system 
which now has hardly any bounds. Advertising 
has, of course, within the last fifty years developed 
entirely new courses and has become an institution 
of so great importance that it would hardly be pos- 
sible to conduct any kind of business without it. 
Henr}^ Sampson in his ''History of Advertising," 
from which I will quote frequently, says that inves- 
tigation shows that advertisements were published 
in Greece and Rome in reference to the gladiatorial 
exhibitions, so important a feature of the ancient 
days of those once great countries. That these ad- 
vertisements took the form of what is now generally 
known as ''billing" seems most i)robable, and from 
the way the excavated walls of Pompey look, giving 
pictures of the gladiators and times of exhibition, 
Rome must have often looked like a modern country 
town, when the advent of a circus or other traveling 
company is first made known. Both the Greeks 
and the Romans had on their houses a piece of the 
wall whitened to receive inscriptions relative to 
their affairs. To give an idea of their style of ad- 
vertising r will quote one or two taken from the 
walls of Pompey and written 2,000 years ago. 

"N. FESTI AMPLTATI 
Familia Gladiatoria. Pugna iterum 
Pugna XVI. K. Jvn. Venat. Vela." 

That is "The troop of Gladiators of the Odil will 



fight on the 31st of May. There will be fights with 
wild animals, and an awning to keep off the sun." 
Barnum could not have done much better than that. 

Here is another: "Traveler go from here to the 
Twelfth Tower, there Sarinus keeps a Tavern. This 
is to request you to enter. Farewell." 

Mediaeval advertising was done by "criers," who 
would walk through the streets proclaiming the 
news of the day, and where different kinds of com- 
modities were to be found. 

After the inventing of the printing press adver- 
tising by hand bills became the custom, but no 
newspaper was in existence before the reign of 
Queen Elizabeth, supposed to be issued by Chris- 
topher Barker, Her Highness' printer, 1583. This 
paper was said to be started for the prevention of 
the fulmination of the false reports, but it was more 
like a succession of extraordinary gazettes, and had 
by no means the appearance of a regular journal, 
as we understand the term. Periodicals and papers 
really first came into general use during the civil 
wars of Charles the First, and from that period rapid 
progress was made in journalism and advertising. 
The first newspaper advertisement was found ac- 
cording to "Notes and Queries," in Mercurius 
Elencticus of October, 1648. Boston was the first 
city in America that published a local paper; this 
was done in 1689. 

Advertising, derived from the Latin word adver- 
tere, to turn the mind to, to notice, is not an experi- 
mental luxury, but a necessary adjunct and invalu- 
able assistant, to be paid for as logically as any other 
legitimate expense, not a new thing, either, but a 
means by which the producer of commodities has 
disseminated information regarding them from the 
earliest beginnings of history, though here as every- 
where else the advancement of progress and science 
has given enlarged opportunities for the seller who 
before the invention of the printing press was lim- 
ited to his vocal organs, and it was a matter of who 
could cry the loudest, who got the most attention 
from the purchasing public. 

America is par excellence the country of the ad- 




Page 2 



frt^-j^'ss^-.y-., .^;=g{^-v?l'3:'^Ji 



POULTRY FANCIE 




Januar y. *10 J H^ Bf 



vertiser. In the colonial papers, advertisements 
furnish material for history, telling of new goods 
just imported from England, coffee, slave sales, run- 
away slaves and servants, or lost cattle. 

Advertising has grown with the newspapers. In 
1795 there were 200 newspapers in the United 
States ; in 1850, 2,526, and in 1895, 20,217. 

Newspaper advertising on a large scale dates 
from the establishment of the New York Sun in 
1833, followed shortly by the New York Herald, the 
Philadelphia Public Ledger and the New York 
Tribune. 

Estimates on the amount annually spent on ad- 
vertising in the United States are as high as $500,- 
000,000, which goes to show the great importance 
of advertising in the commercial world, employing 
the keenest brains, the most talented men and 
women, as business men begin to appreciate that ad- 
vertising is no more incident of competition, but 
frequently the most important department, upon 
whose skilfull management the growth and success 




A PEN OF S. C. WTTITE T^EGHORN WINNERS. 
This pen and others equally Rood are owned by Naumburg & 
Booth, 1532 W. Bancroft St., Toledo, O. They are selling eggs 
from these birds at reasonable prices. 

of the business depends entirely. Business certainly 
seems to be king today, but except you want to have 
it dethroned, advertising must be resorted to, for 
without it anything in the way of pre-eminence can- 
not be established ; good goods and well worded, 
persistent advertising, will in the end bring success. 

If you have got the goods and you ram home the 
selling points through some good medium, business 
cannot help coming to you sooner or later. 

In writing an advertisement tell the truth ; then 
if you cannot think of anything else, repeat it. 

A man is known not only by his advertisement, 
but by the way he backs it up — good stock keeps on 
talking business. 

Show your birds and win the ribbons, then make 
your ad dance to their whistle. 

There are just four foundation principles to good 
advertising. The first is display it well, then tell 
the merit, tell the merit, tell the merit — these are 
the other three. 

Be original ; don't follow in anyone's steps. Say 
what you have to say ; say it in the same way you 
would say it to the man if he was face to face with 
you. Never mind how your ad looks to the other 
fellow — if it brings results keep right on in the same 
way ; don't get off the track as long as it leads to 
results. 

You cannot run an incubator on last year's heat, 



neither can you run your business successfully on 
last year's advertising. 

I have known a number of men who persistently 
refused to advertise and depended on their winnings 
to do the business; they had won reputation at 
show after show, and expected that this would sell 
their stock for all times. Other men bred the same 
kind of birds and did advertising, and the time 
came when the former men ceased to sell and pur- 
chasers came to the latter. 

It is no use to depend on the notice given in a 
show report — this will not successfully advertise a 
man's stock but for a little while. 

If a man should buy a fine pen of fowls and then 
board up the yard in which he kept them so no one 
could see them, this would be very foolish indeed ; 
yet that is exactly what a man does who has plenty 
of fine stock for sale, but refuses to advertise. 

Don't expect your advertisement to do miracles 
for you ; it takes time to build up a good trade, but 
once it is built up it stays as long as the buyers are 
satisfied. 

Don't stop advertising during the dull months, 
but push business with all your might; when the 
other fellows are taking a rest, you work. 

Find a good field, then sow your ad — and you 
will reap a harvest of customers in due season. 

It has been most beautifully stated that ''the ad 
is the bud of promise, and inquiry the blossom of 
hope, and the order is the fragrant fruit." 

It is always best to answer every inquiry you re- 
ceive, whether you have the stock inquired for or 
not ; you may have it some other time, and it is 
even possible that the prospective customer may 
wait. 

It is poor business to pay out good money for 
advertising and then spoil your own ad by a poorly 
written reply, and on stationery of poor quality. 
Have a printed letterhead and a return envelope; it 
gives confidence in your business capacity. The 
other was is a free ad of slovenliness and confidence 
is destroyed. 

It is not enough to tell people that your stock 
is the "best in the world" — the buyers are wearv of 
such threadbare publicity. 

It is absolutely necessary to prove that your stock 
is either the best, or has some special qualities that 
make it an important factor in the other man's 
breeding yard, and taking everything into consid- 
eration as to quality, style and productiveness, is 
cheaper than any other stock he could get, even if 
the i)rice is much more than the other inan offers 
the same birds for. When you can do this you are 
on the right side of successful publicity. 

Wit alone won't do it, as a cleverly put ad may 
draw attention, but in itself is not enough. 

To shake a man's faith in the breed in which he 
is interested, or in the strain from which he got his 
stock, strong arguments are needed— smooth, 
plausible talk will not do it; nothing but facts and 
figures will, and so in answering any inquiry state 
plainly and honestly where your birds are superior 
to others, give their winnings, if any, and make your 
letter so convincing, because it breathes the spirit 
of truth, that it will shake your inquirer's belief 
in his present connections, appeal to his reasoning 
powers, and it won't be long before you have an- 
other customer on your books. 

A good photographic illustration of your stock is 
one of the best means to follow your ad; it tells 
more in a glance than the words you could use in 



• 




• 










.«i»*»!U;/wyfl«»MMQ*»»<,!'Sft«*BU:*K 



[ January. *10 II 



POULTRY FANCIER 




SSESSSSE 



Page 3 



.Ai^^;^.^,^tf-^^-rr^-a^A';fe 





the description of one or more specimens, but let 
me repeat "a good photograph," as a poor one, will 
si>oil an otherwise good ad. 

And in conclusion let me record a few hints on 
advertising that I have picked up from a number 
of sources and that will be of value to the readers 
of Poultry Fancier, as well as they have been to me 
and others that become acquainted with them: 

You cannot keep up steam without a continuous 
supply of fuel. Advertising is the recognized force 
which drives the engines of industry, but it must 
not be expected that the advertising of today will 
keep the wheels turning in a year from now. 

Some ads scream and others whisper, some throw 
dust in your eyes and some perform vaudeville. 
Make your ad talk like a man to a man. 

"A man must keep his mouth open a long time 
before a roast pigeon will fly into it," says a Danish 

How to Mate Col 

One of the Originators of this Variety Tells What 
It Should Be and How to Produce Birds that 
Will Win Under the New Standard. 

By T. REID PARRISH 

N offering to the Columbian breeders 
an article on the mating of this breed, 
I do so feeling that it is possible I 
may save to some breeder several 
years of experimental work and prob- 
ably cause others to continue with the 
breed that would otherwise give up, declaring that 
the Standard and Poultry Judges were too exacting 
in small matters, or at least in things that appeared 
to them non-essential. 

As an excuse for offering these ideas I would 
state that I have brought the Columbian direct from 
the Light Brahma and White Wyandotte cross, 
thereby being in a position from experience to know 
\ ery nearly the results from the crossing of any two 
birds that have the appearance of Columbian Wy- 
andotte. 

The next Standard published will require for the 
female the same flight feathers as in the males, a 
solid black primary. The judges now are very ex- 
acting in this matter and in the next few years will 
be even more so. The problem in the female will 
therefore be the production of these solid black pri- 
maries. In the male bird we are confronted with 
something that is just as difificult to produce; a back 
absolutely free from straw or creaminess, and now 
and possibly for another year, a male bird good in 
color and shape although decidedly creamy has a 
fair chance of winning in a class with birds having 
white backs, but this will not be the case two years 
hence, for by the time of the show season of 1912 a 
Columbian showing creaminess in the back would 
not be given any more consideration than a White 
Rock or White Orpington or a White Wyandotte 
showing the same defect. This breed must have a 
better back than was ever produced in the Brahma. 
In view of these facts it is well for the Columbian 
breeders to start now with matings to improve the, 
back or rather to perfect the back of the male bird 
and to do this we must look to the female for we 



proverb. And a man, nowadays, stands as poor 
chance of getting things without advertising as 
the seeker of roast pigeon in the proverb. 

The man who went out to milk and sat down on 
a boulder in the middle of the pasture and waited 
for the cow to back up, was a brother to the man 
who kept a store and wouldn't advertise because 
he reasoned that the purchasing public would back 
up to his place of business when it wanted some- 
thing. A cow's tail has a limited circulation, but 
it reaches the fly. 

These few selections, out of many, tell a tale 
worth listening to, so as the time is now here, get 
before the public with what you have, and with a 
little money judiciously expended you will find, like 
hundreds of others have found out, the money in- 
vested in advertising is a paying investment. 

Bridgton, Maine. 



umt)ian 




van 




ottes 




cannot breed on and on with the male line that 
shows brassiness and expect an improvement un- 
less we know the type of female that will bring 
about the desired results. 

We have in the female line two very distinct and 
different whites, one a pearl white, the other a bluish 
vvdiite and it is from this bluish white female that 
we must look for this improvement in the male. If 
you have in your flock some birds like this female, 
you will find that the undercolor is very slatey, and 
while this is a defect according to the Revised 
Standard, yet it will never be looked on as such by 
most judges. 

If you have one or a dozen females that show 
bluish white on the surface, I would advise that you 
immediately proceed to mate these birds to the 
very best male you have or can procure with solid 
black primaries. Of course the better the wings in 
the female the larger per cent of good birds would 
be the result and if you have one or several with 
good black wings that have considerable black 
showing on the surface, do not be at all afraid of 
this bird: she will throw you manv culls, but the 
chances are that there wifl be sorne exceptionally 
nice males as a result. You cannot expect from a 
single season to produce males with white backs. In 
using the words "white backs" I have reference to 
backs free from creaminess. A little black, low 
down on the cape and saddle feathers heavily ticked, 
I would consider an advantage rather than other- 
wise, for a male so marked is sure to prove a strong 
breeder, while one with no ticking in saddle feathers 
has not the strength to produce the color, if you 
haven't females that will answer this description. 
I am sure there are many breeders who have not, as 
the tendency has been to breed from a female line 
of pearl white birds. Many breeders I am sure have 
killed off as culls very dark specimens that would 
have been valuable in a mating of this kind and 
some very prominent breeders believe that there has 
been too much stress placed on dark matings. I 
would now and always have preferred that my culls 
be birds too dark rather than too light and 'if you 
have bred the other way, all I can say that would 
Iielp you is to select a few of the very darkest speci- 
mens you have and mate them this season that you 
may be in position next year to make a mating that 




Page 4 



3^POULTRY FANCIER^ i""^^y"'l^ 





anuary. '10 




POULTRY FANCIER^ 



will start you in a way to produce the male bird 
that it will take to win in 1912. 

In selecting- the male bird for a mating of this 
kind there are some very essential points that should 
not be overlooked. It is necessary in high class Co- 
lumbians that you should have strong- color in legs 
and good combs and if in selecting a male bird you 
neglect these two points you have accomplished 
very little in making the improvements along the 
other line. I would especially warn you against 
extra large combs in males. You should of course 



have the best eyes possible, but I would not turn 
down a bird meeting the other requirements unless 
the eye was a decided gray. In the neck of this 
breed you have that part that will have all or very 
nearly all in making the Columbian the most pop- 
ular and extensively bred fowl and you must not at 
any time lose sight of this fact. 

In next month's issue of Poultry Fancier I will 
describe several matings that can be made with 
birds having very bad hackles that will produce 
good well laced feathers.' Nashville, Tcnn. 





ects of Environment 




A Suggested Explanation for the Variation in Type 
of Fowls of the Same Variety in Different Sections 
of the Country. 

By H. S. BABCOCK 

HE United States government is a 
great institution. It not only attends 
to the strict duties of government, the 
making, interpretating and the en- 
forcement of laws, but it investigates 
all kinds of subjtcts which may be 
helpful to its millions of citizens. It has made spec- 
ial studies of the injurious sparrow, the helpful 
swallow, the useful hawk, the destructive rat, the 
industrious hen, the fur-bearing fox, the mild-eyed 
cow, the gentle sheep, the progressive goat, the spir- 
ited horse, and the noblest animal of them all, honto 
sapiens. That it believes with Pope that 'The proper 
study of mankind is man," appears evident from the 
following sent out from Washington, D. C, under 
the date of December 16, 1909.' I quote from a 
prominent daily paper: 

^ That the physical form as well as the habits of 
living and ways of thinking of the descendants of 
foreigners who immigrate to America is different 
from that of their ancestors, is the conclusion of the 
Immigration Commission as embodied in the pre- 
liminary report of that body which today was pre- 
sented to Congress. 

The discovery is regarded as of importance in 
anthropological science as indicating the develop- 
ment of a distinct American physical type in persons 
of European descent. 

The investigation which has brought this fact to 
the surface was undertaken soon after the appoint- 
ment of the commission and it was conducted in a 
scientific manner by the comparison of measure- 
ments of the bodies of such immigrants and their 
descendants at different ages and under differino- 
circumstances. '"^ 

The investigation was placed in the hands of 
a committee composed of members of the com- 
mission and Prof. Frank Poaz of Columbia Uni- 
versity was engaged as expert. 

The inquiry was confined to New York City and 
so far^ as the present report shows was restricted 
to Sicilians and Fast European Hebrews. A later 
report will give the details of the investigation 
among Bohemians, Hungarians and Scotch. 

The report indicates that the descendant of the 
European immigrant changes his type, even in the 
first generation, almost entirely. Children born 



even a few years after the arrival of the immigrant 
])arents in America develop in such a way that they 
differ in type essentially from their foreign-born 
parents. 

These differences seem to develop during the 
earlier childhood and persist throughout life. Every 
part of the body is influenced in this way and even 
the form of the head, which has always been con- 
sidered as one of the most permanent hereditary 
features, undergoes considerable changes. 

In an official synopsis of the commission's report 
attention is called to the fact that even the most 
stable racial characteristics seem to have changed 
under the new environment, and this fact is com- 
mented upon as follows: 

'This would indicate the conclusion that racial, 
physical characteristics do not survive under the 
new social and climate environments of America. 
The adaptability of the various races coming to- 
gether on our shores seems, if these indications shall 
be fully borne out in later studv, to be much greater 
than had been anticipated, tf the American en- 
vironment can bring about an assimilation of the 
head forms in the first generation, m.av it not be 
that other characteristics may be as easily modified 
and that there may be a rapid assimilation of wide- 
jy varymg nationalities and races to somethino- that 
may well be called an American type?" ^ 

The commission feels that it is 'too early to pro- 
nounce absolutely upon this question and says: 

"The investigation is bv no means complete and 
moreover, considering the importance of the sub- 
ject, it should clearly be conducted on a larger scale 
and in different surroundings in various parts of the 
country and perhaps also be checked up by certain 
investiirations made upon the same races else- 
where. 

Among other results noted, it is shown that the 
American-born children of the long-headed Sicilians 
and those of the round-headed East European He- 
brews liave very nearlv the same intermediate head 
form. The children of the long-headed Sicilians are 
more round-headed, the children of the round-head- 
ed Hebrew are more long-headed than their parents 
Similar changes are traced in the development of 
the faces of these types. 

The amalgamation is most rapid durino- the 
period immediately following the arrival of the im- 
mio-rants. 

The difference in type between parents and chil- 
dren manifests itself almost immediatelv after their 
arrival here. 

Among individuals born a long time after the 
arrival of the parents in America" the difference is 



• 




• 




• 




t 



^' Page 5 



\ ^ii:^^i:^^f^^^^^-i^^n\^}\^M^^ 





increased, but only slightly as compared to the 
great difference that develops at once. 

Up to this time the investigations have not been 
carried so far as to determine what happens in the 
second generation of immigrants; but it seems like- 
ly that the influences at work among the first gen- 
eration born in America will be still further accen- 
tuated. 

The commission lias also made the discovery that 
as a rule there is a falling off in the size of families 
after their arrival in the United States and coinci- 
dent with this discovery has come the more im- 
portant revelation that as the number of children 
decreases, the size of the individual increases. This 
fact is discoverable among the children of the well- 
to-do as well as those of the poor. 

Another result of the investigation is the de- 
velopment of the fact that while removal from 
Europe to Xew York has had a beneficial effect 
upon the physique of East European Hebrews, the 
result has been just the opposite upon the Sicilian, 
the conclusion being that bad as they are, the sur- 
rounding's in Xew York are better for the Jews 
than in their city homes in the Old World, while 
the cramped (piarters which the Sicilians occupy in 
New York City are not so desirable as their rural 
surroundim^s in southern Italy. 

What This Has to Do With Poultry. 

lUit what has all this to do with poultry do you 
ask? Much, in every way. If environment can 
effect so great and so profound physical changes in 
man, it can make great and profound physical 
changes in fowls. If further investigations should 
confirm those already made, and it seems quite 
probable that they would, we can easily understand 
why fowls imported from foreign countries into 
the United States should in a few generations differ 




I'ARTRIDGE PLYMOTTfr ROOK. 
Second prize cook at Missouri State 
Show. St. r.ouis, 1!»0!>. Hwd and owned 
by i'aul La Fromboisc. Mt. Pleasant, 
Midi. 



not a little in type from their ancestors; we can 
understand, too, why different sections of our own 
country should have, or tend to have, different 
types of the same breed of fowls; why there should 
be an luistern and a Western type, a Northern and 
Southern type of IJrahmas, Plymouth Rocks, 
Wyandottes and Rhode Island Reds, as well as of 
other breeds; we can further understand why one 



type of fowl may be better fitted for one section 
and another type for another section of the coun- 
try, because it is in greater harmony with its en- 
vironment. 

The results of this investigation teach us the 
imperative necessity of selection if we would, in dif- 




Winner of 
and owned b.v 



BARRED ROCK PULLET. 

first at Dearborn, Mich., December, 
A. L. Emerson, Inkster, Midi. 



1909. 



Bred 



ferent parts of the country, preserve any given 
type of fowl. The tendency of the environment to 
modify must be overcome by the skill of the breeder 
in selecting and mating his stock. These results 
also emphasize the need of a common standard if 
the type of a given breed is to remain uniform un- 
der differing environments. The work of the Amer- 
ican Poultry Association is not a useless work. 
Without a common standard, with such forces in 
operation, it would be practically impossible to keep 
our breeds uniform in type. 

We are to learn, also, from such results the neces- 
sity of providing the best and most suitable en- 
vironment for the fowls which we keep. The en- 
vironment may not only hinder but help us in the 
development of our fowls. We can make it a breed- 
ing instrument, if we will but study how best to 
do so, instead of an obstacle to be overcome in our 
efforts to perfect our varieties. 

Perhaps we knew all these things long before 
the Immigration Commission began its labors. lUit 
if we did, the report of the commission will remind 
us of what we may have forgotten to apply. Every 
breeder needs to have his memory jogged at times. 
It is not so much what we know as it is what j<nowl- 
edge we put to practical application which helps us 
to succeed. And success is our object. We may 
therefore be thankful for this reminder, even if we 
do not feel that it has enlarged our knowledge. 

East Providence, R. I. 



Get your birds in the best possible condition for 
the show and see that they are well cooped in good, 
clean coops. Look after their wants and don't ask 
the secretary to feed and water them for vou on 
the plea that you will be too busy to get there be- 
fore the ribbons are uj), but after, if you have won a 
blue ribbon, you will have time to be there all day 
and point to your winnings. 




POULTRY FANCIER 




EDITORIAL PAGE 



Poultry Fancier 

Published under the name Fancy Fowls for 10 years. 



Mr. Robinson is Looking for Trouble 



Entered •■ Second Class Matter, Sept. 28, 1907, at the 
Post Office at Chicago, HI., under 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



Published the 1 5th of each month by 

POULTRY FANCIER PUBLISHING CO. 

FRANK HECK. President 
357 Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 



FRANK HECK, 



Editor 



Subscription price in United States and pos- 
sessions 25 cents per year. 

Subscription price in Chicago, Canada and 
foreign countries, 50 cents per year. 

All subscriptions are immediately discontinued 
when the lime expires for which they have been 
pud. 

Requests for advertising rates will be given 
prompt attention. 

Changes of ads must be received by the 1st of 
the month. New ads must be received not later 
than the 1 0th of the month. 

The circulation of Pouhry Fancier is national 
in character. It is the only poultry journal pub- 
lished solely m the interests of fanciers, the people 
who constitute practically the entire fraternity. 

The mission of Poultry Fancier is to teach 
breeders how to produce the beautiful and valu- 
able Standard bred birds which are the founda- 
bon of all profit and pleasure in poultry raising. 



January, 1910 



There is no excuse for any one 
failinfi: to take his birds to the shows. 
A breeder who takes his birds to a 
show and is defeated, is entitled to 
much more credit than the one who 
is afraid and stays at home. If one 
does his best it is no disgrace to lose 
in any undertakinj?, but it is a dis- 
grace to never try and to be afraid 
to meet your rival in honorable com- 
petition. If he wins over you once, 
the chances are that he cannot do it 
next time and he is compelled to give 
you the second opportunity to com- 
pete with him or the tables are turned 
and he becomes the one to be cen- 
sured for cowardice. It is foolish to 
make yourself believe that the buying 
public will have any faith in your 
statements regarding the quality of 
your stock unless you can back them 
up with evidence in the shape of show 
records. And after you get the rec- 
ord, if you keep quiet about it, you 
are almost as bad off as though you 
did not have it, but that leads up to 
the question of advertising, and it is 
not our desire to discuss that here. 
The two absolute necessities for finan- 

Birds intended for exhibition should 
be handled and made tame. The 
judge cannot do justice to a wild or 
frightened specimen. 

Don't attempt to carry a lot of 
weakly or stunted chickens through 
the winter. Get rid of them right at 
the start. 



"Please bear these things in mind, 
brethren of the press, and don't be 
too hard on our own rascals unless 
you are sure you've no faults of your 



own. 



The above words were written by 
Editor Robinson of Farm Poultry and 
appeared upon the editorial page of 
his November number. They con- 
cluded a lengthy dissertation, includ- 
ing quotations from Scripture, upon 
the injustice and inconsistency of con- 
demning one's fellowman for the 
same faults which the accuser him- 
self possesses. We quote the above 
to show Mr. Robinson's hypocrisy. 
Upon the same page containing the 
article above referred to there ap- 
peared an attack upon the editor of 
Poultry Fancier for publishing the 
book, ''Secrets of Expert Exhibitors 
and Easy Lessons in Judging," which 
book exposes the methods of fakers 
and enables honest breeders to pro- 
tect themselves. Mr. Robinson says 
that we are educating the people to 
fake. If that be true, Mr. Robinson 
IS guilty of the same offense, and 
herein is the evidence of the revenge- 
ful malice which prompted his attack 
and of his brazen nerve and hypoc- 
risy in posing as a techer of the 
Scriptures in precept and action. In 
the December number of Successful 
Poultry Journal we replied to his ac- 
cusations and pointed out numerous 
instances where prominent editors and 
member.s of the American Poultry 
Association had published informa- 
tion of a like character as contained 
in the book referred to. 

We should have no more to say 
regarding the matter were it not for 
the fact that in the Januarv number 
of Farm Poultry Mr. Robinson will- 
fully misrepresents conditions and 
employs methods of deceit which no 
honorable opponent would adopt. He 
has the egotistical audacity to assume 
the self-appointed position of censor 
and prosecutor of those who. in his 
prejudiced opinion. are offenders 
against the code of morals adopted 
by poultrymen and the American 
Poultry Association. He says. "We 
have a case against them (the book 
and its author) * * * ^y^^ would 
much rather we hadn't (imagine the 
tears in his eyes as he wrote that) 
* * * but the fact that the writer 
and Mr. Heck have been personally 
friendly, and so far as the writer is 
concerned will continue so, docs not 
obligate us to leave Mr. Heck unmo- 
lested. * * * I'll buy a copy of 
his book. * * * I'll use it as a 
basis of charges which will make it 
necessary for the American Poultry 
Association to expel Mr. Heck or to 
take the position that faking is crim- 
inal, but teaching how to fake is not." 
This, from Mr. Pharisee Robinson, 
the quoter of Scripture, the self-satis- 
fied model of perfection and the au- 
thor of the first paragraph at the 
beginning of these remarks. If he is 
idiotic enough to carry out his threat 
the writer is ^oing to have a lot of 
good company when the time comes. 



We made the assertion that Mr. 
Robinson has published, in his paper, 
methods of faking. He dodges the 
issue and says that he didn't write 
them. The authorship makes no dif- 
ference. Mr. Robinson published 
them and is responsible for their ap- 
pearance. He acknowledges that he 
has published many such articles, but 
he denies that they teach faking. 
Here are a few extracts from the 
one on page 95 of his March issue, 
1909, to which we called his attention: 
"Bleaching the sap and creaminess 
from plumage is usually done either 
with bluing or peroxide. I have used 
both. * * * If ^ve are exhibiting 
a bird before the sap leaves the 
feather, why not remove it if possible 
and put the bird in the best present- 
able condition? * * *" In a recent 
issue of the Stock-keeper Drev. tells 
us bleaching with peroxide is faking 
and that the suggestion of using per- 
oxide without what per cent solution 
to use is liable to lead tlie amateur 
mto trouble. Now, if Drev. had 
really washed a few we might take 
it more serious. "T want to say I 
use the pure quill, the l)est T can buy 
and never saw any injurious effects 
on the plumage. * * * Repeated 
applications might cause this or might 
mjure the plumage. * * * j^ ,nay 
take precious little per- or di-oxide 
to remove a suspicion of sap from 
such birds, but there are others that 
a pretty henlthy dose of the bleach 
mg fluid will hardly make an impres- 
sion; and such birds are often 
overdosed with this stuff or the oxalic 
acid preparations some breeders use 
with obvious results." The above 
quotations are sufficient. Mr. Robin- 
son lets his readers know that they 
can fake white birds by bleaching 
them with peroxide or oxalic acid and 
that the quantity to use depends upon 
the extent of the defect. The first 
thought to enter the mind of the 
breeder who wishes to try the prepa- 
rations would be to experiment with 
different birds and perhaps get a few 
pointers, if possible, from the drug- 
gist who sells him the chemicals. 

There are numerous cases where 
poultry journal publishers and edi- 
tors have published methods of fak- 
ing and we mentioned some of them 
in our answer to Mr. Robinson in 
December Successful Poultry Jour- 
nal They will be taken up in detail 
and in greater number when the oc- 
casion arises, if it does. Poultrymen 
who are familiar with the poultry 
press know that Mr. Robinson has 
many times attacked us on various 
pretenses, and his present outburst is 
^vlthout foundation except as a con- 
tinuance of his antagonistic policy. 
1 hore IS no reason why we should be 
picked out of the crowd, including 
himself, and be used as the goat No 
man ever did anything out of the or- 
dinary or adopted an aggressive pol- 
icy without making enemies. Mr 
Kobinson may gain the support of a 
few others occupying the same posi- 
tion toward us that he does, but the 



• 



• 





# 





January. *10 



ii\v^^^ 




court and jury whose rulings must be 
respected are not made up of a man's 
competitors and rivals in business, 
althouL^h there is a goodly number 
with whom we would be willing to 
rest our case. Mr. Robinson is the 
black sheep of the poultry publish- 
ers and editors. He is constantly 





Pertinent Paragraphs 

By EASTERNER 

So Secretary Crawford's standing 
offer of ten dollars did not bring to 
light a single case of faking. Of 
course not. We all know that every- 
thing at the New York show is al- 
ways on the Square— Madison Square. 

•se- ^ 

Says the Cock to the Hen, as he bade 

her adieu, 
"I'm off to the Show; but betwixt me 

and you. 
When the Judge looks me over, If I'm 

not mistaken. 
He'll say I'm a shining example of 

fakin'." 

Says the Hen to the Cock: "Why, 

what a confession! 
Don't talk about faking,— that horrid 

expression; — 
You mean 'preparation': you've yet to 

be taught 
That nothing is faking until you get 

caught." 

THUMB-NAIL BIOGROPHIES. 

King Kellerstrass. 

Once there was something ahap- 
pening in the West and in Missoury 
in particular. I'll be goshdinged if 
there had ever happened anything 
that was like it in the West before, 
so we stuck our ears up to catch all 
that was doing. In doing so we took 
a chance in having them knocked off 
by the sound waves, for these carried 
news of import, heavy with meaning. 

It was this way: 

Ernest Kellerstrass decided to go 
into the chicken business. He was 
some time making up his mind about 
it. He quietly went about the coun- 
try, crossed the Rig Wet and looked 
about, visited all the fanciers who 
would be able to give him much in- 
formation of value, and gathered 
facts from first hand. Nobody's word 
but his own was good enough for 
him. He had an idea in mind and 
wanted to cast about to see if it was 
practical. 

After a short time he discovered a 
fact that was to be of more value to 
him than the stock he founded his 
Crystals upon. It was really a great 
discovery. The hen-fever germ he 
knew had been working inside his 
cosmos was accompanied by another 
germ of still greater magnitude, and 
today we can see it without the aid 
of a microscopical apparatus. The 
discovery was that he had latent in 
himself the making of a true fancier. 
He appreciated values in chickens and 
in White Orpingtons in particular. It 
must ever be thus if a fancier is to 
be evolved from a common, every- 
day species of hen-crank. 

Then he began to collect a few of 



POULTRY FANCIER 



criticising his contemporaries and he 
has had a much greater number of 
controversies and attacked many more 
of his editorial brethren than has any 
other individual connected with the 
poultry press. Mr. Robinson is look- 
ing for trouble and the indications 
are he is going to find it. 




the best birds that were not tied up 
with the bonds of love that might 
have been wrapped about them. He 
was shrewd and builded a founda- 
tion that was to have a stout super- 
structure erected thereon. When he 
bought a bird to add to his little flock 
he knew exactly what that bird would 
do for him before he decided to buy. 
His first breeding seasons were suc- 
cessful, so his flock grew in nropor- 
tions, and he culled closely, that the 
quality might improve from year to 
year. 

When he went out to show he made 
winnings that set the old heads all 
by the ears. They had thought that 
a new man getting into the fancy 
must take all the hurdles in their or- 
der and gradually get trained to the 
point where he could show among 
them without getting scared. They 
found that Ernest Kellerstrass was 
never scared. Then they began to 
get a little weak in the knees them- 
selves. Here was a fancier who took 
all the hurdles at a single leap and 
whose war helmet was right in the 
thick of the fight, just as was the 
white rose badge of the House of 
York in the battles of the war of the 



roses, the latter half of the fifteenth 
century. But enough of bloody his- 
tory! 

Kellerstrass the worker, Keller- 
strass the fancier. Kellerstrass the 
breeder. Kellerstrass the advertiser, 
Kellerstrass the producer of good 
White Orpingtons has arrived — all by 
his own efforts, proving to the fancy 
that he has the right to be one of 
them-— one of the first Hentown citi- 
zens. The men who are putting their 
time into the Orpington game know 
that he has done more than his share 
to push the breed, to say nothin- of 
the Whites, to the plane of promi- 
nence they now move forward upon. 
Breeders acknowledge him as King 
Kellerstrass— there is no division 
against him. With one acclaim he is 
championed by them all. 

And truly they arc right. 



LEGHORNS - HOUDANS - ROCKS 

I^eghorns to Dec. 4th 2 Total 1425 
Rock.s • - 30th 11 •' 1506 

Houdans for Dec. 2 to date 926 

H. E. ROGERS ^29 miss street 



LACROSSE, WIS. 



?,^F S. C. R. I. RED COCK- 
ERELS FOR SALE "?* <" '?*■" 

D • . ?r kjj-Ks^i^, winner Qf jg^ 

Prize at Central Wisconsin Poultry Show 
If Pfce'^I^er. Eggs in season. Al^ a few 
Barred Rock Pullets. 

T. E. LEE MARSHFIELD, WIS. 






THE PRETTIEST CHICKS OF ALL 



No matter whether they are day -old, week-old or month-old, are 
those of the Polish variety. To see a flock of the cunning Polish Chicks 
IS to be lost in admiration and as for matured Polish, well — real fanciers 
know they are the most stylish and handsome of all fowls—the real 
Aristocrats of Poultrydom — 

We can supply day-old or month-old chicks from our Polish 
varieties where advance orders are received— as well a« matured stock 
and eggs arid you can rest assured that such chicks will come from the 
largest selection of prize winners at the largest shows that can be found 
in any Polish breeders yards in the United States. 

In White Crested Black Polish, our first pen is headed by the First 
Cock at the Chicago, 1909 show and contains 1st pullet, Chicago, 1908, 

!?i^"l^"j ^*'" ^""^ ^^^ P""^*' ^*' ^°""' '^^' '»^ ^^"' Memphis. 
1909, besides other prize winners at these shows. 

In Silver Bearded Polish our first pen is headed by Ist cockerel. 
New York, 1908 and contains Ist hen Chicago 1908. Ist pullet Chicago 
1909. Ist hen St. Louis 1909. Ist hen Memphis 1909. 2nd pullet Boston 
1909 besides other prize winners at these shows. 

In White Bearded Polish our first pen is headed by Ist cock Chicago 
1908 and contains Ist hen Boston 1909 Ist and 2nd hen Chicago 1908 
1st pullet St. Louis 1909, 1st hen Memphis 1909. I st hen Chicago 1909^ 
besides other other prize winners at these shows. 

In Golden Bearded Polish our first pen is headed by 1st Cock Chi- 
cago 1908. which won Ist at St. Louis 1909 and contains Ist pullet 
Chicago 1909. Ist pullet St. Louis 1909, 3rd pullet Boston 1909. besides 
other prize winners at these shows. 

It is unnecessary to say that these are the finest pens of Polish birds 
in the country They could not win these prizes unless they were. 



H? 




ROYAL POLISH 




POULTRY YARDS 



fRDsX 



AShLAiSU, 



H/SLOISSaS 




■^•^L-^ Page 8 




POULTRY FANCIER: 



January. '10 





TERS FROM READERS • 



This department is for the purpose of giving publicity to the views of our readers who 
would Hke to express themselves briefly upon topics that are of interest. A hearty 
invitation is extended to all our readers to use the department freely. 



REPLY TO A STIFF PROTEST. 

lulitor Poultry 1^'ancier: 

Your issue of December contained 
an article from a breeder of Asiatics, 
in which he states that he breeds Dark- 
Bra h mas and Partridire Cochins, but 
that there is no longer any sale or 
demand for them. Thirty years ago 
he states they were verj^ ')opnlar and 
sold like red lemonade at a country 
show, and he might have added the 
purchaser received just about as luuch 
for iiis money as did the fellow who 
bought the red lemonade. After prais- 
ing his favorite breeds and "roasting" 
the popular varieties, he takes a turn 
at the Poultry Journal editors and 
shies a few bricks at them because 
they pay so little attention to the 
poor and forsaken Asiatics and winds 
up his article with a frantic appeal t:i 
i. K. Felch and Dr. Ballard to come 
to the rescue and write them up and 
see if something cannot be done to 
restore them once more to popular 
favor. He says he doesn't advertise, 
as it is no use as the other fellow 
don't want them. Truly, this is de- 
plorable. What a task to impose on 
good old "Uncle" Isaac and Dr. Bal- 
lard. And then he calls the popular 
breeds "Monirrels." Pray, what are 
the Dark Brahmas; are they not the 
result of a cross or series of crosses. 
And Partridge Wyandotte — is not the 
name synonymous? Does it not smack 
of a mingling of several varieties? 
['Asiatics," indeed. No. my good man, 
it will take more than the combined 
efforts of Dr. Ballard and Uncle 
Isaac to bring them to the iiead of 
the procession. As the tragedian says 
in the show. ".Mas. too late, nic bov, 
too late, too late." 

The "ATongrels" are all on the band 
wagon, and to be serious, why? Is it 
not because they have luerit? Have 
they not made good? They passed 
the "fad season" long ago. and have 
become fixtures simi^ly because they 
are the goods. Xow. don't waste your 
time Brother Breeder, monrning over 
the departed: come in out of the rain. 
select some one of the popular varie- 
ties and advertise, for you must ad- 
vertise (even with Asiatics), and yon 
will never regret it. We have been 
breeding "Mongrels" (so-called) for 
thirty odd years, twelve of which have 
been with the Reds, and always fmd 
a good sale for birds and eggs, at 
fair prices. Turn your back on the 
"good old has-beens" and be a good 
winner instead of a bad loser. 
Yours for the "Mongrels," 

John E. Davis. 
Marblehead. Mass. 



A WORD TO THE POULTRY 
ASSOCIATIONS. 



Kditor Poultry Fancier: 

One of the great needs of our poul- 
try exhibitions is more competent 
attendants in the show room. There 



is altogether too nuich carelessness, 
nicompetency and lack of knowledge 
on the part of attendants who care 
for the birds cooped for exhibition. 
In some cases they are overfed and 
perhaps lack water: in other cases, 
they are not fed enough and neither 
do they get sufficient water. In very 
few instances are they fed and wa- 
tered properly. In some exhibitions 
the bedding is allowed to get foul and 
damp and this condition is not con- 
ducive to good attendance. Neither 
is it healthful for the birds or the 
patrons. 

One of the first duties of the super- 
intendent of a poultrv show should 
be to instruct attendants as to the 
feeding^ watering and l)edding of the 
birds. They should have an abundance 
of food until the weighing is done. 
Then it is well to cut the feed down 
to a handful to each bird twice each 
day and they shonld have water be- 




PARTRIDGK PLYMOTTH ROCK. 

First prize lien at Mis.soiiri State Show 
St. I.ouis. liXiH. Bred and owned bv I'ani 
I.a Fromhois'\ Mt. Plea.«jnu. '\\\ch.' 

fore them at all times. Birds that go 
into a show are usually in prime con- 
dition and carry (jnite an amount of 
lat. The cooping in warm (piarters. 
overfeeding and lack of care are lia- 
ble to produce digestive troubles 
which will ruin the birds as breeders 
even if it does not bring on disease 
that will result fatally. Many times 
they come out of a show in such a 
condition that it re(|uires a month or 
two to get them back where they can 
be depended on to produce fertile 

There is another feature which is 
sometimes overlooked in the care of 
the birds after the show is over. Most 
poultry exhibitions close Saturday 
evening and the birds remain in the 
show room until Moiu.ay. Sometimes 
they are cared for, but more often, 
I would judge from exi)erience, they 
get no feed or water at all froin the 



time the show closes until they are 
received by their owners. This is a 
condition that shonld be improved. 
All birds should have the best of care 
until delivered to the transportation 
companies or to their owners. 

When the returning of the exhibi- 
tion stock is in order, the superin- 
tendent should personally see that all 
birds are crated properly in the crates 
in which they were received, and if 
the exhibitor furnishes his own coop- 
ing, as is usually the case in local 
shows, these coops usually being con- 
structed of canvas, care should be 
taken to have the curtain securely fas- 
tened, thus protecting the stock from 
drafts and inclement weather. The 
change from the show room to the 
cold air outside is very decided, and 
nothing should be neglected at this 
stage that will add to the comfort 
and safety of the stock to be returned. 
Express companies and other trans- 
portation companies should be cau- 
tioned not to allow the birds to stand 
outside of their warehouses and not 
removed to trains until necessary for 
loading. 

These instructions, if followed, will 

save niany a good bird that would 

otherwise be exposed to unnecessary 

risk, and as the exhibitor usually pays 

good money in entrance fees, every 

show management should feel it their 

duty to protect their patrons to the 

greatest possible extent. Such care 

and treatment on their part will mean 

many friends to the association and 

another entry for the following sea- 

sf^'i- E. M. Long. 

Osceola, Ind. 



S. C. W. Leghorns and W. Wyan- 

dotteS ri'^T'"^ qualify. Winners wherever shown. 
Our b rds are famous for shape, color and layins. 
,eo« ,., NAUMBURG AND BOOTH 
1532 W. BANCROFT ST. . TOLEDO. O. 



Greider's Fine Catalogue 

of pure bred poultry for 1910 is biKKer 
and better than ever, 200 pages, hand- 
somely Illustrated, 150 engravincs 
photos, m fine colored plates, de- 
scribes 65 leading varieties of land 
and water fowls. Gives low prices of 
stock and eggs, also incubators, poultrv 
supplies, etc Calendar for each month. Tells 

Th^ nHn«''^J''»''v,P''l!'*7'.»'^''"« f'>» *>etail3. 

WHte^f!fr'itfo-i^'^ '°°'^ '^ "'">' '« -"*- 
B. H. CREIDER. Box 101 




Rheems, Pa. 



Barred PlymoutH 

IvOCKS ^^"'l^y'« Kinglets ire 
^1 ,, . •■■**^ Rood Rocks. Won 1st 
iSiQ^' w* • ^^*^" ^l'i^^'^«t Nebraska Stare Fair 
1909 Write me for stock and e^^K u«cr 
$1.50and $2r,0for l.'i ^^ "^ ""''^ "^^^^ Kgg> 

CHAS. MT. MVJLI.OY 
BOX lO. FRCMONT, NEBR 



F. L. POULTRY FARM 
REDS I/Vu ""^ "^'^ ^'"'^ y°" ^'i*'»-e so"'e 

„„ » of ^.^e prize winners at Chicae.) 

"Jfre'b^red'.rr''''"'^^- ^'^^^^'^I>-^ «'"^^^^^^ 

limes. Kggs in .season. Sati.sfaction tnu., 
ranteed or your money back "•^'*''"''" «"«' 

F. L. OBER R. F. D. No 1 , Verona. Pa 



t> 



• 




• 




k 







January. '10 



A BOOM FOR POLISH FOWLS. 



The Various Varieties of this Breed 

Are Growing Wonderfully in 

Popularity and They Possess 

Merit to Justify It. 



By Burt Williams. 

That there i.s a growing revival of 
interest in the Polish breed of fowls 
is being brought very forcibly to the 
. minds of the poultry public with 
the annual meeting of the American 
Polish Ckib held on Jan. 12 at Bos- 
ton, and the organization there of an- 
other new specialty club, including 
many of the prominent breeders of 
Polish fowls, to be called the Crested 
Fowl Breeders of America. 

The American Polish Club has just 
closed by all odds the most success- 
ful year in the club's history. Secre- 
tary Caldwell of Lisbon, O., reports 
that not only is the membership at 
the present time by far larger than 
at any previous time in the club's 
history, but the new members the 
past year have been greater than any 
previous year. The club's member- 
ship is scattered over every part of 
the United States and Canada, and its 
very rapid growth, particularly the 
past two years in itself shows the new 
and increased interest being taken in 
Polish fowls, which, as a breed, rank 
among the oldest and purest of all 
breeds. The new organization which 
was formed in Boston, is to include the 
breeders of all crested fowls, but its 
most active members are Polish 
breeders, the temporary secretary be- 
ing John A. Gough, the well known 
Polish breeder of Meriden, Conn., 
who was the superintendent of crest- 
ed fowls at the Boston show, and 
with the stimulus of these new clubs 
it is expected that the coming year 
will show a revival of interest in the 
Polish breeds that will make a record 
for specialty clubs, 

7^he increased interest in 'Polish 
fowls is also indicated by the efforts 
that are being made by show secre- 
taries to secure exhibits of Polish 
birds. As is well known, the Polish 
breed of fowls ranks as the most 
handsome and stylish of all breeds, 
and to the true fancier they are de- 
cidedly attractive. To the person who 
is not actively in touch w^ith various 
breeds of fowls there are no varie- 
ties that he is more attracted to than 
T'olish fowls, and in the show room 
it has been found that Polish exhibits 
are decidedly the most attractive to 
the people who frequent such gath- 
erings. 

In cjuite a number of the leading 
shows of the countrv some remark- 
able efforts have been made to bring 
out large exhibits of Polish fowls on 
account of their beauty and general 
attractiveness. 

At the great Hagerstown. Md.. fair 
this year the exhibit of ]\)lish fowls 
was one of the finest which has ever 
been gathered together and attracted 
the admiration of every fancier pres- 
ent, lor the management exercised 
every possible effort to make the Pol- 
ish display a varied and attractive 
one. 

At the Boston show thi.^ month the 
list of prizes far surpasses those of 
almost any other breed to be exhibit- 



POULTRY FANCIER- 



ed at that show. In addition to the 
various cash prizes offered directly 
by the Boston show itself, the Ameri- 
can Polish Club offered unusual cash 
prizes besides very handsome badges, 
while the Crested Fowl Breeders' As- 
sociation entered the lists with many 
special cash prizes. 

In addition to these, twelve of the 
most prominent Polish breeders in 
America offered attractive prizes eith- 
er in cash or gold and silver cups, 
making the array of prizes altogether 
one that clearly indicates the high es- 
timation in which show managers 
hold exhibits of these handsome 
fowls. 

Not only are these efforts being 
made at the largest shows like Bos- 
ton, but in the smaller shows the 
same results are found in securing 
Polish exhibits. 

At the Wisconsin state show, which 
was held in Oshkosh this month, not 







these cups being, of course, in addi- 
tion to the various cash prizes and 
specials offered. At Goshen, Ind., 
there was offered a beautiful silver 
cup, besides several specials, in addi- 
tion to the usual cash prizes for 
Polish. 

I could enumerate many other in- 
stances like these, but I simply men- 
tion the above shows in order to 
show how highly officials of poultry 
shows value exhibits of Polish fowls 
as an attraction, 

Tt was only two or three years ago 
when it was almost impossible to find 
any specials at all listed for Polish 
fowls outside of one or two of the 
largest shows in the country, and now 
to find that so generally handsome 
silver and gold cups and gold prizes 
and many specials are bing offered 
to bring out large exhibits, shows that 
the poultry fraternity generally is 
awakening to the fact that these 






A->w-fck ik'y 



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Silver BeardedCockerel-NewYork.08 
RST Silver Bearded Cock St. Louis.09 

OWNED BV TViE, 

Royal Polish Poultry Yards 

ASH LAND, WIS. 




only did the show managers offer the 
same cash prizes as were given on 
other fowls, but in addition gave spe- 
cial gold cash prizes for the best ex- 
hibits of parti-colored Polish, solid 
colored Polish, and Polish bantams. 
In addition to these, an exceptionally 
handsome cuj) was given by the show 
management for the best display of 
Polish, An opi)ortunity was also 
given Polish breeders to compete for 
silver and gold cups for the highest 
scoring pen and the highest scoring 
trio, and a number of specials were 
offered on Polish exhibits at this 
show. 

At the Southern Wisconsin Poultry 
show at Janesville this month an im- 
ported tankard was given the highest 
scoring j)en in Polish varieties, and 
at the Vo\\(\ du Lac, Wis., show a 
thirty dollar silver cup was given. 



".Aristocrats of Poultrydom" are be- 
coming decidedly popular with the 
l)ublic generally, 

T have just had returned about a 
score of my Polish fowls that have 
made a trip to Chicago. St. Louis, 
Oconomowoc, Wis,, and LaCrosse, 
Wis., and 1 have received the 
most gratifying letters from the 
show secretaries regarding them. 
The secretary of the West Wis- 
consin show at LaCrosse wrote 
me a personal letter after the 
show was over, stating that my ex- 
hibit of various kinds of Polish fowls 
made the hit of their entire show, and 
they gave the birds the principal lo- 
cation in the center of the show- 
room. This is the sentiment expressed 
by other secretaries, and it shows 
that the iniblic who patronize the 
shows and who enables them to be 




Page 10 ^ 

kept open are certainly looking upon 
Polish exhibits with a great deal of 
interest and admiration. 

Among many letters I have received 
from show secretaries is one from 
the secretary of the Minneapolis 
show, one of the oldest and greatest 
m the country, urging me to make an 
exhibit there, and stating that it is 
their intention to give the Polish ex- 
hibits the choicest location in the cen- 
ter of their main floor, certainly a 
high tribute to this breed. 

It is a noticeable fact that the re- 
porters on daily newspapers, in writ- 
ing up poultry shows, invariably pick 
out the Polish fowls for special men- 
tion, they apparently being attracted 
by their handsome appearance above 
that of almost any other breed, and 
wide-awake show secretaries are cer- 
tainly beginning to realize these facts. 
With such a strife for every kind 
of new breed that can be imagined, 
it is surely gratifying to see an old 
established breed like the Polish 
fowls, whose history in this country 
dates back to the very earliest of do- 
mestic fowls, so rapidlv coming to 
the front. 

As a rule the Polish fowls are in 
the hands of men and women who 
not only value them highly for their 
utility purposes as egg layers, but 
%vho also admire them especially for 
their handsome appearance, and who 
take pleasure at all times in striving 
to breed them with the highest de- 
gree of care and attention. 
Ashland. Wis. 



POULTRY FANCIER 




.^gVJJV -A" iV^.VA"-^' A^'.i> h\'i.V f. 




Polish Prize Winners. 



1 M^'\?^*?-'^' Polish Poultry Yards of Ash- 
land, \Vis.. have just mad« a wonderful 
series of winnings on their Polisli fowls 
at various poultry shows during Decem- 
ber, and they have manv of their bird«^ 
entered at the leading .Januarv shows at 
various points. Their winnings during 
DecemJier. 1909. were: week of December 
b. at Chicago, four firsts, two seconds, 
two thirds; and at St. T.ouis, six firsts 
four seconds, one third and one fourth" 
week of December 13. at Oconomowoc" 
^^ is., quality show, ten firsts, four sec- 
onds, and one third, including manv sp«^- 
cials and prize for the highest parti-col- 
ored bird on exhibition: week of December 
20, at Western Wisconsin Poultrv Asso- 
f^iation. La Cro.sse. eleven* firsts four 
seconds and one third. Our readers who 
are interested in Polish fowls and who 
expect to purchase stock or eggs foj- 
hatching should write to the Royal Polish 
>ards for prices. 

•Jf -if 

F. U Ober. R. F. D. No. 1. Veiona. Pa 
won third pullet and fifth hen in the R C 
Red cla.ss at the Chicago show this sea- 
son. This is an excellent testimonial of 
the quality of Mr. Ober's stock as the 
Rhode Island Red Class contained bird^? 
from the leading eastern and western 
yards. At the big M(K"espr,rt. Pa., show 
he won first and third cockerel, first and 
third hen. second and fourth cockerels 
second and fourth pullets and first pen hi 
the Rose Comb class. He also won fourth 
cockerel, fifth cockerel, third pullet and 
first pen in the Single Comb Class and 
Sliver (.up for best displav of Ro.se Combs 
He has some grand birds for sale as weli 
as eggs from his choicest ma tings. 

A. L. Emerson of Inkster. Mich, can 
please our readers who send Iiim tlu'ir or- 
ders. The breeding of Barred Rocks is 
no side issue with him; he has made a 
specialty of the business and we believe 
produce's each year as good stock as can 
be found in the country. At the Michigan 
state fair September, 1909, he exhibited 
young stock only and won first, second 
cockerel; first, second and third, pullet 
At Dearborn, Mich., December. 1909. h<^ 
won second cockerel: first, second and 
third hens; second, third and fourth cock- 
erels; first, second, fourth pullets, and 
first pen. 



January. '10 

Awards at Urbana, Ohio 

Llcf ^f rr^kik.'f^..^ BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

ISl or CXniDllOrS organ: 1, ck; 1. 2. hen; 4, pul. Black: 

Acker, J. B.. libana O. 1- -• 3. 4. ckl; 2. 3, pul; 1, pen. 

Barr. Dr. F. P V. .'.'. V. . I^ancaster, O. WHITK WYANDOTTES. 

Bell, John Urbana, O. Berry & Son: 1, 2, ck ; 1, 4. hen; 1, ckl; 

Berry & Son. J. P Urbana, O. 1, pul; 1, pen. Steinberger: 2, hen; 3, 4, 

Black, C. B Cable, O. ckl; 2, 4, pul; 2, pen. Barr: 3, hen; 2 

Burnham, P. D Machanicsburg, O. ckl; 3, pen. 

Creamer, L. H Mechanicsburg. O. GOLDEN LACED WYANDOTTES. 

De Long Jacob Lancaster. O. Acker: 1, 2, 3. 4. hen; 2. ck ; 3, ckl; 2. 

Feather. R B West Liberty, O. pen. Wilson: 1, ck; 2, 4, ckl; 2, 3, 4, pul; 

Flaugher. J- W . Urbana. O. i^ pen. Owen: 1, ckl; 1. pul. 

Hoppersett. C. H Urbana, O. ^-_ „„„ ^ /^r^^n «rvAXT.»*»rr,p»,u 

Hill. Jno. R ITrbana O SILVER LACED WYANDOITES. 

Huston, J. E' . Urbana' o' Lehne: 1, 2, hen; 1, ckl; 1, 2, pul; 1, pen. 

Kendrick. Wm ' Urbana ' O. Weiser: 3. 4, hen; 4, pul. 

Lehne, Adolph Mechanicsburg O. PAKTKIDGE WYANDOTTES. 

Long. Mrs. W- T Urbana' O. All to Schrubb. 

Organ. C. F Urbana', O. SINGLE COMB BLACK ORPINGTONS. 

Owen, T. B Urbana, O. All to Hoppersett. 

So!;^^' i" ^T V; 7^^^' 9.- SINGLE COMB BUFF ORPINGTONS. 

Racer. T. M Urbana, O. aU to Burnham 

Robinson Bros Plain Citv O ^ „ 

Russell, G. M Urbana O ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Salts. Noah .'Catawba' O Creamer: 1. ck; 2, ckl; 1, 2, 3, pul; 1. 

Schrubb. Jas Urbana* O. P®^- Berry & Son: 1, ckl; 4, pul. 

Steinberger, I. P West Liberty,' O. LIGHT BRAHJ>IAS. 

Wamper, M. M Dayton, O. All to Bell. 

wfll^on' p' n tJ'"?^"^' S- SINGLE COMB WHITE LE(iHORNS. 

Wilson. F. C Urbana, O. Feather: 1. ck ; 1, 2. hen; 3. ckl; 1. pen. 

L- . r A 1 T. Racer: 1, 4, ck) : 1, 4. pul; 2, pen. 

1st OI /\ wards Robinson Bros.: 2, ckl: 2, 3, pul; 3, pen. 

BARRED PLYMOUTH KOC KS. ^^f^.'^^^u^^^^ BI40WN LE(;HOHNS. 

Kendrick: 1, 3. ck; 1. 3, 4. hen; 1, pen. ^° ^'"■ 

De Long: 2. 4, ck; 2. hen; 2, ckl: 2. pen. ROSE CO.MB BUACK MINORCAS. 

Salts: 1. 2. 3. 4, pul. Wamper: 1, 3 4 ckl. Russell: 1, ck; 3, hen. P^laugher: 1, hen; 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 2. ckl; 1, pul. 

J. H. Race: 1. ck; 1. 2, hen; 1, 2, ckl; TOCUOl SE <;EESE. 

1. 3, 4. pul: 1. pen. T. M. Racer: 2. pul. All to Long. 




January, *10 




POULTRY FANCIER 




:^./'H, yfV'-v'/'y'jtSJaa a 



Reliable Breeders' 
Directory. 

SEVERAL BREEDS. 
Mva. C. R. Thompson, Box 23, Randall, 
la. 

M. Jj. Musselman, Bethlehem, Pa 
Jos. M. Fay, 808 Howard Ave., Altoona, 
Pa. 

Thos. M. Stubbl«^field. R. r,. Jackson- 
ville, 111. 

BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS 
J. W. Bell, Box H. Chetek Wis 
Chas. Spangler, Kentland, Ind. 
INIrs. Minnie McConoushv. Martelle, la 
Dr. F. A. Shuffelton, Saint Marvs, O. 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 
S. P. Kvan.s, 3838 E. TSlli St.. Cleve- 
land. O, 

A. L. Mrl.aiis:hlin. Spnrland 111 

BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 
The Buff Rock Poultry P^arrn, Jeffer- 
sonville, O. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. 
C. N. Hoslottfr. Alaiili'ini 1 'a 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES 
J. Reepmeyer, Craig- N V 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. 
Ralph Woodward, Hex S2, Grafton 
Ma.s.s. 

O. R. Eddy. 0(-onomo^^•o^ Wis 

ORPINGTONS. 
}Vm. Cook & Sons. Box C. Scotcli 
Plams, N. J. 
Jas. C. Olson, Harlan, la 
Alice C. Morriss. Big Rock. Til. 
Mrs. H. Wcdderspoon. Cooperstown 
N. Y. 

P. J. Armstrong, 118 E. 20th St., Chi- 
cago, 111, 

W. J. Scliinitt. Donnollson. Tm 

RHODE ISLAND REDS. 
Valley Farm, 9] E. Main St.. Amherst, 
Mass. 
Davis Crows, Hanna City, 111 
Mrs. fl. T.. Alsop, Sylvia, la.' 
Isaac H, Painter, Chrisnev, Ind. 
C. I. W, Adkisson. G'Mlatia, Til. 
J. B. Garber, Ho]>odaU'. III. 
F. C. Eldridgo S: Son, l^.onrno Ma^^s 

BLACK LANGSHANS. 
Mrs. Frank Canicici-. Gazette :^To 
S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. ■ 
E. H. 01.«.on. R. 1, Thor. la. 
Beaver Dam F\)ultry Farm. Montgom- 
ery, N. Y. 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 
H. M. Moyci-. \l L'. [•.(•(•lit(>ls\iIlo Pa 

R. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 
W. Hipkiss, Scott. iai.- Pa 

BUFF LEGHORNS. 
Sunnyside Poultry F;nm, C. C Gla.sgo 
T.ondonville, O. 

Dr. C. E. Hoover. Edgoiton. D 

BLACK LEGHORNS. 
H, C. Hunt. D.Iavan. Ill 

BLACK MINORCAS. 
Frank Mc(irarin, Lancaster. Pa. 
Oscar F. Sampson, Franklin, N. Y. 
I, Allison. Florence, Neb. 



H. A. Bratlin, Brazil. Ind. 
G. A. Clark, Sevmour, Ind. 

HOUDANS. 
.1. D. Payne, Waterloo, Ind. 

POLISH. 
Warren W. Dickens. Box 9.',, Middle- 
\ille, N. Y 

SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURGS. 
Simon C. Kuij). Mattuld, J^a 

BANTAMS. 
Dale Arnold, Newton III. 

INDIAN RUNNER DUCKS. 
Davis iV I>.\ti<s. Zi(.iis\ illc ind 

WILD MALLARD DUCKS. 
H. W. Fahali. Iowa (Mtv, la 

BABY CHICKS. 
E. & D. Hatcherv, Yardle\ . Pa 

TURKEYS. 
Mrs. Mary S('lHM>nniai<<r. K 1 Meshop- 
pen. I 'a, 

PETS AND BIRDS OF ALL KINDS. 

O. W. Zeigler. Ilarni.uiy. I'a . 



D. E. Lee of Marshfield. Wis., is a 
breeder of S. C. R. t. Rods exclusivelv. 
He has exhildtion (|ualitv and utility rec- 
ords. At tile recent Central Wisconsin 
show at Marslifield, lie secured manv of 
the best prizes, including first cockerel 
and first pullet. He Iia.s cockerels of the 
same breeding and (juality to spare which 
he offers at very reasonable prices. Mr. 
Lee was superintendent of the show at 
Marshfield. He is a very pleasant gen- 
tleman to meet and possesses the reputa- 
tion of being strictly honorable in all his 
dealmgs. Judge Hackett writes us that 
he vouches for the «iuality of Mr. Lee's 
stock and he recommends him to those 
wishing stock or eggs for hatcliing of his 
cho.sen variety. See his ad. in this issue 

Located in the iioitliern part of Wis- 
consin on beautiful Fiiterprise Lake near 
the town of Elcho in Lanprlade countv, 
IS a progressive and quite extensive poul- 
trv farm owned and opeiated bv R P 
Guptil. 

Mr. Guptil is a gentleman whose ac- 
quaintance it is a ple.asuK' to make and 
whose honor and iute^ritv is plainly 
marked with his ])ersonality 

Single romh R. L Reds are raised on 
thus farm exclusively and are doing a 
paying business producing eggs and 
broilers for which there is a readv mar- 
ket in that section. But not alone from 
a utility standpoint do Mr. Guptils birds 
excel for they possess the exhibiti«m 
(lualities that mnke tliem winners where- 
ever they are shown. At the recent cen- 
tral Wisconsin slu.w whet- IJcmIs were the 
leadmg class and c(uni)et ition verv warm 
Mr. Guptil carried off more prizes than 
all cou.petitors. We cheerfullv recom- 
mend Mr. (Juptil and Ids stock to those 
looking for good (luality in this popular 
variety of fowls, and who nppreciate a 
square deal." The above conu>]imentarv 
notice has been sent us bv .ludge George 
W. Hackett, Nortli Fi.-e.lom. wig/"'"'^^'' 



# 




# 




# 




# • 



1 Pag-e 11 M 





Awards at the New York SI 



low 



[1 DECEMBER 27, 1909, TO JANUARY 1, 1910 



List of Exhibitors 



Adair, C. E Elma Center N. Y. 

Adams, Jas Rfd. 2. Poughkeepsie, N Y 

Adams, Newton. 1092 Oneida St., Utica N Y 
Albers. Wm. F 

300 Rochester Ave., Brooklyn! NY 

Alden, R. F '...... 

... .25 Roosevelt Ave., Binghaniton, n' y. 

Allen, Hattie E 

. Great Hills. Staten Island,' N."y. 

Allen, Sidney C Orchard Park, N. Y 

Almendinger, A. F 

. 42 Orton PI.. BufTaloVN.' Y. 

Alter, O. T. & C. M Pittsburg, Pa. 

Anderson. Adolph E 

35 Bellevue Ave.. Bristol. Conn 

Ander-son, Annesley M Morton, Pa 

Anderson, Louis Bloomsburg, N J 

Andrews, E. B 

^ • • 9 W. 17th St.. New York City 

Andrus.s, Dr. C. J Canandaigua, N. Y. 

Annandale Farm Mt Kisco, N. Y 

Arnol, J. E Spring Valley, N. Y 

Arthur, B. H Gloversville, N Y 

Astoria Leg. Yds " 

• • 240 Jamaica Ave.. Astoria N Y 

Backus, Frank Rensselaer Falls, n" Y 

Bailey, A. S Cobalt, Conn." 

Bailey, C. K Bethel, Conn. 

Batch & Brown Manchester, Conn. 

Ball, Geo... 24 E. Milton Aye., Rahway, N J 

Ballard, E. A Chestnut Hill, Pa! 

Ballygungs Farm .. .Oyster Bay, L. I. N Y 
Bartlett, M. A.. 508 Lincoln Ave.. Canton o! 

Barton, Wesley B Dalton. Mass 

Banner Poul. Yds Meadowbrook. Pa. 

Bean, F. G Collegeyille. Pa. 

Bean, Irving W 

115 Plain St.. So. Braintree! Mass. 

Beattie, Geo. B Caldwell, N. J. 

Becker, Mrs. M. M 

S4 Penna. Ave.. Dover, N J 

Benerlein, B. S Mt. Morris, N Y 

Bennett. A. G 

59 Hollywood Ave.. E. Orange, N. J. 

Bennett, Henry Brown, W. Va. 

Bent. Myron H Antwerp. N Y 

Benton. H. Stacy So. Norwalk Conn 



Beresford. E. A 

65 Broadway, New York City 

Besson, Geo. E Mansfield, Mass. 

Best, C. W 

„ 411 N. Church St., Charlotte,* N. ' C. 

Betz, John... 23 Quitman St., Newark, N. J. 

Bidgood Bros Dover, N J 

Bird, Geo. R.85 Valley Rd., W. Orange N J 

Bird Bros Meyersdale, Pa! 

Black Diamond Orpington Farm 

„,• • • Scranton, Pa. 

Blackstone, Shed Merchantville. N J 

Black & White Poul. Farm .' . 

D,T";,VV Basking Ridge, 'n.* J. 

Blake, W. J Burnside, Conn 

Blodgett & Drake Windsor, Conn. 

Bloshke, Alfred H '. 

,^ 23 Orchard St., Bloomfield, N. J 

Bogert. E. W Pt. Washington, N. Y. 

Bohman, H. H..32 Davis St., Danbury, Conn 

Bonfoey, A. L Higganum, Conn. 

Bowden, Jno.. Box 20, Ridgetown, Ont Can 
Bowers, W. R 

16 W. Saratoga St., Baltimore, Md. 

Braine, H. S New Brighton, Pa. 

Brett. John New City, N. Y. 

Bright, L. L 

1923 N. Main Ave., Scranton! Pa. 

Brinkerhoff, Geo. C Rutherford, N. J. 

Britton, Harry W Moorestown, N. J. 

Brokaw, H. L ;.. 

97 E. Main St., Somerville, N. ' J. 

Brookside Poul. Farm Bloomsbury Pa 

Brown, C. A Sayvllle. L. I., N. y' 

Brubaker. E. E Bird in Hand. Pa. 

Brundage, Chas. H Danbury, Conn. 

Brusie Nelson Salisbury Mills. N. Y 

Buck, H. C 

151 Montclair Ave., Montclair, N. J. 

Bunk, H. W Germantown, N. Y. 

Burch, Jas. S Millbrook, N. Y. 

Burgott, Glenn H Eden Center, N. Y. 

Cameron, John 

26 Beech St., New Bedford, Mass. 

Campbell, W. D Bloomfield, N. J. 

Carpenter. Harry M Ossining, N. Y. 

Carrick, J. B 

514 Kosciusko St., Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Carter, A. G Freeport, Me. 



Carter, Ezra E Rfd. 1, Marathon, N. Y. 

Case, C. W Rochester, Mich. 

Catlin, L 539 1st St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Central Bantam Yds 

25 Central Ave., Dover, N. J. 

Chaffee, Geo. B..16 S. Main St., Rutland, Vt. 

Chalker, R. S Higganum, Conn. 

Chalmers, F. G Valley Stream, N. Y. 

Cheesebrough, H. E Greenwich, N. Y. 

<:hestnut Hill Poul. Yds 

Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Clark, G. A Seymour, Ind. 

Clark, J. W Cainsville, Ont., Can. 

Clinton, C. E 

221 S. Division, Peekskill.N.' Y. 

Cobb, B. & R Brewster, N. Y. 

Coffin, M. H Whitensville. Mass. 

Coles, F. A Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Collins & Son, E. R 

Baker Ave., Dunton, Richmond Hill^ N. Y. 

Congdon, W. H Oak Lawn, R. I. 

Conner, W. J... 621 Main St., Coatesville, Pa. 

Conniscliffe Poul. Farm Tenafly N. J. 

Conrad & Bratt Hackensack, N. J. 

Cook, Jr., C. S 

70 Valentine St., W. Newton, Mass. 

Cook, Fred H Beaver, Pa 

Cook & Sons, Wm Scotch Plains, N. J. 

Corey, M. J 

900 Summer Ave., Springfield, Mass. 

Cornforth. E. O Slatersville, R. I. 

Cornish, Edw. D Naples, N. Y. 

Council, V. H Box 114, Warrenton, Va. 

Cox, A. B 

211 Glenwood Ave., Rochester, N. T. 

Craig & Mapes 

914 Empire Bldg.. Pittsburg! Pa. 

Crawford, Jas Cameron Mills, N. Y. 

Cressman, B. F 

370 N. Main St., Sellersviile, Pa. 

Crevolserat, Wm. E 

95 S. Main St., Freeport, N. Y. 

Crosby, Howard Del 

Breezemont, Riverside, Conn. 

Cruttenden, Tyler 

\ . 117 Cliff St., Norwich! Conn. 

Curry, Thomas Anderson, Ind. 

Dary, Jacob 12 Clover St., Yonkers, N. Y. 

Davenport. Wm. H Cobrain, Mass. 




THE SECRET OF SUCCESSFUL POULTRY RAISING FOUND AT LAST 

Y« • sure CRuhiiicomo and profit of f8500.OO from 1000 hens in 5 monthiu at » m.. - 

other necessitiee. making • profit of ,„ore tlmn $7 oo per hen. per year. It i.s a .iVtnon.tratei 

J.ttrof'rou^t'ryCaUur:."- ^' ^""'*'^ '**•"*• "''' •^^^'^•** •"/ Prollt. aa.«red by thi. 



It !• now possililu to have 
imuin cost for help feed an 
lurcess. This has oeeii easil, 
wouderful and revolutionary sytt 



EDGAR BRIGGS 

Poultry Expert 



READ WHAT THE BRIGGS SYSTEM WILL DO FOR YOU 

The Brings Syftem can be applied to any poultry plant large or einail with equal anccesa. Equally as valuable to the beffinnar 
to the experienced poultry raiser. It contains poultry secretg never before published wi«- urginD«r 

SUCCESS WITH POULTRY ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEEO BY THE USE OF BRIGGS 

SYSTEM AND SECRETS 

Feed for srnwlns chicks and maklnK ecira at 1 5c. per bushel explained by the Briggi System. No machinery; no cooking. 



95% OF ALL CHICKS HATCHED CAN BE RAISED 



2000 layers and .1000 riiicks ran be rared for without help 
by one person and still have time tor other work. 

$'_'.'> 0(1 saved on every hundred chicks raised to maturity 
by this wonderful Briggs system. 

EndorM-d by hundreds of lending sncccsafnl 
poultrymiMi llundreda of unqualltled testlinonlals 
in oar puHHeaaioii. 

"PROFITS IN POULTRY KEEPING 
SOLVED" 

This jrreat book by l.dgar Briggs tells how to increase 
your present profits or start a profitable and easy occupa- 
tion. Failures unknown when the lirl^irH ^>3'stein is used. 
It ineetH every condition aiiil covers every part of the busi- 
ness. Keeps hens in the pink of condition and prodaccs 
more egns than any other systeni; molts hen* early, and 
fowls are rarely sick when this wonderful system is followed. 

THE SECRET OF TURKEY RAISING IS 
ALSO BARED 

This book ban never been sold for less then 
#&.00 per copy, and tlioiiRaiiiU covering several editions 
are being followed by an equal Dumber of successful poultry 
raisers. 

WE HAVE iURCHASED TUK SOLE RIGHTS OF 



PUBLICATION FROM THE AUTHOR. MR. BRIOGS, 
and have just reduced the price fVom |U>.00 to #!.)£& 
per copy, including one year's subscription to ' I'orLTRT 
SiJccKss," regular price 60 cents, so under the great ofier you 
get the Briggs System book for only 75 cents. We have 
also just taken off the press "RrigrK" Secrets In Poultry 
Culture," containing most valnuble aii<i mver before pub- 
lished secrets that have produced wonderful and easily ob- 
tainable results. These secrets are alone worth the price 
of the book, but under our great offer you get them FRE£. 

3f=>e:OlAL. OF-F-CIR 

While fhc present edition of the liritEKS (^jetem 
and Secret Books lasts. 

IF V()U WILL REMIT US $1 25. WE WILL SEND 
IMMEDIATELY A COPY OF BRIGGS WONDERFUL 
SYSTEM BOOK, Viz.: PROFITS IN POULTRY CULT URB 
SOLVED, also a set of BKIOGS 'SECRETS IN POULTRY 
CULTURE'' and Include also POULTRY SUCCESS one 
year. Even if you already have a copy of 'Profits in Poultry 
Keening Solved." you arc losing money every day by not 
having the supplemental publication **8ecrets in Poultry 
<"ulture." POULTRY SUCCESS it admittedly the world's 
leading and best POULTRY JOURNAL. 20 years old. 60 
to lti4 pages, beautifully illustrated and printed. Most com- 
petent and experienced writers in the country. 60 cents a 
year. It is the joth Centura Poultry Magazine. Samples 
and Circulars tree. Atldres^ 



HOSTERMAN PUBLISHING CO.. Briggs Desk 25 SPRINGFIELD. OHIO 




Page 12 




. . . Mid vale, Pa. 
Bradford. N. Y. 
.Franklin, N. Y. 

Ossininj?. N. Y. 
Lancaster, Pa. 



Dayhoff. L. s 

Decker, Dr., B. E 

De Gray, Good win 

Demins, Jr., Richard... 

So. His:hland Ave., 

Demmy, Bros Hfd. ;"> 

Dodds, Frank J 

398 Riverdale Ave., Yonkers, N. Y. 

Doll, Paul W White Plain, N. Y. 

Dumars, Cokefair & Churchill 

64 CMinton Rd., Glen Rid^e, N. J. 

Dune Alpin Puul Farm 

East Hampton, L. 1., N. Y. 

Dunne. Henry 

1492 Queen St, W., Toronto, Can. 

Dunrobin Farm Chatham, X. J. 

Dutcher, J. G Pawling, N. Y. 

Duval, Hanson R East Islip, L. I., N. Y. 

Dysart Bros Belmont, O. 

Eddy & Young- Pleasant Vallev, N. Y. 

Edgar, Wm . . . . Rfd. 1', So. Pethlehem Pa. 
Edwards. F. L.21S Blake St., VVestville, Conn. 

Ehle & Greenhaigh Catasauqua, I>a. 

Elkins Park Poul. Farm. . . Elkins Park, Pa. 

Ellen wood Faim Hatboro, Pa. 

Ellison, W. A Elkland, Pa. 

Elm Poul. Yds Hartford, Conn. 

Elmhurst Poul. Yds 

Riverside on Hudson, N. Y. 

Englewood Bristol, N. H. 

Evansward Farm Fayetteville N. Y. 

Evelyn Heights Farm '. . . .Catle'tt, Va! 

Fairfield Poul. Farm Fairton, N. J 

Faust Edward 

STj Oceanview Ave., Woodlawn, N. Y. 

Fell, A. J West Point, Pa. 

Fernwood Farm Litchfield, Conn. 

Felkin, John 

Broad and Watchung Ave., Bloomfield, N. 
J. 

Fike. H. L Meyersdale. I'a. 

Fincke & Thornton Vineland N. J. 

Fisher, C. E McConnellsv'ille, O. 

Fisk, Howard J 

Cor. Work and Mason Sts., Falconer, N. Y. 

Fiske. Harlo J Sterlington, N. Y. 

Foulke, J. Stewart 

.Sanford Ave. and 2.Tth St.. Flushing, N. Y. 

Foxhurst Farm Lime Rock, Conn. 

Fraleigh, Howard Forest, Ont., Can. 

Franklin, H. C Townsend. Vt. 

Frasier, F. S..46 Waldo St., Brockton, Mass. 
Freeburn, Wm. B....Box 88, Sparkill, N. Y. 
Frelinghuysen. P. H. B . . . . Morristown. N. J. 

Frost. Harry B Paterson. N. J. 

Fry. Jas. S Nazareth, Pa. 

Fuller. Jas. M Warwick. N. Y. 

Furman. C. C Bloom.sburg. Pa. 

Galleher. R. F Mt. Gilead, O. 

Gardner. M. S Palmvra. N. Y. 

Gates, Harry M Mt. Moiris, N. Y. 

Bebhard, Louis 

300 r.th St., Phillipsburg. k.'j. 

George, E. A Henvelton, N. Y. 

GiflPord, W. E..l]l Genesee St., I'tica N. Y. 

Gibb. H. Elmer 

Sus.^ex Ave., Morristown. N. J. 

Goetz. Wm. J. H 

11;">0 Cadillac .Ave.. Detroit, Mich. 

<;ould, Howard 

Box 29."), Port Washington. N. Y. 

Gould, J. Nelson 

238 Van Wyck Ave.. Dunton,' N. Y. 

Grannis Bros La Grangeville, N. Y. 

Green. Mrs. C. S 

Sailors Snug Harbor, New Brighton! NY 

Green, Ralph C Savville. N " Y* 

Greenberry Farm Poul. Yds. . Annapolis Afd 

Greene. Geo. A Medwav. Mass. 

Greener. N. N Elizabethtown. Pa 

Greyst(»ne Poul. Farm Yonkers N Y 

Grove Hill Poul. Yds Waltham.' Mass! 

(.rover. J. D New Berlin. N. Y. 

Hales. Henry Ridgewof.d. N. J. 

Hallock, J. H Saranac Lake. N Y. 

Halsey, Chas. D Remsen N J 

Hampden F'oul. Yds Cbic<»pee Mas« 

Hanna. ('. S West H.brc.n. N. y! 

Hanna. Mi.s. C. S West Hebron. N. Y 

Hariies. Fred Fernlea. Elmsford. N. Y 

Harrington. Nftrman 

1" Myrtle Ave.. Holvoke Mass 

Harter. S. H Nesc.)pe(k pa 

Hatch, Leonard F Vineland. N .1. 

Havemeyer. Horace Stamfor<l Conn 

Havemeyer TJros Mahwah. N. J. 

Hawkins, A. C Lancaster. Mass 

Hawkins, Harry Dover. N. J. 

Haynor, Jonas .. Li^•ing^.^t on N. Y 

Haywood, Albert Waterloci. N Y 

Hazleton. W. W Hudson N Y 



Easton. Pa. 



Hell, Wm. H R .V, 

Hellyer, A. W. E 

68 Belmont Ave., Ottawa, Gnt., Can. 

Hearsfleld. Wm. H. . . . Woodmere, L T., N. Y 
Hewke, T. S.261 Main St., Middletown, N Y. 
HlJlcrest Farms 

„ • • • Nishaning Falls, Oakford. Pa. 

Hilldorfer, Jos. P., Chester ave. 

,, • ; • Pittsburg, Pa. 

Hillson. Geo. W Hyde I'ark. N Y 

Hills. Edwin H Plainville, Conn 

HInes, John. 4812 Snyder ave.Brooklvn N Y 

Hollis. John F.. Box 81 '. 

„ ■, No. Abington. Mass. 

Holmhurst poul Yds Whitby, Ont., Can. 

Homeyer. John F.. Cornwall ave 

„ Hollis. N.- Y. 

Hooker, Henrietta E So. Hadley, Mass. 

Houseman, Peter Warwick N Y 

Howell. L. D Mineola,' N.' y! 

Howie, Geo. W Fordham N. Y 

Howland. Stuart A., Bx 415 . .Granville. N. Y. 
Hoyt. Geo. D Plttsfleld. Mass. 



POULTRY FANCIER 



Hubbard. B. W., 49 Lafayette St 

New Haven. ( 'onn. 

Hubbard, .Jr., Eliot, Orchard St. . Millis. Mass. 

Huey. H. A Ronie City, Ind. 

Humphrey, H. E Greenwich, N. Y. 

Hungerfoid, A Bav Shore, N Y. 

Inchef, Mr.s. Geo. B No. Grafton, Mass 

Inglesand I'oul. Yds Flushing, N. Y. 

Irwin. .Jno. H., 2:5;-) Front St., New York City 

Ivins, M. Harvey Langhorne, Pa. 

Jackson, J, H., Bx 8.5 Hudson. Mass. 

Jackson, Lawrence Havsville, I'a. 

Jacobus, M. R Ridgetield, N. J. 

Jannson, F. B Pennington, N. J. 

Jefferis, Leslie .. Norristown, Bridgeport, Pa. 

Jensen, C. S' Dover, N J. 

Jessel, Arthur E.. 56 Asylum St 

, ; Bridgeport. ( \\nn. 

Johnson, Wm. R Gartesford. I'a. 

Joidan, Dr. H. M Hicksville. O. 

Josenhaus, Arthur A, 204 E. 202d St.. Bed- 

ford Park New York City 

Ivahle. Chas. A.. 163 Branch Ave 

, , Red Bank, N. J. 

Kautmann & WMndham Nutley N J. 

Keating. .J. p Westboio,' Mass. 

Keator, Isaac, 20 N. 1st St., Jamaica, N. Y. 

Keck, Otto Milton, N. Y. 

Kellerstrass. Ernest, R. 1 .. Kansas City, Mo. 

Kendall ik Langley Greenwich, N. Y. 

Kennedy, W. Hugh Red Bank, N J. 

Kentgen, Wm. A., Iserholn Farm ". 

,,; •.•,•. New York City 

Kichlme, Geo. F., oOi5 Northampton St... 

,,. Easton, Pa. 

Kienzle, F. X., 428 Nisquehoning St 

,,.• • • • • • Easton. Pa. 

Kmg, Clarence W Romulus, N. Y. 

Kingston, Jr., H. H., R. F. D. 1 

Rochester. N Y. 

Kmney. Webster A. J Seneca Falls, N. Y. 

Kirk & Speakman, Bx 223. Wilmington, Del. 

Klee Bros Blauvelt, N. Y. 

Knapp, Dr Milleiton, N Y. 

Knapp, Rodney A., R. ;i, Binghamton N. Y. 

Koons Farm Freichler, Pa. 

Krenn, Jos. G.. 114 Beecher St 

,, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Kreutter, Albert J Seneca Falls. N. Y. 




January. '10 



'2E. 



^■Au. 





Lamson, H. S 

Lance, S. D 

Langfoid, Frank.. R. R. 
Landers, M. J 

133 Hampden 

Latham, C. H 

Leach, Arthur H 

10 Frank St 

Lee. C. G 

Lichenwalter, E. H.... 
Liddell &. Sons, W T. . . 

Little. Geo. R 

Little. Sara A 

Lincoln Poultiy Yards. . 

398 Lincoln 



Cameron, N. Y. 

Troy, O. 

10, Nashville, Tenn. 

St., (^hicopee, Mass. 
. . . .Lancaster, Mass. 

, Middleboi-o, Mass. 
. . .Walworth. N. Y. 

Girard. Pa. 

...Greenwich, N. Y. 
Schaghticoke, N. Y 
Clyde, N. Y. 

Ave., Newark, N. J. 



THK MOnKl. PORTA BI.K HENNF:RV 



Liiidstrom, J. .A Morris l^lains, N. J. 

Linton. Geo. T 

Branch Ave., Red Bank, N. .1. 

Livingston, Mrs. R. C Islip, L. I., N. Y. 

Llangollen Farm Great Neck, N. V. 

I..oesing, Jr., Leo 

E. 2;Jd St., Sheepshead Bay, N. Y. 

Lott, Dr. S Hellona, N. Y. 

Lovett, J. E Little Silver, N. J. 

Luce & Hill R. 1, Vestal, N. Y. 

McCaulley. Emma 

.42 Helen St., Highwood, Conn. 

McClave. Chas New London, O. 

McGrann, Frank Box 417, Lancaster 

McKittrick, T. A Hudson, N. Y. 

McMillan. R. D 

8 Harrison St., Cortland. N. Y. 

Manis, Frank W Morris Plains, N. .1. 

Maple Hill Farm 

R. 1, Frenchtown. N. J. 

Marsh, Stephen 

s I.,enox Ave., Ridgewood, N. J. 

Marshall, S. I 

130 Smith St.. Port (Miestcr. N. Y. 

Martin, Frank . Charles Point, Peekskill, N. Y. 

Masten, W. P Pleasant Valley, N. Y. 

Mayer, Jr., Mrs. Jno 

39 Franklin St., Morristown, N. J. 

Megargee ik C\j.. F. O 

1600 Jefferson Ave., Scrantoa, Pa. 

Megargee, M. B Wyncote, Pa. 

Meiere, Ernest Flushing. N. Y. 

Mellor, D. Howard Springhouse, Pa. 

Memann. Ed. D 

Fail-ground, Huntington, N. Y. 

Merihevv, L. E Marathon. N. Y. 

Meyer, H. C Box 68, Saugerties, N. Y. 

Miers, C. O. . . . «)72 S. Main St., Bangor, Pa. 

Millard, J. K Guelph, Ont.. Can. 

Millei-. Harry B Clarks Summit, Pa. 

Miller, Jno. A Nazareth, Pa. 

Minard. Ed Elyria, Lorain, O. 

Mintuin & Son, W. Q Warwick, N. Y. 

Mitchell, Geo. W 

3.") Believue Ave.. Bristol, Conn. 

Moffett, ,Ias. ..;{G8 Wash St., Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Mole, 1. W Roosevelt, N. Y. 

Monmouth Poultiy Farm . . . Frenean, N. Y. 

Moore Bros Moscow N. Y. 

Morgan^ Harry S ' 

8.'{ Smith St., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Morgan. Wm. L 

1"'3 Grove St. So., E. Orange, N.' J. 

Morris. Edwin H Sparkill, N. Y. 

Morrow. \\. A 

1029 Lehigh St., Easton! Pa. 

Moss, Geo. H Burkes Garden, Va. 

Mount joy, B. J 

.1:52 Mt. Pleasant Ave., London. Ont.. Can. 
Mountain Vi.-w Farm .... South Kent Conn 

Moyer, Ralph W 

W. Market St., Orwigsburg Pa. 

Mt. Pleasant Farm Brvn Mawr. Pa. 

Mudge Si Son.. 75 Cross St., Westeilv R I. 




The Model Portable Hennery /^'^^ 

thing for the city man, the breeder and for 
keeping fowls on the colony plan, a complete 
henhouse. Kcoiiomy Trap-Nest. Simplest 
and most economical ou the market, never 
will get out of order and always work, made 
both In wood and metal. Model Brood 
Coops. Made of galvanized Iron, eolIapnal.)e. 
mite and vermin proof, easily cleaned, by 
drawing two hooks bottom drops out. Mod- 
el Set! ill); Cooi>s. Made of galvanized Iron 
.lust what you want when the hatching season 
comes on again, you can also use It as a brood 
coop. Write at once, catalogue free, mention 
you saw my iid In Poultry Fancier. Nieiiinnn 
H'os. Mfir. Co, Box 377, Mt. Olive, II 



60 Years *' lir "^ I. K. Felch & Son 

Si;f J^.H^"'^ BRAHMAS, BARRED ROCKS 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS, WHITE WYANDOTTES 

and judged all breeds in nearly every State in the union without a protest. 

WHY^Jnnm '^^ ?^'^ ^^^ the money paid. 

WHY SHOULD THEY NOT. when none but specimens to score 90 
to 96 points find place in their breeding pen ? Which 

WIN AND BRE:ED ON 

in the hands of their patrons, for they do not exhibit, nor do they appropriate 
their patrons winnings to their advantage. 

From Sept I to May 1 5, Brahmas $3.50 to $1 for females; $5 to $20 
or males. White and Baired Rocks and White Wyandottes. $2.50 to $8 
for females; $4 to $1 5 for males. Eggs from all, $4 for I 5, $7 for 30 $9 
for 45. and $15 for 105 eggs From May 15 to Sept.). all yearlings before 
moulting sold at 40 per cent off of catalogue prices. For catalogue and other 
particulars address 

I. K. FELCH & SON. Box 1 ?6, NATICK. MASS. 



1 



• • 



t 




C • 




• 




January. '10 




Myers, Arthur 

„ • • • Mill Place, Hartford ' Mills. N.Y. 

Nathans J. A White Plains. N. Y. 

Nesbit, Edw. J • 

-^, Locust Hall, Pouffhkee'ps'ie.' n' ' Y 

SLwT' A^*'"'^;;-; Washington, n! J." 

o2l .•,M'fi <v I-Walbrook, Baltimore. Md. 

Oak 11,1 Poultry Yards Ben Avon. Pa. 

Oakland Poultry Yards Trenton N J 

Oakley Bert A Brooklyn. Pa." 

Oak Nest Farm 

^.•••••;; I.ibrary PI.. Allegheny, Pa. 

Oke & Murray London. Ont.. Can. 

Old Acres Wrentham. Mas.s. 

Only. A.. Farm Poultry Yards 

_ Box B. Morristown N J. 

K^Ji' ^^ I-'ncoln Orrs Mills, n! Y. 

Otte. Fred W Peekskill. N. Y. 

Owen Farms Vineyard Haven, Mass 

Oyster. Edw Strawberry Ridge, Pa. 

Paine. Jr.. Robt. Treat 

^ Ifi State St., Boston, Mass. 

Payne. Oscar W 

_. t^larks Summit. Scranton, Pa. 

Peapack Farm Peapack N. J. 

Pen.syl, R. G Bloomsburg, Pa. 

Phillips. Thos. H Dover N J 

Pine Top Poultry Farm Hartwood ' N." Y 

Plummer, J. Russell R. .5. Easton Pa 

Poley, .John W Royersford. Pa. 

Pope, r. H 

-^9 N. Warren Ave.. Brocitton. Mass. 

r orter. Horace Ridgefield. Conn 

I'ratt. (^has. W 

, SO'^ Bedford St., No. Abington. Mass. 

Prescott. Henry B Derry Village N H 

I'rescott, Mrs. Henry B.. Derry Village N h' 

Preston, A. O .5.5 Hall St.. Concord' N. H 

Pritchlynn. Sophia C ' 

• •1104 6th St.. N. W.. Washington, ' i)' "C. 

Puder, Chas. L ' _ 

104 Orange St.. Irvington. N J 

Pullins Bros Rensselaer. Ind. 

I'ure Strain P^arms Scottsville, N. Y 

I'uivis, Harold Butler Pa 

Quackenbush. R. B Darien. Conn.' 

Rake. J. D Monroe. N. Y 

Rankin. James R. 7, Schnectadv N Y 

Rapelye, W. W Hempstead" N Y.' 

Raschke, C. A .'...'. 

-0 Shufeldt St., Kingston, x! " Y. 



POULTRY FAN CI 



Read. Frank D 

Red Feather Farm .. Tiverton 4 Corners, R. I. 
Reepmeyer. Jr., J .... Aqueduct, Craig. N. Y. 

Reider R. D R. 2, Middletown. Pa. 

Renner, A. T Coshocton. O. 

Reynolds. Edwin G 

1181 Grand St., Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Rice, Irving P Cortland. N. Y 

Richardson, Jr., M. B Lime Rock. (.\)nn. 

Ricketts. F. H Coshocton O. 

Ridge View Farm Willoughby' O. 

Riggs, F. F 

423 S. Broadway, Elmira N. Y. 

Riggs. Mr. & Mrs. P. S Pelham, N. Y. 

Riley, Henry D Strafford, Pa. 

River Home Poultry Yards. .. Perrysburg, O 
Riverview Poultry Yards 

80 Van Wort Ave., Tarrvtown, N Y 

Roberts. E' Chester. N." Y. 

Robertson. R. A Warehouse Point. Conn. 

•• 3282 N. Main. Phillipsburg, N. J. 

Rockandotte Farm Southboro, Mass. 

Rock Hill I>oultry Farm Ossining. N. Y. 

Roecker, B. C 

39 S. Main St.. Phillipsburg N. J. 

Rogers & Packard 

41 Howard St., Montello, Mass. 

Rogge. J. C. L 

3071 Perry Ave.. Bronx, N Y. 

Rose Court Poultry Yards 

Westhampton Beach. N. Y 

Rose, Hugh A Welland. Ont.. Can. 

Rose. J. A Matthews Ave.. Scranton, Pa. 

Rose. Zebulon Thiells. N Y. 

Rosemary Farm Huntington, k'. Y. 

Rosemount Poultry Yards Esopus, N Y. 

Rothget Bros Milford, 111. 

Royal Farms Little Silver. N. J. 

Russell, A. L Washington, N. J 

Ryan, T. J 

358 VVoodside Ave., Newark N. .1. 

.Sanborn, Dr. N. VV Holden,' Mass 

Sander, Wm ..Albion PI., Paterson, N. J. 
Saupe, Ernest F 

18 Clayton St., Newark. N. J. 

Sayre, J. L Vineland, N. J. 

Schall. Dr. J. H., 115 St. Marks Ave 

^, ^ • • : • • • • Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Schambacher, E. G 

183 N. 19th St., E. Or'a'n'ge," 'n.' J. 

Scheib, J. H. & T> Newark N J 




JOSEPH DAGLE, Manager OAK HILL POULTRY FARM 

EXPERT JUDGE AND BREEDER Member American Poultry As.sociation. Member Buif Rock 

^i^«' IZ^^lV^'^^XlTJ''^''^''''^^''^'''''' P"''^*^ ^^°""8: and sell you high class stock and 
eggs. KIV-HLAND, IOWA. 



BOGARDUS^ ORPINGTONS 

S. C. BUFF AND S. C. BLACK 



have the finest lot of cockerels and pullets I ever raised, 
prices, I can and will please you. 

O. A. BOGARDUS, 



First prize winners 
a t Chicago, 111., 
Hagerstown, M d . 
Cincinnati, Ohio; 
Nashville. Tenn. I 
Show birds that will win. Get my 



BOX A, WARSAW, KY. 



PAR.TRIDGE, BUFF 
AND BLACK X : i 

BUFF-LACKD Yir^v YCZ^V^ 
AND GOLDEN JriJLrl^O 

DR. H. F. BALLARD, 



COCHINS 



W^ H I T E , 
BLACK, 

Stock for sale and eggs in season. 
Prize winners 27 years . 

CHENOA, ILL. 



WHITE ROCKS 

"■""""■"""■"■"■"—"""■"■"■""-"■"" are Dig, wnire, D€ 

WHITE WYAND OTTES 

BERWYN POULTRY YARDS, 



Stock for sale that will win in the show 
room and fill the egg basket. Our birds 
are big. Wh ite, beauties, strong in good 

points. Eggs from our 
choicest matings at 
"~~— — — liveng prices. 
BOX P., BERWYN, ILL, 



L. H. JOSTES, Rte. 2, MACON, ILL. 

BREEDS HIGH CLASS 

Lt. BRAHMAS and S. C. Brown LEGHORNS 

Some fine youngsters for sale. Satisfaction guaranteed. Also utility 
BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS, and some grand young MAMMOTH BRONZE 
TURKEY TOMS. I am ready to book orders for eggs. Write me for 
prices. 



SehillinK. A. & B 

443 Central Pk., Rochester, N. Y. 

Schoff Farms Campville, N. Y. 

Scho.«kie, J. M Rochelle Park, N. J. 

Schran, Louis B 

60 Hamilton Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Schriever. Hiram W Chester, N. Y 

Schroeder, • A 

25 Oakland St.. Red Bank, N. J. 

Schwenker, Carl F Red Bank, N. J. 

Scott. H. B 

110 W. Newell St.. Syracuse, N. Y. 

Scott, J. Alvah Passaic, N. J. 

Seaman. Frank P Mineola, L. I.. N. Y. 

Sechler, R. C 

526 Wash St., Allentown. Pa. 

Seeley & Son, Geo Chester. N. Y. 

Seeley & Son. Jas. C. ...R. .5. Geneva, N. Y. 

SeiRfried, LeRoy W Waterloo, N. Y. 

Shaw & Mcintosh Forest. Ont., Can. 

Shaylor. C. H Lee. Mass. 

Shea, Dennis Fabins. N. Y. 

Sheppard, H. Cecil Berea, O. 

Simmons Bros Stockton. 111. 

Sites. Frank C No. Dover. O. 

Sites, Eugene Elyria, O. 

Skerritt & Son. Dr 

51 Columbia St.. Utica, N. Y. 

Skylands Sterlington N. Y. 

Smith, Dr. Alf K 

74 W. 103d St., New York City 

Smith. Frank L Lexington. Ky. 

Smith & Son. J. J 

269 Madison Ave.. Wilkes-Barre Pa. 

Smith. Sinclair .' . . 

59 Frankfort, New York City 

Smith. Wm. A Brookline, Mass. 

Smith. Wm. F Salem, O. 

Smithers. C. F. & Co Henvelton. N. Y. 

Snead. C. E 4th Ave., Freedam. Pa. 

Springmann. Henrv 

1019 E. '3d St., Williamsport, Pa. 

Springs, W. Lee 

633 Stokes Ave., Collingswood, N. J. 

Stern. Moses Valhalla. N. Y. 

Stevens. Carlton G Manchester, N. H. 

Stickles. J. H Claverack. N Y. 

Stockel Bros 

961 Wheeler Ave., Scranton, Pa. 

Story, Rowland 

187 Arlington Ave.. Brooklyn. N. Y 

Stowe. F. D. B B"a<tleboro. Vt. 

Stratton. W. W Norfolk. Ma.ss. 

Strong. Herbert Chatham. N. J. 

Strubb. P. D Bascom, O. 

Sturges, Mrs. Agnes Pleasanton. N. Y. 

Success Farm 

S. Pleasant Ave.. Rldgew^ood. N. .1. 

Sunnybrook Farm W. Orange, N. .1. 

Sunswick Poultry Farm . . S. Plainfleld. N. J. 

Swayck. John 

No. Hackansack, Englewood. N. J. 

Tabor. F. C Worcester. N. Y. 

Tannenbaum Farms Willoughby, O. 

Tccktonius. F. \ Racine. Wis. 

Tcttz. Harvey J . . . R. 1. Gloversville. N. Y. 

Templeton. W. S Dakota. 111. 

Terwilleger. Clinton 

1 Gould Ave., Paterson, N. J. 

The Columbian Poultrv Yards 

E. Williston. N. Y. 

The Gale Poultry Place.. New Haven, (^onn. 

Tillev. G. D Darien. Conn. 

Titus. Wm. W E. Williston. N. Y. 

Todd. Jr.. J. H. L Fanwood, N. J. 

Todd. W. S Greenwood, Del. 

Tompkins. Lester Concord. Mass. 

Top Notch Farm Water Mill. N. Y. 

Trethaway, Arthur 

45 Parrlsh St.. Wilkes Barre. Pa. 

Tulloch, Walter C 

213 E. 202d St.. New York Citv 

Tygert. .1. F Rutherford. N. .1. 

rnderhill. Mrs. L. C 

Lincoln Ave.. Mineola. N. Y. 

I'rban. Jr., Geo 

Pine Ridge, Buffalo. N. Y. 

Van .Msfyne. J. F Nlverville, N. Y. 

\"an Brunt, Geo. A Red Bank. N. J. 

Van Sire. J. W 

Syosset. Woodburv, N Y. 

Vass. C. B Washington. X. .F. 

Waddell. J. L Decatur Ml. 

Walker. Wm. F Stamford. N. Y 

Wall. Ernest F R. 8. Lakeview, Erie. Pa. 

Walters. W. C Blairstown. N. J. 

Wampler. Ray S Timberville, Pa. 

Warner. Austin G....New York Mills. N. Y. 

Wasson, Jas. S 

....30 Genesee Ave.. Grand Rapids. Mji-h. 

Watson. W. N Sunburv. Pa. 

Watt. Miss Grace Hartsdale. N. Y. 

Watt. J. L Hartsdale. N. Y. 

Watt. Miss N Hartsdale, N. Y. 

Watt, .Jr., T. L Hartsdale. N. Y. 

W«bster. C. F Girard. Pa. 

Webster. Dr. B. E Woodhull. X. Y. 

Weed. Geo. W East Lee, Mass. 

Welch, J. Hart Douglaston. N. Y. 

Welles. Chas. H Stratford. Conn. 

West fall, Watson Sayre, Pa. 

Westbrook Farm B. Norwich, N. Y. 

West Mountain Poultry Yards 

Naugatuck. Conn. 

Whiting Farms Holyoke, Mass. 

Wieners. Miss Selma. .. .College Point. N. Y. 

Wild Goose Farm Copeagne, N. Y. 

Wilhelmina Poultry Farm 

Morganvllle. N. .1. 

Willes. Edw. A Brockton. M ss. 

Williams, W. C. & H. B Chatham. N. J. 

William.son. C. M 

Grand View, Nyack, N. Y. 




Page 14 

Wllmarth J. E Amity villo. X. Y. 

W n^'H*^';^ Ja«. F Athol Mass. 

WiSkle',; ^^^'''^^' L Chambersburg. Pa. 

wAhI'ii' ' i\: '^^ Hawthorne, Rutherford, N." J. 
Wofpo ; ^il^'^-l^'* Broadway. New York City 

A\ olcott H . R White Plains. N. Y. 

\V oodruff. Fred Florida N. Y. 

Ym,nt "t^^^ J'arm Wi^sted Conn. 

Young. D. W Monroe. N. Y 

Itoung, Jos. B 

450 Union Ave., Irvington, N. J. 




List of Awardi 



BAKKKD PLYMOUTH KOCKS. 

,.nV.'''^i" Farms; 3, ck; 4, 6. 8, hen; :>, ckl; S, 

}^^'n 'v}' P*"?; ^'"^ '^'"P ^0"1- Farm: 6, 
<-K, 7, hen. Hawkins: 4. 5. ck- ' 4 ckl • 
6. pen. Welle.s: 7. ok; r>, hen; 3. '8. ckl; 1. 5. 
6. pul; 4. pen. Grove Hill Poul. Yds.: 1. 2 

f' '> 'hlu^^.J''./' ^'J' ^•'': 3, pen. Latham: 

' ,-• „^"= '^' •^' P"J; -. 5, pul. Hayner: 4 

pul; 7. pen. HiUson: 7. pul '^^"er. 4, 

in. WM'TE PLYMOUTH KOCKS. 

•? V ^L^" .' u^' ^' "' *''^"; '^ 'P«"- Chalker: 
iicii, -., CKl, J, J, 0, pul: 1 ."). Den rir^v- 
|tone Poul. Farm: 1. ?k; ' 1, ' 5 ' h^en "^ 1. puT; 
2 4. 6. pen. Elm Poul. Yds.: 3, henT 5 
pul. Landens: 4. hen; 3, 4 ckl. Dow: 6 
ckl. Russell: 4, pul. 

BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 
Poley: 1. ck; 1, -, hen; 2, 5, pul; 1 3 

o^'^r- ^,^^= 5' J^«": 4, ckl; 2, pen. Marsh: 

2. ck. Corey: 5, ck. Armer: 4, hen- 4 
pen. Goetz: 3. hen. Harter: 1 ckl-' 1 
pul. Mmard: 3, ckl. Englewood: 2 'ckl 

^'"n'SIf^ .^' ^■^'- -^'^"^^^ *• P"'- WaddeH: 
o, pul. Morgan: o, pen 

PARTRIDGE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

..uf^ """"v^' Farms: 1, 2. ck ; 1, 3, hen; 1. 2. 
okl; 1 3 pul; 1, 2, pen. lonis: 3. ck ; 2 
hen; 4, ckl; 4, pul; 3. pen. Ehle & Green- 
haigh: 4. ck; 3, ckl; 2, pul 
.SIL\TQR PENCILED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 
Halsey: 4, ck; 3. 5, hen; 4. ckl; 4, pul; 

3. o pen. Rock Hill Poul. Farm: 1 " 
^k; 1. 2, hen; 1, 2. ckl; 1. 2, pul; 1, 2. pen! 
Bowers: 5. ck; 3, ckl. Van Brunt: 3, ck - 
Rhi^ i Hillcrcst Farms; 4. hen; 4. pen'. 

^S,-,^.^^^^"^^^^*^: i^. ckl; 3, pul 

COLUMBIAN PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

l'i.^^ ^- r.^/'^'^r^ll Farms: 2. ck; 4.h;n; 2 
oKl. 3. pul; 1. 3, pen. Otte: 1, ck. An- 
drews: 1, 2. hen; 2. pul. Sites: 3 hen 1 
pul. Bean: 3. ckl. Allen: 1. ckl; 4. pul' ' 
WHITE VVYANDOTTES. ' 
Fell: 1 ck; 1, hen; 6, ckl; 3, pul. Hav- 
meyer: 2 ck; 2, 4, hen; 3, ckl! 1. pul? 2 
■». pen. Rockandotte Farm; 4. 5 ckl- r, 

f^^riuf: "i^^- ?'''^," ^^'''"«= 3,' ck; 3-. 6 hen;' 
4. ckl; 2. pul; 1, 4. pen. Hollis: i;. rk 
Jack.son: 2 ckl. Rock Hill Poul. Farm: I 
Ckl; 4 pul; 6, pen. West Mountain Poul." 
Yds.: 5, pul; 3 pen. Wagenblatt: U. pul. 
BUFF WYANDOTTES. 

4 nu- 9 h ^v!"- H^^l^s: 2, ck. Howland: 

iui ' o*^^"- Etl^ar: 2, 4, ckl. Hewke: 1. 
ckl .3. pen. Pensy] : r,. ckl. Howell: :'., 
4. pul, 1. pen. Smithers & ('o. : 2. pul 
Bell: 5. pul; 2. pen. (JrifTiths: 4 pen 
GOLDEN WYANDOTTES. 
van Sire: 5, ck. Brundage: 1. 2. 3 4 
ok; 1 2. 3. 4. hen; 1. 4. 5, ckl; 1. 2 4 I' 
pul; 1. pen. Simmons Bros.: 2 ckl- 3 nul" 
Mmturn & Son: 3, ckl • «^ki. .,, pui. 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES. 

Doll: 1. ck. Oak Lawn Farm: 2, 4. 5. ck : 
1. ;. 4. hen; 2, 4 5. ckl; 3. 4. 5, pul. Colvln: 
j, ck, 1. pen. Van Sire: 5. hen. Siegfried; 
i\ nen; 1, ckl. Fernwood Farm: 3, ckl. 
Morris: 1. 2. pul. Van Alstvne: 2. 3 pen 
Reepmeyer, Jr. : 4 pen ' . , ^ . 

r, «. I'ARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES. 

o °,?"'r.^\ ^^' 1- ^e": •^- ckl. .Johnson: 
v' ?^\ ^0^^^^= ''• ^'^^ ^' hen. Bird Bros.; 
■{. 4, ck; 2. 3, 4, hen; 1. 4. 5. ckl; 2. 3 4 .". 
P"'^j Rogers & Packard: 2. ckl. Clinton: 

SILVER PENCILED WYANDOTTES 

Wasson: 1. ck : 1, hen. Smith & Son'- " 
ck. Shea: 5, ck ; 4, hen. Warner: 4 ck- 
n. hen Oyster: 3, ck; 2. ckl. Woodruff! 
-. 3, hen; 1, ckl; 2, pul. Fuller: 3, ckl 
1, pul. 

COLl.MBIAN WYANDOTTKS. 

Orr: 1. ck; 1, 4. ckl; 3. pen. Porter: 
3. 5, ck. Keating: 2, 4. ck ; 2, hen: 2 3 
ckl; 2, pen. Sunnybrook Farm: 3, 4. hen ' 
3, pul; 1. pen. Campbell: 5, hen. Andruss: 
• ,hen. Coles: 5, ckl; 4, pul. Miller: 2. 
pul. Alden: 5. pul. Tannenbaum Farms: 
J. pul. Van Alstyne: 5. pen. Hilllunst 
Farm: 4, pen. 

CUCKOO WYANDOTTES. 

Wilhelmina J'oui. Farm: 1 pen 
BLACK WYANDOTTES. 

Brown: 3. ck; 1, hen; .5, ckl. Sites: 2 
ck; 3. 4. hen: 4. ckl; \, 2, pul. Grev.stone 
Poul. Farm: 2. ckl. Weed: 1, 3, ck. 
BUCKEYES. 
All to Robertson. 

S. C. BUFF ORPINGTONS. 
Cook & Sons: 5, ck. Owen Farms: 2. ck : 
2, hen; 3, ckl; ?>, pul; 4. pen. Ingle'sand 
Foul. Yds.: 4, ck. Clark: 6, ck; 3. hen; 

1, ckl. Hooker: 1. 3. ck; 6. hen; 2. ckl; 

2, 3, pen. Sunswick Poul. Farm: 1. 4. 5 
hen. Walker: .'>, ckl. Richardson: 4 ckl 
Besson: fi, ckl. Dunrobln Farm: 1 ' pul 



POULTRY FANCIER* 



Howie: L pul. Hellyer: 3, pul. KiiigstoJi. 
.n. : 2. pul. Elm Poul. Yds.: G, pen. Craig 
A: Mapes: 5. pen. 

R. C. BUFF ORPINCiTONS. 

Wm. Cook & Sons: 3, ck ; 3, hen; L ckl; 
4, pul; 1, pen. Owen Farms: 2, ck. Roe- 
eker: 1, ck ; 1. hen; ;{. ckl; 3, pul. Lance: 
-, 4, hen; 2, 4. ckl. Williams; 1. 2, pul. 
S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. 

Foxhurst Farm: 1, 6, ck; 3, hen; 2, 3. (J, 
ckl; 1. pen. Sunswick Poul. Farm: 3 ck • 
y, ckl; 4, pul; 4, pen. Knapp: 2, ck; 2, 
hen. Mountain View Farm: 4, ck; 4. hen; 
1, pul. Craig & Mapes: 5. ck; 6. hen; 2. 
pen. Cook & Sons: 5, hen; 1, ckl; 2, pul; 
.i, b, pen. Black Diamond Orp. Farm: 1, 
hen; 4, ckl; 5, pul. Prescott: 3, pul. Howie- 
b, pul. Elm Poul. Yds.; 5. pen. 

R. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. 

All to Cook & Sons. 

8. C. WHITE ORI»INGTONS. 

Kellerstrass; I, 4, 5, ckT 4. 6, hen; 2. 3. 
t;kl: 1, 3, pul; 2, 4, pen. Sunswick: 3, ck; 
4. ckl. Owen Farms: 1, 2, ck; 1, 2, hen; 
1. o, ckl. Elm Poul. Yds.: 5 hen; 6 pen 
Jackson: 3, hen; 2, pul. Cook & Sons: 4, 
pul; 3, u, pen. Foxhurst Farm; 6, pul 
Wall: o, pul. Harries; 1. pen 

R. C. WHITE ORPINGTONS. 

All to Couk & Sons 

SPANGLED ORPIN(;tONS. 

Cook & Sons; 1, pen 

DIAJVIOND JUBILEE ORPINGTONS. 

Cook & Sons: I, ck; 1. hen; 2, ckl; 2, pul; 
1. pon. Prescott; 2. 3. hen. Elm Poul. 
Ids.; 4. hen. Webster; 1 ckl 

S. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

lompkins: 1, 5, ck; 1, 2, 4. hen; 1. ckl; 
.5, 4. pul; 1, pen. Read: 2, ck; 5, hen; 2. 
ckl; J, pen. Gardner: 3, ck; 1. 5, pul. Pure 
^tram Farms: 4. ck. Terwilleger: 3 hen 
Rankin: 4, ckl; 2, pul; 3. pen. Lee Smith: 
i. ckl. Rose: 5, ckl. Arthur: 4. pen. 
Hazleton: .j, pen. 

R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 
_ Kaufmann A: Windham: 1, 3, ck; 4, puT 
•>, pen. Oak Nest Farm; :!. ck. Smith- ' 
<k; 4. hen; .-,. pul. Pure Strain Farms:" 4'. 
• •k. Skylands; .■.. hen. B^an: 3, hen- 1 " 



j;^2:*fcf5^5»w««,M«f-fta»flw».-vin 



January. '10 




3, ckl; 1, pul; 2 ,3, pen. Bogert: 2, hen. 
Red Feather Farm: 1, ckl; 4. pen. Strong: 
5, ckl. Anderson: 4, ckl; 2, pul; 1, pen. 
Hazleton: 3, pul. 

LIGHT BRAHMAS. 
Balch & Brown: 1, 2, 3. ck; 4, 5, hen; 

3, 4, 5, ckl; 1, 2, 3, 4. pul; 1, 2, pen. Klee 
Bros.; 4, 5, ck; 2. hen. River Home Poul. 
Yds.: 1, 3. hen; 2 ,ckl; 5, pul; 3, pen. F. 
Smith: 1, ckl. 

DARK BRAHMAS. 
Leach: 4, ck; 5. ckl. Lott: 5, ck; 3, hen; 

4. pul. Adams: 3, ck; 1, 2, hen; 1, 3, 
cki; 1, 2, pul; 1, pen. Arnol: 1. 2, ck; 
u, hen; 2, 4. ckl; 3, 5, pul. Minturn & 
Son: 4, hen. 

BUFF COCHINS. 
Curry: 3, 5, ck ; 3, hen; 2, 5, ckl; 3, 5, 
pul; 1. pen. Holmhurst Poul. Yds.: 4 ck- 
4, hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul. Ball: 2. ck; 2, ' hen! 
Case: 1, ck; 1, 5, hen; 4, ckl; 2, pul; 2. 
pen. North: 3, ckl; 4, pul. 

PARTRIDGE COCHINS. 
Mitchell: 1. ck; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul- 1 
pen. Rose: 2, ckl. 

WHITE COCHINS. 
Anderson: 2, ck; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 2, pul; 1 
pen. Rose: 1, ck ; 2. hen; 2, ckl; 1, pul. ' 
BLACK LANGSHANS. 

T,,^*^,!; ^' ?^= ,"*• ^' ^^^'' 1' ^' ckl; 1, 2, pul. 
Bloshke: 4, ck. Freeburn: 2, ck ; 3, hen • 

2, ckl. Elm Poul. Yds.: 3. ckl; 2 ,hen; 2, 
pen. Rose Court Poul. Yds.: 1, hen- l 
pen. Urban: 5, ckl; 3, 4, pul. Payne': 4^ 
ckl; WMnkler: 5, pul. 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 

Myers: 4, ck. Brinkerhoff: 3, ck. Grove 
Hill Poul. Yds.: 1, 2, ck; 5, hen; L 3, 
ckl; 1, pen. Hubbard: 3, hen; 2, 5, pul 
Moyer: 1, hen. Hearsfield: 4, hen; 3 pen 
Pritchlynn: 2. hen; 1, 3, pul; 2, pen. Braine! 
%' ckl. Bowers: 4, ckl. Miers: .5, ckl 
Cook, Jr.: 4, 6, pul. Astoria Poul. Yds • 
;>, pen. Puder: 4, pen 

R. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 

The Gale Poul. Place; 1, ck; L 3. 5, hen; 

3, Ckl; 3, pul; 1, pen. Inches: 2. 4. ck- 

4, pul. Crawford: 3. ck; 2. ckl; 2, 5, pul' 
2, pen. Lamsoii; .-,. ek, Oakley; 2, hen; 



SINGLE COMB BRO WN LEGHORNS ^°" ^^^^'^y p"^^ *" '^^'^ <^'^^ 

on ^.^ QQ K ou 11 w ^^ Kenosha, Dec. 1909, .scoring 

90 to 93 by bhellabarger. I have Cockerels of the same high quality for sale. Prices right and 
satisfaction guaranteed. ^ *°° 

J- H. RYAN, KenosHa, \¥is. 



WHITE WYA NDOTTES. ^ ^'" oflfenng at bargain prices Males 

. , „ , ^ r- . — ■— — — — ii^-B. and Females of excellent quality both 

old and young Can furn..h score cards with many of th.m. I guarantee satisfaction in e«ry 



sale. Write me. 



ELIZABETH DVPQNS, KenosHa, Wis. 



PETERSON'S HOUDANS 

Rev. C. E. Petersen, President American Houdan Club VM) to 1907 i-oi>iage oi cents 

■ . ' ^•^' oridgton, Maine 



The Undefeated Champion 
Strain of America. 



R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. ^^ ^^"^^ ^^^^ *^^'" *^ t^*^ ^ig Missouri 

iJL state Show, St. I^ouis, Dec, 1909. 1st, 2d 

;M Pen in a class of 148 R. C. Rhode Island Reds. 

Cup for best Male and Female, special for 



Pullet; Ist. 3d Cockerel; 2d, 5th Hen; 4th, r)th Cock 
Also R. I. Red (State Cup) the fourth year in succession 
best Cockerel. Some good stock to spare yet. 



CLASS »^« C> K, L REDS 

strong competition Exhibition cockerels for sale. Kggs in season 
MOTTO.^^^' "SATISFACTION GU ARTANTEED ^ OR YOUR 

FRANK CHALUPA. 



VIRCIL BLAKEMORE. Fayette. Mo. 



My wnnnuK.^ i^» itiu.».t.e .... loiiow.-,: i ..^^ ,. ..... 

Iowa Nov. 17-20. 1st cockerel, l.st and 3rd pullet 

and 1st pen. Richland. Iowa, Dec. 14-17 l«!t and 

2nd cockerel 2nd, 3rd. 4th and pullet 1st pen in 

Eggs in season. Score cards bv Ru.ssell and 

MONEY BACK," IS MY 

PLEASANT PLAIN, IOWA 



ROSE COMB RHODF f^^^^l^^l^'oi youngsters iors^l^, bred. 
*^^^'^*-' V^V^ITIU 1X1 IVfJ^lJ from the best winning and laying strain 

in America. They are red to the quill and possess the 
length of body and symmetry of form so desirable in a typi- 
cal Red. We solicit your orders and guarantee satisfaction 
LUMBERTON POULTRY CO. JAY B. DEUTSCH, Mgr.. ANTIGO. 



ISLAND REDS 



C. F. LIVINGSTONE, 



WIS 



SINGLE COMB BROWN LEG- 
HORN SPECIALIST 

Only a few of the.se fine pullet line bred breeders left at $1 60 and tl 75 each Next r»t, tum 
hst some choice exhibition cockerel-bred cockerels for the show season The kind that make them 
selves heard wherever shown. Write for prices. ^^^a"". t- nc itma mat make them- 



C. F. LIVINGSTONE, 



Member American S. C. Brown I^eghorn Club 



CARPENTERSVILLE. ILL. 



for sale. Young.slers from pen headed 
by winner of A. P. A Sweepstake 
Medal at Minneapolis, January, 1909. 



BUFF WYANDOTTES 

c I I rA-. 1 . . ivjruai ai ivimneapous, lanuarv. iy(W 

Females in f«„ :Kor«i 92 and betlcr. 1 won at LaCros»e, December, 1908, Tucker, ludse 1.1 cockerel' 
Ist pullet. 2d pen. Al«, Am. BufI Wyandotte Club Ribbon, m North Freedom. W , ,T„ IW My 
vcjung .tock ,. «,ll better ,h.. year and wU win m the hottest classes. 11 you wakt wir;ner,. Zt me'^ 
w. a. HAKt, . , . , ELROY-WIS 



#]• 



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w 



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# 



• 



•^,J 



-^ January. '10 



;inrj;/,i.:d-'.;'<'«;.'w^^'-».yvTpr 




1. ckl. Llddell & Son: 4, hen; 4, 5, ckl. 
Tabor: 1, pul. 

8. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 

Young: 1. 2 4. 5, ck; 1. 5 hen; 1, 2. 3. 4. 
6 ckl; 4, pul; 2. pen. Whiting Farms: 3, 
ck; 2, 3, hen. Elm Poul. Yds: 4. hen; 5, 



SINGLE COMB BROWN 
LEGHORNS exclusively 

^ ^ Bred for size, to lay, 

to win. One and two-year-old males and fe- 
males for sale cheap. Some of my high 

scorers. 

IRA FORD. LA GRANGE. INDIANA 



S. C. Brown Leghorns, S. C. 

Rlarlc Minnrrac ^'^^y exhibition and 
DldCK minorcaS breeding cockerels for 
sale. Bred from high scoring, prize winning 
stock. Also yearling stock both male and 
female. My birds score to 95 and win the 
blue wherever shown. 
G. A. GAGE, LA GRANGE. IND. 



I still have a few fine yearling BARRED 
ROCK breeders to sell and 200 of the best 
chicks I ever owned. Order now and get 
your pick. Prices right. 

E. F. PEIRCE 
RTE. 1. PORT CLINTON. OHIO 

Breeder of Prize Winning Barred Rocks 



Single Comb Brown S^if^^ia^?!^^ 

I Pahnf n« CHAMPIONS «bow8 in 20 years 
LegnOrnS ^f^^,^ yve.t Kecord unequall- 
ed. Klght color 
and size with yellow lejjs. I have a few breeding 
hens to spare, good ones. Will let them go at 
•1.50 each to make room for my young stock. 
Circular free. 
C. F. and J. Lansr, Ta CroKHe, 'Win. 



Thousands of People in the South 

Are looking for Good Stock and Eggs 

The Southern Poultry Magazine 

OF NASHVILLE, TENN. 

Reaches the cream of the Southern Trade. 
Subscription 50c per year. Send for adver- 
tising lates. 



SMITHES 
WHITE 
ROCKS 



We win wherever we 
show, including Madi- 
son Square, New York 
1908-09. Why not 
place your order where 
you know you can and 
will get the best. Write 
me for mating list and 
■""""■■"■""■■^ photos of male birds 
heading my breeding p>ens. I want to build 
up a big business with Poultry Fancier read- 
ers and I'll give you the very highest quality 
at most reasonable prices. 

CHAS. L. SMITH 
RTE. 58; NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



WATCHEMOKET 
POULTRY YARDS 



Argonatits : 
Phoenix Fowls 



SEASON OF 1909. 
EGGS FOR HATCHING 

: $5.00 per dozen 
: 3 00 per dozen 

Only a strictly limited number of eggs will 
be sold. The Argonaut is a pea combed bird, 
buff colored, yellow shanked, general piir- 
pose fowl. The Phoenix is the unique long- 
tailed breed produced by the "Yankees of 
the Orient", the wonderful little Japanese. 
Cash in advance with all orders. 

H. S. BABCOCK 
77 Summit St., - E*«t Providence, R. I. 



POULTRY FANCIER- 



pen. Pine Top Poul. Farm: 5. ckl; 5. 6, pul; 
1, pen. Oakland Poul. Yds: 3, pul. Rock 
Hill Poul. Farm: 2, pul; 4, 6, pen. Blake: 
1, pul. Rice: 3. pen. 

R. C. WHITK LEGHORNS. 

Burch: 2, ck; 3, ckl; 3, pul; 2. pen. 
Black & White Poul. Farm: 1, ck; 1, 2, 
hen; 1, 2, ckl; 1, 2, pul; 1, pen. Decker: 
4, ckl. 

8. C. BUFF LEGHORNS. 

Knapp: 2. 4. ck; 1. 3, hen; 1, 3, ckl; 4, 
pul. Royal Farms: 5, ck; 5, pul; 3, pen. 
Benerlein: 3, ck ; 3, pul. Cox: 1, ck; 5, 
pen. Hell: 4. hen; 1, pul. Cornish: 2, 
hen. Roberts: 5, hen; 2, pen. Monmouth 
Poul. Farms: ,5. ckl; 2. pul; 1, pen, Cre- 
voi.serat: 4, ckl. Campbell: 2, ckl. Meri- 
hew: 4, pen. 

R. C. BUFF I^GHORNS. 

Almendinger: 1. ck ; 2, ckl. Flsk ; 1, hen; 
1, ckl; 1, pul. Crosby: 3, ckl. 

S. C. BLACK LEGHORNS. 
All to Black & White Poul. Farm. 

ANCONAS. 
Sheppard: 1, 2, 4, ck; 1, 2, hen; 1, 3, 4, 
ckl; 2, 3, 4, pul; 1, pen. Mains: 3, ck; 

3, 5, hen; 2, 5, ckl; 1, 5, pul. Ellison: 

4, hen. 

S. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 
Story: 5, ck. Smith: 1, ck; 3, 5, hen; 3, 
ckl. Stevens: 4, ck. Hilldorfer; 3, ck; 2, 
ckl; 5, pul; 1, pen. Dunne; 2, ck; 1, hen; 

1, 4, pul. Wilson: 4, hen. Armstrong: 

2, hen. Greenberry Farms: 4, ckl 2, pen. 
Top Notch Farms: 5, ckl; 2, pul; 4, pen. 
Greener: 1, ckl. Harrington: 3, pul. Schoff 
Farms: 5, pen. Thethaway: 3, pen. 

R. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 
Collins & Son: 5 ck; 1, hen. Grover: 2, 
ck; 2, pul. Story: 4, ck. Samuels: 1, ck; 

3, hen; 3, ckl; 1, 4, pul. Mountjoy: 3, ck. 
Clark: 4, 5. hen; 5, ckl; 5, pul; 1, pen. 
Bent: 2, hen; 2, pen. McKittrick: 1, 2, 

4, ckl. 

S. C. WHITE MINORCAS. 
Raschke: 2, ck; 2, hen; 3, ckl; 3, pul. 
Teetz: 1. 3. ck; 1, 3. hen; 1, 2, ckl; 1, 2, 
pul. Wingerd: 4, hen. 

R. C. WHITE MINORCAS. 
All to Adair. 

BUFF MINORCAS. 
All to Luce & Hill. 

BLUE AND.4LUSIANS. 
Banner Poul. Yd.s. : 3, 4, ck; 1, ;?. hen; 

5, ckl; 4, h, pul; 2, pen. Llangollen Farm: 

1, 2, ck; 4, 5, hen; 1, 4, ckl: 1. 2, pul; 1, 
pen. Alter: 2, ck. Councill: 3, ckl; 3, pul. 

BLACK SPANISH. 
All to Kennedy. 

WHITE CRESTED BL.\CK POLISH. 
Rose Court Poul. Yds.: 2, ck; 3, hen; 2, 
ckl; 2. pul; 1, pen. Mayer: 1. ck ; 1, 2, 
hen; 1, ckl; 2, pul. 

GOLDEN POLISH. 
All to Rose Court Poul. Yds. 

SILVER POLISH. 
Shriever: 1, ck; 1, hen; 2. ckl: 1. pul; 1. 
pen Rose Court Poul. Yds.: 1, ckl. 

GOLDEN BEARDED POLISH. 
All to Schriever. 

BUFF LACED POLISH. 
All to T^langollen Farm. 
HOUDANS. 
Beresford: 1. 4, 5, ck; 1, 2. 4. hen; 1. 3. 
5, ckl; 1, 2. 3, 4, pul; 1, pen. Crosby: 3. 
ck. Springmann: 2, ck. Rose Court Poul. 
Yds.: 5, hen; 4. ckl. Llangollen Farm: 3, 
hen; 5. pul; 2, pen. Ballard: 2. ckl. Schoff 
Farms: .'>. pen. Arnold: 4. pen. Shove: 
3. pen. 

LA FLECHE. 
All to Elm Poul. Yds. 

SALMON FAVEROI.LES. 
Xeck: 1. 2. ck; 2. 3. hen; 1. 2. pul. Han- 
na: 1, 4. hen; 1, pen. Annandale Farm: 

2, pen. 

LAKENVELDERS. 
Rose Court Poul. Yds.: 2. 5. ck ; 2. hen. 
Green: 1. 3. r,. ck; 1. 3. 4, hen; L 2, 3. 
ckl: 1, 2. 3, pul; 1. pen. Cobb: 4, ckl; 

''" ■ AMERICAN DOMINIQUES. 

Skerritt & Son: 2. 3. 4. ck; 2. 3. hen; 4. 
r. ckl; 1. n. pul. Davenport: 1. ck : 1, hen: 
1.' 3, ckl: 2. 4. pul; 1, pen. Carter: 2, ckl: 

3^ pul. 

WHITK DOKKINGS. 

All to Hales. 

SILVER GREY DOKKINGS. 

Jacobus: 3. 4. ck; 1, 3, r,. hen; 2. 4. ckl: 
3 4. f). pul: L pen. Westfall; L 2. ck ; 
2'. 4. hen; 1. ckl: 1. pul. Hales 5, ck ; 

3, ekl: 2. pul. 

GOLDEN SPAN(iLED HAMBURGS. 
All to Oke .St Murray. 

SILVER SPANGLED HAMBl KGS. 
I^aine: 1, ck ; 1, hen; 1. ckl; 1, pul. Oke 
1^' Murrav: 2. ck; 2. hen: 2. ckl; 3. pul. 
Rlvervlew Poul. Yds.: 3. hen; 3. ckl. Llang- 
ollen Farm: 2. pul. 

GOLDEN PENCILED HAMBURGS. 
Oke <fe Murray: 1. ck : 1. hen: 1, ckl; 1, 
l)Ul. .Tarobus: 2, hen. Rose Court Poul. 
Yds.: 3. hen. 

8IL\T5R PENCILED HAMBURGS. 
All to Oke & Murray. 

BLACK HAMBURGS. 
All to Oke & Murray. 

EXHIBITION GAMES. 
Morrow: 2, ck ; 4. hen. Bennett: 1. ck; 2. 
hen. Hubley Schall: 3 5, hen; 4, ckl; 4, pul. 
Mudge & Son: 1. hen; 2. ckl. Tllley: 5. 
ckl; 3. pul. GIfford: 1, ckl; 1. pul. Frost: 
3. ckl; 2. pul. 




INDIAN GAMES. 

Schaff Farms: 5, ck; 5, hen; 5, pul; 3, 
pen. Huey: 2, ck; 3, hen. Hearsfield: 4, 
ck; 4, ckl; 3, pul. Templeton: 1. 3, ck; 

1, 2. hen; 1, 2, ckl; 1, 2. pul. Bird: 4, 
hen. Wampler: 3, ckl. Miller: 5, ckl; 4, 
pul. Reider: 2, pen. Carpenter: 1, pen. 

WHITE INDIAN GAMES. 
Rosemary Farm: 3, 4, 5, ck; 1, 3, hen; 

4, 5, ckl; 1, 2, pul; 1, pen. Megargee: 1, 

2, ck; 2, 4, hen; 1, 2, ckl; 3, 4, pul. Mil- 
ler: 3, ckl; 5, pul. 

BI^CK OR BROWN RED PIT GAMES. 

Schambacher: 1, ck; 2, hen. Wodell: 3, 
ck; 4, ckl; 1, pen. Coplin: 2, ck. Freling- 
huysen: 4, ck; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 3, pul. Beat- 
tie; 5, ck. Top Notch Farms; 3, hen; 1, 2, 
pul. Memann: 4, hen. Nathans: 2, ckl. 
Green: 5, ckl. 

SILV*:R or GOLDEN DUCKWING PIT 

GAMES. 

Blackstone: 4, ck. Dumars, Cokefair & 
Churchill; 1, ck; 2, hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul. 
Green: 2, ck; 1, hen. Hubbard: 3, ck. 
ANY OTHER COLOR PIT GAMES. 

Deming: 4. ck Dumars, Cokefair & 

Churchill: 2, ck ; 2, hen; 2, 4. ckl. Beattie: 
1, 5, ck; 2, pen. Hubbard: 3, ck. Bennett: 

1. hen. Nathans: 5, hen. Chaffee: 3, hen; 

5, pul. Memann: 4, hen. Top Notch Farms: 
5. ckl. Frelinghuysen: 1, ckl. Buck: 3, 
ckl. Morgan: 1, pul; 1, pen. Mt. Pleasant 
Farms: 2, 3, pul. Green: 4, pul. Hallock: 
4, pen. Dodds: 5, pen. Roach: 3 pen. 

SILVER CAMPINES. 
All to- Jacobus. 

ANY OTHER VARIETY POULTRY. 

Howell: 1, 2, ck ; 1, 2, hen; 1, 2, ckl; 1, 2, 

pul. Wilhelmina Poul. Farm: 3. ck; 4, hen; 

?), ckl; 5. pul. Rose Court Poul. Yds.: 3, 

hen. Adams; .5, hen; 4, ckl; 3, pul. Lovett : 

3, ckl; 4, pul. 

BLACK BREASTED RED GAME BAN- 
TAMS. 
Fllkin: 1, 4, ck; 5, ckl. Congdon; 5, ck ; 

3, hen. Havemeyer Bros.: 2, ck; 1, 2. hen; 

2. 3, 4, ckl; 2, 3, 4, pul; 1, pen. Fincke 
& Thornton: 3, ck. ; 4, hen; 5, pul. 
Schwenker: 5. hen. Wild Goose Farm; 1, 
ckl. Kienzle; 1, pul. 

BROWN RED GAME BANTAMS. 
Kohle: 1, ck; 4. .^. ckl; 3. pul. Congdon: 

4, ck; 4, hen. Havemeyer Bros.: 3, ck; 2, 
hen; 1, ckl; 1, 2, pul. Fincke & Thornton: 
2 ck; 1. hen; 2, ckl: 4, pul. Schwenker; 
5'. hen; 3, ckl; 5, pul. Wild Goose Farm: 

GOLDEN DUCKWING GAME BANTAMS. 

Wild Goose Farm: 2. ck ; 1, hen; 4, ckl; 

5, pul. Congdon: 3, ck; 4, hen; 2, ckl; 2, 
pul, Havemeyer Bros.: 1, ck; 2, 3, hen; 3, 

4, pul. Kienzle: 1, ckl; 1. pul. Schwen- 

Ic P T* * '? C It 1 

SILVER bl CKWING GAME BANTAMS. 

All to Havemeyer Bros. .^,^.„^ 
RED PYLE GAME BANTAMS. 

Schwenker: 1, ck; 3. hen. Havemeyer 
Bros.: 3, ck; 4. hen; 1. 2. 3. 4. ckl; 1, 2, 4, 
pul- 1. pen. Fincke & Thornton: 2. ck; 5, 
hen- 5. ckl; 5. pul. Wild Goose Farm: 1. 
hen; 3, pul. Filkin: 2, ben. 

BIRCHEN GAMES. 

Schwenker: 4, ck; 4. hen. Congdon: 2. 
ck- 5 pul. Havemeyer Bros.: 1. ck; 2. hen; 
1 cki; 2. pul; 1. pen. Fincke & Thornton: 
.3 ck; 3. hen; 4. ckl; 3. pul. Wild Goose 
Farm: r.. hen. Kahle: 1. hen; 4. pul. 
Stowe: 3, ckl: 1. pul. Cook: 2. ckl. 
WHITE GAME BANTAMS. 

Havemeyer Bros.: 1, 2. ck: }-^^l'^^l^' 
1. 2. 3, ckl; 1. 2. 3. pul; 1. pen. Wild Goose 

'^'''^"' WHEATON GAME BANTAMS. 

All to Klckler. 

SILKIES. 

Ro«e: 1. ck: 4. hen; 3. 5. ckl; 2. pul. 
Peapack Farm: 2. 3. ck ; 1. 2, hen; 1. 2, 
ckl- 1 3, pul. Llangollen Farm: 4. 5. ck . 
", '1 lien: .'> pul. Tullock: 4. ckl: 4. pul. 
GOLDEN SE ABRIGHT BANTAMS. 

Duval: 1. 3. ck; 1. 2. hen: 1. 2. 4 ckl; 
1 4 T), pul. Rose Court Poul. Yds.: 4. ck. 
Oke'& Murray: 2. ck ; 3. hen: 3. pul. Hun- 
gerford: .'.. hen; 1, ckl. Eddy & Young: 
4 hen. Rose: 3. ckl: 2. pul, 

SILVER SEABRIGHT BANTAMS. 

Demmv Bros.: 2. ck : 5. hen; 2, ckl; 4. 
t)ul. Hungerford: 3. ckl: 2. r>. pul. Foulke: 
4 ck; 2. 3. hen. Oke & Murray; 1. ck; 1, 
ben- 4. ckl; 1 pul. Manls: 4, hen. Duval: 

3. ckl. Rose Court Poul Yds.: 1 ckl. Rose: 

5, ckl; 3. pul. 

R. C. BLACK BANTAMS. 
Tilley: 1. 2, ck : 1. 4. ben; 1. ckl: 1. 2. 
3. pul:" 1. pen. Wieners: .'>. ck ; 3. hen: 4. 
pul. Oke & Murray: 4, ck ; 5. hen: 5. ckl. 
Grove Hill Poul. Yds.: 3. ck. Wild Goose 
Farm: 2. hen; 1. 3, ckl; 5. pul. Carrlck: 

R. C. WHITE BANTAMS. 

Wild Goose Farm: 1. 3, ck ; 2, 3. hen; 2. 3. 
pul. Oke .S: Murray: 2. ck: 1. hen; 1. ckl; 
1. pul. Eddv * Young: 4. ben: 4. pul. 
ANY VARIETY BOOTED BANTAMS. 
All to Oke <Sr Murray. 

BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Collins & Son: 1, 2. ck ; 2, 3. hen; .""i, ckl. 
Schilling: 3. 4. ck ; 1, 4. hen: 1, 2. ckl; 1. 2. 
pul; 1, pen. Faust: fj, ck. Rock Hill Poul. 
Farm: 5. hen; 3, ckl; 2. pen. Megargee & 
Co.: 4. ckl; 3, 5, pul. Homeyer: 4. pul; 3. 
pen, 

WHITK COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Jessel: 2, hen. Megargee: 1, 4. hen; 1, 



r 



■■'-,i,-^y--s- .•^>.<r-".'-.-ryTx;-- 



AMATITE ROOFING 

MINERAL SURFACED NEEDS NO PAINTING 
rk 4 •*.«.——_?*"** ^°'^ ^'■*« •ample. 

BARRETT M'FG CO., 2?,Tc a'g'o 




GfoWttBone Gutter 



Hcus ft'd cut gret'n l»one lay I 
. more eitjis. G<t u Crown Boue 
Outter. Si-nd to-dav for catalogue. 
nilson liroD., Box H22, Easton, Pa. 



BEST AVADC 

Lowest 
in Price 



WHITK ANO SILVKK LACEIJ WYAN- 
DOTTE COCKERELS. HOUDAN COCK- 
EllELS. Bred from noted strains. Satlfactlon 
guaranteed. Get prices. 

B. H. BACON, R. F. D., Elroy, Wis. 



Partridge Plymouth Rocks, Trios, 
Pens, single Birds 

Prices right. O. L. PROUTY 

Box 115, New Lothrop, Mich 



W. THEO. WITTMAN 

ALLENTOWN, PA. 

General Judge all varieties Poultry. Careful 
and straightforwardly honest work in the show 
room. 30 years a poultryman. 



Donaghey's S. C. Reds S^^^^'r^Z^rtf 

hrst prizes, silver cups and other specials at Wis- 
consin's best shows I can start you right or im- 
prove your flock. Stock and eggs in season Free 
catalog J. T. Oonanhftv. Box 1 1 7. North Freedom. Wis. 



S. C BROWIN 
LEGHORNS 



Choice cockerels 
for sale. Bred in line 
for several years. Cock- 
erel bred females to spare 
Excellent layers Prices reasonable. 
H. E MAROlTAPnT. WAUSMJ. WIS. 



PRI7F WINNING BARRED PLY- 

MOUTH ROCKS ts^i^£:^::,^ 

young stock. 

HARRY W. PRICE, RTE 2, LA GRANGE IND. 



Barred Rocks ZTT'^T' 

tries, L>rooks- 
ton, Minn., Dec. 1909, 1st and 2nd hen, 4th 
ann 5th pullet, Book egg orders now. $3 
per I 3. Booklet free. 

A. S. WEBB SANDSTONE, MINN. 







you want to be a good pen- 
man, learn by correspondence. 
Write for free booklet. 
Luther System of Penmanship 
33 RIsiey Ave Morton Park . ill. 



;?^f> 



CAPON 
rOOL5 



0. p. PULING & SOU CO., 



MAKE MONEY 
WITH CAPONS 

Caponizing is easy and soon 
learned. Capons brine fancy pric- 
es and are alw.iys in demand. 

PILLING ?»SON 

complete with free instructions. 
Sent postpaid for $2. 50. Capon 
Book free. Write to.I.iv 

Arch St,. Philadalphla, Pi. 



f.r: 



THE IMPROVED CHAIVIPION LEO BAND. 



•T APPLIED FOR 



tg \-i--a^---^.-.:..- ^->.>.^-;j-y 



Aluminum or copper, two sizes, ad- 
justable to fit any fowl. Held by 
double lock. They can't lose off. 
Initials 10 cents per hundred extra. 
Also Pigeon Bands. 





THE SUPERIOR 

iB securely locked; can't lose off; six 
sizes. State breed and sex. Price 
postpaid, elthfr kind. No. to suit, 12, 
l.'ic; 25, 20c; 50, 3.5c,; KM), fiOc. One 
sample for stamp. Circular free. 

T. CADWALLADER. Dox 960, Salem, Ohio 



t'kl; 1. 2, pul. Rose Court Poul. Yds.: 1, 
hen. Hungerford: 2, ckl. Reynolds: 1, 2, 
pen. 

BLACK rOC'HIN BANTAMS. 

Collins & Son: :i, ck; 1, hen; 4, pul. Con- 
ner: 1, ok; 1. fkl; 1, pul. Me^arRee & Co.: 

2, ek. Watt: 4, ck; :i, ckl. Fraleigh : ."), ok; 
:i, hen; 2, ckl; 5, pul. Josenhous: 2, ',. hen; 

3, pul. Bowers: 4, hen; 4, ckl; 2, pul. 
Memann: 2, ckl. 

r.^RTRIDOE rO( HIN BANTA.MS. 

-Ml to Mtg^arg^ee. 

LIGHT BKAHM.V BANTAMS. 

Shaw & Mcintosh: 1, 3. ck; 3. 5, hen; 
1. 2, ckl; I, 2, pul. Central Bantam Yd.: 

4, ck. Welch; 2, 5, ck ; 1. 2, 4, hen; 3, 4, 
ckl; 3. 4. pul. Fry: 1. pen. 

DAKK BKAH.>L\ B.ANTA3IS. 

Stockel Bros.: 1, ck ; 1, 2, hen. Wilson: 
3, hen. 

SPECKLKI) SUSSEX. 
Conrad .SL- Bratt: 1, 3, pen. Scoskie: 2, 
]>en. 

WHITE JAPANESE BANT.AMS. 
Alber.s: 1, ck; 1, hen. Oke Xr Murray: 
3, ck; 2. hen; 1. pul. Eddv ^' YounR: 2, c-k. 
BLACK JAPANESE BANTAMS. 
All to Oke <fc Murray. 
BLACK TAILED JAPANESE BANTAMS. 
Tilley: 2, ck ; 4, 5, pul. Otte: 1, ck; 3, 
pul. Oke & Murray; 3, ck : 3. hen; 1, ckl; 
2, pul. Albers: 1, hen; 1, pul. Becker: 

2, hen. 

.ANY OTHER VARIETY JAI'ANESE BAN- 
TAMS. 
Alber.s: 1, ck ; 1, hen; 1, pul. Gould: 3, 
ck. Oke & Murray: 2, ck; 2. hen; 2, i)ul. 
Otte: 1, ckl; 3, pul. 

ANY VARIETY POLISH BANTAMS. 
Rose: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 1. 2. pul. 
Oke & Murray: 2, ck : 2, hen. Rose Court 
Poul Yds.: 3. hen. Schreiver: 2, ckl. 
BRONZE TIRKEYS. 
Kreutter: 4. ck. Kenny: 2, ck; 1, pul. 
liiid Bros.: 1, 3, .'>, ck; 1, 3, ."., hen; 1, 2, 

3. 4, ckl; 2. 4. pul. George: 2, hen. Ken- 
dall & I.,angley: 4, hen; 3, pul. Pullins 
liios. : r>, ckl ; 't, pul. 

BOLRBON REI> Tl RKEYS. 
Sunny Brook Farm: 2, ck ; 2, hen. Dysart 
Bros.: 1, ck; 1, hen. 

WHITE TLRKEYS. 
Kreutter: 2. ck; 1, 2, hen: 1, 3, ckl; 2, 3, 
pul. Royal Farms: 3, ck. Hun^erford: 5, 
ck. Harries: 4, ck; 4. hen. Moss: 1, ck; 
3, hen. Linton: H, hen. Stickles: 2 ckl; 1, 
pul. 

NARAGANSETT T I RKEYS. 
All to Sunnvbrook Faiin. 

SLATE Tl RKEYS. 
Little: 1. ck; 1. hen. Sunn.\- Brook 

I''arm: 2, ck; 2, hen. 

BL.ACK Tl RKEYS. 
Seele.N- <Sr Son; 1, ek; 1, hen. Sunny Bro(d< 
Farm: 2, ck ; 2, hen. 

MALLARD DICKS. 
.\nnandale Farm: 1, jien. Ro^Re: 2, i)en. 

PEKIN Dl < KS. 
Westlook Fai-m: 1. r)ld diake; 1, old 
(luck; 2, youuR drake; 3, young duck; 1, 
l)en. Samuels: 2. old drake; 5, old duck; 

3, young drake; 1, young duck. Evelvn 
Heights Farm: 3, n, old drake; 2, 4. old 
• luck; 1. young drake; 2. young duc-k. Sites: 

4. old drake; 3. old du(k 

ROl EN DKKS. 
Skylands: 3, old drake; 3. old duck; 3, 
young drake; 3. young duck. Schiann: 1, 
4. old drake; 1, 2, old duck; 2, voung 
drake; 4, young duck. Seeley ^^e Son: ."., 
old drake; o. old «luck. Wyleyhurst Farm: 
2. old drake; 4. old duck. Brett: 1. voung 
drake: 2, young duck; 1. pen. .Morris: 4, 
young diake; 1, young duck. Kreutter: 2^ 

I)en. 

MlSiOVEY DICKS. 

-All to Carpenter. 

WHITE (RESTED DICKS. 

Wyleyhurst Farm: 2. drake; 2, du(k. 
Sehreivei-; 1. drake; 1. duek 

SWEDISH Dr( KS. 
.Ml lo Morris. 

AYLESBIRI Dl ( KS. 
Morris: 1. old drake; 1. old duck; 1. 
.voung drake; 1. young duck. Wyleyhurst 
l-'aiiii: 1. old drake. 

INDIAN Rl NNER DICKS. 

Tilley: 4, 5, old drake; 4, .">. old duck; 2, 

.voung drake; 4, .">. young duck; 2, pen. 

Westlook Farm: 3. old drake; 3, old duck. 

Galleher: 2, old drak«>; 2. young duck. Sites; 

1. (dd drake; 1, 2, old duck; 3, 4, voung 
<lrake; 1. :{. young duck; 1. pen. Success 
Farm; ."). young drake: :?. ]>rn. Moiiis- 1 
young drake. 

EAST INDIAN DICKS. 
Morris: 1. old duck; .'■>. young duck. Til- 
ley: 1, 2, 3. 4, i), young drake; 1, 2. 3, 4. 
young duck; 1, pen. 

BIFF ORPIN(iTON DK KS. 
Sturgess: 3, .^), drake; 3. duck. Cook \- 
Son; 4, drake; 4, duck. Dunroliin Farm; 1 
drake; 1. duck; 1. i)en. Morris; 2, drake; 

WHITE CALL DICKS. 

Rake: I, diake. Tillev: 1, pc-n 
(iRAY CALL DICKS. 

Tilley: 1. jxri. 

TOLOisE <;eese. 

Kenny: 4, <dd gandei- 1. 2. old goo.se ; 

2. young gander; 2, young goose; 1, i)en. 
McOraw: .•">, old uander; ,".. old goose King" 

1, old gander; 3. rdd goose. Seelev iVt Son • 

2. 3, old gander; 4, old goo.se; 3, young 
gander; 3. young goo.se; 2, pen. Kc-ndall 



& Langtdey: 1, young gander; 1, young 
goose. Westlook Farm: 3, pen. 
EM B DEN CJEESE. 
Stickles: 2, old gander; 3, young gander. 
King: 3, old gander; 2, old goose; 2, young 
goose. Sites: 1, old gander; 1. old goose; 

2, young gander; 1, young goose. I^ittle: 
1, young gander. 

BROWN CHINESE C;EESE. 
Seeley: 1, gander; 2, goose. McC^Iave: 2, 
gander; 1. goose. 

WHITE C HINESE CiEESE. 

Rake: 2, gander; 4, goose. Masten : 1, 4, 
gander; 1, 2, goose. McClave: 3. gander; 

3, goose. 

AFRICAN CEESE. 
Sunny Brook Farm: 2, gander; 2, goose. 
McClave: 1, gander; 1, goose. 

ANY OTHER VARIETY GEESE. 
Tilley: 2. 3, gander; 1. 2, goose. Westlook 
I'^'arni : 1 , gander. 



Jos. M. Fay, 808 Howard Ave., Altoona, 
Pa., is offering a lot of 700 birds for sale 
at rock bottom prices if taken at once. 
He breeds several varieties of fowls, as 
will be noted b.v referring to his ad in 
tills issue. He guarantees the (luality of 
his stock and says that lie can please 
any one who will jdace their order with 
liim. This is an opportunity for our read- 
ers to get some really good stock at low 
prices. 

•3f ^ 

Tlie attention of Bai'red Plymoutli Rock 
breeders is called to the ad of Earnest 
Wagoner whicli appeals in tlii.s isstie of 
the P'ancier. Mr. Wagoner has bred 
Barred Rocks for a good many years and 
Ills birds have won honors wherever 
sliown. At the Kendallville, Ind.. show, 
iield January 4 to 8, Tuck<^r, judge, in as 
strong a class as was ever shown In 
nortliein Indiana, Mr. Wagoner won 
third, fourth cockerel, second pen. At 
La Grange, Ind., he won tirst cock, first 
hen, second pullet. His ])irds have also 
won tile blue ribl)ons at Butler and Wa- 
terloo. Ind,, in stron.g competition. Cus- 
tomers buying eitlier stock or eggs from 
Mr. Wagoner will not only be treated 
riglit but will receive full vaue for every 
dolliir sent liim. 

We are starting an ad in tliis number 
for Frank Clialupa of Pleasant Plain. 
Iowa. .Judge Dagle writes us tliat he lias 
been at Mr. Chalupa's farm and scored 
some tine cockerels and pullets for him 
ami has also liaiidled his birds in tlie 
show room. He advises us that Mr. Clia- 
lupa lias some tine S. C. R. I. Reds and 
any one wanting stock or eggs will make 
no mistake in placing their order with 
Mr. Clialu|)a. 

Naumburg ^ Booth. 1532 West Bancroft 
St., Toledo. ().. repoi-t the following win- 
nings this season: At Itliaca. Mich., on 
S. VVliite Legliorns, second cock*^rel, third 
cockerel, tirst and third hens, third ]>ul- 
iet. first lien and tie for the higliest scor- 
ing bird in the show. On White Wyan- 
dottes they won first cockerel, third hen 
and third pullet. At Wapakoneta. O., on 
Wliile Wyandottes they won first cock- 
erel, first and second liens, first and sec- 
ond inillets. first pen. At Sylvania, O., 
on White Wyandottes. thev won first 
cockered, first cock, first ' and second 
hens, first, second and third pullets and 
first ])en. Tiiis firm is a leader in their 
two varieties and can please tiieir cus- 
tomers both in <iuality and price. 

Thos. M. Stubbletiidd. Rout- »;, Green- 
field, 111., can supnly our readers witii 
extra choice S. (\ Wliit,. Legliorns. Barred 
Koeks and White Holland turkevs and his 
])rices are reasonable. He also has eggs 
lor hatching and can mak-.^ promjit siiit)- 
ments. At the Fit tslicdd. III., sliovv this 
season on 1<; entries he won eight first 
prizes, fiv seconds and two thirds At 
Greenfield on seven entries he won ftnii- 
first ])i'izes. 

Breeders of Huff Plymouth Rocks who 
are lo(»king for a place to send tlieir or- 
ders tor eggs the coming spring will do 
well to look up the ad of Harrv Sower 
Rome City. Ind.. which ai)pears in this 
is-ue of the Fancier. Mr. Sow*'r is a 
man of honor and will treat his custom- 
er.s right, besides he will give vou full 
value in Ins eggs. His sto(d< is A No 1 
At the great Kendallville. Ind.. show. Jan- 
uary 4 to 8. a show which Judge Tucke'- 
sa.vs was ecjual in (|uality to the largest 
shows. Mr. Sower won f,n his Huff Rocks 
first, second. third and fourth hens' 
fourth cockerel, first and third pullets 
and second iH>n. 



t 9 



i 



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V 



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January. '10 




POULTRY FANClERr 




Answers to Questions 

ReacJers are invited to use this department freely. Write to the 
editor for any information desired. There is no charge for the service 



Question.— Why is not a high scoring 
prize winning bird as good for a breeder 
as its condition indicates? 

Answer.— It may be a chance good 
specimen from poor parents, in which 
case it could not be depended upon to 
reproduce its equal. 

Question. — How can eggs for hatching 
be .safely packed for shipment? 

Answer. — Fse common splint baskets 
such as can be purchased from the grocer 
at about .'J.5 cents per dozen. Line the 
bottom and sides with excelsior about 
an inch thick. Take a small quantitv 
and shap«^ it about like a bird's nest and 
in it, after which close the 
over the egg, making it 
ball Prepare each egg in 
pack them in the basket, 
la.ver of excelsior on top. 



place an egg 
opening well 
round like a 
this manner, 
place a thick 



is against the rules of the American 
Poultry Association. 

Question. — Is the rose comb on the Wy- 
andotte as easy to breed as the single 
comb on the Plymouth Rock? 

Answ^ei\ — There is about the same p<^r- 
centage of good combs found in each 
breed, but in say 50 birds of equal qual- 
ity of each breed selected at random the 
single combs as a lot would approach 
nearer perfection than the rose combs. 

Question. — Is it reasonable to expect 
cockerels and pullets to reach standard 
nine months of age? 
-Only a portion of any flock 
and generally not more than 25 



weight at 

Answer 
will do it 
per cent. 



two dollars to several hundred dollars 
eacli. 

Question. — I want to raise pedigreed 
birds this season, and do not know how 
to mark the young chicks. Will you 
please tell me how to go about it? How 
can I tell one from another when hatched 
by a hen, and how can I mark them 
when too small to use leg bands? 

Answer.— The only plan is to use a toe 
punch and punch a hole in the web be- 
tween tlie toes, as for instance a hole 
in the right web of the right foot wall 
indicate chicks from a certain mating; a 
hole in the right web of the left foot 
will indicate another. Many different 
combinations can thus be made. The 
eggs should be marked with the band 
number of the hen when they are taken 
from the nest and then closely watched 
when liatching. The best method is to 
set all of one hen's eggs under the same 
hen (not necessarily the hen that lays 
them), and then there will be no mistake 
in marking the chicks at the time of 
hatchiniT. If a record is desired only 
from certain pens and not from individ- 
ual hens, the inatter is much more sim- 
ple, as eggs from several hens may be 
set together and all the chicks marked 
alike when hatched. 



and cover with a piece of muslin, sewing 
the edges down through the sides of the 
basket with a h'^avy darning needle and 
twine. There are other methods, but this 
one insures absolute safety if properly 
done. Kg:^ boxes and patent carriers art- 
less troulil^, but are much less protection 
to the eggs and are responsible for many 
poor hatches. 

Question. — Can fancy eggs for hatching 
be packed in any way that will secure safe 
transportation by mail? 

Answer. — They might reacli their d^s- 



■Jf -Sf 



tination unbroken, 
handled too roughly 
good hatch. 

■5f 



but they would be 
en route to insure a 



Question. — What are some of the first 
points of excellence a breeder should con- 
sider w^hen mating his breeding birds? 

Answ^er.— First of all, they should be 
healthy, vigorous and of fair size. Pav 
particular attention to shape of back, tail 
and breast, and color of wings and tail. 

Question. — Is it customary, when weigh- 
ing birds in the show room, to give them 
the advantage of one-fourth or one-half 
pound? 

Answer. — It is sometimes done, but it is 
an injustice to the exiiibitors who have 
their birds up to weight, and the practice 



Qu*-stion.— Is it not possible for a fowl 
to show^ white in the ear lobes tempor- 
arily? 

Answer.— Yes. There is a difference, 
however, in the white resulting from sick- 
ness or poor condition and the enamel 
white which, in some breeds, disqualifies. 

Question. — Can you or any of your read- 
ers tell me the name and address of the 
Secretary of the Int«^rnational Water Fowl 
Club? 

Answer. — We are unable to learn anv- 
thing regarding such a club, and we do 
not know whether or not it exists. The 
Water Fowl Club of America is an active 
organization, and the secretary is P^dwin 
H. Morris, Sparkill. N. Y. 

Question.— Kindly give me a description 
of Barred Plymouth Rocks weight and 
value. 

Answer. — Your request is too indefinite. 
We do not understand just what you 
want. The Standard of Perfection is the 
only iilace where .you can get the exact 
description of shape and color of all sec- 
tions of this variety. The w^eights are: 
Cock, 1)1/2 lbs.; cockerel 8 lbs.; hen. 714 
lbs.; pullet. 61/2 bs. The new Standard 
will specify (> lbs. for pullets. The value 
of specimens of this variety ranges from 



Waterproof Roofing. 

Most people think that a material 
which is called a roofing is of course 
waterproof. As a matter of fact ordinary 
ready roofings are only waterproof for a 
little while, and do not really become 
roofs at all until they are painted. Most 
ready roofings when new have a coat of 
paint which has been applied at the fac- 
tory, and when the paint wears out it 
must be promptly renewed or the manu- 
facturers' guarantee will not hold. 

An up-to-date roofing like Amatite. has 
a surface of pitch and mineral matter 
which, is absolutely proof against water. 
The pitch in Amatite Roofing is in two 
good thick layers. On account of the 
oily nature of pitch water has no effect 
upon it. and accordingly Amatite Roofing 
needs no paint whatever and can be left 
out in rain and snow and sun year after 
.vear without any attention or care. 

Despite this peculiar surface, .\matlte 
is just as easy to lay as any other roofing 
and does not cost any more. 

A sample of Amatite can be obtained 
free on request to nearest ofnc<^ of the 
Barrett Mfg. Co., New York. Chicago, 
Philadelphia, Boston, St. Ix)uis, Cleve- 
land. Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Kansas City, 
Minneapolis. New Orleans. 




IDEAL ALUMINUM LEG BAND 

To Mark Chickens 
CHEAPEST AND BEST 

12 for 16c ; 26— 26c; 60— 40c ; 100—750. 
SHjnpIo Jiand Mailed for 8o .StJiinp. 

Frinl Myers, Mfr. B0168, Frasport.lJI, 



BARRED ROCKS, 

RHODE ISLAND REDS, Both Combs 

BUFF TURKEYS, 

We have a fine lot of cockerels and pullets to offer our customers at prices ranging 
from $1 50 to $25.00 each. Before placing your order write us describing what you 
want and receive our catalog, which will be sent without charge. We guarantee every- 
thing as represented and all orders are shipped subject to approval. Our pens will 
be mated up early in December. Our new incubator house with twenty large 
machines will be ready for use in a few weeks. When you get ready for eggs or 
day-old chicks from first class stock, write us. Address, 



WILLIAM OSBURN, GOOSE LAKE FARM, 



BOX P, MORRIS, ILLINOIS 







Page 18 




POULTRY FANCIERe 



Ads will be inserted in this department under the following conditions : The size 
shall be uniform, each ad occupying three-quarters of an inch single column- Each 
advertiser to use the same space each month. Ads may be changed every three 
months if desired. No ads will be inserted for less than twelve months. The cost is 
$10 per year.^ Payment strictly in advance. No exceptions to this rule. The price is 
made exceptionally low on this account. 



^rysui White Orpington fS?' 



cockerels 
sale, 
Kellerstrass strain. Also choice White Wy- 
andotte and White Rock* cockerels. Get 
prices now D. A. WEDGE 

215 GALENA STREET, AURORA. ILL. 



C. Buff Orpingtons and Barred 

Rocks of Quality. 

We won four silver cups this season, two 
with each variety. Eight fine yards mated 
for this season's egg trade. Eggs from best 
matings $3 per 15. Stock for sale, send for 
circular. A. S. & E. Hileman. Monessen, Pa. 



COLUMBIAN WYAN 
DOTTES 



Bred from the 
money can buy 

Strain. Satisfaction gauranteed. 

and 13 00 per .setting. 

LOUIS WESTFALL, R. 3 WAVERLY. N.Y 



best stock 
(Keating's 
Kggs $2.00 



R. C. & S. C. Rhode Island 

Rf^rlft None better. 40 first and second 
IXCUO. prizes at at Sedalia and Kansas 
City. 150 grand birds at special prices to 
quick buyers Place egg orders now. 

I>. J. IILISS. Carthace, Mo. 



Anrnnae EXCLUSIVELY. 
i%llCUU<t5 years. Hundreds 



l^eaiiers for 12" 
years. Hundreds of prizes in 
hot competition won by us and our •ustomers. 
Young and old stock $1.50 and up. Prices low 
for quality. Our stock and eggs will put you 
up among the leaders W. H. Branthoover, 
6115 Station St.. East End, Pittsburg. Pa. 

President Ancona Club of America 



PEACH GROVE STOCK '"'' 



won 
the blue 

ribbons at New York. Syracuse and Rochester 
for three years. Grand young Houdan and 
BuflF Wyandotte stock at right prices. Write 
me. 
MRS. R. Y. BOWDEN. Clifton Springs. N. Y. 



lammol 
Turkeys 



bronze 



Moseley has the 
largest and best 
Mammoth Bronze Turkeys, 
noted for superior size of frame, 
bone, vigor and color. Especially pure white 
Edgings. Produced 48 to 50 lb toms. Score to 
98. Money refunded if not satisfied. Honesty 
guaranteed. R^S. Moseley. Cambridsre.N.Y 



RKED'S ROSE COMH BKOWN LE(i- 
HORNS. Have the record of wiimliiK nearly 
every first prize at ChlenKO and other flbows the 
past five years. Can spare some nice hreedlDK 
cockerels fit to exhibit at the local shows. Also 
have some extra fine bred pullet breeding cock- 
erels. Fit to head any pullet matlnjr. 
I>R. F. IVf. RKEI>, WYANKT, ILT,. 



For ten dollars you can buv four hens. 1 
cock B»rr«d PlysnoutH R.ocks. 

I won 1st, 2nd and 3rd prizes, also 2 Special 
Prizes at Decatur, 111., January 1909. 

J. J. HACKETT 
BOX 81, - TUSCOLA, ILI^. 



Buff Cochins That Win 

On ten birds at Cedar Rapids, I won all firsts and 
special for best 10. I can help you win too, If 
you send me your order for stock or eggs. Grand 
birds for sale and eggs that will produce winners. 
$3 per 15, $5 per 30. I will more than please yon. 
J. C. MITCHEM. Marshalltown. Iowa 



l 



Fuller's Barred Rocks f;f J'^^o'st 

strains of prize winners in America. I^ine 
bred for size, shape and color. Good breeders 
for sale, either sex. Early hatched youngsters 
ready. Write your wants. No trouble to an- 
swer, A. F..FULLER, Box C, Mattoon. ill. 



Few choice n J CtxAit^w'tAQ^ Sired by 
Single Comb '^Ca ^OCKereiS pirst and 

Special cockerel of Decatur, 111. in a class 75. 

Also Rose Comb Reds. Beck strain direct. 

Score cards furnished after November 27th. 

Prices $2 00 up 

FERD. W. OERTEL, BRIGHTON. ILL 



SILVER WYAN DOTTES 
BEST STRAINS 

Special for the next month. Promising 
cockerels at |2 00. Stock and eggs. 

C. G. LOEBER 
482 11th Av<>., Milwaukee, Wis. 



YOU SHOULD MAKK A WILL. Read 
"Make your awn will" under classified 
advertisements In this Issue of "Poultry Fancier" 
The time to make a will Is when you are in 
sound health. 

MOFFETT'S WILT. FORMS 
Dept. F., 894 Broadway, Brooklyn, N.Y. 



Big ^Wliite Bea^&ties 

If you want White Rocks that are white, grand 
In shape and good lavers, dont fall to write me. 
First prize winners at Milwaukee and other 
strons; shows. They win for me and my 
customers. Eggs from my best birds at living 
prices. Prompt shipment and saMsfactlon guar- 
anteed. Mrs. L. ShultH, "The Oaks" Rlo,Wl8. 



I^INE BR.ED FOR 20 YEARS 

Exhibiton and breeding stock for sale. 
Dscribe wants for prices — "Do it now." 

E. W. BUECHLY, Box 10, Greenville, 0. 



BARRED ROCK COCK- 

17 DC* I C Best I ever raised. Guaranteed 
i:«I\.IJ1^0 to please. $;^ 00 to $5.00 each . 

GEO. O. ANDERSON 
R. 5, BOX 0022, RUSHVILLE. IND. 



S, C> Rhode Island Reds, 

Over 400 youngsters coming on for the fall 
trade. 

J. E. SCHUTTE, LEBANON, SO. DAK. 



Silver L.a«;e<l Wyaiuiot ten, Whit*- <'reHt«'d 
Itlark PoUmIi and Barred I'lyniouth 
BockH. Direct desceudantH from Madison square; 
and Chicago winners. Won twenty eight regular 
prizes and two diplomas at Oelweln. Iowa, ,Ian. 
4-!>. JHOfl, In strong competlon. Choice stock for 
sale,. Circular free. Cascade Poultry Yards, 
\Vm. Neiers. Prop., I., It. 45, Cascade, la. 



BARRED ROCKS AND WHITE 
ORPINGTONS For Sale. ^^r. '"' 

A. J, Waldschmidt, Washington, Iowa 



t:'j:/ai73firirfA^'-WrVfV'V/-^'-3>.?f,ii>g 




January. '10 




White Wyandottes jreX^sTt mo' 

and Kans. State shows. 1908. First pen at 
Mo. State Fair, Oct. 1909. Young or old stock 
$2.00. $3.00 and $5 00 Two fine show cocks 
$10 00 and 51.".. (X). Free circular. 
S. G. WHIPRECHT, Box H, Sedalia. Mo. 



EffSTH for Hatching: after Feb. 15, from .S. C. 
Black and AVhite Minorcas, S, C. Brown 
Lefirhorns both cockerel and pullet line. A few 
cockerels for sale from above breeds. Also one 
year old Leghorn hens $1 up. Good breeding 
stock. Extra choice pullet breeding Leghorn ckls. 
C.JACKSON, - BUCHTKL, OHIO 
Member A. S. C. Brown Leghorn Club 



CORNISH INDIANS 



Blood of the best 
Imported and do- 
mestic prize winners. Fine cockerels for breed- 
ing and exhibition and a few cocks for sale. I 
can help you. Prices right. 

T. 1>. MOORE 
BOX 93, . HOPKINSVILLE, KY. 



PRIZE WINNING 

WHITE PLYMOUTH I'::' It^.'^^S. 

D|^/^I/'C ter than ever this year. Prices 
OSCAR E. WOOD UNION, IOWA 



S. C. and R. C. RHODE LSLAND REOS 

Single combs direct descendants from New 
York Champion, his sire '"Old Glory" and "Red 
Cloud." Rose comb descendants of O. E. Miles 
first pen. superior color, line combs. Best stock 
obtainable. For stock and eggK write 
Dr. E. B, CRAMBLIT, AMES, lO^WA 



Choice Collie Puppies h"i,!dsomtlu1 

as I make a specialty of Whites. I do not place 
as high a value on the colored ones that come 
along with them and so offer them at low 
prices. SERVOSS COLLIE KENNELS 
BOX 220. - EDISON PARK. ILL. 



IJarred Rock, White Wyandottes, W kite 
Orpinsrtons, Maiumuth Bronze Turkeys. 

Hens, cockerels and pulletH for sale, grand birds. 
Prize winners wherever shown, excellent layers, 
leading strains. Give me an order. My motto, to 
please. Prompt shipment and satisfaction guar- 
anteed. Prices reasonable One % wild, ^ bronze 
Tom for sale. Miss Clara Smith, Croxton. Va. 



<'<)C1HNS IIO.MK. Headquarters for Amer- 
ica's greatest Cochins and Hrabmas. First prlz'^ 
and sllvercup winners aiJWiuuepeg, Can., Seattle 
A.Y.P., Minn.. 111., and S. Dak. State Fairs. Man- 
kato, Minneapolis and Madison Square Garden. 
N.Y. Get my pricee before you buy birds of 
quality. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
C. M. Atwood, Box Z, ,3.'», Dundee, Minn. 



BUFF ROCKS I ^,, 



u n g 

o c 

Also yearlings. 



sired by a 95 point male. 
Special prices for short time. 
A. L. Fawcett, Box 8, New Albany, Pa. 



WATSONS •=*'^^T'"' REDS I °„" ,? 

grand-sons for sale from Golden Princess 

that layed 291 eggs in a year. Also yearling 

IRA P. WATSON, FREDONI A, N. Y. 



(N>himbian Plymouth KockH (Sweet's 
Strtiln.) Hlack-talled -Japanese and BulT Cochin 
Bantams, Harred Rocks. A few choice cockerels 
of each variety for sale. Let me book vour 
order early for eggs from my choicest matings 
at 1:5. (H» per 15. 1.5.00 per 30. Bantam eggs at 12 ."JO 
per 15, |i4.()Oper30. ^^ ' 

K. B. IIOBKKTS C VN.ASTOTA, N. V 



le Comb Reds f,?S^^«,'.„X.^p'-\ 

has the Nicest Ueds here In Hrlghton why He 
cause nriy Strain comes from Hennett's famous 
prize-winners scoring from •>(; to 94. Kecelvod '5 
prizes lately. # Write fon.rlces of eggn. Mat'lnir 
list ready F6b. ir,. Satisfaction gauranteed 
.1 V. I,Htnpert, . Hrij^hton, 111 



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January. '10 




POULTRY FANCIER^ 



Columbian Wyandottes ? * "= "^ ' ? J < ^- •"• ROCKS & s. c. w. leghorns 



S 

Strain are prize winners. They win fo? me^ 
they win for my customers. They will win 
for you. Old and young stock for sale prSes 
reasonable, write your wants. Jacob Heck 
Leeseville. Mich. Station 23. Detroit Mich* 



S. C. Rhode Island Reds and ^^•^ 



Win. 

on 



Barred Plymouth Rocks STd'^'bEd 

ing stock for sale. Write us for description 
and prices *^ 

E. H. DOWNS, RTE. 20, IDAVILLE, IND. 



America's Foremost Strains '.^^^HT' 

Direct *°^,\<^.^^s^ prices on S. C. Reds, S. 
1^11 cut. c. White I^eghorns, Duckwing and 
Pit Games, Buff Cochin Bantams. Write for 
show record and prices. Egg orders booked 
before February l.'ith, .') eggs free. 
K.Qh?LHvZie«enfua«,_ Box Z. Bethlehem. Pa. 



i Crawford's R. C. Brown Yo'k^'sut" ^ 

T Aahnrnc ^^^^' Syracuse. N.Y.,l pen young 
L.egn0rnS i cockerel, 1 and 3 pullet. Exhr 
bition cockerels and pullets that can win at 
any show. 50 yearling breeders, 50 cockerels 
for sale cheap to make room All high cla«s 
stockCircular Jas. Crawford. Cameron Mills. N V 



Trap-Nested, Standard-bred, 

Rhode Island REDS 



Dr. Holmes' 

Single 

Comb 

Famous blood, vigor, vitality, heavy layers 
Stock and eggs in season. 

RED ROBE POULTRY PENS 
West Main Street. - EVANSTON, ILL. 



Barred Plymouth ^rrs'T'lZl'^s 

R nr!r« EXCLUSIVELY leading shows in 
IXULKb 1(08-1909. Also their layingqualities 
cannot be excelled. L,ast years breeding stock 
also cockerels and pullets for .sale. Write us 
for prices. S R. Patterson. CentervUle. Iowa 




TOULOUSE GEESE 



that win. Also 
White Chinese 
Geese and Fawn Headed Indian Runner 
Drakes for sale. Breeder and shipper of fancy 
land and water fowls. Write for prices. 
W. M. SAWYER, Box F. Lancaster, Mo. 



P FILE'S CATALOCiUK glvcH 
prlccH of all the leading? varieties of 
land and water fowls. Farm raised 
stock for sale and ckKS in season. 
Send 2 cents for my Poultry Book. 

HENRY PFILE 
Freport, 111, Dept. A 




Quality Strain WARKEI> ROCKS have 
been lino bred for 1(» years from foremost win- 
ners In America. Winners at leading shows. 
Cocks, hens, cockerels and pullets both matings 
for sale, from these winners or bred In line. 

C. C. DRAKE & SON, 
liock Box asa. La Harpe, 111. 



At INDIANAPOLIS February 1906, my 

RArrikrl Rnrlrc ^°" ^^^ cockerel, 2d cock. 
Oarrea IVOCKS silver Cup; Feb. 1908, 1st 
cock, ist cockerel; Sept. 1909, Ist and 3d cock.s, 
1st pen. I breed Rose Comb Reds- Indiana- 
polis winners too Stock with cjuality for 
sale. W, W. ZIKE. MORRISTOWN. IND 



BtJifr RocKs, Btxte and Sil-v«r 
Lo a c « d W jr a n di o 1 1 €» •* an&d 
V(rHit« Holland TvttrHmym, choice 
Cockerels for .sale from prize wiiitiing stock. 
Egg orders booked now, prices reasonable. 

L. C. VOGT. LYONS, IXriS. 



Egg orders booked now from my !i(X)-ei?e 
strains. Trap nests used. I know Just what I am 
doing Birds scoring 91 to 95 with a famous eetr 
record behind them. Have the shape, color and 
size. Write me for a square deal. 

H. O. SWIFT.-F. Castlewood, So. Dak. 



Golden Wyandottes ?S?ca#o" D^ec "V" 

12, 1909. 66 in class, won 5th cock, 4th cockerel 
3rd pullet, with 4 birds. Mo. State Show St' 
Louis Dec. 6-11, 1809, 64 in class, won 2d cock 
3d cockerel. 4th pullet, with 5 birds. 
J. S. Penninffton, Box F, Plainfield. III. 



Langshan - Hills Poultry Farm, 
Home of Barnes' Black Lang- 
Shans, winners whenever shown. Write 
your wants; Cockerels and Pullets $2.50 each. 
Hens $1.50. Napoleon J. Barnes 
R. D. 7. Box 15. Winchester, Ky. 



SILVKR LACED and WHITE WYAN- 
DOTTES FOR SALE. Utility and Exhibi- 
tion block tijat has pleased others and they will 
please you If you will give us a trial. Eggs In 
season from prize winning stock. Every Bird In 
breeding pens a high scorer. FOUR SISTERS 
POULTRY FARM, li. 8, Box A. 

Will P„ Yetter, Prop.. New Bavaria, O. 



LAKE SHORE POULTRY FARM 

Breeders of 

High ClaHs Silver Laced W^yandottes 
Exclusively. Stock for sale at all times. Egg 
odrers booked now. 

H. F. BERGNER, Pres. HENRY MAU, Mgr. 
South Chicago. Ills. R.F.D. No .S4, Kenosha, Wis. 



Reichert's Farm Raised White Rocks and R. 
C. White Leghorns of good shape and white plum- 
age. Some choice W. Rock cockerels and a few 
breeding pens yet for sale. Orders tor eggs booked 
now. A limited number of eggs from our Barred 
Rocks. Eggs «2 per 15. 85 per cent fertility guar- 
anteed. 
E, H, REICHERT. - VIRDEN, ILL. 



BUFF 'WYANDOTTES Cxclta- 
siveljr. Ideal shape, solid buflf color. 
Guaranteed to please you. Eggs and Baby 
chicks. Write me today. 

GLENN H. BURGOTT, 
EDEN CENTER. - N, Y. 



•i 



Faultless" Hottdans, 287 
£i(^ StraixA. Five carefully mated pens 
of large, crested, dark colored birds, de- 
scended from the greatest prize winners in 
America. Book your orders now for Spring. 
A few males at low prices. Circular free. 
Wm. C. Snider, Box 105, Kansas. Ills. 



R.in[^let Barred PlymoutH 
RocHs won all firsts at Oshko.sh, 1909. two 
silver cups, clean sweep. Cockerels |1 .50 up. 
Kggs, best matings |3.50 per \h. |5 per 30. gen- 
eral stock ll.^O. Lakk Vikvv Poultry Farm. 

T. \V. Crltchette. MarkeHan, Wis. 




ColumtMan KockH, Columbian Wyan- 
uotteH, K. C. IJuttLegrhornH, bred from New 
\ork, Buffalo and Rochester winners, 5 firsts 2 
seconds on 7 entries at Rochester show Dee 19(W 
Cockerels «8 to tlo pullets «2 to «6, Trios »7 topis'. 

pen with eHch$ 10 order. Stock suaranfeeed. 
F, A CAMPRELT. HONKOVE, N. Y. 




ORPINGTONS 1909 also several at Ocon- 
yixi iiiviiv/llkl omowoc and silver cup 
for best pen. Several choice cockerels for sale 
F:ggs from pen No. 1 $5 per 15 : pen No. 2 $2 
per 1.5 Dora James Pick Fall Rirer, Wis. 



CLASS Single Comb Rhode Island 

Rpf1« ^^^^^ Winners. Eggs from 1st pen, 
i\cu» setting 1.5 e^gs $2.50. Eggs from 2nd 
pen, setting 15 eggs $2.00. Special prices on 
orders of 100 or more. Guaranteed satis- 
faction. William Kenney. Sparland. 111. 



S. L. ANIi W. WVANDOTTKS. K C 
KHOI>E ISLAND RKDS Winners at the 
biK CentervUle, Iowa and St.Louls shows Write 
for catalogue describing the largest pure bred 
Poultry Farm In North Mo. Fancy and utility 
matings a specialty. Egg orders booked. Guar- 
antee 9 chicks to the setting or will replace 
JOBN KEARSE, R. 1, CoatHville, Mo, 



THE BEnT is none IOO CiOOD. High 
scoring cockerels of White Rocku ri up Bred 
In line for 16 years - score cards. White Holland 
Turkeys-the best grown, Hens f,3. one .S-year-old 
ton, 33 lbs. »7.50, Embden Geese 1H-2() lbs., $2 50 to 
f^i 30. Eggs from all nhove, prices reasonable 
Sqiiare deal to all. WHITE PLUME FARM 
J. C. Raker Prop. R. i . Plainville III. 



R. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 

l8t cock, 1-2-.3 cockerel. 1 2-3 hen. 1-2-3-4 5 pullet 
at Fond du-Lac. 1st pen scores 94% to 95')^. Also 
S C. W. and S. C. Br Leghorns, winners of firsts. 
Birds pure white, excellent layers Kggs pent. #2 
pen 2, 11. Booking orders now; also, have cock- 
erels and trios for sale. I>l«t. Atty. Philli|> 
Lehner, I*ri n<et«»n. Wis. 



WHITE PLYMOUTH 



Cockerels and 
«^^^^.> . pullets for 

ROCIC ^*^^- ^*^^® ^^°^^ fro«i 94K to 9(5 
^^^^*^ and will improve your flock 
Prices rearonable. Eggs for sale from this 
quality of stock. 
W. R. GEIER REMINGTON. IND. 



LIGHT BRAHMAS 

Twenty years a Breeder 
Twelve Extra Cockerels for Sale now. 
JNO. F. WOODS 
Utility Farm. R. 19. Owentville, Ind 



100 Barred Plymouth Rocks 100 <; $ FOR SALE. M. BRONZE 



from prize winning stock which 1 am going to 
sell at reasonable prices. If you want healthy 
vigorous 8to<'k write. SatlHfactlon guarautov^d. 

Chaa. F. Schlueter. - Box K, Reynolds, III. 



TURKEYS 



sired by my great prize 
winner and d i p 1 o ma 
Tom. Finest stock to be found. Al.so S . I, 
Wyandottes. C. J. KAPPHAHN 

R. 8 ALEXANDRIA. MINN, 




WYANDOTTES AND I.AN<;.Sll A N.S. 

Winners at St. Louis Show, 19()!». also two •25.o<) 
HJlvercupsat big Perry county 19U9 show In hot- 
test class of Wyandottes ever shown. Partridge 
and Huff Wyandottes #2 per 1.5. 3 setting for f5. 
Black Langshans 1..5() per 15. Buffs Bred by K B. 
Schlndler, Partridge and Langshans bred by .John 
Allen. Allen & Schlndler i»erryville. Mo- 



Philips Strain of S. C. Blacit 

Mi 



noted for shape, size and 
color. Write for prices and 



imorcas 

full particulars. 

TliOS. IT. riTTT,T.TPS, Dover, N. J. 



I If! HT EXCLUSIVELY 1 2 years a breed 
■-'*^^* * * *r My stock is excellent, high 
BRAHMAS sconng. great layers. 
"^^^^^ i^^M,^\,0 ^iH please the most 
particular. Flock of 200 to .select from. Prices 
right. Kggs, .single settings or incubator lots. 
HAROLD DAVIS SLEEPY EYE, MINN 





Page 20 




POULTRY FANCIER 




January. '10 







ASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Numbers and initials count the same as words. 

30 words or less one month, $1. For more than 30 words 
add two cents for each additional word. 

30 words or less, three months, $2. For more than 30 words 
add 3 cents per word. 

For any time longer than three months the rate is two cents 
per word per month, but no ad will be accepted for less than 50 
cents per month and the ad must appear each successive month. 

A discount of 1 per cent given on ads running for 1 2 months. 



All classified advertising is payable in advance. Positively no 
exceptions to this rule. The rates are so low that we cannot 
afford to take the time and trouble and incur the expense neces- 
sary to keep book accounts with these ads. 

Send money order, currency, draft or registered letter. Stamps 
accepted fc amounts less than one dollar. 

Poultry Fancier is published the 15th of each month. All 
ads must reach us not later than the 5th. Advertisers receive 
the paper free each month that their ad appears. 



«3«P* 



BREEDERS' SEVERAL VARIETIES. 

BREEDING STOCK FOR SALE NOW IN 
Black and White Langshans, Light Brah- 
mas. White and Brown Leghorns and W. C. 
Black and Golden Polish. Address Caton 
Poultry Yards, Zanesville, O. 3-9-12 

FOR SALE — BREEDING PENS BAliRED 
Plymouth Rocks and White Wyandottes, 
also Plymouth Rock cockerels. Eggs for 
setting $5 per 100. $1 for 13. Bohemia Villa 
Poultry Farm. Absecon, N. J. 2-09-12 

DON'T PASS THIS AD.— AM CLOSING OUT 
my White Rocks. Have three pens of breed- 
ers, some scoring as high as 95, also a fine 
lot of young stock. 4 pens of S. C. White 
Leghorns scoring 90 to 96. These birds will 
surprise you at the low price I will ask. Be 
sure and write me. Mrs, Laura McKee, Deep 
River. la. ^_^ 2-9-12 

THIS WAY FOR YOUR HIGH CLASS S. C. 
Black Minorcas and Partridge Cochins. Birds 
have good shape and are fine in all points. 
Stock for sale. Eggs $1.50 per 13, Mention 
this paper. H. S. Fegley, Gilbertsville, Pa. 

12-3 

WHITE FACED BLACK SPANISH WHITE 
Plymouth Rocks, Houdans and Java cock- 
erels and trios for salo. The very best 
strains. Eggs in season, Theodore A. 
Moritz. 569 St. Georges Avenue, Rahway, N. 
£ 12-4 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. ORPINGTONS AND 
Rocks. Solid Buflf cockerels and pullets that 
will win in the show room and fill the egg 
basket. Our birds are big, blocky, golden 
beauties, strong in all points. Write Buff 
Poultry Farm, F. A. Poertner, Prop., Berea, 
O. ■ 3-9-12 

SPECIALTY BREEDER FOR YEARS OF 
S'. S. Hamburga and Buff Turkeys. The 
quality of my birds is the very best and I 
have hundreds to select from. Can please 
you all. A hunch of fine show birds; 
cheap. Hnrry Pi Mintv, rumhorlnnrl O. 11-3 

S. S. HAMBURG AND BARKED liOCK 
cockerels for sale. Biids fine in all i)<)int.s. 
If you could see them I know I would get 
your order. Be sure and get my prices. 
Correspondence answered promptly. Egg 
orders hooked. Mrs. C. R. Thompson, B(jx 
23. Han<lall. Iowa. 1-3 

ST. LOUIS AND STAT1-: FAIR SHOW 
birds. Won, 1st cockerel. 2nd pullet. 1st 
pen. Black Leghorns and Black Javas. 
Birds. $2 to $5. Eggs. $2 per 15. Also 
choice White W.vandottes. Try a specialist. 
H. C. Hunt, i:)elavan. 111. 1-3 

FRENCH SALMON F.\ \' EROLLES, SKIL- 
ian Buttercups and Indian Runner Ducks. 
Non-setting hens. Booking orders now for 
spring delivery. Eggs per setting, hens .$1 
per 13 eggs. Ducks. $1 to |2 per setting 
12 eggs. Send order now. Davis «fe lJ)ynes. 
R. 30, ZIonsville, Ind.. Sunnyside Poultry 
Farm. 1-3 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. MclNTOSH 
strain. Eggs. $1.50 per 15. White. Golden 
and Buff VVyandottes, Rose and Single (^omlt 
Brown Leghorns. Kulp'.'s strain. From prize 
winning stock. Eggs, $1 per 15. Circular 
Jiee. M. L. Musselman. Bethlehem. Pa. 1-3 

EGGS AND STOCK FOR SALE. BUFF 
and White Leghorns. Rocks. Silver Ham- 
burgs,. Partridge Cochins. Pearl Guineas. 
Toulouse GtM'se, Pekin Ducks, English Phea- 
sants, Belgian Hares, White Rabbits, Canary 
Birds. O. W. Zeigier. Harnicmy. Pr. 1-3 

FOR SALE. I OFFER STOCK AND EGGS 
for hatching from the following: S. C 
White Leghorns, Brown Leghorns. Black 
Minorcas. Buff Orpingtons. Light Firahmas. 
White Rocks, White and (Columbian W.van- 
dottes. Also day old chicks. Get my prices. 
Jos. M. Fay. 808 Howard Ave., Altoona. Pa. 

1-3 




LOOK! HERE WE ARE BETTER THAN 
ever. We have some Partridge Cochin 
cockerels and pullets, also some fine S. C. 
Buff Orpington cockerels for sale. We 
have some very fancy birds. Write for 
prices. S. E. Speerg. Cooksville. III. 11-3 

BUFF AND PARTRIDGE ROCKS. NO 
better stock bred. Limited number of eggs, 
so book your order early. Birds are good 
in all points and will please. Prices right. 
R. J. Gaines, 4820 Capital Ave., Omaha. 
Nebr. 2-9-12 

SEND MIO YOUR ORDER FOR A COCK- 
erel. Can please you if you give me a 
chance. Grand Barred Rocks. S. C. Reds' 
and Columbian Wyandottes, also Mammoth 
Bronze Turkeys. Old Tom weighs 40 lbs., 
scores 96V4. Get prices. Mrs. Chas. Howell, 
Rockford, Iowa. 11-3 

FAIRVIEW POULTRY FARM HAS A 
fine bunch of high scoring cockerels for sale 
at a low price, $2.50 to $5. White and 
BulT Orpingtons, Rhode Island Reds and 
Buff and Barred Rocks. A square deal and 
your money's worth. F. J. Unland, Mere- 
dosia. 111. 11-3 

DOOLITTLE STRAIN PARTRIDGE WYAN- 
dotte pullets and yearling hens, $1 to $1.50 
to quick buyers, his is your chance for a 
bargain. Limited number of very choice 
White Wyandotte cockerels cheap. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. J. W. Deach, Nora 
Springs, Iowa. 11-3 

RHODE ISLAND REDS— THE KIND YOU 
are looliing for. Shipped C. O. D. to be 
returned if not satisfactory. They win 
wherever shown. Our records prove it. 
Also Barred and Buff Plymouth Rocks, 
same quality. Cold Brook Farm, C. E. 
Hul)bell. Prop., Westmoreland. N. Y. 11-3 

WANT A PRIZE WINNER FOR THE 
next show? Have some choice Dark Brahmas 
and Buff and Partridge Cochins, also Rouen 
Ducks. Winners of first prizes at State 
Fairs. Let me quote you prices. John Con- 
rad. Rte. 15, West AUis, Wis. 11-3 

LIGHT BRAHMAS, BARRED AND BUFF 
Rock, Black Langshan and Buff Cochin 
cocks, cockerels, hens and pullets for sale. 
Winners at Indianapolis, Lafayette, Frank- 
fort. Crawfordsville and other big shows. 
Write for prices. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
J. E. Coen, Box 110. Wingate. Ind. 11 -3 

IF YOU WANT CHOICE BRAHMAS. CO- 
chins, Rocks, Reds, Wyandottes, Orping- 
tons. Houdans, Minorcas. Spanish. Red Caps, 
Hamburgs or Leghorns, we have them. 
Special discount on Leghorns to those who 
order early. Eggs in season. Send for 
catalog. Ervin & J. W. Trettin, Grafton. 
Iowa. 11-3 



FAIRVIEW POULTRY YARDS. PART- 
ridge Rocks, Barred Rocks. Rhode Island 
Reds. Silver Wyandottes, Silver Hamburgs. 
Brown Leghorns, Black Minorcas. Canadian 
Wild Geese and Decoys. Cockerels. Breed- 
ing stock or show birds for sale. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. Mrs. J. E. Mielke, 
Poultry Judge. Basco. Wis. 11-3 



qiALITY K. r. JiUOWN LEGIiUiiNS. 
Ivulp & Gale strain. Greens Curgh and 
Uniontown winners, 1st pens, 1st cock, 2nd 
ckl., 1st. 2d pullet. 1st. 3rd hens. Eggs 
both matings. Closing out R. C. W. Leg- 
horns. Show birds, first prize winners at 
bargain prices. Write me. W. HIpklss. 
Scottdale, Pa. 1-:? 

YOUNG STOCK OI^' C^UALITY l<'OR SALE. 
4 firsts on 7 entries at Greenfield. III., Nov. 
15-20, 1909; 8 firsts, 5 seconds and 2 thirds 
on 16 entries at Pittsfteld, III., Dec. 15-lK, 
1909. S. C. W. Leghorns, B. I». Rocks and 
White Holland Turkeys. Write your wants 
to Thos. M. Stubblefleld, R. 6, Jacksonville. 




I AM READY TO RECEIVE ORDERS 
for all leading varieties of thoroughbred 
poultry and eggs. Write Frank McMullen, 
Marietta, Pa. 11-3 

i HIS WAY FOR STOCK AND EGGS. 
Choice Houdan and Bradley strain Barred 
Rock cockerels at prices to move them 
• luick. Book your egg orders now. First 
pen $3 for 15, balance $2. S. M. Crosby, 
Leechburg. Pa. 11-3 

FOR SALE— SOME CHOICE BARRED AND 
White Rock cockerels, Bradley and Fishel 
strain, $3 to $10 each; also forty Rose 
Comb Brown Leghorn pullets and cockerels, 
$2 each while they last. Randolph Poultry 
Farm. Randolph. N. Y. 11-3 

BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS, WHITE 
Orpingtons, Houdans, Silver Spangled Ham- 
burgs, Single Comb Buff, White and Brown 
Leghorns. Our birds have won first prizes 
in strong competition wherever shown in 
the past 4 years. Young and old stock 
for sale at special low prices. F. C. Mit- 
chell. Crookston. Minn. 11-3 

MAMMOTH WHITE HOLLAND TURKEYS, 
Buff Rocks. Extra large size, fine points. 
Toms $5, hens $3, until January 1; after 
that Toms $7.50, hens $3.50. Buff Rock 
cockerels, choice ones. Rock eggs for sale. 
Mrs. .1. W. Warren. Paris. Mo. 11-3 

SINGLE AND ROSE COMB RHODE 
Island Reds and Black Orpington cockerels 
for sale. These birds are bred from win- 
neis at different shows. Prices $1 to $5. 
Eggs in season. F. H. Kopp, Rte. 1, Janes- 
ville. Wis. 11-3 



FINE. YOUNG MAMMOTH BRONZE TUR- 
key hens $4, toms $6. Large Imperial Pe- 
kin Ducks $3 each. These will make prize 
winners. A few choice Barred Plymouth 
Rock cockerels $1.50 to $3 each, Rosalie 
Newberry, Argyle, Lee County, Iowa. Box 
5. 11-3 

FITZPATRICK POULTRY FARM. BRED 
to lay hens that will lay 240 eggs a year. 
Light Brahmas. S. C. Rhode Island Reds, 
S. C. White Leghorns. Embden Geese and 
White Holland Turkeys. Eggs in season. 
Mrs. Effie F itzpatrick. Rte. 5, Paris. Mo. 11-3 

BARRED I'LYMOUTH ROCKS, YOUNG 
and old stock, from my fine show birds. 
Toulouse Geese from imported stock. Im- 
perial Pekin Ducks. Book your orders 
early for eggs. Gus A. Lengfelder, R. 5, 
Box 36, Mt. Vernon, 111. 11.3 



S. C. BUFF ORPINGTON AND HOUDAN 
cockerels. Can furnish you some that will 
please you at a very reasonable price; also 
Pekin Ducks for sale or exchange for Hou- 
dan or Buff, Black or White Orpington pul- 
lets. A. E. Larson, Delaware, Iowa. 11-3 

BRU(^E AND CROW'S WYANDOTTES, 
buff and white, are the kind that win 
and lay. Wonderful show record for twelve 
years. Show birds and choice breeders 
re.Tsonnblc. No. ]\, Wooster. O. II-3 



PULLETS ALL SOLD; HAVE ONLY COCK- 
erels to sell; very large White and Black 
Orpingtons and enormous crested handsome 
Houdans. Call at Palos Park or write Hat- 
tie P. Franks. Worth. 111. 5-9-12 



111. 



6-9-12 



DON'T DELAY ABOUT SENDING IN 
your egg orders. Now is the time to raise 
yotjr prize winners. Let me fill your order 
and get In the winning line. Have Barred 
Rocks and Brown Chinese Geese. Eggs at 
living prices. M. C. Flagg. Boylston. 
^^^^j 3-9-12 

COCKS AND COCKERELS CHF.AP— 
Houdans, Minorcas. R. C. R. I, Reds and 
Spanish. Also eggs In reason — 60 for $3 15 
for $1. 25 varieties. 28 years as breeders. 
Circular free. Whitney & Son, Triangle, 
N. Y. 12.3 



to 



« • 



• 




• 





January. *10 



■" '^ ■' ■ t 



^f^t;^w 




RINGLET BARRED ROCKS. CRYSTAL 
White Orpingtons. Pure strain, prize win- 
ners direct. Eggs $2 and $3 per 15. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. Write for list. Jno. Had- 
den, Norwich, O. 2-9-12 

BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS AND Co- 
lumbian Wyandottes. No one has better 
stock. Winners wherever shown. Eggs and 
stock in season. Frederick Pfaff, Anadarko. 
Cykla. 7-9-12 

PENS, TRIOS AND COCKERELS OF 32 
varieties poultry, including Wyandottes 
Brahmas, Cochins, Rocks. Polish, Reds, Ham- 
burgs, Leghorn. Andalusians, Houdans and 
Minorcas. Booking egg orders now for spring 
delivery. Stamp for catalogue. Simon C. 
Kulp, Box S'. S., Hatfield, Pa. 1-3 

THOROUGHBRED BREEDERS FOR SALE 
for 1910. Silver Wyandotte, Barred Rock 
cockerels and Toulouse geese. Winners at 
all Austin Shows and Fairs. Eggs for sale 
in season at reasonable rices. Write Mrs. 
F. H. Pike, Austin, Minn., Pinedale Poultry 
Farm. 12-3 

LIGHT BRAHMAS, COLUMBIAN WYAN- 
dottes and Black Tailed Japanese Bantams. 
Egg orders booked now. At TrI-State Show, 
Keokuk, Iowa, in November, won 1st cock, 
1st hen on Brahmas; 1st cockerel, 1st, 2nd, 
3rd pullet. Few cockerels. Edw. Miller. 
Donnellson, Towa. 12-3 

HOUDANS P^OR SALE, BOTH YOUNG 
and old birds, some with score cards. Fine 
big birds, great layers. Place egg orders 
now for Barred Rocks or Houdans. If you 
could see my birds I know I would get 
your order. T.,et me hear from vou. Elmer 
J. Johnson, R. 2. Box 26, Argyle, Wis. 

12-3 

FINE COCKERELS — WHITE' WYAN- 
dottes. Barred Rocks, S. C. Reds, White 
Leghorns, Black Minorcas. Pure stock, own 
raising. Big quality; little ad — save you 
money. Many of these would be prize win- 
ners in show room. Ernest Haynes. Prairie 
du Rocher, 111. 12-3 

BARGAIN SALE OF COCKS AND COCK- 
erels. Single Comb Rhode Island Reds. 
White and Buff Rocks, Orpingtons, An- 
conas. Langshans. I.,eghorns, Minorcas and 
others. See my large circular. Illustrated 
in colors. 3? breeds bred for laying. Eggs 
for hatching. .John E Heatwole, Hnrri.KJon- 
burg. Va. 12-3 

BREEZE LAWN POULTRY YARDS'. MRS. 
Clara Reichenbach. prop., Coopersburg. Pa., 
offers 500 yearling hens, pullets and cock- 
erels, from Reds. Rocks. Wyandottes. Brah- 
mas. Games. Cochin and Polisli. Prices 
$1.50 up. Show birds a matter of corre- 
spondence. Eggs, $5 per 100, $1 per 13. 

12-3 

COCKERELS FOR SALE -- DTTSTON 

White Wyandottes and Rhode Island Reds 
("both combs), at $1.25 eacli and up. Or- 
ders booked now for eggs and baby chicks. 
Cash 10 days prior to shipment. Forrest- 
dale Poultry Farm, R. 2, Forrest. 111. 12-3 

BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. BALD- 
wln's Barred Beauties. Exhibition and 
breeding stock for sale. Free catalog. Matt 
W. Baldwin. Sioux City. Towa. 11-3 

BARRED ROCKS AT CLOSE PRICES. 
Either cockerel or pullet bred. Satisfaction 
guaianteed on all stock or eggs shipped. 
Eggs in season from fine pens, mated for 
best results. Have some good exhibition 
birds. J. W. Freeman. R. 4, Benton Har- 
bor. Mich. 12-3 

BARRED ROCKS. FAMOUS LATHAM 
and Thompson strains. Winners of 9 prizes 
(more than all competitors combined) at 
Lancaster. O.. show, January, 1909. In 
placing your order don't overlook us. Qual- 
ity that counts. Eggs $3 per 15, booked 
now. Samuel Friend. Rushville. O. 11-3 

EDGEWOOD BARRED ROCKS. BRED 
for exhibition and utility; heavy laying 
strain. Bred from Latham. Brights. Haw- 
kins. Females $2.50 to $5. cockerels $5 to 
$10. Eggs from my choicest matings $3. 
Orders booktMl now, 25 per cent with order. 
Frank A. Simons, R. F. D.. Thompsonvllle. 
Conn^ 11-3 

BARRED ROCK COCKERELS AND PUL- 
lets bred fiom first prize winners at Spring- 
field. Birds are good in all points and will 
please. Place egg orders now. Plymouth 
Rock Homer Pigeons, fine ones at right 
prices. Write Wm R. Rollston, R. 9, Box 
21. Sprincfield. Mo. 12--^ 

WATSON'S BARRED ROCKS HAVE NEV- 
er been defeated, and are better this year 
than ever. Have been breeding this strain 
rthe Roval Blue) for 14 years. My matings 
for 1910 will be very fine. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. Geo. W. Watson. Eldorado. 
III. 12-3 



POULTRY FANCIER 



UTILITY BARRED ROCKS. FINE LAY- 

ers. Pullets, $1.50 to $3. Yearling hens, 
$2. Eggs any time after the first of Feb- 
ruary. Book your orders early. Eggs, 
$1.50 per 1.".. Samuel Wickham, Palmyra. 
Micii. i2-3 

BARRED ROCKS. THIRTEEN PREMI- 

ums here this September. Strong competi- 
tion. Won all firsts. Refused $25 for young 
pullet. Good stock, $2 and up. L. C. Ober- 
dorf, Waverly. la. 2-9-12 

GET MY CIRCULAR ON BARRED ROCKS. 
Have some fine ones for sale at prices tliat 
will surprise you. considering the quality. 
Let's get in touch with each other. I know 
I can plea.se you. Egg orders booked. J. 
W. Bell, Box H.. Chetek, Wis. 1-3 

liARRED ROCKS, HIGHEST QUALITY. 
Eggs from special prize matings, $1 and $2 
per 15; $5 per 100; utility flocks, $1 per 26; 
$3.50 per 100. Choice cockerels, $2 and $3 
each. Circular free. Chas. Spangler, Kent- 
land. Ind. 1-3 

BARRED ROCKS. O. C K. STRAIN. 
Something grand in either cockerel or pullet 
matings. A few good exhibition cockerels 
and pullets. Prices reasonal>le for quality. 
Eggs. $3 per 15; $5 per 30. Write for mat- 
ing list. Mrs. Minnie McConaughy, Martelle, 
Iowa. 1-3 

SPECIAL BARRED ROCK SALE. ON Ac- 
count of lack of time I will dispose of 2 
very good darli cocks, one pullet breeding 
cock, 25 cockerel bred hens and pullets and 
15 cockerels. Get prices now. Dr. F. A. 
Shuffelton, Saint Marys, O. 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

WHITE ROCKS — STOCK FOR SALE THAT 
will win in the show room and fill the egg 
basket. Our birds are big, white beauties, 
strong in all good points. Eggs from our 
choicest matings at living prices. Berwyn 
Poultry Yards. Box P. Berwyn, 111. 12-4 

WHITE ROCKS— LARGE BONED, GREAT 
layers. Pens contain first prize winners of 
many Ohio shows. A few extra good cocks 
and cockerels for sale. Chas. Bristol, Up- 
per Sandusky. O. 2-9-12 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. UTILITY 
and exhibition quality. Grand size and 
shape. Choice cockerels, pullets and yeai- 
ling hens for sale. Prices reasonable. Sat- 
isfaction or your money back. Wm. C. 
Goodwin. Chillicothe, 111. 11-3 

QUALITY WHITE ROCKS. STANDARD 
bred, white, hardy and vigorous. They 
will improve your flock and raise you win- 
ners. Improved each year for fifteen years. 
Book vonr orders for eggs now. Stock for 
sale. Mrs. C A. Brown. Tolucn, 111. 12-3 

WHITE PLYMOT'TH ROCKS WITH PURE 
white quills, bay eyes and yellow shanks. 
Stock scoring 96 V4 in show room. Kansas 
City and state show winners. Scored stock 
for sale; prices right, quality considered. 
Mrs L. L Tliggins. R. 1. Sheldon, Mo. 12-3 




WHITE ROCKS, PRIZE WINNING STOCK. 
Snow white cockerels, $2.50 up. One year- 
ling cock, few hens and pullets, trapnested. 
Fishel strain. Excellent layens. Three pens. 
Eggs, 15 for $3, $2 and $1. Send egg or- 
ders now. Rev James A. Slack, Yorktown. 

Ta_ 12-^ 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS— BREEDERS 
and exhibition birds for sale at reasonable 
prices. They have the size, shape and can 
win In the' strongest class. Write P. F. 
Carr. Kenton. O. 12-3 



WHITE ROCKS. HEAVY WINTER LAY- 
ers. Pullets from this stock laying at 5 V2 
months this season without forcing. Not 
one dissatisfied customer last season. Book- 
ing egg orders, $2 per 15. S. P. Evans, 3838 
E. TSth Street. Clevela nd, O. 

FISHEL STRAIN WHITE ROCKS EXCLU- 
slvely. Eggs from first pen, $2 for 15; sec- 
ond "pen, $1.50 per 15. 10 cockerels for sale, 
$2 to $5 each; pullets. $1.50 to $5 eacii. 
Order early. A. L. McLaughlin. S"parland. 



Til. 



1-3 



BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

WHY NOT GET THE BEST? I HAVE 
it In Buff Rocks and you can get It at 
prices usually asked for much lower qual- 
ity. A breeding bird or a few eggs from 
my yards will put you on top. Write 
me. Phil Fell. Buff Rock Specialist and 
Poultry Judge. Canal Dover. O. 3-09-12 

ONE HTTNDRED BUFF ROCK COCKE'R- 
els or pullets at half price. Exhibition and 
1)reeding birds. The world's best strain. 
Fifteen years exclusive breeding means 
quality. Highest honors. World's Fair. 
New York, Boston, clean sweep at three 
exhibition this fall. Sliipments on ap- 
proval. Edgewood Farm, Ballston Lake. 
N. T. 11-3 



RUSH IN YOUR OTRDER FOR ONE OF 
my early hatched cockerels. Prices |2 to 
$10, and they will please anyone. A fine 
large flock of Buff Rocks to select from. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded 
and express charges paid. W. P. Garth- 
wait, Gas City, Ind. 11-3 

BUFF ROCKS. THE FARMER'S FRIEND. 
Prize winners. 1st cockerel, 2d pullet, at 
Jeffersonville, Ohio, Poultry Show, Dec. 
1909. Eggs, $2.50 the 15. The Buff Rock 
Poultry Farm, Jeffersonville. O. 1-3 

COLUMBIAN PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 



COLUMBIAN PLYMOUTH ROCKS. WIN- 
ners at Boston 1909. Young stock for ex- 
hibition that are able to win in the strong- 
est competition; also first-class breeding 
stock. Eggs for hatching in season. Cir- 
cular. J. H. Woodhead, Pleasant Poultry 
Yards. Leicester, Mass. 11-3 



PARTRIDGE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 



WHY TAKE CHANCES? SEND ME YOUR 
order for Partridge Plymouth Rocks and 
you are sure of the best. Don't take my 
word for It. Look at my show record at 
Chicago. Detroit and other strong shows, 
consider the competition and you will see 
who has the quality. Some choice breeders 
at reduced prices and young stock that will 
please. Paul LaFrombolse. Mt. Pleasant 
^'^^ 4-9-12 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. 



BARGAIN PRICES ON 18 CHOICE BREED- 
ers. My White Wyandottes are pure white, 
correct In shape, and are prize winners. 
Need room for young stock so must close out 
at once. Don't fail to get prices. Can please 
the most exacting. Miss S. L. Putsch, Wi- 
nona. Minn. 2-9-12 



MILLER'S WHITE WYANDOTTES WON 
more than any other strain In Pa. last sea- 
son. Prize cocks and hens to sell. A. A. 
Miller. McKeesport. Pa. 2-9-12 

WHITE WYANDOTTE'S EXCLUSIVEL,Y 
for 10 years — Prize winners at state fair and 
others. 50 choice cockerels for sale at 
prices that will move them quick. Deer 
Creek Stock i^ Poultry Farm, John A. Behr- 
f^ns. Ft. Dodge. Ta. 2-9-12 



HEABLER'S WHITE WYANDOTTES— 200 
choice birds from my best breeding pens. 
Eggs in season, $2 per 15, $3.50 per 30. 
Orders booked now. I devote my whole 
time to this one breed. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed. K. J. Heabler, Box 204 W, Attica 
O. 11-3 



MODEL WHITE WYANDOTTES — NOT 
only white but also winners of shape. St>e- 
cial stock, old or young, from $1 to $5 
each. Value for money. Guaranteed as 
represented. Eggs In season, $3 per 15 
Exhibition mating. F. G. Paul, Marshall- 
town. Ta. 11-3 

FOR SALE— THOROUOHBRED WHITE 
W^yandotte cockerels. Fishel and Corey 
strains. Prices $3 to $5 If taken at once. 
Grand birds for the money. Eggs In sea- 
son. Mrs. Joseph Taylor, Maple Grove 
Farm. Edinboro, Pa. 11-3 



WHITE' WYANDOTTES. DT'STON'S 
Hawkins' strains. Barred Rocks 
world's best blood, 
sale at right prices, 
for 15. $3.50 for 30, 
dleton. Tnd. 



AND 

the 

Eggs and fowls for 

None better. Eggs $2 

W. H. Bollnger. Pen- 

11-3 



WHITE WYANDOTTES. NOTED PRE- 
mier strain. Farm raised, blocky. white, 
unexcelled layers. vigorous constitutions. 
Line bred cockerels. $5 to $10; cocks $5 to 
$10; pullets, $2 to $3; hens. $2 to $3; eggs 
$3 to $10. W. H. Humiston. Cleveland! 
Ohio. 12-3 

BUSINESS WHITE WYANDOTTES. OTTRS 
are great layers, have farm privileges, essen- 
tial to success. We aim above all to please 
customers. Write your wants. Stock, $3 
to $5 each. Eggs. $1.50 per setting. C. 
N". TTostetter, Manlielm. Pa 1-3 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. 

THTMSEN. BUFF WYANDOTTE SPECIAL- 
Ist — My Buffs win at the leading shows. I 
can furnish you winners, as well as breeders. 
I have the size, shape and color. Two hun- 
dred March and April youngsters at $1.50 
and up. T guarantee satisfaction. F. P. 
Thimsen. Blooming Prairie. Minn. 5-9-12 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTEsT" 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES EXCLU- 
slvely. Line bred. Have never shown 
birds without winning my share of prizes. 
Scored birds that will please the inost par- 
ticular. Males $2 up. females f1.50 up. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Egg orders booked, 
$2.50 per 15. H. Kerl, Lenexa, Kans. 11-3 




Page 22 ] 

REEPMEYER'S SILVER LACED WYAN- 
clottes in good competition won 6 firsts 6 
seconds. 3 thirds. $10 special and Presi- 
dent's Silver Cup. Best display, all varieties 
competing- at Schenectady. N. Y., bis show. 
Breeders or show birds for sale. J. Reep- 
meyer. Crai- Schdy. Co.. N. Y. 1-3 




PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES. 

MY PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES ARE CHI- 
eajro and Milwauliee winners and ray two 
jjrand pens contain these winners and raanv 
others of the same blood lines. Egrjrs $3 per 
per 30. Orders filled promptly. Aur. 

2-09-12 



Rlopse. Jeflferson Park. 111. 



PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES EXCLUSIVE- 
ly. The fowl of both beauty and utility. My 
winnin.er whereyer- shown proves the .•superi- 
ority of my stock. Start right. It will pay 
you to buy the best. M. N. Cecil, Elm Grove, 
W. Va. 11.3 



COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. 



COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. LOOKING 
for good blocky shaped ones, nicely laced 
tails, clean hackles? Farm raised from New 
York and Boston winners. Great vigor. Egg.s 
very fertile. You must be satisfied or its 
no sale. Address Ralph Woodward, Box 82, 
Grafton, Mass. 1-3 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. SOME FINE 
well marked birds for sale. Watch my show 
record this season. O. R. Eddy, Oconomo- 
woc. Wis. 5-9-12 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. FIRST PRIZE 
winners at Toledo. Sprinprfleld. Troy and Mid- 
dletown. Five grand pens, superb in neck and 
tail lacing. Eggs, only $1.50 per 15. R. P. 
RiifRneton. Sprlnefield. O. 2-9^2 



COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES EXCLU- 

sively. None better than mine and their 
record proves it. Won Silver Cup at Pen- 
acook, Dec, 1908, for the highest scoring 
cock, ckl.. hen and pullet in the Wyandotte 
class; at Sherbrooke, Quebec, 1909 on 4 
entries 2 firsts. 1 second; at St. Joh'nsburv. 
Vt., on 4 entries 2 firsts. 1 second; at 
White River Jet., Vt., 1st pen chicks, 2nd 
and 5th pullet, 3d, 4th ckl., 5th hen. In a 
hot class. Both old and young stock for 
.sale. Trios $6 up. A. L. Cook, West Con- 
cord, N. H. 11-3 



COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES, THE GREAT 
coming variety. A few trios and pens for 
sale. Birds .scoring 90 to 93 H. Will furnish 
.score cards if preferred. Book orders now 
for eggs and baby chicks. Jacob Gerig, 
Noble, la. l''-3 



COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES A SPECIAL- 
ty. Prize winners and good layers. Mv 
pens this year are better than ever, headed 
by finely marked cockerels. I am now ready 
to book orders for eggs. Prices reasonable. 
Cockerels for sale. J. A. Roscoe, Norwalk. 
Q. 12-3 

BUFF COLUMBIANS. 



BUFF COLUMBIANS — GRAND BEAUTY 
and utility breed. Hand.somest. largest, most 
vigorous of Columbians. The coming buff. 
Be first in your locality. Finest flock in the 
West. Edward Cone, Muskegon, Mich. 
1 0-8-12 

START NOW WITH A RISING BREED. 
Buff Columbians are the coming buffs. No 
finer birds anywhere than In my "Origina- 
tor's Strain." E^xtra setting free to first 
1910 customer from each state. Correspond- 
ence will do you good. Edwin Cone, Mus- 
kegon. Mich. 12-3 



ORPINGTONS. 



BREEDER OF THOROUGHBRED PRIZE 
winning Black Orpingtons. Old and young 
Ptock for sale. Inquire Frank McMullen. 
Marietta. Pa. 11-3 



SQUARE DE.AL OBPINGTON YARDS— S. 
C. Buff. Black and White (Kellerstron's 
strain) Orpingtons. Black and white stock 
for sale. Buff stork all sold. Eggs In 
season. Prices right. Let me fill an order 
for you. Annie McKee, Edgar. Neb. 11-3 



THIS WAY FOR COCKEREL BARGAINS 
in S. C. Buff Ornlngtons. Fine, large, 
strong, vigorous birds, true Orpington type 
and fine color, bred from a prize winning 
strain. Get prices. Can please you. Five 
choice pens mated for eggs. Place orders. 
"^'■. T. Harrington. Brunswick. O. 12-3 

BOOK ON ORPINGTONS! SEND 10c TO- 
day for club book! Tells why Blacks are 
best of Orpingtons. The favorite of all who 
breed the three varieties together. Tells of 
Australian Government proof of laying su- 
])remacy.; most rapidly maturing fowl; 
largest per cent of white meat; largest and 
most beautiful of Orpingtons. Milton 
Brown, Secretary, Cheviot Poultry Farms, 
Cincinnati, O. 12-10 



POULTRY FANCIER: 



ORPINGTONS. SINGLE COMB BUFF. 
Choice cockerels and pullets for sale. $2, $3 
and $5 each. Large early hatched birds. 
Eggs for sale after Feb. 1 from six pens at 
$2 per 15, $10 per 100. B. S. Long, Little 
Sioux, la. 12-3 

1.^)0 S. C. BUFF ORPINGTONS AT PRICES 
that will satisfy, quality considered. Have 
j)leased many. Let us show you. Get our 
egg circular after Feb. 1 and place your 
order early. Major Griffin. R. 27, Glenwood, 
Tnd. 12-3 

.'=5. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. EVERY ONE 
a show bird, winners in the leading shows 
of Northern New York. Cockerels. $5 and 
up. Orders booked for eggs at $2 and $3 
per 15. Day old chicks. 25 cts. each. 
Brook View Stock Farms, Rte, 3, Pulaski, 
N. Y. 12-4 




KELLERSTRASS STRAIN CRYSTAL 

White Orpingtons. Breeders first prize win- 
ners direct from Kellerstrass. Fine cocker- 
els and pullets for sale. Get my prices on 
eggs and stock. W. D. Barrett. Shelton, 
Neb. 2-9-12 

FOR THE BEST ORPINGTONS', ANY OF 
the varieties, you must send to their origi- 
nators, who, naturally, have the best. Send 
six cents for catalog, history of Orpingtons 
and hints on Poultry keeping. William Cook 
& Sons, Box C, Scotch Plains. N. J. 
^ 1-10-12 

12 FINE S. C. WHITE ORPINGTON COCK- 
erels, $2.r)0 to $6, according to score. These 
birds will put new vigor in your flocks. 
Have mated some extra fine pens, eggs, $3 
per 15; 30 for $5. You will be sure to be 
pleased if you send me your order. .las. 
r. Olson, Harlan, Iowa. 1-3 

SINGLE COMB HUFF AND KEI.LER- 
strass White Orpingtons. Eggs from 3 pens 
Buffs correctly mated. $2, $3 and $5 per 15. 
Limited number eggs from 2 pens extra 
fine Wliites $5 and $10 per 15. Circular 
free. Alice J. Morriss, Big Rock. 111. 1-3 



S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. OWEN BROS, 
strain. Fine stock for sale from prize win- 
ners. Eggs from choice mated pens. Prices 
within reach of all. Mrs. H. Wedderspoon. 
Cooperstown, N. Y., Perthmoose Farms. 



1-: 



BLACK ORPINGTON (WRRY THE 

world's record for best winter layers. Eggs 
for hatching in season. Scored cockerels for 
sale. Write me for prices. W. J. Schmitt. 
D'ltipr'iisdn. Iowa. I-3 

RHODE ISLAND REDS. 



ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND RED COCK- 
erels and pullets for sale from high scor- 
ing birds, after Nov. 16. Scored by Heim- 
lich. Free from smut, good color, combs 
and eyes. Eggs in season. Mrs. C. H. 
"U'est. FarinR. Fayette County. Ill 11 -3 



ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS THAT 
are right. Prize winners at leading Missouri 
shows. Can please the most exacting. Cor- 
respondence answered promptly. Place e^p: 
orders now. Grand pens mated, headed by 
cockerels from first prize pen at Trenton 
show. Day old chicks. Write Arthur S. 
f^'lTPP, T'nionville, Mo. i2-3 



BE IN THE FASHION AND RAISE 
Rhode Island Reds. Some choice Rose Comb 
cockerels and pullets at prices that will suit 
you. Let me fill your order. Eggs when 
you want them. Place order now. Wllber 
Bellows, li. Box 405, Anoka. Minn. 12-3 



25 R. C. RED COCKERELS, $2 TO $3 
each, according to quality. Some dandles 
among the lot. Get your pick. All fine big 
birds. Eggs, $1 per 15. Book your orders 
now. Red and White Poultry Farm, Colts 
Neck. N. .1. 12-3 



R. C. AND S. C. RHODE ISLAND RED 
cocks and cockerels. Have good color and 
shape, descendants of Buffalo and Boston 
winners: some have score cards. My birds 
were winners at Oconomowoc. Milwaukee 
and Waukesha. Prices reasonable. Egg or- 
ders booked now. Chas. G. Wheeler, Dous- 
ninn. Wis. ' 12-3 




S. r. R. I. REDS. SELECT COCKERELS 
for sale. Healthy, vigorous, good color and 
free from smut. My stock has won the 
blue ribbons In strongest competition for 
seven years. Write for description. Eggs 
for sale. V. Hlbnor. Aurora. 111. 12-3 



MEADOW LAWN POULTRY YARDS' 
Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds exclusively. 
Some nice, large cockerels for sale from 
])rlze winners at leading shows. Eggs from 
choice matings In season. Send for mating 
list. Gorrespondence solicited. H. J. Mil- 
ler, Albert Lea. Minn, 12-3 

RHODE ISLAND REDS. SINGLE COMB. 
Eggs In season. Good stock at right price. 
Describe what you seek ^\hen writing and 
address E. O. Uhllg, Holdrege, Neb. 11-3 



1 January. *10 T; 

f7":'^?r"7~^-,'"""^r----','---^r'';.>,-?'^^-; 

E. S. BECKER, PROP. GLEN VIEW 
Poultry Farm, Route 3, Elmira, N. Y., 
ofTers fine bargains in high scoring S. C. 
Rhode Island Reds. Book orders now for 
eggs and day old chicks. Several fine cock- 
erels for sale. Correspondence solicited. 

12-3 



SOME EARLY CHOICE ROSE COMB RET) 
pullets and cockerels. Lester Tompkins 
strain. Cockerels expectlonally good. Place 
egg orders early. First pen $2.50 per 15 
eggs, $4 per 30. Fertility guaranteed. Dr. 
W. G. Bradshaw, Ogden. Iowa. 11-3 

MY ROSE AND SINGLE rOMB RHODE 
Island Reds are first prize winners wherever 
shown. Won the lion's share at Springfield 
and Holyoke. Can send you birds that will 
improve your flock. Eggs. $3 per setting. 
Valley Farm, 94 East Main St., Amherst, 
Mass. 1-3 

SINGLE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS 
Exclusively. I showed 6 pullets and 4 cock- 
erels at Peoria, 111., Dec, 1909, and won 8 
prizes. I showed no old birds. Will sell 
the four cockerels. Also eggs in season. 
Write for prices and matings. Davis Crows, 
Hanna City. 111. 



S. C. R. I. RED COCKERELS FOR SALE. 
Fine birds at reasonable prices. Eggs from 
best matings at $2 per 15. Free range 
stock. $1 per 15; $5 per 100. Mrs. H. L. 
Alsop, Sylvia, Iowa. 1-3 

HIGH CLASS S. C. R. I. REDS FOR SALE. 
Original birds direct from Lester Tompkins. 
Scoring 91 to 93. E'ggs from pens 1, 2, 3, 
$1, $2, and $3 per 15. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed. Isaac IT Painter. Ghrisnev, Tnd 
' 1-3 

LIBERAL POULTRY YARD. SINGLE 

Gomb Rhode Island Reds. Eggs: First 




$2.50 per 15 

pen, $1.50 

other pens, 

per 100. C. 



; second pen, $2 per 15; 

per 15. Incubator eggs 

$4 per 100; farm range, 

I. W. Adkisson, Galatla, 

1-4 



ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS. WON 
first at Pef)iia. Dec. 14 to IS, 1909; first 
at I>incoln, Dec. 14 to 17, 1909. Eggs, $3, 
$2 and $1 per 15. Utility, $5 per 100. J. 
B. Garber, Hopedale, 111. 1.3 



'I'O BREEDERS OF S. C. U. J. REDS. I 
have a limited number of egj:;s to sell from 
my prize winning pen. None better. F. C. 
Eld ridge fi- Son, Bourne, Mass. 9-9-12 



BUCKEYES. 



BUCKEYE REDS. UNEQUALLED FOR 
os;g: production and market qualities. Get 
acquainted with this grand new breed, the 
handsomest of reds and wonderful winter 
layers. Limited quantity of stock for sale. 
A few fine colored cockerels at a bargain. 
Address Fred A. Woodmansee. Galesburg 
111.. member of National Red Feather 
11-3 

LIGHT BRAHMAS. 



Club. 



LIGHT BRAHMAS. BOTH OLD AND 
young stock for sale. Have first premiums 
from London and Guelph. Canada, Cedar 
Rapids. Waterloo and Waverlv Ta Write 
for circular. Chas. Hunt. Box' 14, Clarks- 
vllle. Ta. 2-9-12 



PRIZE WINNING LIGHT BRAHMAS. 
Winners at leading western shows. Grand 
cockerels for sale. Great big fellows, good 
In all points. Get prices now. as they won't 
last loner. Letters answered promptly. Burt 
Giirtls. .MUson. Iowa. " tj.«^ 



LIGHT BRAHMAS. PT'RE' FELCH STRAIN 
line bred for sixty years. Greatest winter 
layers of large, brown eggs. Fine young 
stock for sale. Including a few birds direct 
from Felcb's best eges. Prices reasonable 
W. W. Took University Heights. Madison' 
11-3 

BLACK LANGSHANS. 



wis. 



BREEDER OF THOROT^niTBRFD PRIZE 
winning Black Langshans. Fine voung stock 
for sale. Inquire Frank McMullen Mari- 
etta. Pa. ' ^^^^_^ 



TWELVE YEARS A BREEDER OF BLACK 
Tiangshans exclusively. Some nice cockerels 
bred from prize winners for sale Ee-trs after 
March 1. 1910. at $1.50 nor 15. Write your 
wants to Mrs. L, A. McGracken. Bonaparte 
Iowa. 1'>-3 



THE QTTALITY OF MY BLAGK LANG- 
«bnns is proved by their show record. You 
don't take chances when you send me your 
order. I can start you right or Improve 
your flock with some of the grand birds T 
now have for sale. Scores to 95 lA in 
show room. Prices ritrht. Eggs in" season. 
U rite me. Mrs Frank Camerer, Gazette 
Mo. i.g 



t O 



• • 



• 




t 






J anuary. *10 

21 YEARS A BREEDER OF THE BEST 
Black langshans. Have a show record un- 
der leading Judges unequaled by any other 
breeder. Male birds each season score to 
951/^, females 96 1/^. Buy where you know 
that you will get the highest quality at 
reasonable prices. Have some grand cocks 
and cockerels to spare, scoring from 94 
to 951/^; also some extra choice hens. Made 
a clean sweep at the Eastern Wisconsin 
show this season and won silver cup for 
best pen in the show three years, all breeds 
competing, score 191%. A. Stransky, Pres. 
Eastern Wis. Poultry & P. S. Assn., Chilton 
VV'«- 11-9-12 

WHITE LANGSHANS. 



WHITE DIAMOND STRAIN WHITE 
Langshans. Winners at Illinois State Fair, 
St. Louis and many other prominent shows. 
Our strain originated from the oldest and 
best black Langshans in America and the 
world. Best winter layers. Stock for sale 
at all prices. T. J. Usselmann, St. Libory, 
111- 11-3 



BUTF COCHINS. 



OUR BUFF COCHINS HAVE FOR YEARS 
been acknowledged leaders. Their record at 
the largest shows has placed them In the 
front rank. My birds have been given the 
highest possible scores by many of Ameri- 
ca's leading Judges. They are clear buff, 
true to type and grandly feathered. My 
Buff Bantams are equally as good. Eggs 
$3 and $5 per 15. Leslie Parlin, 19 Phalen 
Ave.. St. Paul, M inn. 3-9-12 

SOME' DANDY BUFF COCHIN COCKER- 
els for sale. Hanchett strain, good buff 
color. Only a limited to dispose. Write 
quick if you want one. Correspondence an- 
swered promptly. C. J. L. Ware, 551 Marl- 
boro St., Keene, N. H. 12-3 

BUFP^ COCHIN SPECIALIST TEN YEARS. 
Have two finest pens mated for the egg 
trade in the United States, bred from the 
world's best winners at leading shows. Val- 
uable illustrated catalogue for stamp, show- 
ing prices and winnings. S. Berger, Pleasant 
Hill. O. 12-3 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 

SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORNS. EX- 
tra good ones. Good combs, white lobes, 
red eyes, snow-white plumage, correct in 
back and tail. Prize winners wherever 
shown. Satisfaction guaranteed. Cockerels 
$1 and $1.50 each. E. G. Judy, Potomac, 
111. 11-3 

BERWICK WHITE LEGHORN POULTRY 
Yards. Breeder of Blanchard strain. Have 
several cockerels for sale. Price $2 and 
more. Cocks scoring 93 to 93%, $5 and 
more. Eggs in season, $2 per 15, $5 per 
100. Now booking orders for delivery In 
season. Fred Prue, Prop., Box 315, Ber- 
wick, Me. 11-3 



SUNCREST SINGLE COMB WHITE LBG- 
horns. Line bred ten years. We have 
pleased hundreds of customers. Can please 
you. Write for catalogue. Suncrest Poultry 
Farm, R. 1, Box F, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
_^ 3-9-12 

S. G. WHITE LEGHORNS THAT HAVE 
size, shape and color. Bred from my win- 
ners at Hartford, Meriden, Manchester, 
Springfield. Holyoke and Boston. Eggs, $2 
per setting. W. J. Blake, Burnside, Conn. 
8-9-12 

BIG BARGAIN IN S. C. WHITE LEG- 
horns. Don't overlook this chance. Our 
pens are so crowded that we must sell at 
once a large number of birds, including 
extra choice specimens. Our birds score 
from 93 to 96 1^ by Judge Heck and the 
leading Judges. Not a poor bird In our 
flock. Our birds have many first prizes, 
cups and sweepstake prizes at good shows. 
Have a special lot of cockerels at $3 to $5. 
Be sure to write us. Address S. C. White 
Leghorn Plant, 1030 Central Ave., Wilmette, 
IlK 12-2 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORN EGGS FOR 
hatching after Feb. 1, from heavy laying 
standard bred stock, at $1 per 15, $4 per 100. 
Fertility and satisfaction guaranteed. C H. 
Zurburg, R. 1.. Topeka, 111. 12-3 

SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORNS FOR 
sale from loading prize winning strains. 
Good shape and color cocks, $1.50; hens 
and pullets, $1 each. I am selling out 
my entire stock of Leghorns, therefore will 
make these low prices, E. H. Olson, R. 1, 
Thor, Iowa. \'^ 

SINGLE (T)MB WHITE LEGHORNS. 
Choice stock for sale. We make a spec- 
ialty of supplying breeders with foimdation 
stock. Prices from $2 to $1 for pullets 
and cockerels, according to merit. Eggs 
for hatching, $2 per 15; $5 per 50. Beaver 
Dam Poultry Farm, Montgomery, N. Y. 1-3 



POULTRY FANCIER^ 



R. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 

DR. DOMBART, EVANS CITY, PA., HAS 
Rose Comb White Leghorns that won 16 
ttists, 11 seconds. 8 thirds, 8 fourths and 3 
silver cups at Pittsburg, New Castle and 
Evans City shows. Write me. 11-3 

I OFFER YOU THE HIGHEST QUALITY 
in R. C. White Leghorns at prices you can 
afford to pay. My birds are first prize 
Chicago winners. They will win for you 
and breed winners. Stock for sale, in- 
cluding some special cockerels and hens. 
Mrs. W. Jones Williams, Maywood, 111. 11-3 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 

SINGLE COMB BROWN LEGHORNS 
Bought part of David Kehm's (Wittman's 
strain) prize winners. Limited number pul- 
let bred cockerels, $3 to $5. Eggs for 
batching, $4, $3 and $2 per 15. Satisfac- 
tion guaranteed. Send orders in early. 
R. C. Sechler, 526 Washington, Allentown, 
Pa. 11-3 




a^*.'jjm.. '^■^'■■w^vA' ' '-^ } .^'-v-^.. 'km ^ 



S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS, BRED FOR 
shape, color and laying qualities. Pullet 
bred cockerels, the finest show and laying 
breeders in existence, cheap. H. M. Moyer, 
R. 2, Bechtelsville, Pa. 11-9-12 

liO CHOICE S. C. BROWN LEGHORN 
cockerels at special prices to close out. De- 
scribe Just what you want. I know I can 
please you. Egg orders booked now, either 
Brown or Buff Leghorns. Prices right. O. 
R. Rice, Delavan, Wis. 12-3 

INVINCIBLE SINGLE COMB BROWN 
Leghorn cockerels — both lines. Cockerel- 
bred females, $2 up. Pens and trios mated 
scientifically. Photos of show birds on re- 
quest. Correspondence solicited. Harry T. 
Trainer, Carpenter, O. 5-9-12 

PRAY'S POULTRY FARM. PRAY'S S. C. 
Brown Leghorns have been bred for show 
purposes and heavy egg production. Have 
free range and are fine. Show birds, $5 
each; breeding cockerels, $2; eggs, $1.50 to 
$3 for 15, $6 per 100. Geo. L. Pray, Ovid 
St., So. Elsie. Mich^ 12-3 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS BRED FOR 
shape and color and laying qualities. Tills 
line of females won first prize at New 
York, Boston, Chicago, Hagerstown, Allen- 
town, Reading, Williamsport, Penna. State 
Fair, etc. One of my pullets was one of 
the best that was ever exhibited at Hagers- 
town. I have had also the best pullet this 
year at Allentown, Reading and Williams- 
port, etc., the only shows I exhibited this 
season. I have the genuine WMttman's 
strain and have 100 pullet-bred cockrels 
of above blood for sale. Price of two-thirds 
full grown, $1.50; larger, $3. I guarantee 
satisfaction and safe arrival. Order from 
this advertisement, as they must be sold 
quick. The above is not half what they 
are worth. H. M. Moyer, R. 2, Bechtels- 
ville, Pa. 1-1 

BUFF LEGHORNS. 

S. C. BUFF LEGHORNS. 1ST CKL PHILA- 
delphia, 1909, will head my pen. Eggs $3 per 
13. Book orders early as this is my only pen. 
Harper W. Blyler. Lebanon, Pa. 2-9-12 

EGGS AND STOCK FROM S. O. DECKER'S 
prize winning, trap nested S. C. Buff Leg- 
horns. Write me for prices and winnings. Cor- 
respondence a pleasure. S. O. Decker, R. 12. 
Box 18., Defia nce. O. 2-9-12 

S. C. BUFF LEGHORNS— SOME FINE 
cockerels for sale. They are beauties at $2, 
$3 and 5 each, sired by a son of first cock, 
Madison Square Garden, 1908. Eggs, $2 per 
13. F. D. Kemp. Sparta. Wis. 12-4 

ROSE COMB BUFF LEGHORNS. OUR 
birds are good layers, large and healthy 
with good combs and good buff color. Just 
tbe kind you want. Eggs, $1 for 15, $5 for 
100. No stock for sale. Sunnyside Poultry 
Farm. « '. (\ Glasgo. Loudonville, O. 1-3 

HUFF LEGHORNS, SINGLE COMB. BRED 
from Chicago winners. Two pens mated. 
Produce show specimens only. I^ow, well 
spread tails guaranteed. Elegant, golden, 
even buff. Eggs, $3 per 15, produce speci- 
mens cfiualing the best. Dr. C. E. Hoover, 
Edgerton, O. 1-3 

BLACK LEGHORNS. 

BREED'S BLACK LEGHORNS ARE WIN- 
ners and layers. They have proven their 
abilities to many and will to you. Grand 
.stock for sale. Let us book your order 
now for eggs or day-old chicks. S. Mat- 
thew Breed, Cincinnatus, N. Y. 11-3 



Page 23 







BLACK MINORCAS. 



BLACK ROSE COMB MINORCAS FOR 
sale, Campbell-MIshler-Clark strain. Pul- 
lets $2 each, cockerels $3 each. Eggs in 
season. Book orders now. Also Indian 
Runner Ducks for sale at $1.50 each. Mrs. 
Geo. Webst er, R. 2, Columbia, Tenn. 11-3 

SINGLE COMB BLACK MINORCA STOCK 
and eggs for sale. Northup strain. All 
stock sold with score card. Heidemann & 
Co., Brighton, 111. 11.3 

ROSE COMB BLACK MINORCAS. STOCK 
for sale; cockerels $2 to $5. hens and pul- 
lets $2 to $4. Eggs $2 and $2.50 per 15 
from first prize winners Chicago, Cleveland 
and Cincinnati. J. M. Glass, Sta. A.. Cin- 
cinnati, O. ii_3 



10 SINGLE COMB BLACK MINORCA 
cockerels. Fine head points, low tails, big 
bone, fine color. Your chance to get some 
fine ones for shows. Also 1 Rose Comb 
Cock, fine show bird, D. C. Huggett, Grand 
Ledge, Mich. 11-3 



ROSE COMB BLACK MINORCAS. EXHI- 

bition and breeding cockerels, $2 up. Pure 
Northup strain. Grand large birds. Every 
one a bargain. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Circulars. Eggs, $2 for 15. Book your or- 
ders now. James F. Gleason, Michigan City 
l^ 12-3 

PURE ROSE COMB BLACK MINORCAS. 
A few choice cockerels for sale, bred from 
winnmg stock at the leading shows in this 
state. Book your egg orders early from 
three choice pens. Dr. E. H. Drews, Madi- 
son. Wis. 12-3 

NOW IS THE TIME TO PURCHASE A 
cockerel if you desire to introduce some 
new blood in your stock next season. I 
have a fine lot of them for sale at rea- 
sonable prices. Remember, I am the largest 
exclusive breeder of S. C. Black Minorcas 
m the United States or Canada. Give me 
a trial and I am confident 1 can please 
you. Cannot spare any cocks, hens or 
pullets. Write for catalog. Frank Mc- 
Grann, prop. Whatglen Farm, Box 417 P. F., 
Lancaster, Pa. i_i 

MUST SELL AT ONCE. FEW VERY FINE 
a. C. Black cockerels from my noted "Oul- 
cout" Minorca. Booking egg orders. Blacks 
and whites. Pullet record, 27 eggs In 
Jan., 1909. Six ribbons on 7 entries 1909. 
Oscar F. Sampson , Franklin, N. Y. 1-3 

1 BREED FOR QUALITY AND SIZE. S. 
C. Black Minorca eggs, $2 per 13. Cockerels 
tor sale. I. A llison, Florence, Neb. 1-4 

SINGLE COAIB BLACK MINORCAS, Ex- 
clusive winners of 5 firsts at Shelbyville, 
Lebanon and Sheridan poultry shows. 
Scores, 93 to 94 1/^, by Judges McCracken, 
Kummer and Greer. Eggs, $1.50 and $2 
per 15. Fertility guaranteed. H. A. Brat- 
lin, Brazil, Ind. 1.3 

ROSE COMB BLACK AND ROSE COMB 
White Minorcas. First prize winners at 
New Y'ork, Chicago, St. Louis and all large 
shows. Breeding stock and eggs for hatch- 
ing guaranteed. Large stock. Great layers 
Catalog mailed free. G. A. Clark, Sey- 
mour Ind. ' j^_3 



ANCONAS. 



MOTTLED ANCONAS. MARVELOUS EGG 
producers! i won every first and second 
but one at great Minnesota and Wisconsin 
state shows. Fine exhibition birds, both 
comb.s. Magnificent yellow-legged Rose 
Combs. Free circular. Dr. Guy Blencoe, 
Vice President American Ancona Club, Al- 
ma Center, Wis. 11-3 

SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURGS. 



SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURGS, STAN- 
dard bred. Lot of fine cockerels, some few 
choice pullets, for sale. Great layers. Egg 
orders booked now for spring delivery. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Denton Warehelm, 
Lineboro. Md. 11.4 

FOR SALE— LINE BRED SILVER SPANG- 
led Hamburgs. Winners 17 ribbons one 
show. Also highest scoring eight birds. 
Will dispose of cocks, hens, cockerels, pul- 
lets. Eggs In season. None better for 
breeding and eggs. Write Wauconda Poul- 
try Farm. Benton Harbor. Mich. 12-3 

FAVEROLLES. 

BREED SALMON FAVEROLLES. CAN 
send you some fine ones, all bred from 
first prize winners at leading shows. This 
popular breed of French fowls is unexcelled 
for utility and fancy. Egg orders booked 
for spring delivery. C. P. McAndrew, Ells- 
worth, Wis. 11-8 



I 




v^., — : — I- --^^^.fi-^ St / -w-i-..-', ^-^^<;^»^^1 



Page 24 



■ r,r<-<'ii iiv-i- 'a,., 



'■;^"^v^^^:?.y-Tj 




CORNISH 



12 YEARS A BREEDER OF CORNISH 
and we have better birds this year than 
ever. All bred from prize winners at 
leading shows Old birds for sale scoring 
to 93 1/^. Young stock to be scored Nov. 20. 
Describe what you want. Customers always 
pleased. Egg orders booked. Mrs. S. A. 
Hawk. R. 3. Chariton, Iowa. 11-3 



CORNISH FOWL,. MADISON SC^UARE, 
Jamestown Exposition. Allentown, Trenton, 
Hagerstown, Philadelphia winners. Old and 
young stock for sale. Egg orders booked 
now. Circular free. R. D. Reider, Middle- 
town, Pa. 12-3 

POLISH, 

WHITE CRESTED BLACK POLISH, LINE 
bred for 25 years. Winners at World's Fair, 
New York and Boston. Remember that See- 
ly is the veteran Polish breeder of America. 
Stock for sale; eggs in season. Chas. L.. Seely, 
Pres. Am. Po lish Club, Afion, N. Y. 5-9-12 

W. C. B. I'Oi^iSH. A FEW CHOICE 
cockerels for sale. Bred from wmneis at 
Herkimer, Utica, Rochester and Buffalo. 
Birds are sure to please. Eggs after Feb. 
15. Don't fail to get my prices. Warren 
W. Dickens, Box ^ 3, Middlfvilk", N. V. 1-3 

BANTAMS. 



RARE BARGAINS, GOEDEN AND SILVER 
Sebright, Buff and Black Cochin. Rose Comb 
Black and Black Red Game Baniam.s. High- 
est honors New York. 60U birds. I'ruper & 
Co., Schoharie. N. Y. 8-9-12 



GOLDEN SEABRIGHT BANTAMS FOR 
sale. Birds scoring 93 to 95%. Won at 
Newton, 111., in lively competition, first cock, 
first and second cockerel, llrst, second and 
third pullet. Eggs after March 1, .•$3 per 
Sftting. Dale Arnold, Newton, 111. i-i 

HOUDANS. 



HOUDANS— BLUE RIBBONS AND SILVEK 
cup winners. Write me for prices on eggs. 
Laura B. Rel ff. Idaville, lud. 2-0«-12 

HOUDANS. WINNERS WHEREVER 

shown. 1st at Phila., Allentown, Norris- 
town. Pa.. 1908, Phila., 1909, lifteen rib- 
bons with ten entries. Stock and eggs for 
sale. J. Emlen Smith, Chestnut Hill, Phila- 
delphia. Pa. 3-9-12 

CHOICE HOUDANS. Cocks, cockerels, hens 
and pullets to close out at reasonable prices. 
Write, stating just what you want. Supply 
limited. Order at once if you want a bar- 
gain. Birds are good in all points and will 
b'ive satisfaction. J. B. Belknap, R. 3, 
Council Bluffs, Iowa. 12-3 

llOUDAN EGGS FROM McAVOY'S AND 
Dr. Taylors .strain. Have raised them 3 
years. Have 50 pullets and hens, from 
which will ship eggs for hatching at $1.50 
for 15, or $7 per 100. J. D. Payne, Water- 
loo, Ind. 1-3 

GAMES. 



GAMES — INDIAN GAMES, WINNERS 
wherever shown. If you want a show bird 
or breeder write me. I have the goods. 
Grand lot cockerels; also 30 pit game cocks 
and stags. 18 years a breeder and exhibitor. 
Eggs In season. J. Boyce, Summitville, 
N. Y. 12-3 



DOMINIQUES. 



DAVENPORT'S AMERICAN DOMINIQUES 
won at New York 1908 every first prize of- 
fered; 1909 six of the ten firsts and seconds. 
Write for circulars and prices. W. H. Dav- 
enport. Coleraine, Mass. 5-9-12 



BABY CHICKS. 



FINE BABY CHICKS, 8 CENTS EACH; 
shipped safely anywhere. Partly grown 
chicks, 30 cents each. Eggs for hatching, 
%i per 100. Place your spring orders now 
before prices advance. Write for booklet 
and remember that we are pioneers in low 
prices for fine poultry. Culver Poultry 
Farm, 501 Fifth Ave., Benson, Neb. 11-3 

E. AND D. HATCHEIIV, YARDLEV. 1>A., 
shippers of day-old chicks and eggs from 
high grade stock of the leading varieties. 
Expres.s paid and safe arrival guaranteed 
east of the Missi.'^sippi river. VViite for 
ll.st of varieties and prices. I-3 



PHEASANTS. 



ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANTS $5 A 
pair. China Rlngneck Pheasants. $7.50 a 
pair. Write Jennie Milner. Bloomlngton, 



POULTRY FANClERr 



PHEASANT BREEDING PAYS 800 PBR 
cent better than chicken raising. A pair of 
pheasants are worth from $25.00 to $150.00 
to a breeder yearly. Read the Reliable 
I'heasant Standard, the recognized authority 
on pheasant breeding, and learn all about 
this rich industry. 75 cents a copy by mail 
from A. V. Meersch, Poughkeepsie, New 
York. 9-08-tf 

AMllEliST, GOLDEN, SILVER, REEV1<:, 
Mongolian, Elliot versicolor, English, Pied 
and Swinhoe Pheasants, i'ure bred, healthy 
birds. No duty on i^heasants. Price list 
free. John Downham, Strathioy, Ont., 
Canada. 11-3 



TURKEYS. 



BRONZE TURKEiS. First cockerel, sec- 
"nu, imrd, fouiiii pullei, hrst pen ai Illi- 
nois state show 1909; first cockerel, first 
i»ullet at I'eoria. 1908. William Ringhouse, 
a. 2, Box Y, H avana, 111. 3-9-12 

FOR SALE MAMMOTH BltONZE TUR- 
Keys. A fine strain of good layers, large 
bone and frame, and nicely marked; bred 
from prize winning stock from Madison 
Square Garden. Order early. Prices rea- 
sonable considering quality. Mrs. Mary 
Schoonmaker, R. 1, M e-shoppon, Pa. 1 1 

Jii;oNZl<: TURKEY i'ZGGS, $2 PER 10, ANu 
genuine Wild ivialiard Duck eggs, $1..)0 
per 10. Order eany. Will snip when 
wanted. H, W. Fairali, Iowa City, lowa. 

1-4 



DUCKS AND GEESE. 



EXTliA LARGE TOULOUSE Gii^ESE FOR 
sale at right prices. Write me before 
placing your order elsewhere. Can send 
you buds that will give satisfaction. Edw. 
J. liess, Itie. 14, Caledonia, Wis. II-3 



iHOROUGHBRED TOULOUSE GEESE, 
•no and $12 per pair. My geese are prize 
winners. Fancy White Rocks and Rouen 
Ducks. Eggs in season from each variety. 
Mrs. L. L. S w in ford, Oakland, HI. 12-3 

INDIAN RUNNER DUCKS. IMPORTED 
Slock, Magnificent exhibition strain. Flock 
average 2U4 eggs each per year. We are 
booking egg orders from tlie best stock in 
the entire country at only $2 per 11. Hill- 
crest Duck Farm, G. W. Maglott, Manager, 
Bellville. O. 11.3 



BLACK CAYUGA DUCKS AND WHITE 
Holland Turkeys for sale. Also a few Afri- 
can Geese (females only). Let me book 
your orders now for eggs from the above 
varieties. Satisfactory hatches guaranteed. 
Correspondence solicited. Floyd S. Beau- 
mont, R. 15. Kansasville, Wis. 12-3 



PIGEONS. 



1 OFFER GUARANTEED 
in any quantity, at $1.00 _ ^_.., 
lenge squab companies or dealers 
better stock at twice this price. 
White Homers. $1.50 a pair. Get 
on Runts. Carneaux and Maltese 
save dollars. Charles K. Gilbert, 



MATED HOMERS 

a pair, and chal- 

to produce 

Beautiful 

my prices 

Hens, and 

1563 East 



Montgomery Ave.^ Philadelphia. Pa. 8-9-12 

WANTED— 5,000 COMMON OR HOMER 
Pigeons. Pay at least 25c pair. Highest 
prices paid for Guinea Fowls, Live Rabbits 
and Guinea Pigs. S. Gilbert. 1128 Palmer 
St., I'hiladelphia, Pa. 12-5 

FERRETS. 



4,000 FERRETS. 
They hustle rats 
dium and large 
color. Prices and 
Knapp. Rochester, 



SOME ARE TRAINED, 
and rabbits. Small, me- 

size. Light and dark 
book mailed free. N. A. 

O. 11-3 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



•WANTED"— PIGEON DUNG. WRITE 

Pfistor & Vogel Leather Co., Milwaukee, 
Wis., for prices, etc. 10-3 



A FINE 160- ACRE FARM IN THE WHEAT 
belt of Kansas, 19 miles from Abilene, 
county seat Dickinson county. Four miles 
from R. R. Now being used for pasture;, 
good wire fence, good water the year round. 
Will sell below the market on reasonable 
terms. Non-resident widow owns it and 
has no use for it. Some improvements. 
Address K. F., care Poultry Fancier, 357 
Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 



I CAN SEND YOU WHITE ROCKS THAT 
are right. Birds score from 93 to 95% 
and are first prize winners. Will improve 
your flock and win for you. Eggs. $2, $3, 
$5 per 15. Send me your order now. Robt. 
Walker, 233 Port er St., Now Castle, Pa. 1-3 

SINGLE COMB lillODIO ISLAND REDS. 
Fggs in season from excellent laying strain. 
Pen No. 1, $2 per 15; pen No. 
15. Utility flock, $1 per 15 
hundred. Mrs. Harvey Truitt, 
Ington, 111. 



2, 


$1 


.50 


per 


or 


$5 


per 


R. 


1. 


Parm- 








1-3 




January. *10 





POULTRY SUPPLIES. 



K. C. WHITE ORPINGTONS FOR SALE, 
Cooli's strain, $1.50 up. Orders booked for 
eggs and early chicks. Orpington and Light 
Brahmas. B^ull line of Incubators and 
Brooders equipped with flame controlling 
device. You can't burn up the eggs with 
this incubator. Rebuilt and second-hand 
incubators, guaranteed to give satisfaction 
or money refunded. 10 per cent discount 
given on all orders received up to Jan. 15. 



Geo. Boyer. Spencerville, O. 



11-3 



PROF. JOHN EVANS' REMEDIES FOR 
roup, rattling in throat, canker, chicken- 
pox, scaly legs and frozen combs has no 
equal. I^rice 50 cents per box. Send for 
free .sample. 500 Columbian Wyandottes 
and Rocks from my New York and Boston 
winners. Cranston. R. L 11-3 



'lOKD— PRICE PER 100 
$2.75, meat and bone 
$2.25, hen scratching 
scratching grains 



.•52, 



■•>, 



LBS. 

$2.25, 

grains 

poultr,v 

alfalfa 

shells 

crystal 



I'OULTUV 1 

Beef scraps 

ground bom* 

$LSr,, chick 

mash $1.S0. pigeon grain $2.2 

clover meal $1.50, crushed oyster 

65c. crushed clam shells 60c, mica 

grit 65c, pearl grit 60c. medicated charcoal 

$1.50. The meat and bone, shells, grit 

and charcoal in both hen and chick size. 

Give us a trial order. J. G. Hermann & 

Co., Iiuiianapoli.s, Ind. 11-6 

TWO INCUBATORS FOR SALE ClllOAI'. 
Good as new. Have had 90 per cent hatches 
with tliem. 50 and 120 egg sizes; be quick. 
Isaac L. Snllais. Washington C. H., O. 1-1 

PRINTING. 

PRINTING— POULTRY, GENERAL, NOTE- 
heads, envelopes, postcards, labels, cards, 
tags. 100 either, 40c; 250, 75c; 500, $1.25, 
postpaid. Circulars, everything. Finest en- 
gravings. Beautiful samples for stamp. 
Model Printing Co., Manchester, la. 10-9 



Wilkinson's White Rocks 

anrl I4rfeiir1»n« ^^^ P"^^ winners. 

ana nouaans pine lot of puiiets 

and cockerels for sale at $2. 50 to $10.00. Write 
me your wants. 

W. T. WILKINSON 

Box 15 G, East Des Moines, lowa 



S. C. R. I. REDS 

Business Birds 
— of Quality — 

Vigorous range bred birds from heavy winter 
laying Strain. They win Silver Cups too 

TOP NOTCH POULTRY FARM 
R. P. GUPTILL, prop. ELCHO, WIS. 




TRAP NEST 

niti'lc Iji !i few inhiiites 
ver Hliiipie aiwl rt-jlahle 
••omplete pinnH 10 centH. 
(t. o. .SMnllvHnt. IJox 8, 
Sheboygiin FallP. Wis. 



}. 






Mmiiii"inM'ii!rinii 



M]'i;iwiiii,,,[i;|iiiiniii))ii|||||i|||iMmin^ Mi)| 



POULTRY PEHCf 

STOCK STRONG -RUST PROOF 

Madeofcxtra heavy double K^alvanized wires. 

No top or bottom boards required. 

Chick ti«:ht— bottom wires onlv 1 in. apart 

COSTS NO MORE THAN NETTING 



X^V yet will last five times as long. 
K\ Send for catalog — we have 
160 st^'leM and 

can save you 

money. 
Write today 



^^ 



->*pio3rV 



^ 



: PAY THE 
FREIGHt/^ 



v. 



':f: 



yi 



BROWN PENCE & WIRE CO. DEPT 94. CLEVELANaQ 



c 



• 





t 




THE BOOK THAT EVERYBODY IS BUYING— 

Secrets of Expert Exhibitors 

And Easy Lessons in Judging— By Frank Heck 

A book that is new in character and the most valuable and interesting production ever published 
for breeders of exhibition fowls. No other book or similar publication comes within gunshot of it. It is 
in a class by itself. 

The time has gone by when a breeder can pick up birds right out of the yards and win with them without 
special preparation. This is true even in the smaller shows. There are always at least a few hustling, 
enterprising breeders in nearly every locality who are keenly alive to the financial profit and the honors ac« 
cruing from winning over all competitors. These breeders use all legitimate methods for putting their birds 
in show condition. 

FAKING AND LEGITIMATE PREPARATION ~ BOTH LAID BARE. 

Faking is certainly wrong and it should not be practiced, but even in legitimate show preparation what 

chance have you to win over one or more honest competitors who may have a copy of this book and 

' thereby possess the knowledge which enables them to fix up their birds in scores of ways that lire not known 

to you. Consider also the immense advantage you would have in being able to detect such forms of faking 

as can be discovered in cases where there may possibly be a dishonest exhibitor in the class. 

Wouldn't You Like to Know 



How to Straighten Lopped Spikes op Blades of Combs. 
How to Bring Out the Bright Red Color of Combs, Face and 

Watties. 
How Small Patches of White are Covered up in Red Ear 

Lobes. 
How Back Plumage is "Fixed" to Reduce the Angle at the 

Tail and Give a Nicer Curve to the Back. 
How to Clean the Plumage of Parti-Colored fowls for Show 

Without Washing. 
Removing Creaminess and Brassiness from White Birds. 
Covering up Off-Color in Black Plumage Including Purple 

Barring. 
How to Improve the Color of Any Parti-Colored Bird. 
How to Make a Bird of Its Own Accord Pose in the Show 

Coop. 

How to Add Lustre to Plumaqe of Dark Colored Fowls. 

How to Add Weight to Exhibition Birds Quickly. 

Coloring Yellow Legs. 

How Side Sprigs are Removed Without Leaving a Scar. 

How Foreign Color is Removed from Beaks. 

How the Plumage of Red Birds is Treated to Secure a Dark- 
er Shade of Color and Lustre. 

How White Tips are sometimes Removed from Barred Rock 
Plumage. 

Removing Traces of Stubs Pulled from Legs. 

How Foreign Color is Removed from thg Edrjes of Large 
Feathers. 

How Dark Streaks are Removed from the Quill of White 
Feathers. 

How Unscrupulous Exhibitors Have Been Known to Pre- 
vent a Competitor's Birds from Showing Properly. 

Putting Birds in Show Condition that Have Missing or 
Broken Feathers in Main Tail or Wing. 

Preventing Purple Barring in Black Fowls. 

Pi eventing Show Room Growth and Lopping of Comb. 



How Feathers are Spliced. 

Feeding to Produce a Darker Shade of Buff. 
How White Ear Lobes are treated for Small Defects In 
Color. 

A frequent Cause of Large, Beefy and Lopped Combs and 

How to Prevent Them. 
How to Artificially Moult Fowls in Nearly Half the Regular 

Time. 
How to Secure and Hold Profuse Toe and Leg Feathering on 

Feathered Legged Varieties. 
A Practically Unknown Cause of Lopped Combs and the 

Remedy, 
How to Prevent Light Colored Lens. 
How to Increase Gloss Sheen and Depth of Color In Moulting 

Male Birds. 
A cood Stimulant and Preventive of Colds in Birds Shipped 

to Shows in Extreme Cold Weather. 
How to Prevent Combs from Freezing when Bird§ are Ex- 
posed. 
One of the Causes of Off-Colored Feathers in Partl-Colored 

and Black Fowls. How to Remedy the Defect. 
How Sickle Feathers are Shortened without Clipping the 

Ends. 
What to Feed to Promote Feather Growth. 
Tonic for Maintaining Health and Appetite In Show Birds 

and to Counteract the Effects of Confinement. 
Preventing Brassiness from Appearing in White Birds. 
How to Clean Paint from Birds that have Come in Contact 

with Newly Painted Coops or Houses. 
How to Prevent Color Cuts on Plumage by Stopping the Flow 

of Blood from Comb, Wattles, etc., when Injured In the 

Show Room, 
Complete Detailed Instruction for Washing and Chemically 

Bleaching White Birds. 
How Black or Gray Specks In White Plumage are Hidden. 



THE ABOVE SUBJECTS ARE ONLY A PORTION OF THE CONTENTS. There are many other 
equally interesting, important and valuable secrets, many of them being alone worth the price of the book. 
There are many seemingly "little" things that are of great importance and that you would never think 
of. THE EASY LESSONS IN JUDGING ARE ALSO A FEATURE OF THE BOOK AND WILL 
TEACH YOU THE PRINCIPLES OF SCORING FOWLS. 

ALL THE METHODS, DRUGS, CHEMICALS AND VARIOUS MODES OF 
PREPARING BIRDS FOR THE SHOW ROOM ARE FULLY EXPLAINED. 

You need the book to protect yourself against the dishonest fakir and you need it to put yourself on 
an equal footing with your honest competitors. It will save you dollars in useless entry fees, and it will 
show you how to win the coveted prizes and honors which your rivals would otherwise receive. 

Have you ever bought a poultry book on general topics or disclosing some system or so-called secrets, 
and upon receipt of it had your expectations drop with a dull thud of disappointment? Well! this isn't that 
kind of a book. 

THE PRICE OF THE BOOK IS $2 AND IT IS WORTH THE PRICE. 

BiCH PURCHASER AGREES TO NOT DIVULGE TEE SECRETS OF THE BOOK EXCEPT TO MEMBERS OF HIS FAMILY. 

DON'T PUT OFF SENDING YOUR ORDER. YOU NEED THE BOOK NOW. ADDRESS 

SUCCESSFUL POULTRY JOURNAL ^Rank ^heck 



355 DEARBORN SL, CHICAGO, ILL 




CORNISH 



1-' YEARS A LJKEEDEU OF COKNISH 
and we have better birds this year than 
ever. All bred from prize winners n'. 
leading sliows Old birds tor sale scoring 
to y3l-. Young stock to be scored Nov. 20. 
Descril>e what you want. Customers always 
pleased. Egg orders booked. Mrs. S. A. 
Hawk. R. ;i. Chariton. Iowa. 11-3 



<'<»1:.\1SH I'OW 1.. ,MADlSU-\ SC^UAltK, 
Jame.slown Exposition. Allentown. Ticnlou. 
llagcrstown, I'hiladelphia winners. Old and 
young stock lor sale. Egg orders booked 
now. Circular free. It. D. Reider, Middle- 
town, I'a. IL'-;; 

POLISH. 

WHITE CRESTED BLACK i'Oi.ISll, LINE 
bred lor 2b years. Winners at Worlds Fair, 
New York and Boston. Remember that See- 
ly is the veteran Polish breeder of America. 
Stock for sale, eggs m season. Chas. L,. Seely, 
I'res. Am . Polish Club, Afton, X. Y. 5-9-1 L' 

\v. C. Ji. ia)i.l.Sll. A I'IJnx < llUKl-: 
cockerels for sale. Jircd liom wmiieis at 
Herkimer, Utica, Rochestei' and HuiTmIo. 
liirtls are sure to please. iOggs alter l\l.. 
1.'.. Don't fail to get my prices. Warnn 
W. I>i.-k.iis, II.ix :•;;. Middl.x illc, X. ^•. 1 :; 



BANTAMS. 



i:.\KK HARGA1X.S, cui^DEx amj .sil\i:u 

Sebright, Buff and Black Cochin, itose Comb 
Black and Black Red Game Banianis. High- 
est honors New York. bi){> birds. Proper tVc 
«'o.. ."^I'lKdia lie, N. V. &-',•-] :j 



COLDION .SEAi;i:j(HiT PAN'l'AAiS |()i: 
sale. liirds scoring ;tj l(j 'J.>'-U- \\'<>n ai 
Newton, 111., in li\ii.\ competition, liisi vxrk. 
tivsi and second cocl\(;rcl, lust, sec.. ml and 
third i)ullel. Eggs after March 1, s;; jht 
Setting. Dale Aiii.dd. Xcwioii, 111. i-i 



HOUDANS. 



HUL DANS— BLUE KlKiJUNS AND 
cup winners. Write me fur prices 
l^ura B. Ueiff. Iduville. Ind. 



SH.VEU 

on eggs. 

2-0y-]2 



HOUDANS. WINNERS WHEREVER 

shown. 1st at Phila.. Allentown. Norris- 
town. Pa., lyus. Phila., VJQi). lifteen rib- 
bons with ten entries. Stuck and eggs for 
sale. J. Emlen Smith. Chestnut Hill, Phila- 
delphia. Pa. 3-9-12 



CHOICE HOI 'DANS. Cocks, cockerels, hens 
and pullets to close out at reasonable prices. 
Write. Slating just what ycju want. .supply 
limited. Older at once if you want a bar- 
gain. Birds are good in all points and will 
«ivo satisfaction. J. B. Belknap, li. 3. 
Council Bluffs, Iowa. 12-3 

ii(»rDAN i:<;<;s from m.a\oy's .vnd 

Dr. Taylors strain. Ha\ e raised them 3 
years. Ha\e .')0 pullets and hens, from 
which will ship eggs for hatching at $1.50 
for 1.".. or $7 per loo. J. D. Payne, Water- 
loo, Ind. 1-3 

GAMES. 

tJAMES — INDIAN GAMES, WINNERS 
wherever shown. If you want a show l>ird 
or breeder write me. I have the goods. 
Grand lot cockerels; also 30 pit game cocks 
and stags. 18 years a breeder and exhibitor. 
lOggs in season. J. Boyce, Summitville, 
N. Y. 12-3 



DOMINIQUES. 



DAVENPORT'S AMERICAN DOMINIQUES 
won at New York 1908 every ftrst prize of- 
fered; 1909 six of the ten firsts and seconds. 
Write for circulars and prices. W. H. Dav- 
enport. Coleraine, Mass. 5-9-12 



BABY CHICKS. 



FINE BABY CHICKS, S CENTS EACH; 
shipped safely anywhere. Partly grown 
chicks, 30 cents eacli. Eggs for hatching, 
$4 per 100. I'lace your spring orders now 
before prices advance. Write for booklet 
and remember that we are pioneers in low 
prices for Jine poultry. Culver Poultry 



Farm, 501 Fifth Ave., Benson, Neb. 



11- 



I': AXD 1), ll.\T(•lll•:K^ , v.\kdli:n, i-a.. 

shipi>ers oi day-old chicks and eggs Irom 
high grade stock of the leading \aiieiies. 
I':xi»ress i)aid and .safe ;iiii\al guaranteed 
east of the Mississi|)pi liver. Write for 
list of varieties and ]tiicf!s. i-;{ 



PHEASANTS. 



ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANTS. $5 A 
pair. China Ringneck Pheasants. $7.50 a 
pair. Write Jennie Milner. Bloomington. 
III. 9.6 



POULTRY FANCl Eiv C^^ry 




PHEASANT BREEDING PAYS 800 PER 
cent better than chicken raising. A pair of 
pheasants are worth from $25.00 to $150.00 
to a breeder yearly. Read the Reliable 
i'heasant Standard, the recognized authority 
on pheasant breeding, and learn all about 
this rich industry. 75 cents a copy by mail 
from A. V. Meersch, Poughkeepsie, New 
Y^ork. 9-08-tf 

.\-Miii:UST, GOLDEN, SILNLK, i:EE\E, 
Mongolian, Elliot versicolor, English, Pied 
and .Swiiihoe Pheasants. Pure bred, healthy 
bii\ls. No duly on I'heasaius. I'rice list 
free. John Dowuliam, Slralhroy, Out., 
Canada. ii-;{ 

TURKEYS. 



JUCONZ1-. TLlilvEiS. First cockerel, see- 
"iiu, uiiid, loiuiii j.uilei, ijisL pell ai Illi- 
nois state show I'Jii'J; lirst cockerel, hrst 
i)uliet at I'eoria. 1L»0S. William liinghouse, 
R. 2, Box Y, Havana, 111. 3-9-12 



FC>ii i^.WA-: .MAM.MoTJl LlUJXZi-: TUR- 
Jiejs. A line slraiii uf good la.\eis, large 
hone and frame, and nii-ely maiked; lued 
from prize winning slock from JNladison 
Square Garden. order early. Prii-es rea- 
sonable considering quality. Mrs. Mary 
.*-;<• iioonmaker, J:. 1, :\l<sho])j)eii. I'a. 1-1 



j.ia )Nzi-: 

.genu i He 

Jier ju. 
W .-I hied. 



I'UJiKEV ]■:<;( 

Wild .Mali.iid 

Oltler eii . I\ . 
M. \\ . h'.lil;iM, 



S. .^_' i'l']!: it), AXiJ 

Dliek e.i4gs, S1...IJ 
Will Si I I J) U llell 

1 1 >\\ a « 'il .\ , I o\\ a. 

1-1 



DUCKS AND GEESE. 



I'^XTiiA i^AliGE TULLOUSf: GEESii. FOi: 
sale at right prices. Write me before 
plaiing your order elsewlieie. Can send 
you birtls that will gi\e salisiaciion. Edw. 
.). i less, liie. J I. <'ale(loiHa, Wis. 11-3 



J horolghbi:ed toueouse geese, 

••^lO and $12 per pair. My geese are priz<- 
winner.s. Fancy White liocks and Itouen 
Ducks. Eggs in season from each variety. 
jMis. E. L. Swinfoid. Oakland, 111. li'-3 

IXDIAN KUNXER DUCKS. IMi'UliTED 
Slock. Magniiicent exhibition strain. Flock 
average 2uf eggs each per year. We are 
liooking egg orders from the best stock in 
the entire country at only $2 per 11. Hill- 
crest Duck l'"aini. G. W. Magloit. Manager, 
l!ell\ille, O. ll-;j 



iii.ACK CAYUGA DUCKS AND Wiii'lE 
Holland Turkeys lor sale. Also a few Afri- 
can Geese (females only). Bet me book 
\(>ur orders now for eggs from the above 
\arieties. Satisfactory hatches guaranteed, 
t'orrespondence solicited. Floyd S. Beau- 
mont. R. 15. Kansasville, \\'is. 12-:; 



PIGEONS. 



1 OFFEli GUARANTEED MATED HOMERS 
in any quantity, at $1.U0 a pair, and chal- 
lenge squab companies or dealers to produce 
better stock at twice this price. Bt;autitul 
White Homers. $1..')0 a pair. Get my prices 
on Runts. Carneaux and Maltese Hens, and 
save dollars. Charles K. Gilbert, 1563 East 
Montgomery Ave.^ Philadelphia, Pa. 8-9-12 

WANTED 5,000 COMMOX OR HOMER 
Pigeons. Pay at least 25c pair. Highest 
l>iices paid for Guinea Fowls, Live liabbits 
and Guinea Pigs. S. Gilbert, 1128 Palmer 
St., I'hiladejphia, Pa. 12-.") 

FERRETS. 



■1,01)0 FEliRETS. 
They hustle rats 
dium and large 
color. Prices and 
Kiiapp, Rochester, 



SOME ARE TRAINED, 
and rabbits. Small, me- 

size. Eight and dark 
book mailed free. N. A. 

O. 11-3 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



WANTED"— PIGEON DUNG. WRIT 10 

1 'lister & Vogel Eoather Co., Milwaukee, 
Wis., for ))iices, etc. 10-3 




Will s. 
I ernis. 
has no 
Add fcss 



])olow the niaiket 
.\on-iesidont widow 
use for it. .^onie 
K. F., <ai(! poultry 
Dearboin St., C^hlcago, 111. 



on reasonable 

owns it and 

improvements. 

Fnnciei-, :!.', 7 



1 fA.N si;xD you wiirif: liocKs that 

are right. I^iitls score from 1)3 to 951/2 
and are tirst prize winn<rs. Will imi)rove 
.\our Hock ;ind win for you. Eggs, $2, $3, 
*:. i)er 15. Send me youi- ordf?r now. Robt. 
Wiilker, 2:;.T Porter St., New Castle, Pa. 1-3 



SI.VGLF. <'oMI! RIIODI'; ISLAND REDS. 
lOggs in Season frctm excellent laying strain 
P. 11 No. 1. $2 per 15: pen No. 2, $1.50 per 
15. TTtilily flock, •$! per 15 or $5 per 
hundred. Mrs. Harvey Truitt, R. 1, Farm- 
ington, 111. i_3 



POULTRY SUPPLIES. 



R. C. WHITE ORPINGTONS FOR SALE, 
t'ook's strain, $1.50 uj). Orders booked for 
eggs and early chicks, Orpington and Light 
Hrahmas. Full line of Incubators and 
Brooders equipped with llame controlling 
device. You can't burn up the eggs with 
this incubator. Rebuilt and second-hand 
iiieubatois, guaranteed to give satisfaction 
or money refunded. 10 per cent discount 
given on all orders received up to Jan. 15. 
<;en. l?o\er. .Spencei-\ill<', O. 11-3 




i't)ii/nLN- fi:i:d i-kicio 1'i:k dmi mis. 

lieeT serajis .■^2.75. imat and boiie .'<2.25, 
Ki'ouml b.uie -Si'. 25. hell scratching grains 
$l.'^5. cliiii< scratching grains .S2. jmultr.N- 
mash .i^l.sii. p.igeon i^iain .'i;2.25. alfalfa 
elovcr ipeal $1.5(1. cinshed o>ster sludls 
i;5c. eiuslied ejani shells (iuc. mica ci\\slal 
f^iil •i5c. |)earl grit tiiic. medicated charcoal 
•'1.5(1. 'I'lie ineiil and Imiie. slndls, gi-il 
and eliarcnal in both hen and chick size. 
Ci\e lis .1 Ilia! order. .1. G. Hermann it 
' 'o.. Iin! ia iiajiolis. Ind. 1 1 -C 

TWt» I x» 'ii:at( >Ks j.'oi: SAi.f: «'iii.:Ai'. 

<iood as new. lla\e had DO per c<-iit hatches 
with them. 50 and 1_'") egg sizes; be <iuick. 
ls;i;i<- L. Sollars. Washington C. II., (). 1-1 



PRINTING. 



1 'HINTING— POULTRY, GENERAL, NOTE- 

heads, en\eloi)es, postcards, labels, cards, 
tags, 100 either, 40c; 250, 75c; 500, $1.25, 
posli)aid. Ciicuhirs, everything. Finest en- 
gra\ings. Jieauliful samples for stamp. 
Mod( 1 Printing Co., Manchester, la. 10-9 



Wilkinson's White Rocks 
and Houdans 



are prize winners. 
Fine lot of pullets 



and cockerels for sale at $2.50 to $10.00. Write 
me your wants. 

W. T. WILKINSON 
Box 15 G, East Des Moines, Iowa 



S. C. R. I. REDS 

Business Birds 
— of Quality — 

Vig[orous range bred birds from heavv winter 
laying Strain. They win Silver Cups too 

TCP NOTCH POULTRY FARM 
R. P. GUPTILL, prop. ELCHO, WIS. 




TRAP NEST 

lUii'le In .1 few niiiiiiteH 
\ er simple ami fellahle 
coiniiletc piniis H) cents. 
(•■ o. silrdhant. r,.»\ S, 
Sbeboygan KhIIh. Wis. 



i|l|U]lllMl^ili]_liL 



"'"i:';'i":ii' iin i 



POULTRY FeNCf 

STOCK STRONG— RUST PROOF 

iSIadcofextraheax \<l()ul)]cgalvani/e(l wires. 

No lop or bottom ho.irds recmired. 
Chick tight— Ixjttom wires onh 1 in ai^art 

COSTS NO MORE THAN NHTTING 




BROWN FENCE & WIRE CO. DEPT 94. CLEVELAND,0. 



• • 



• . • 



1 




• 




THE BOOK THAT EVERYBODY IS BUYING— 

Secrets of Expert Exhibitors 

And Easy Lessons in Judging— By Frank Heck 

A book that is new in character and the most valuable and interesting production ever published 
for breeders of exhibition fowls. No other book or similar publication comes within gunshot of it. It is 
in a class by itself. 

The time has gone by when a breeder can pick up birds right out of the yards and win with them without 
special preparation. This is true even in the smaller shows. There are always at least a few hustling, 
enterprising breeders in nearly every locality who are keenly alive to the financial profit and the honors ac- 
cruing from winning over all competitors. These breeders use all legitimate methods for putting their birds 
in show condition. 

FAKING AND LEGITIMATE PREPARATION — BOTH LAID BARE, 

Faking is certainly wrong and it should not be practiced, but even in legitimate show preparation what 
chance have you to win over one or more honest competitors who may have a copy of this book and 
thereby possess the knowledge which enables them to fix up their birds in scores of ways that are not known 
to you. Consider also the immense advantage you would have in being able to detect such forms of faking 
as can be discovered in cases where there may possibly be a dishonest exhibitor in the class. 

Wouldn't You Like to Know 



How to Straighten Lopped Spikes or Blades of Combs. 
How to Bring Out tfie Briglit Red Color of Combs, Face and 
Wattles. 

Patches of White are Covered up in Red Ear 



IS 



"Fixed" to Reduce the Angle at the 
Nicer Curve to the Back, 
umage of Parti-Colored fowls for Show 



How Small 

Lobes. 
How Back Plumage 

Tail and Give a 
How to Clean the P 

Without Washing. 
Removing Creaminess and Brassiness from White Birds. 
Covering up Off-Color in Black Plumage Including Purple 

Earring. 
How to Improve the Color of Any Parti-Colored Bird. 
How to Make a Bird of Its Own Accord Pose in the Show 

Coop. 
How to Add Lustre to Plumage of Dark Colored Fowls. 
How to Add Weight to Exhibition Birds Quickly. 
Coloring Yellow Legs. 

How Side Sprigs are Removed Without Leaving a Scar. 
How Foreign Color is Removed from Beaks. 
How the Plumage of Red Birds is Treated to Secure a Dark- 
er Shade of Color and Lustre. 
How White Tips are sometimes Removed from Barred Rock 

Plumage. 

Stubs Pulled from Legs, 
is Removed from thg Edqes of Large 



are Removed from the Quill of White 



Removing Traces of 

How Foreign Color 
Feathers. 

How Dark Streaks 
Feathers. 

How Unscrupulous Exhibitors Have Been Known to Pre- 
vent a Competitor's Birds from Showing Properly. 

Putting Birds in Show Condition that Have Missing or 
Broken Feathers in Main Tail or Wing. 

Preventing Purple Barring in Black Fowls. 

Preventing Show Room Growth and Lopping of Comb. 



How Feathers are Spliced. 

Feeding to Produce a Darker Shade of Buff. 

How White Ear Lobes are treated for Small Defects In 

Color. 

A frequent Cause of Large, Beefy and Lopped Combs and 

How to Prevent Them. 
How to Artificially Moult Fowls In Nearly Half the Regular 

Time. 
How to Secure and Hold Profuse Toe and Leg Feathering on 

Feathered Legged Varieties. 
A Practically Unknown Cause of Lopped Combs and the 

Remedy. 
How to Prevent Light Colored Le-^s. 
How to Increase Gloss Sheen and Depth of Color In Moulting 

Male Birds. 
A rjood Stimulant and Preventive of Colds in Birds Shipped 

to Shows in Extreme Cold Weather. 
How to Prevent Combs from Freezing when Bird^ are Ex- 
posed. 
One of the Causes of Off-Colored Feathers in Parti-Colored 

and Black Fowls. How to Remedy the Defect. 
How Sickle Feathers are Shortened without Clipping the 

Ends. 

What to Feed to Promote Feather Growth. 

Tonic for Maintaining Health and Appetite in Show Birds 

and to Counteract the Effects of Confinement. 
Preventing Brassiness from Appearing in White Birds. 
How to Clean Paint from Birds that have Come in Contact 

with Newly Painted Coops or Houses. 
How to Prevent Color Cuts on Plumage by Stopping the Flow 

of Blood from Comb. Wattles, etc., when Injured In the 

Show Room. 

Complete Detailed Instruction fop Washing and Chemically 

Bleaching White Birds. 
How Black or Gray Specks In White Plumage are Hidden. 



THE ABOVE SUBJECTS ARE ONLY A PORTION OF THE CONTENTS. There are many other 
equally interesting, important and valuable secrets, many of them being alone worth the price of the book. 
There are many seemingly "little" things that are of great importance and that you would never think 
of. THE EASY LESSONS IN JUDGING ARE ALSO A FEATURE OF THE BOOK AND WILL 
TEACH YOU THE PRINCIPLES OF SCORING FOWLS. 

ALL THE METHODS, DRUGS, CHEMICALS AND VARIOUS MODES OF 
PREPARING BIRDS FOR THE SHOW ROOM ARE FULLY EXPLAINED. 

You need the book to protect yourself against the dishonest fakir and you need it to put yourself on 
an equal footing with your honest competitors. It will save you dollars in useless entry fees, and it will 
show you how to win the coveted prizes and honors which your rivals would otherwise receive. 

Have you ever bought a poultry book on general topics or disclosing some system or so-called secrets, 
and upon receipt of it had your expectations drop with a dull thud of disappointment? Well! this isn't that 
kind of a book. 

THE PRICE OF THE BOOK IS $2 AND IT IS WORTH THE PRICE. 

EiCH PURCHASER AGREES TO NOT DIVULGE THE SECRETS OF THE BOOK EXCEPT TO MEMBERS OP HIS FAMILY. 

DON'T PUT OFF SENDING YOUR ORDER. YOU NEED THE BOOK NOW. ADDRESS 

SUCCESSFUL POULTRY JOURNAL ^Rank^heck 355 OEARBORN ST., CHICAGO. ILL 



4 



TENTIONAL 2ND 



a^sBo^m 



MORE EVIDENCE THAT SIBLEY'S 



are in the lead 
and will hold 
it. At the Big 

Rw-l w^ ^ Indiana State Fair this season, our Rose Comb Reds won the most coveted prize, Ist pen. Also 
r^ I 3 |3 1st and 3rd cocks, 2nd cockerel and many of the other winners were decended from our flock. 

They have an unbroken chain of victories to their credit for many years at leading shows. At 

Detroit January 1909 they won 23 prizes including 12 firsts and 11 others. At 
Chicago, December 1908, 17 prizes including 10 firsts. At Indianapolis, September 
1908, 11 prizes including 5 firsts. 



Our winnings at Detroit, January, 1909, in one of the strongest classes of Reds ever 
gotten together were: first, second, third and fourth on cocks, first, second, third 
and fourth on hens; first, second, third and fourth on cockerels; first and fifth on 
pullets; first and second on pens. T^^e four club specials for color and shape. 
The silver loving cup (valued at |25.00) offered by the Mayor of Detroit for the 
best display of either Rose or Single Comb Rhode Island Reds. The silver loving 
cup (valued at $20.00) offered by the Hotel Normandie for the best display of rose 
comb Rhode Island Reds and other valuable specials. 




THE SIBLEY REDS HAVE ALWAYS WON EAST AND WEST 

2000 BIRDS RAISED DURING THE PAST SEASON FROM WINNERS 

Some of the cream of this year's production is still in 
our yards and if you are looking for a choice bird or two 
we can more than please you at right prices. 

We will have ten grand pens mated for the egg trade. Book your orders 
early. Prices $3.00, $5.00, $10.00, $15.00, $20.00 and $25 00 per setting. Send 
for catalogue describing our matings and telling all about the Sibley Reds. 

Irving A. and Frank Churchill Sibley, South Bend, Ind. 



MIN-NE-HA-HA 1st prize winner, Chicago, 
Dec. 16-19, 1908. Detroit, Jan. 9-14, 1909. 




THE FAMOUS HEN, "PEGGY." 

VAL.UE $10,000. First prize winner at Jamestown 
Exposition, Madison Square Garden, New York, and every- 
where else she has been shown. The reason we value the 
above hen at Ten Thousand Dollars Is becansa we refused 
$2,500 for her after we sold five of her chicks for I7,S00: and 
we Avill Kive $10,000 for a "Crystal" White 
Orpincton Hon that will equal her in every way. 

KELLER8TRASS FARM, KANSAS CITY, MO. 



• • RELLERSTR ASS * * 

White Orping'tons 

ARE THE BIGGEST PAYERS 

Because they have proven to be 

THE BIGGEST WINTER LAYERS 

KELLERSTRASS < « ^ T^ V ^ TT A T " 

White Orping'tons 

Are the GRANDEST UTILITY birds on record today, an«J aft tO 
their FANCY QUALITY they won first at Madison Square Garden, 
New York 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908; also at Crystal Palace, London, 
England, Chicago and Boston. If you need some birds to IMPROVE 
YOUR STOCK or for the SHOW ROOM write us. We have thefll, 
and the KIND THAT WINS, as our past record shows. STOCK 
and EGGS for sale at all times. Remember, we are the ORIGINA- 
TORS of " CRYSTAL" White Orpingtons, and breed only thdiSDft 
kind. We devote our whole time to this one breed. 

SEND FOR OUR CATAl,OGUE 



I^ife Members American White Orpinfrton Club and the American Poultry 

helle:rstrass farm 

ERNBST KELLERSTRASS, Proprietor 

Originators of Cr^'stal White Orpingtor^s 
R. r. D. No. 1 KANSAS CITY, MO. 



• 



• 



w 






.-"■*:'"■ 



Barred Plymouth Rocks Exclusively LONG S ORPINGTONS 



Eggs from 5 grand pens, $2 per 15. Have many prize 

wmners m my yards. : : : Satisfaction guaranteed. 

ERNEST WAGNER, - KENDALLVILLE, IND. 



Matin^i list on re (juest. Stock for .'^ale. 



E.M.LONG 



Box P. F. Osceola, Ind. 



S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS 



Winners of 1st, 2nd. 3rd and 4th pullets, 
2iid pen in a strong class at the big 
Baraboo Valley Show, January 1910. 

Acr-r.ob-^r^i loof o^„c« u . . -. , ^ , Pen headed by 1st cock at above show. 

ThrfemXVi^ t^t « H^ '^''f'\\^S^^ ^ Wisconsin State Association Show. 

i^^, /,o? ° ^X y»''^«/'"«^ f"il of quality, bred from the best blood lines in America I will supplv 

my customers with eggs from these without reserve at $3 per 15, |5 per 30. Thev will produce winners 



JAS. McGUAN, 



BARABOO, WIS. I 



Save Time, Effort & Money 

Buy S. C. White I^eghorn Day Old Chicks 
from me and you get a good strong healthy 
chick in each specimen. I guarantee this 
aud also safe delivery and the price is only 12 
cents each. Cheaper than you can afford to 

C. E. KYLE, 

Rocky River, Ohio 



hatch them 
R. F. D. No. 1 



Barred Rocks 



EXCLUSIVELY. R-^gnl Blue is the name. Bied in line for 
jU) years and originally from the best blood lines in the world. 

Show Uftrr,u «fin .•««,o4.,of There unequalled record of five first-premiums at Mich State 

snow, Detroit st 11 remains for some one to duplicate. No room to tell vou of hundreds of other 

Mfds o'f rarelf Wni FnArn^'n'''uS''^ "°" ^!,°^*^"^ ^I^^^"^ ^^°-«- I "ow ha^e in m^yar^^^^ show 
birds or rarest type and color with narrow, deep and distinct barring. Al.so breeding stock that 

w 11 merit the approval of any fancier. When ordering remember I do not requfre yfu to pay f^^ 
o.^iu^'^P^^'r^^'^''^''-*''"'^ ^"^^^'Py°"^-^&ood as can be found at reasohabTe^pricer The 
?^f^l^ fl ""^ li''''^^"/ increasing demand warrants me in advancing the price of eggs [for hatch! 
ing> to $4 per 15. Address A. L. EM^IRSON INKSTER MICH P it.c oi egg.s ^lor naicn 



EGGS 



Book 
your 
o r ders 
now. Pens headed by Prize Winners. 

S. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS 

T, E. LEE, Marshfield. Wis. 



"H 




CH'S WHI TE RO CKS 

Established a BIG RECORD by winning 
BESl DISPLAY AT CHICAGO JANUARY. 1907 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO DECEMBER, 1908 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO DECEMBER. 1909 

me oywr.H'l ^^ ^%f^nl^ r° ^T^' ^^^^ '" ^'^'''''°" ^° ^^'""'"^ ^^^ ^"^^ y^"' ^irds purchased from 

Xr i I, ^u^} I '°''^ ^^""^ '^°° ^' "'' '^^^^■'^' '^'°'^^ '" t'^e <^°"'>try- I could mention show 

after show, where my b.rds have won the BEST PRIZES but I honestly believe this honor belongs to 

the purchaser. So, when you buy birds from me you need not be afraid that I will p.blish your winnings 
as mme For the season of 19,0 1 have mated 15 grand pens. Write for mating list, which describes my 
?how"i .T K '"'/"'"'■'? °^ "LEADER" my ist CHICAGO COCKEREL and other famous biVds A 
choice lot of breedmg cockerels left at $3 to $10 each. H. W. Halbach, Box 7, Waterford, Wis. 



A CLEAN SWEEP 




BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS 



Win all First Prizes at the Michigan State Fair, Detroit, Mich., September 2 to 10, 1909. 
Winning ist and 2d cock, ist and 2d hen, ist, 2d and 3rd cockerel, ist, 2d and 3d pullet, 
ist pen. At the Dearborn, Michigan Show, December, 1909, in a class of 87 birds, one of 
the strongest ever gotten together in the West, I won ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th cocks, ist and 
Srd pullets, 2nd and 3rd cockerels, ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th hens, with birds scoring to 94 
by Tucker. 



ONE THOUSAND BIRDS FOR SALE 

including some of the cream of my old stock and the cockerels and pullets of last spring's 
production. I can mate up pairs, trios and pens that will win and produce winners. Also 
single birds both sexes in lots to suit. Write for prices on eggs from my choicest matings. 
They will put you in the lead. 

DONT DELAY, WRITE TO-DAY 

20 young Toulonse Geese from Chicago and Detroit winners (never beaten.) Write for 
prices. Catalogue free. Please mention this paper when writing. 

DEARBORN POULTRY YARDS. S. D. LAPHAM. prop., Box P. Dearborn, Mich. 





# 




• 






Vol. XIV 



CHICAGO, ILL, FEBRUARY. 1910 



No. 2 



Doubl 



e 





How to Get Pure White Birds and Standard Shape 
in Backs and Tails of Male Birds. 

By S. G. WHIPRECHT 

HE secret ui i)r()(hicino- high clas.s cx- 
liibition .specimen.^ h'es in the propcr 
niating ol the breech'ng binl.s jind this 
knowledge is gained only b\ years of 
experience and a very close sttidy of 
one breed. One mav coinnienc'e bv 
bu\ing high chiss breeding or exhibition stock and if 
properly mated bv the breeder from whom he buvs, 
and the blood lines are right, the otTs])ring will show 
an improvement over the original birds and he may be 
al)le to select a few to show and win with. The next 
season lie finds it np to him.self to mate his birds, 
using his own ideas and judgment and depending 
mostly on the scores of the birds. He raises all he 
can each season for a few years and winds up onh- 
to find tliat his birds are not as good in shape as they 
were, and the color has al^o disappeared. I laving 
spent a good sum of money and a few vears of time 
he gives it up in di.'^gust a.^' hundreds do each sea.son. 
I am more than convinced if the l)reeders over the 
country would explain their method of mating through 
the journals instead of arguing faking, the new begin- 
ner would get along faster.' Instead of this they 
generally drift along from year to year until thev 
have learned it themselves. Shape can be understood 
])retly well by studving good cuts made from win- 
uers. but color nuist be seen to be learned, even in the 
white varieties, as some birds are chalk white and 
others a creamy white. 

As to mating, an experienced breeder needs no 
score cards for a guide. Tie keeps records of his 
birds, he knows how he mated the year bef(-)re to hold 
what he had while he is overcoming a small defect, 
also how much improvement can be expected both in 
shape and color. A high score of a male or female 
is almost worthless as a breeder if not properlv mated 
with something almost its equal. Take the \\'hite 





W \andottes for example. One is almost compelled to 
run two hues for the verv best results, one for cock- 
erels, the other for imllets, mostlv for the ^hape of 
l)ack and tail, as tin males are dili'erent in <hape in 
these two sections than the females, (iood shaped 
backs, short, wide tails and full round breasts are 
ihe hardest sections to get just right in the males 
•or a mating for cockerels, the secret lies in the hen 
Without a fine female it is almost impossible to pro- 
duce a iine male. Select a large, round, deep-breasted 
blocky hen up to weight and over, with broad back 
and heavy cushion, with no break in front of tail 
which should be short and wide, carried a little hio-h' 
a heavy well outlined fhilt, short li-ht-colored legs' 
white or bluish skin witli the whitest of plumage The 
male to mate with this female need not be a wonder 
in shape, Imt a lairly good bird and must have the 
curve of back in front of tail instead of a sharp break • 
good color, tail carried upright, white or bluish skin' 
nistead of yellow. Such a bird would probablv have 
a leg ot lemon color. A mating like this will give 
you the best results in back and tail shape and a color 
that will need no bleaching of plumage for the shows 
as their pin leathers and voung plumage will come 
pmk or bluish pink and are alwavs readv for the earlv 
shows. With good head points, etc., and other things 
I)ciiig equal, you have a natural bred bird t^t to show 
Ihe pullets from this mating will show cockerel bred 
back.^ and tails in shape and are valuable for cockerel 
l)reeders another sea.son. 

The females for the pullet line should show backs 
ami tails about what the Standard calls for in shape 
which shows a gradual rise from shoulder to tip of 
tail. A male showing the .^ame slope of back with 
tail carried a little low for this mating will give the 
best results. The two lines should be bred separatelv 
and not cross them back and forth as it would onlv 
tear down what was gained the vear before. 

By knowing the sire and dam and keeping records 
of one's birds, one can gain more real valuable breed- 
mg knowledge in five years than could be learned in 
ten by any other method. 
Sedalia. AFo. 



Barred Plymouth Rocks Exclusively LONG'S ORPINGTONS 



Eggs from 5 grand pens, $2 per 15. Have many prize 

winners m my yards. : : : Satisfaction guaranteed. 

ERNEST WAGNER, - KENDALLVILLE, IND. 



Mritinji list on request. Stock for sale. 



E. M. LONG 



Box P. F. Osceola, Ind. 



S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS 



As cockerel last season he won 1st at I,a Crosse and i,. «l tuc Wisconsin siaie asso( 

mv r.,..?Jfr!,!frc" ffl yardsare full of quality, bred from the best blood lines in America, i win suppiv 

my customers with eggs from these without reserve at $3 per 15, $5 per 30. They will produce winners 



Winners of 1st, 2nd. 3rd and 4th pullets, 
2nd pen in a strong class at the big 

^_^^^_^^^^ Baraboo Valley Show. January 1910 
Pen headed by 1st cock at above show. 

1st at the Wisconsin State Association Show. 

I will suppiv 



JAS. McGUAN, 



BARABOO, WIS. 



Save Time, Effort & Money 

Buy S. C. White l^eghorn Day Old Chicks 
from me and you get a good strong healthy 
chick in each specimen. I guarantee this 
aud also safe delivery and the price is only 12 
cents each. Cheaper than you can affora to 
hatch them. q g KYLE, 

R. F. D. No. 1 Rocky River. Ohio 



Barred Rocks 



EXCLUSIVELY. R^gnl Blue is the name. Bied in line for 
1.J years and originally from the best blood lines in the world. 

cHnw Tl^frr^if ..ill t '^"<^^e ""equalled record of five first-premiums at Mich State 

Show. Detroit st 11 remains for some one to duplicate. No room to tell you of hundreds of other 
regular and special prizes they have won at other leading show.s. I now hav4 in my yards show 
birds of rarest type and color with narrow, deep and distinct barring. Al.so breed hfg^stocktha^ 
r ot ofTvt!!^ approval of any fancier. When ordering remember I do not require v?u to pay foJ 
n, fm ^^^"S'^V'^vertising. but .ship you as good as can be found at reasonable prices The 
cjuality of my stock and mcreasing demand warrants me in advancing the price of eggs (for hatch- 
ing) to $4 per 15. Address A. L. EMERSON INKSTER. MICH. ce o eggs ^lor naicn 



EGGS 



Book 
your 
o r ders 
now. Pens headed by Prize Winners. 

S. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS 

T. E. LEE, Marshfield. Wis. 




ALBACH'S WHITE ROCKS" 



f. 



Established a BIG RECORD by winning 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO JANUARY, 1907 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO DECEMBER, 1908 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO DECEMBER. 1909 

m. J^^^T",''^ ^^ ^'i!;£l'|^ *° ^1T' ''"^^ '" ^'^^"'°" *° winning year after year, birds purchased from 
me or hatched from EGGS I sold have won at the largest shows in the country. I could mention show 
after show, where my birds have won the BEST PRIZES but I honestly believe this honor belongs to 
the purchaser. So, when you buy birds from me you need not be afraid that I will pmblish your winnings 
as mine For the season of 19.0 I have mated 15 grand pens. Write for mating list, which describes niv 
?hof/°A^Tl^'"!,?'''"''"? °^ "LEADER" my ,st CHICAGO COCKEREL and other famous ted^ A 
choice lot of breeding cockerels left at $3 to $10 each. H. W. Halbach, Box 7, Waterford, Wis. 



A CLEAN SWEEP 

LAPHAM^S BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS 

Win all First Prizes at the Michigan State Fair, Detroit, Mich., September 2 to 10, 1909. 
Winning ist and 2d cock, ist and 2d hen, ist, 2d and 3rd cockerel, ist, 2d and 3d pullet, 
ist pen. At the Dearborn, Michigan Show, December, 1909, in a ckss of 87 birds, one of 
the strongest ever gotten together in the West, I won ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th cocks, ist and 
5rd pullets. 2nd and 3rd cockerels, ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th hens, with birds scoring to 94 
by Tucker. 

ONE THOUSAND BIRDS FOR SALE 

including some of the cream of my old stock and the cockerels and pullets of last spring's 
production. I can mate up pairs, trios and pens that will win and produce winners. Also 
single birds both sexes in lots to suit. Write for prices on eggs from my choicest matings. 
They will put you in the lead. 

DONT DELAY, WRITE TODAY 

20 young Toulonse Geese from Chicago and Detroit winners (never beaten.) Write for 
price*. Catalogue free. Please mention this paper when writing. 

DEARBORN POULTRY YARDS, S. D. LAPHAM, prop., Box P, Dearborn, Mich. 



t 



t 



I 



1 



INTENTIONA 





• 




• 






Vol. XIV 



CHICAGO. ILL, FEBRUARY. 1910 



No. 2 



Double Mating White Wyandottes 




How to Get Pure White Birds and Standard Shape 
in Backs and Tails of Male Birds. 

By S. G. WHIPRECHT 

HE secret of prodncinor high class ex- 
hibition specimens lies in the proper 
mating of the breeding birds and this 
knowledge is gained only bv years of 
experience and a very close study of 
one breed. One may commence bv 
buymg high class breeding or exhibition stock and if 
properly mated by the breeder from whom he buvs, 
and the blood lines are right, the offspring will show 
an improvement over the original birds and he may be 
able to select a few to show and win with. The next 
season he finds it up to himself to mate his birds, 
using his own ideas and judgment and depending 
mostly on the scores of the birds. He raises all he 
can each season for a few years and winds up only 
to find that his birds are not as good in shape as they 
were, and the color has also disappeared. Having 
spent a good sum of money and a few vears of time 
he gives it up in disgust as hundreds do each season. 
I am more than convinced if the breeders over the 
country would explain their method of mating through 
the journals instead of arguing faking, the new begin- 
ner would get along faster. Instead of this they 
generally drift along from year to year until they 
have learned it themselves. Shape can be understood 
pretty well by studving good cuts made from win- 
ners, but color must be seen to be learned, even in the 
white varieties, as some birds are chalk white and 
others a creamy white. 

As to mating, an experienced breeder needs no 
score cards for a guide. He keeps records of his 
birds, he knows how he mated the year before to hold 
what he had while he is overcoming a small defect, 
also how much improvement can be expected both in 
shape and color. A high score of a male or female 
is almost worthless as a breeder if not properly mated 
with something almost its equal. Take the White 



W yandottes for example. One is almost compelled to 
run two hues for the very best results, one for cock- 
erels, the other for pullets, mostly for the shape of 
back and tail, as the males are different in shape in 
these two sections than the females. Good shaped 
backs, short, wide tails and full round breasts are 
the hardest sections to get just right in the males 
Iw a matmg for cockerels, the secret Hes in the hen 
Without a fine female it is almost impossible to pro- 
duce a fine male. Select a large, round, deep-breasted, 
blocky hen up to weight and over, with broad back 
and heavy cushion, with no break in front of tail 
which should be short and wide, carried a little high' 
a heavy well outlined fluff, short lidU-colored legs' 
white or bluish skin with the whitest of plumage The 
male to mate with this female need not be a wonder 
in shape, but a fairly good bird and must have the 
curve of back in front of tail instead of a sharp break • 
good color, tail carried upright, white or bluish skin' 
instead of yellow. Such a bird would probablv have 
a leg of lemon color. A mating like this will give 
you the best results in back and tail shape and a color 
that will need no bleaching of plumage for the shows 
as their pin feathers and young plumage will come 
pink or bluish pink and are always readv for tue earlv 
shows. With good head points, etc., and other things 
being equal, you have a natural bred bird fit to show 
J he pullets from this mating will show cockerel bred 
backs and tails in shape and are valuable for cockerel 
breeders another season. 

The females for the pullet line shoui I show backs 
and tails about what the Standard calls for in shape 
which shows a gradual rise from shoulder to tip of 
tail. A male showing the same slope of back with 
tail carried a little low for this mating will give the 
best results. The two lines should be bred separately 
and not cross them back and forth as it would only 
tear down what was gained the year before. 

By knowing the sire and dam and keeping records 
of one's birds, one can gain more real valuable breed- 
ing knowledge in five years than could be learned in 
ten by any other method. 

Sedalia. Mo. 



^ 



yv^ p i-v^>. ' ' i^^ gif r ,. - 'y^'-i^r ni. 'g^ 



[ ^' %n#XrfmI Page 26 Tj^poij I 



/"■ 



r 






February, 






oF 



ioperly 



SI 



p 



Stock 



Thousands of Dollars in Unnecessary Express Charges 
are Paid by Buyers. Many Breeders Injure Their 
Business by Ignoring the Interest of Customers. 

By W. W. SAWYER 

HE manner and condition in which 
fancy poultry for bree(Hng- and show 
purposes is bein^ shipped, is neglected 
and sliii^hted by the majority of breed- 
ers. I have been in the poultry busi- 
ness for a number of years, and have 
received and shipped lots of stock. I have found that 
not one breeder out of seven shows any regard for his 
customers as to the looks and condition of the stock 
shipped. While I have often found the stock as good 
as represented, and well w^orth the ])rice, it is dis- 
gusting to see the kind of coons in which some of our 




supposed-to-be fancy poultry breeders ship fowls, 
to ship anything better than some old box. This is 
right w^heii the stock is shipped in that way, but on 
the other hand, if birds are shippped in light, at- 
tractive coops and the stock proves to be as repre- 
sented, nine times out of ten the buyer or his friends 
will send to you again when in need of aiiy thing in 
your line. I don't by any means intend to say that all 
l3reeders and ship})ers send out their stock in rough, 
mean coops, for they do not. There are some who 
have enough enterprise about their business to furnish 
neat coops. Some breeders ask for the return of 
the coops. Above every thing else, don't ask a cus- 
tomer to return a coop ; he feels that the price you 
ask and the express on the coop is enough that he 
should have it beside the stock. If he has not paid 
you enough for the stock that you demand the rettirn 
of the coop or have to shi]) in a patched-up box to 
kee]) even, better add a few cents more to the first 
price, which will allow you to furnish a neat coop. 




Home-made coops sucli as are used l,.v W. M. Sawyer. I.ai.cusier. Mo., and described by him in accompanying article. 



Actually I have bought fine poultry from breeders that 
from the looks of the coops, they had surely gone out 
in the back yard and used up their old fencing boards 
to make coops. Just think of the added express 
charges that have to be paid on these rough, heavy 
coops, and besides, the customer is ashamed for his 
friends to see him hauling home his fine birds in such 
unsightly coops. 

We don't stop to think how much this is hurting 
our trade and the business in general. We should 
work to the interests of our customers and encourage 
and push the business along. When the new begin- 
ner customer gets disappointed and ''bit" at the start, 
it is like the saying "once bit, twice afraid," and he is 
slow to take hold and start again if he ever does. 

A majority of breeders seem to think that when 
they have succeeded in making a sale, they are done 
with that customer, — that he will probably never send 
for anything again and that it is a waste of money 



The stock gets through its journey in nice condition, 
the customer is pleased, and it is a o-ood ad for your 
business. It shows that you care something for the 
comfort of your birds. If they are stuck down in 
some old box (perhaps too small for them) they come 
out with plumage dirty and broken, and are not a 
very pleasing sight to the eyes of their new owner. 
I am not advertising shipping coops for sale for I 
have nothing to offer in that line, neither do I say 
that there is only one kind to use. There are several 
kinds that are good. Avoid the use of canvas on 
coops (unless ordered shipped in canvas) for this 
doubles up the express charges. T have a plan of 
shippmg coop of my own which I have made at the 
farm to suit any size shipment ordered, suitable for 
any kind of weather. In hot weather a wide piece of 
one-inch poultry netting is used on each side of the 
coop which gives them plenty of air. In cold weather 
a narrow strip of netting- is used on only one side of 



« 



• 



• 



• 







February , '10 



POULTRY FANCIER: 




27 



Kft-; 



■3 . Pag e 



■i^, 



^r, .*«• ^f 







the coop. A water and feed cup are tacked in corners 
next to the wire front. This gives a chance to fill up 
with water and feed while on their trip, and also al- 
lows the express agent and the parties who receive 
them to see the birds in the coop and their condition 



without handling them. For Indian Runner ducks 
and chickens, I have coops 1() inches high; for cock- 
erels and geese, coops are made 22 inches high, as 
shown in the accompanying illustration. 
Lancaster, Mo. 



Is Y 





our Dreed a Lead in 



O 



ne: 




If Not, Read This and Learn the Reason. Then 
Get Busy and Win a Place in the Front Rank. 

By DR. H. F. BALLARD 

WO letters recently appearing in the 
Poultry Fancier have suggested this 
article. 

Mr. \Vm. F. Wright writes rather 
discouragingly about the Asiatics, at 
the same time saving he "expects to 
breed them as long as he lives.'" As he savs, most 
of the new breeds get a lot of their good qualities 
from Asiatics. The ambition of many would-be 
originators of new varieties has been to produce 
some kind of a combination which will catch the 
fancy of the American poultry breeders and make 
them think they have someth'ing better than their 
neighbors. As soon as he gets them so they will 
not throw more than 75 per cent of culls, he springs 
his new conglomeration on a gullible public, and 
the said public proceeds to throw its money at him 
in handfuls and his reputation is mountain high 
— f(^r awhile. 

Take the Orpington for an example: probably 
one of the best of that class of fowls. First it is a 
large fowd ; gets its size from the Asiatic blood in 
It. Rut I do not believe it is one whit better than 
the Plymouth Rock, which was manufactured in 
much the same way fifty years ago. Now T have 
never bred the Orp'ington, and I have no objection 
to it whatever. Raise all you can of them and make 
all the money out of them possible ; they are a big 
meat fowl, no better than die Brahma or Cochin, 
however. There is no meat fowl ever lived that is 
any better. 

But do not try to make everybody believe that 
they are efrg fowls. I have bred Cochins, Brahmas, 
Plyim)uth Rocks, Langshans, Wyandottes, Leg- 
horns and Polish side by side, and in small pens, 
and with identically the same treatment the 
Cochins laid as many eggs as any of them. Out 
on the wider range, I presume, the'Wyandottes and 
Leghorns would beat them for three or four 
months in the summer, but not in winter. My 
Cochin hens have been laying all winter this year. 
Through the coldest weather they have never 
stopped a day. 

I do not believe a single one of the new varieties 
is in any way any better than the old ones. Making 
windy assertions without proof may stuff some 
people, but when they learn by experience they 
will know better. I have a neighbor who started 
in with Barred Rocks. They did not come up to 
the boomlet that had got into his bonnet; so he 
tried White Wyandottes; soon tired of them and 
bought Houdans. I saw him a few days ago and 
he had traded them all off for Orpingtons. He has 



not kept any of them long enough to give them a 
fair trial. I still stick to my old assertion that a 
])erson can make a success of any variety in the 
Standard if they will stick to it and manage them 
right. You see 1 am not kicking the new varieties 
so much as this continual flopi)ing around from one 
variety to another. And the great number of new- 
fangled varieties make the fiopping so much more 
common. 1 know l)reeders who have tried about 
every new variety that has been advertised, and I 
presume, will continue to do so as long as new 
mixtures are brought out. 

Of course, the greatest value in Asiatics is their 
good size and qualities as meat producers, and their 
unequaled characteristics as mothers and brooders. 
There is no variety that can equal them in these 
respects. The only objection that can be brought 
against them at all is in regard to egg production, 
and when we consider their good quality as winter 
egg layers, it brings them uj) to almost the equal 
yearly value of any breed ; and their egg (pialities 
are governed almost entirely by the way in which 
they are fed. If they are suftVd with corn all win- 
ter, as the majority of farm chickens usually are. 
they will stop laying. 

I disagree with Mr. \\'right entirely on his advertis- 
ing ideas. He says he does not advertise his Brahmas 
and Cochins because the other fellow does not want 
ihem. I have been raising Partridge Cochins for near- 
ly 2S years, and I find the demand for them is about 
as good as it ever was, and from the number of letters 
] receive I want to say there are many more people 
interested in them than a man who does not advertise 
would have any idea about. There are just two things 
to do to get people interested in Asiatics or any other 
variety, and the men who are booming the new varie- 
ties are "on to the job." First, show them. Second, 
advertise. Of course, you ought to have good stock, 
but even with their "two or three kinds of combs." as 
Mr. Wright says, the new breeders succeed in creating 
a demand by their everlasting and persistent blowing 
about them. Then let us do the same thing. Raise 
good Asiatics; send or take them to the shows in 
droves ; then blow, blow, blow, till our outlandish crow- 
ing will make such a racket that the amateurs will 
have to take notice. There is no family of fowls in 
the standard that can attract the attention in the exhi- 
bition hall that the Asiatics can, when they are 
properly bred and magnificently shown. 

As to Mr. John F. Davis' tirade against Asiatics, it 
needs no answer. All the argument he brings up is 
that the new varieties ''are the goods," "have made 
good," ''have merit," and so forth. We are willing 
for them to have all the merit, and all the value they 
are entitled to, the same as any variety, but it is not 
necessary to tear down the foundation that built them 
up, and to try to kill off one of the leading families 
of pure bred poultry, just beeaus^ he hapfx^ns to b^ in- 
terested iri something else. Let hihi breed Rhode 
Islatid Reds, or Georgia Shawl Necks or Massachu- 





J Page 28 



setts Browns, or anything that any other state in the 
union can make, but some of us who know how to 
succeed where somebody else has failed, do not pro- 
pose to give up our good things to try some one's else 
new patent. No matter what your variety is, laud it 
?to the skies, but don't be so everlastingly ready to 
jump on to some one else who is attending quietly to 
Ihis own business. I saw at the Illinois State Fair three 
■exhibits that would boom any variety. One man had 
about 25 or 30 Partridge Wyandottes, another had a 



POULTRY FANCJER 




February, '10 




long string of Rhode Island Reds- 



-enough 



m 



each 



exhibit to make a fine showing if no one else had shown 
these varieties and they were all fine ones. No won- 
der they are successful. Asiatic breeders can do the 
same if they try; don't go to the show with a pair or a 
trio or even one pen. Send a long string of them, all 
you have that are up to show quality. Then advertise 
what you win, and if the orders don't come in the 
first time, try again; keep at it. That is the way the 
other fellows do, and that is all there is to their suc- 
cess. Their varieties are no better than yours. 
Chenoa, 111. 



Vital 







Stock 




Some of the Secrets of Proper Selection and an Ex- 
planation of Conditions Which are Overlooked by 
the Great Majority of Breeders. New Theories 
Advanced. 

By REV. C. E. PETERSON 

N the selection of breeding stock, the 
individuals that have developed most 
strongly the primary characters of their 
sex" should always be given the prefer- 
ence, but as this matter of strong sex 
individuality is not always taken into 
consideration by the average breeder he, in many cases, 
works against his own success because success in full 
aiieasure can never be attained except this matter is 
fullv understood and bred for, just as is done for any 
other characteristics of the breed. 

There are effeminate males and masculine females — 
those in which the characters of the opposite sex are 
unusually developed and it is needless to say that such 
birds do not make the best ])arents from which to 
breed. 

In the selection of the male bird, none but a fully 
matured bird should be used to perpetuate his kind, 
and by a fully matured bird we mean a bird which 
has developed all his secondary sexual characteristics 
as near to perfection as is possible. 

Nature has some laws that cannot lightly be trilled 
with and this is one of them ; for, though it is true 
that an immature bird may be bred from, yet this 
same bird under more natural conditions would never 
find enough mates to do much damage to the type 
of the breed. 

The older bird is better furnished with means of de- 
fense, and the younger bird is routed from the breed- 
ing preserves, and until by means of successful battle 
he can maintain his position as sire of the flock in 
the natural state, his chances are very slender for 
propagation. 

In fact, this state of things can be observed in al- 
most any farm yard where fowls are left to themselves, 
for here it is invariably the male bird with the most 
vigor and the most fullv matured sexual characteris- 
tics that becomes what is commonly called "the cock 
of the walk." 

Where birds are bred for certain desirable features, 
such as plumage and other Standard requirements, 
things take on an entirely different aspect, because 
natural selection and the survival of the fittest are set 
aside, supplanted by artificial selection which may, as 
we all know, work an entire change in a species for 



better or worse, as the requirements of the fancy may 
dictate. 

Now, a male bird may be strong and active and in 
good physical health, and yet be a poor breeder, lie 
is, rather, an eater; he puts on flesh, is a glutton, a 
hanger-on, that first and foremost attends to his own 
needs in preference to those of his consorts with which 
he is mated. He would in case of encroachment of 
another male, not show fight more than a minute, run, 
hide his head in a corner and utter sounds very much 
like a hen in distress, wings hanging, tail dragging — 
a coward and efifeminate all through, that never for 
a moment could sustain his sireship of the pen if it 
had to be fought for. 

On the other hand, a male may be in poor health and 
yet be a strong breeder. He knows, or nature knows, 
that his time is limited and so he gives up reluctantly 
to the encroachment of other males on his premises 
and it is only for sheer lack of strength that he is 
vanquished, and never for lack of courage. 

Now\ either one of these males should be avoided. 
It should be the purnose of the breeder to encourage 
every atom of the sexual instinct in his sires and 
make it a strong point in his matingfs never to use, 
if it can possibly be avoided— and it must be avoideci 
— any male of the above description. 

1 have seen males at noted shows, fine in feather, 
much lauded bv their owners, but birds that would 
never fertilize another egg— passe in every sense of 
the word, and I have also seen birds of the other de- 
scription that were too weak to keep on their feet, 
birds that would take considerable nursing to keep 
through the winter and that only the summer season 
would make of use, but only to perpetuate a very un- 
desirable line of breeding. 

A fit breeding male should be a fully matured 
male; a male that is well spurred, that spoils for a 
fight, that will fight to a finish and if defeated crow 
his spite against his antagonist, dying. 

Such stuff as this makes the right kind of a breeder 
He IS ever on the alert, watchingi guarding, calling the 
females, and would starve first before he would satis- 
fy his own hunger as long as he could get one of 
tlie females to eat the last morsel. 

A strong crower, which means good, strong lungs, 
which in turn means less liable to disease, last on the 
roost at night and first off it in the morning, comb 
blood-red and eyes bright, full of the spirit of animal 
hte, clapping his wings incessantlv, dancing before 
the females, spreading his wing and displaying his 
beauty to the ladies of his harem. This is the stroncr 
physical breeding characteristics of a male fit to per- 
petuate a race of hardy, healthy stock. 

The hackles should be long and flowing and an 



m 



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• 




• 






February, '10 




POULTRY FANCIER- 





abundance of them ; the saddle feathers and furnish- 
njgs aboundant, and nothing so detracts from the ap- 
pearance of a male as scanty tail furnishings. Let 
the tail be well furnished, sickles long and flowing, 
and with the spread of legs that looks so well and 
bespeaks the confidence of his own powers to main- 
tain the supremacy over his flock. 

Scanty furnishing, knock-kneed, and awkward, un- 








1 




r 



A pair of prize winnins Wliite Wvandotte hetis \nva and owned 
by S. G. Wliipreclii.Secialia. Mo. 

gainly looking males should be avoided. There is a 
natural grace in a male that should in every way be 
encouraged. 

ScantA^ tail furnishings is the cause of manv a high- 
tailed bird. He has only a few feathers and tliev 
stand up straight; not enough of them to maintain 
the tail at the proper angle. 

The breeding from immature males is largely to blame 
for the lack of proper furnishings, as it stilftrue that, 
"like begets like," and when immature males are used 
generation after generation no better result can be 
expected. 

The furnishings of a male is his badge of matur- 
ity; they show him to be fitted to breed from and no 
male bird is as handsome and as fit to breed from as 
in his second year, and it is about the same with all 
the dififerent species of the Galinaceous birds. 

The females should be selected with the same care 
regarding their secondary sexual characters, as it is 
just as bad to use a ''cocky" hen in the breeding vard 
as it is to use a "henny" 'cock ; both of them will be 
of little use in the perpetuation of their species. 

There are many females that show a pronounced 
tendency in this direction, and as the bird grows older 
this perverted sexual character grows stronger, until 
in some cases she will change her plumage into that 
of the male bird, which has been observed by our- 
selves as well as by others. 

It is, however, not with the rare cases we are 
dealing now, however interesting the progress of this 
change from the feminine to the masculine might be, 
but with the commonly observed masculine tendencies 
in the inmates of our breeding yards. 

Hens that begin as pullets to show signs of devel- 
oping spurs very rarely make good layers; they will 
be found slow to come to the laying age, and their 
eggs will not be very numerous, nor, as a general 
thing, will they prove very fertile. 



EPage 29 

She will very often resent any advances made by the 
male in her second year, if permitted to live out her 
existence, this tendency will be still more pronounced. 

She is generally the female in the pen that the male 
takes a dislike to; the one that generally causes a 
disturbance whenever she has the opportunity, and 
she very frequently makes the opportunity herself if 
it is not otherwise to be obtained. 

On examination of her internal organs it will be 
found that her ovaries are small, in many cases rudi- 
mentary, and in one sterile hen examined, they were 
shrivelled and atrophied. 

Now, it can be readily seen from this that it is of 
the utmost importance to look after the female that 
in every sense of the word stands out prominently 
a type of her own sex, and that however good her 
fancy points may be, a female showing strong ten- 
dencies to partake of the male characteristics should 
be used with a great deal of hesitancy, if at all, for it 
must be admitted that, to encourage the perpetuation 
of such characteristics, will in the end prove disastrous 
to all the hopes of the breeder by becoming their own 
extinction, which, with one breed, has taken place 
several time until males with more pronounced male 
'characteristics were introduced to rejuvenate the 
strain. 

After a great deal of experimenting we have not yet 
'irrivcd at any conclusion, as to how much the sepaVa- 
j'on of the different sexes may or may not induce con- 
ditions similar to the ones described. 

We have, of course, noticed, as have many other 
i*f;breeders. that when cockerels are separated from the 
V pullets that the cockerels as they grow older will 
force some of the v/eaker ones into a state of femi- 




Prize winning Wliite Plymoutli Rook Cockerel, bred and 
owned by Allen Tucker. Mineral Point. Wis. 

ninity that sometimes will utterly ruin and demoralize 
the flock, and, if not make them entirely useless, cre- 
ate habits that are very hard to break them of in 
later life. 

Bridgeton, Maine. 




Page 30 




POULTRY FANCl ER*db^i:'^^;JHJ^ 




EDITORIAL PAGE • • 



Poultry Fancier 

Published under the name Fancy Fowls for 1 years. 
1897 to 1907. 



Entered aa Second Class Matter, Sept. 28, 1907, at the 

Post Office at Chicago, 111., under 

Act of March 3, 1879. 



Published the 15th of each month by 

POULTRY FANCIER PUBLISHING CO. 

FR.-\NK HECK, President 
357 Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 



FRANK HECK. 



Editor 



Subscription price in United States and pos- 
sessions 25 cents per year. 

Subscription price in Chicago, Canada and 
foreign countries, 50 cents per year. 

All subscriptions are immediately discontinued 
when the time expires for which they have been 
paid. 

Requests for advertising rates will be given 
prompt attention. 

Changes of ads must be received by the 1 st of 
the month. New ads must be received not later 
than the 1 0th of the month. 



The circulation of Poultry Fancier is national 
in character. It is the only poultry journal pub- 
lished solely in the interests of fanciers, the people 
who constitute practically the entire fraternity. 

The mission of Poultry Fancier is to teach 
breeders how to produce the beautiful and valu- 
able Standard bred birds which are the founda- 
tion of all profit and pleasure in poultry raising. 



February, 1910 



To Succeed You Must Know 
Your Breed 

Breeders of Standard bred fowls 
would rind success much easier to at- 
tain if they would make more earnest 
effort to learn just wliat is required in 
the variet}^ they ore attempting to 
breed. It is astonishing to what ex- 
tent the average breeder depends 
upon chance matings and a meager 
knowledge of the characteristics of 
his fowls. 

A little study of the Standard will 
enable any one to gain a fair idea of 
what is required in the different vari- 
eties, and this is esi)ecially true as re- 
gards shape of the fowls. The pic- 
tures contained in tlie book are as 
accurate as skill can well make them 
and they show in profile the typical 
shape of the birds as it should be in 
the liviiig specimens. The word de- 
scription of both color and shape is 
complete and a careful study of same 
in connection with the birds them- 
selves will give the breeder a foun- 
dation uj)on which to work and 
which with actual cxiieriencc in mat- 
ing and breeding will make it possible 
for him to i)r()(lue the higli grade 
fowls which bring the greatest pleas- 
ure and financial success. Now is the 
most important time of the year for 
the breeder for the reason that he has 
his birds mated and the result has a 
direct bearing upon his success for 
the entire year until another breeding 



season comes around and gives him 
another opportunity to correct his 
errors. 

The birds which comprise the 
breeding pens should be carefully 
gone over and the good and bad 
points fully considered. The breeder 
should know as nearly as possible the 
value and importance of each defect 
in order that he may iliscard such 
specimens as are clearU' a detriment 
to progress. One bird seriously de- 
fective in some section and used in 
the breeding pen may be the means 
of transmitting and perpetuating a 
disqualifying defect in the entire 
flock. We should learn tli:it quality 
is what counts and that success at 
next season's shows depends not upon 
how many chicks we hatch, l)ut upon 
h(nv good those are that we do get 
out. Most breeders would make 
greater progress if they would cut out 
ai)out half the birds in tlieir pens and 
make smaller matings of only the 
choicest specimens. Perhaps no one 
appreciates the loss and disappoint- 
ment caused by ignorance or care- 
lessness in mating the breeding birds 
as do the judges. The writer has 
l)een compelled to disqualify scores 
of birds at this season's shows Avhich 
without the disqualifying defect would 
reach from OD to 05 points. It seems 
a shame that breeders would mate 
birds of this kind wb.en they know, 
or should know, the certain results of 
so doing. Study your Standard and 
study your fowls and go through your 
breeding pens right now and throw 
out all specimens that have any de- 
fects whicl^ tend toward disqualilica- 
tions. Above all. do not tolerate 
squirrel tails, side springs on comb, 
off-colored ear lobes, wry tails, vul- 
ture hocks, black in white birds, white 
in black birds, lopped combs, absence 
of spike in rose comb varieties and 
stubs of feathers on the legs of clean- 
legged varieties. 

Why Not Go in to Win? 

The amount of pleasure and profit 
which we derive from the breeding 
of Standard bred poultry depends 
altogether upon the amount of energy 
and enthusiasm which we put into 
the work. Without these two things, 
failure will be the result. And if 
the i)oultrymen does not have some- 
thing of the fancier in his make-up, 
he will not be able to scare up much 
energy and enthusiasm, all of which 
is equivalent to saying that if you 
don't like chickens you had better not 
try to keep them. The successful 
breeders in any branch of live stock 
raising are the ones who are in love 
with the work. There are many peo- 
ple who do have a love for fowls who 
are killing it by careless methods and 
lack of a little study of the needs of 
their featherefl charges. 

It is to this class of breeders we 
want to speak and upon whom we 
want to urge the necessity for a little 
intelligent study of the conditions 
under which the greatest success is 
obtained. Very few people can ad- 
niire a lot of scrub chickens and there 
is certainly very little in them to ex- 



cite admiration on the part of anyone. 
Therefore, good stock is the founda- 
tion upon which to build. Standard 
bred stock means birds of uniform 
size, color and general appearance. 
Culls, cripples, runts and all other 
undesirable birds in any flock should 
1)e killed or (nherwise disposed of, 
and in this way one of the prime 
causes of failure will be removed, be- 
cause the harboring of such specimens 
is ofteii the means of the breeder un- 
consciously becoming disgusted with 
his flock. 

Then, again, the surroundings in 
which llie fowls are kept have much 
to do with the measure of success 
achieved. If the breeder has unlim- 
ited range for his stock, there is not 
so much opportunity for failure by 
reason of filthy and unsanitary houses 
and yards, but where the birds are 
kept in confinement and especially on 
the average town lot. these things 
have much to do with the matter. 
Dirty, tumi^le-down houses, ill-smell- 
ing, filled with vermin, overcrowded 
and wholly unsuitable for any living 
thing, are often found as the only 
shelter provided for the fowls. Yards 
that are in the sair.e class are gener- 
ally found in connection with such 
houses. 

From the standpoint of financial 
profit it is absurd to expect results 
from such a condition of affairs. The 
hens wdl never lay enough eggs to 
pay for their keeping and as for pro- 
ducing sho\\- birds under such sur- 
roundings it is time mole than wasted. 
And yet, many people wonder why 
they fail. One of the first reciuisites 
for creating an interest in the work is 
a clean, well-arranged poultry house, 
with yards of proper size and kept in 
a sanitary condition, and all details 
necessary for the comfort of the fowls 
properly looked after. The next is a 
flock of birds, every one of which is 
a creditable specimen of the variety 
it represents, and a Hock not too large 
for the available house and yard room 

Then there must be an earnest de- 
sire to accomplish results above the 
average and there must be sufficient 
energy to back up this desire with 
action. First of all, know at what 
you are aiming and then keep i)lug- 
ging awav till results come. The 
poultryman has no business becom- 
ing easily discouraged, and he should 
not expect to accomplish wonders in 
a day. He should make uj) his mind 
that what others have done he can 
also do. and that he will learn from 
his own or others' experience just 
where the pitfalls are and avoid them. 
The idea is that there is no good 
reason lor ging into the matter half 
hearterl. There is plenty of room at 
the top. The breeder who can pro- 
diice fowls that will win the prizes 
at the hundreds of poultry shows each 
season is assured of linancial success 
as a reward for his labor, and he also 
secures what to many is more to be 
desired, namely, the admiration of his 
competitors and the public acknowl- 
edgment of his superior skill as a 
breeder. Then why not go in to 
w in? 



m 



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• 





{ February, '10 



Pertinent Paragraphs 

By EASTERNER 

It's as plain as the nose on your face 
is. 

Though the reason us somewhat 

amazes, 
If you want to know when 
To set the old hen. 
You must study the Moon and her 

phases. 

'Tis a wonderful tale this of Swavs- 
good. 

Who declares he can make all he says 

good; 
The next thing you know 
He'll be able to show 
How to fix every hen so she lays 

good. 

Mr. J. R., solo: "By ginger! I'll 
get after that man. Heck. What right 
lias he to write a book and sell it? I 
guess I know a few secrets about ex- 
pert exhibitors, and now he has gone 
and done it. skimmed off the cream 
and only left the skim-milk for me. 
What'll my readers think when they 
know I've slept at my post and al- 
lowed another to beat me holler? Gee I 
but it makes me mad! 

^T'm looking for the man who wrote 

That book on fixing fowl; 
And like a cat upon the fence 
I'll make him madly yowl. 
When the A. P. A. I'm telling 
The secrets he is selling, 
I'm looking for the man who wTOte 
That book on fixing fowl. 

*T'm looking for the man who wrote 

That book on fixing fowl; 
And when I find the faking chap. 
I'll make him dance and howl, 
He'll never write another. 
He'll bawl for home and mother, 
I'm looking for the man who wrote 

That book on fixing fowl." 
— With acknowledgments to the Na- 
tional Phonograph Co. 

"I'm looking for trouble, am I! Well, 
I reckon I'm only fulfilling the Scrip- 
tures if I am. Dont we read in Jol), 
"'Man is born unto trouble, as the 
sparks ii\y upward'? Do you suppose 
I'm not going to help the Almighty to 
make this statement true so far as it 
concerns ME? Of course I am going 
to help, and T feel bound to carry a 
chip on my shoulder all the time and 
knock it off if you dare. 

"Mean to peach on a brother Edi- 
tor? Why, my dear hearer, the pro- 
fession of tale-bearer is a very ancient 
■one. You will find it mentioned in 
one of the oldest books in the world, 
the Old Testament. Strife may cease 
if there be no one to bear tales, but 
what a world this would be if there 
were no strife. One lady was say- 
ing the other day to another: "ATy 
husband and I have lived together 
for twenty years, and in all that time 
we have never spoken a cross word 
to each other." "Very delightful." 
her friend replied: "but haven't you 
found it just a bit — ah! — monoton- 
ous?" There'll be no monotony when 
J. R. is arounrl." 

"The American Poultry Association 
won't trouble him? Well, we will 
see about that. You wait till I've got 




POULTRY FANCIER: 



through with my speech against him 
and his book! You just wait. Didn't 
they praise my paper before the an- 
nual meeting? Well, I'll make 'em 
praise me again and condemn that 
condemned Heck and his condemned 
book, condemn me if I don't. 

The American Poultry Association 
ought not to trouble him? Oh, you 
poor, benighted fakir! Haven't I 
already said that I have a case against 
him and his book? How dare you, 
sir; how dare you assert that the asso- 
ciation ought not to trouble him when 
I say that 1 have a case against him! 
Don't you know your Shakespeare? 
Did you ever read: 

"I am Sir Oracle, 
And when T ope my lips let no dog 
bark!" 

Those words, sir, are not history, 
but prophecy, and in me you see their 
fulfillment. How dare you! Oh! how 
dare you. 

"Gee whiz! There will be ructions 
when the spirit of Donnybrook Fair 
breaks loose in the A. P. A. after T 
get in my work. If you see a head hit 
it — that's the true way to promote 
good feeling and keep up the interest. 
I'm enjoying myself in anticipation. 
What do you mean by telling me that 
old story about the Irishman and the 
bull. He had a right to laugh when 



Page 31 





he thought how funny it would seem 
to grab the bull by the horns and rub 
his nose in the dirt. And he had a 
right to say "Begorra! I'm glad I had 
my laugh first," when the bull tossed 
him over the fence and he fell bruised 
into the mud of the street. If you 
can't find a story with a point you 
ought not to tell one. The true phi- 
losophy of life is to get your laugh,, 
when you can, and as soon as you 
can. "He laughs best who laughs 
last," is a mighty poor proverb. The 
only true rendering is, "He laughs 
best who laughs first." for don't you 
see if he don't laugh first, perhaps he 
never will have a chance to laugh at 
all. Of course, I don't care what the 
A. P. A. may do. What T do care 
about is to frighten Heck and blame 
him, he don't scare worth a cent. 
But I'll think up something more 
frightful. If this bogey-man won't do 
the biz, perhaps another bogey-man 
will." 



S. C. White Leghorns 

The right type and color. Line bred 
for years. Winners at Yonngstown 
and Warren, O. Stock eggs for sale. 

RCDTrnilT 336 WIRT STREET. 
DC.I\1 LULL, YOUNGSTOWN. O. 



HAKE BUFF WYANDOT 

Ai^ain ^Mrinners of tHe blu« at La Cross€» and Barahoo 
Snecialtv <;»!#» fKU mnnfK breeding pens and trios. I have a number of 
specially Saie cms mOntn cockerels scored by Roberts and Shellabarger. which I 
will mate with scored and utiscored pullets at $ft to $20 for the trios and $7 to $25 for the pens. Send 
for mating list. Pen 1. will he again headed by rav grand old prize winner 'Hlroy B6y." scored 95^ 
by Hale, and winner of medal as highest scoring cockerel at Minneapolis in 1908. Six'pullets in this 
pen all scoring 91% to 94 ^X- $3 00 per setting of eggs. W. S. HAKE. ELROY. WIS. 



White WvandotteS S- C- ^^^f^ ^' C. Brown and R. C. White 

,„^,. J , vr*.*.v»aj At the recent Baraboo Valley show I won nine firsts, six 



"■. "•' "'j"^^ '" »»"iic vvy«uuuiLcs> inciuuing ciuD specials. At Maaison, January 191i 
nine birds and secured nine prizes on White Wyandottes and R. C. Brown I^eghorn.' 
Club Medal on best W Wyandotte hen. My winners are in my breeding pens. mate( 



s, including 

. Tf J - . • -' ray breeding pens, mated to produce 

winners. It you order eggs you will get the best without reserve at $2.00 per 15 Some choice stock 
for sale Satistaction gunranteed. Highland Poultry Yard., C. Capener. Prop. RF.D. Baraboo. Wis 



have again made 
a record break- 
ing Winning at 

the B a r a h o o 



Raven Rock Poultry Farm 

Valley Show, January 1910. We won on BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS,' 1st 
cock, 3d and 4th hens, 1st and 4[h cockerels, 1st pen, best display and B. P. R. 
Club Cup on best cock, cockerel, hen and pullet— 54 entries in the class. On 
S. C. Black Orpingtons we won 1st, 2nd cocks. 1st, 2d, 3d and 4th hens, 1st 
cockerel, 1st pen, English Class Cup and 1 10.00 Gold Sweepstake for best dis- 
play, open to all classes. In Columbian Wyandottes we entered only seven 
birds winning 3 firsts and 5 other prizes, also cash special for best pen of Wyan- 
dottes all varieties competing. 

This record is but a repitition of our winnings in former years and our winners were produced 
in our own yards. They, with others of equal merit compose our breeding pens for this sea- 
son from which we will supply our egg trade without re.serve. We have used trap-nests for 
years and retain nothing for breeders, but tho.se that make good records at laying Choice 
stock always for sale. Eggs $3 per 15 $5 per 30 from one or all pens. Satisfaction guaranteed 
GEO W. HACKETT. Prop. BOX 111, NORTH FREEDOM. WIS. 



HARDY HOUDANvS 



A Merger of THree Famous Strains 

No Weakened Constitutions Through Inbreedinff 

Blue Ribbon Winners Wherever Ls^a'Senerill 

Shown ^*'''*y Fowl, and may be btetl profitably for either 
. ** pounds of meat or dozens of eggs. Naturally tame, it 

IS contented, and will thrive in a small enclosure. This pecu- 
liarly qualifies it as a "Town Chicken." Heavily Feathered, it is 
impervious to extremes of heat and cold, and is essentially a Winter 
Layer. 

THE HILLCREST ROOKERIES 

FRANK WICKIZER, Mgr. ST. JOSEPH. MICH. 



No comb to freeze. 





^[ Page 32 




POULTRY FANCIER 




. February, '10 





FROM READERS 



This department is for the purpose of giving publicity to the views of our readers who 
would like to express themselves briefly upon topics that are of interest. A hearty 
invitation is extended to all our readers to use the department freely. 



A GOOD STIFF PROTEST- 
TINUED. 



-CON- 



Editor Poultry Fancier: — 

I wish to express a few random 
thoughts upon an article which ap- 
peared in the December number of 
the Fancier as well as upon the reply 
which appeared in the January issue. 
Some of the statements in the latter 
were rather vague and contained a 
little of the spirit of ridicule. In. re- 
gard to purchasers of Dark Brahmas 
and Partridge Cochins of thirty years 
ago receiving so little value for their 
money. I would like to ask why the 
makers of new varieties have elected 
to infuse some of that same value 
into those varieties. Where is the 
American breed, except the old Dom- 
inique, that does not contain some 
Asiatic or kindred blood? 

I call to mind some of the first Sil- 
ver Laced Wyandottes I ever saw and 
which it was my duty to pass upon as 
judge at one of our large fairs in the 
early 70's. They showed unmistak- 
able signs of Dark Brahma blood: 
some showing pea combs, feathered 
legs, and a slight mixture of gray. 
Then later when the Wvandotte 
breeders coveted the color markings 
of the Dark Brahma, I contributed 
some birds to aid them in getting the 
color and penciling. I also aided in 
giving color and markings to the Par- 
tridge Wyandotte by furnishing cock- 
in blood. 

This correspondent then says: 
"Pray what arc the Dark Brahmas? 
Are they not the result of a cross or 
a series of crosses? I think not. T 
remember having seen in the early 
50s at one of our Agricultural Fairs 
as good colored Dark Brahmas as we 
see today. These had sprung directly 
from the early importations of 
Asiatics. Tn those days systematic 
crossing had not yet been resorted to. 

The fancy is 'continually looking 
after something new, and ever ready 
to accept the theory that "Time's no- 
blest offspring is the last." 

It was my good fortune for the past 
two seasons to have a seat at the 
banquet given to the Veteran Fan- 
ciers by the Boston Poultry Associa- 
tion. This was composed of men who 
have had very much to do in placing 
the poultry industry where it is to- 
day, and I found all of these adher- 
ing to the same varieties and types of 
birds that they began with in their 
boyhood days. T mav mention the 
venerable Henry Hales, the Dorking 
man. Seeley the W. C. Black Polish 
breeder, Houdlette, who helped cre- 
ate and who named the Wyandotte, 
as well as Felch, Loring, McNeil and 
others who were present and who 
have failed to get upon the band wag- 
on or to act the part of the "small boy 
who tags on behind." All honor to 
these veterans! While others mav 
ridicule they are certainly worthy of 
the respect of all true fanciers. These 
are the men who were born fanciers. 



and are into it for the love of what is 
beautiful in nature, and for a desire 
to add to that beauty by their own 
efforts. Would you advise them to 
turn their backs upon the "good old 
has beens"? There is too much of 
that spirit abroad. We see it in a 
great share of the numerous poultry 
shows which are springing up and 
which place nearly all iheir specials 
upon the newer creations. Even our 
great New York State Agricultural So- 
ciety last season, ignoring all the oth- 
er varieties, offered a single silver cup 
for Rhode Island Reds. Are we to 
follow their teaching, drop everything 
else that we may have a chance to 
win a cup? 

Dr. S. Lott. 
Bellona, N. Y. 

SOME REFLECTIONS OF A 
BARRED ROCK BREEDER. 



Editor Poultry Fancier: — 

In a recent number of a poultry 
journal, I noticed an article by a 
prominent Barred Rock breeder who 
holds the idea that pullet bred cock- 
erels and cockerel bred pullets should 
be recognized in our poultry shows. 




A Barred Rock cockerol bred and 
owned by E. M. Ruechlv, Greenvile O 
and typiral of the excellent birds raised 
by bim. 



This would really mean the changing 
of the Standard or the enlarging of 
it to cover one more variety. In my 
mind it would be far better to make 
a separate Standard for P.arred Rock 
males, making their color several 
shades lighter than the females as 
nature intended them to be. In other 
words, make a Standard under which 
a high scoring male could be mated 
to a prize winning female with the 



chance of producing something worth 
while instead of birds that look like 
;{0 cents, as the writer puts it. This 
idea is opposed by many breeders 
who claim, that it would enable us to 
produce high grade birds with much 
greater ease and in greater quantity. 
I do not believe that there would be 
anything to fear along this line, as 
there is always opportunity to breed 
more perfect specimens. Such a Stan- 
dard would greatly simplify the breed- 
ing of Barred Rocks and would reduce 
the expense of yards and stock to- 
:ibout one-half what is necessary now. 
Another desirable point, is that breed- 
ers would not always have to explain- 
to the novice the mysteries of the 
double mating system. Many farmers 
and amateur breeders when they learn- 
of the complex nature of the double 
mating system, they immediately go- 
off after some other breed or variety 
where mating is more simple. Only 
a few days ago, I met a gentleman 
a former Barred Rock patron of mine 
who had discarded the breed and had 
taken up another because he was 
not prepared to keep several yards 
and unless he did this, he could not 
expect to raise choice specimens. This 
is only one instance from among hun- 
dreds of similar ones where the dou- 
l)le matiiig system is doing the variety 
a great injury. I am practicing dou- 
ble mating but am obliged to do so as 
long as the present Standard laws 
work against nature's laws instead of 
working in harmony with her. T be- 
lieve that a change in the Standard as 
above suggested would be for the up- 
lift and greater popularizing of our 
favorites among both fancy and utility 
breeders. 

E. M. Buechly. 
Greenville, O. 



Geo. W. Hackett. Box 111. North Free- 
dom, Wi.s., has aprain demonstrated bv bis 
show room record this season that his 
birds are leaders and that his customers 
for both stock and eggs can feel assured 
of s-ettin.i? the hiprhest quality. Mr. 
Hacktlt h;is be<>n a successful breeder for 
many years and hi.s favorites are Barred 
Ttocks. S. C. Black Oriiinf,nons and Colum- 
bian Wyandottes. Ili.^ winnin^.s this sea- 
son constitute a remarkable record, as he- 
secured tlie bulk of the first prizes and 
specinls wherever he has shown. Our 
leadcis who ine interested in his varieties 
should not fail to read his ad in this is- 
sue and make a note of his address for 
future use if they do not need stock or 
«'K-ss at the present time. His ad con- 
tams a partial list of prizes won by him 
in .strong competition. Mr. Hackett is one 
of the newer .judgres who have entered the 
hehl ,luiin^- {ho past few years and he 
has made sood at some large shows He 
is familiar Avith all breeds of fowls and is 
a competent .lud^e of all varieties He 
has a few open dates left for next sea- 



S. C. Brown Leghorns '^°" ^'^ '^'^ 



cock, 2d cock 



Exclusivelv •' *",',' ^^^ -'^- *^'' '^^"s- 1st, 2d 

s nJ if'^u^T^- ^'i- 2d l^en. 1st. 2d pullet. 
1st pen at Richmond on K entries. Kjfes 
trom these winners cheap. 

IRA FORD, LA GRANGE, IND. 



t • 



• 



• 



# 




• 





>^EZ^?IS3 



i^VrV" V •■•fX'r.-^.-'A'<> 



POULTRY FANClER^-i T: Page 33 J 





Awards at the Boston Show 



EXHIBITORS AT BOSTON, MASS. 

Adams, Chester T. . . . .Kennebunkport, Me. 

Adams, Wm. T^ Saxonville, Mass. 

Albers, Wm. F Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Allen, E. H Reading, Pa. 

Allen, Sydney C Orchard Park, N. Y. 

Allen, W. L. Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Almy, F. W. C, Tiverton Four Corners, R. I. 

Andrews, Edgar L Ithaca, N. Y. 

Andrews, J. W Dighton, Mass. 

Appleton, Royal C Brockton, Mass. 

Atherton, W. B Randolph, Mass. 

Atwood, F. E Athol, Mass. 

Auckland, Wm Winsted, Conn. 

Austin, I.. A Plt*.sfleld. Mass. 

Babson, E. C Danlelson, Conn. 

Bacon, .Jordan H Reading, Mass. 

Baerman. F. D Dunnellen, N. J. 

.Bailey, A. S Cobalt, Conn. 

Bailey, H. H Waverly, Mass. 

Baker, Edw. D Norwood, Mass. 

Batch & Brown ... Manchester, Conn. 

Ballantine, Miss Etta I Mansfield, Mass. 

Baxter, J. B. Milton, Mass. 

Baylies, Walter C Taunton, Mass. 

Bean, Irving W S. Braintree, Mass. 

Bennis. W. L Brockton, Mass. 

Benson, Elmer F Whitman, Mass. 

Benway, L. N Salem, Mass. 

Berry, B. F N. Brewster, Mass. 

Berry, Jas. B. Pawtucket, R. I. 

Bessom, Geo. E Mansfield, Mass. 

Birch, Geo. F Milford, Mass. 

Bisbee, Mrs. C. M Mattapan, Mass. 

Black & Son. O. F Newton. Mass. 

Bliss, J. E Clinton. Conn. 

Blodgett & Drake, Windsor. Conn. 

Blood. Wm. E Townshend, Vt. 

Boothby, W. B Westbrook. Me. 

Brayton, Milan A Fall River, Mass. 

Brooks. W. W Berwick, Me. 

Brookside Poul. T..ds. . .West Hartford, Conn. 

Brown, C. Allen Waverly. Mass. 

Brown, Frank Marblehead, Mass, 

Brown, Lewis R Salem, Mass. 

Brown. I^oren H Lunenburg, Mass. 

Bugbee, S. D Concord, N. H. 

Burbank, Frank C Sandwich, Mass. 

Cain, M. J Lynnfield, Mass. 

Cameron. John New Bedford, Mass. 

Campbell. J. B Concord, N. H. 

Capen Bros Bloomfield, Conn. 

Oapewell, L. C Winsted, Conn. 

Carpenter, H. L Woonsocket, R. I. 

Carrier, W. H Glastonbury, Conn. 

Carter, Arthur B N. Attleboro, Mass. 

Carter, A. G Freeport, M. 

Chalker, R. S Higganum. Conn. 

Challis. H. E S. Danville, N. H. 

Champagne. A. E Claremont, N. H. 

Chapin. Albert E Springfield, Mass. 

Chapman, Frank F. B. . .Winchester, Mass. 

Chapman, M. L. Wethersfleld, Conn. 

<'hase, O. P Andover. Mass. 

Chase Bros Newburyport, Mass. 

< Mark, F. H Chelsea, Mass. 

Clark, G. H Northampton. Mass. 

Clarke, Dr. H. P Indianapolis, Ind. 

Clark, L. M. Mattapan. Mass. 

<'"obb, Fred W. . .Newton Upper Falls. Mass. 

Cobb, W. A S. Portland. Me. 

Cobine, Mrs. W. L "...Oneonta. N. Y. 

Coffin, H. I. Freeport, Me. 

<'otfln, M. H Whltinsvllle, Mass. 

<'ole. John M Williamstown, Mass. 

<'olprit. J. H Arlington Heights, Mass. 

Cook. Jr., C. S W. Newton. Mass. 

Cook, E. W. Forestdale, R. I. 

Coombs. E. T.. Wilmington. Mass. 

Corey, M. J. Springfield. Mass. 

Cornforth. E. O Slatersvlile. I{. I. 

<:regar, H Forrest Park, 111. 

Cruttonflen. T.vler Norwich. Conn. 

Cuddahy. Thos Manche.slei-. N. H. 

Dabney, .S. R Dedliam. Mass. 

Danif'ls. W. .1 Whitman. Mass. 

Darling, 13. E Natiok. Mass. 

Davis. Gorham IT Arlington, Mass. 



Davis & Bro., Jno. E Marblehead, Mass. 

Daval Bros Whitman, Mass. 

Day, Walter H Falrhaven, Mass. 

Decker, Dr. B. E Bradford, N. Y. 

Dellmuth, Julius C E. Dedham, Mass. 

Dillon, C. H Cincinnati. O. 

Doehr, Albert Wallingford, Conn. 

Drew, Elmer O. Middleboro, Mass. 

Duclos, B. N Lenox, Mass. 

Dunn, Jno. S Gardner, Mass. 

Duston, A. G S. Farmington, Mass. 

Earl, Mrs. G. O West Qulncy, Mass 

Eastman, Geo. F Granbv, Mass.' 

Eaton. Sumner H Brocton, Mass. 

Elm Poul. Yds Hartford, Conn. 

de I'Etoile. Wilfred Westwood, Mass. 

Evans, Jr., Wilmot R Everett, Mass. 

Evergreen Place W. Hartford. Conn. 

Exmoor Farm Lebanon, Pa. 

Fairfield Farm Wenham, Ma.ss. 

Fairview Poul. Farm S. Portland, Me. 

Fall. Jr., Melvin Berwick, Me. 

Faulds. T. A London, Ont., Can. 

Fay, H. J. W Westboro, Mass. 

Felton, G. W Cliftondale. Mass. 

Fessenden, S. H Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Fiske, Chas. L Middletown, Conn. 

Fiske. Ja.s. A Cliftondale, Mass. 

Fletcher, Geo. V Belmont, Mass 

Forbes, Ralph E Milton, Mass. 

Ford & Farrar 

945 Wash St., Whitman, Wash. 

Foss, H. C Freeport, Me. 

Foster, Daniel P Beverly, Mass. 

Foster, W. D W. Brookfield. Mass. 

Four Oaks Farm Brockton, Mass. 

Fox, Dr. Wm. Y Taunton, Mass. 

Fraleigh, Howard Forest, Can 

Frasier, F. S Brocton, Mass. 

Gale Poul. Place New Haven, Conn. 

Garriepy, F. A Stillwater, R. I. 

Gibson. Ellsworth T Nashua, N. H. 

Gies, R. J. Albany County, N. Y. 

Gilbert, Frank H N. Attleboro. Mass. 

Gillert, Frank H N. Attleboro, Mass. 

Gluck, F. C Kenne, N. H. 

Goodhue, Edw. J E. Bramtree. Mass. 

Gough, Jno. A Merldan. Conn. 

Gould, Howard Pt. Washington, N. Y. 

Grannis Bros La Grangeville, N. Y. 

Grant, Howard Marshall. Mich. 

Greene, Jas. A. Woonsocket, R. I. 

Greene, Ralph C. . Sayville, N. Y. 

Greenwood, O. S Topsfield, Ma.ss. 

Grimm, Henry A Windsor, Conn. 

Grove Hill Poul. Yds Waltham, Mass. 

Gunning, John Sherbrooke, Que., Can. 

Hales, Henry RIdgewood, N. J. 

Hall, David Beverly, Mass. 

Hall, Richard W Needham, Mass. 

Hanes, Oren s. Colton, N. Y. 

Harris. F. B Woburn, Mass. 

Harris. W. S. Mansfield, Mass 

Harwood, R. G Littleton. Mass. 

Hathaway, A. L Arlington, Mass. 

Haupt, J. S Easton. Pa. 

Havemeyer. Bros Mahwah. N. J. 

Havemeyer, Horace Stamford. Conn. 

Hawkins. A. C Lancaster. Mass. 

Hawkins, I>incoln Sharon. Mass. 

Hayden, Warren Hartford, Conn. 

Ilickford, Ira S 

168 Boston St., I^ynn, Mass. 

Hill. David Beverly. Mass. 

Hillcrest Farm Randolph, Mass. 

Hillhurst Farm Orchard Park. N. Y. 

Hillside Bantam Yds Shirley. Mass. 

Hills. Wm. C Antrim, N. H 

llolbrook, A. H S. Braintree, Mass. 

Holcomb, F. L Meridan, Conn. 

HoUis, Jno. F N. Abington. Mass. 

Holmes. Lincoln C Sanford, Me. 

Hooker. Henrietta E S. Hadley, Mass. 

Horte. Robt. F S. Braintee. Mass. 

Hnsley. Mrs. F Gill, Mass. 

Houghton. Jno. w W. Brookfield, Mass. 

Howe.«. A. F Sheffield, Mass. 

Hubbard. Jr.. Eliot Millls, Mass. 




"MAJESTIC I." 

5th Cockerel. Chicaero Dec 'OH 



Rankin's Barred Rocks 

"BEST IN THE WEST" 

AND 
ADVANCING IN QUALITY EACH SEASON 

Bred from Chicago winners. Pens headed by win- 
ning males and specially mated to classy females for 
type, surface color, under color, yellow beaks and 
legs and head points. Which point do you lack.^ 
Winnings Chicago, Dec, 1908, 5th cockerel. Blue 
Island, III.. 1909, 2d and 4th hens, 3d cockerel; 1910. 
1st and 3d cockerels, 1st hen. Eggs, both matings, 
$2.00, $2.50, $3.00 and $3.50. 

Ode L. Rankin. Maywood. 111. 



Hubbard, Helen F Boston, Mass. 

Huckins Farm Berlin, Mass. 

Hunt, Wm N. Middleboro. Mass. 

Hurt. Peter S Thorntown, Ind. 

Hutchinson. N. V N. Abington. Mass. 

Ives. Paul P Guilford, Conn. 

Inches, Mrs. Geo. B N. Grafton, Mass. 

Inches, Mr.s. Geo. B N. Frafton, Mass. 

Jacobus, M. R Ridgefleld, N. J. 

Jefferies, E Toronto, Can. 

Job, Mrs. S. G S. Walpole, Mass. 

Jodrey, J. C Danvers, Mass. 

Jordan, Mrs. H. E Dorchester, Mass. 

Kaufmann «Sr Windham Nutley, N. J. 

Keating, J. P Westboro, Mass. 

Kelleher, J. T Springfield. Mass. 

Kendall, Geo Newburyport, Mass. 

Kennard, Waldo S. Hingham. Mass. 

Kenney. Chas. F Danbury, Conn. 

Kiley, T. J London, Ont., Can. 

King & Whiting Plalnville. Mass. 

Knapp. Dr Millerton. N. Y. 

Knowles. Samuel Lexington. Mass. 

Lane & Burns Taunton, Mass. 

Latham, C. H Lancaster. Mass. 

Leach, Arthur H Middleboro, Mass. 

Leach. Jos. W Methuen, Mass. 

Lee. C. G Walworth. N. Y. 

I..ee. Calvin H Hyde Park, Mass. 

Lee, Francis W Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Le Febre, D. P West Berlin, Vt. 

Lincoln, Jr., Leontine ....Fall River, Mass. 

Lingard, Jas Everett, Mass. 

LIppitt, Henry F Manville, R. I. 

Little, Harold S Newburyport, Mass. 

Little, Jr., J. Lovell Boston, Mass. 

Lochman, G. H Winchester, Mass. 

Lord, Jas. E Stonington, Conn. 

I..oring, C. Carroll Dedham, Mass. 

T-iOtt, Dr. S Bellona. N. Y. 

Lowell, John Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

I.iucier, Mozart Providence, R. I. 

Lunt & Curtis Freeport, Me. 

Lynch, Thomas C N. Abington, Mass. 

McAndrew, R. G E. Milton, Mass. 

McCaffrey. W". J Newport, Vt. 

McDougall, Jno Pawtucket. R. I. 

McDougall, Wm. A Newton. Mass. 

McEwan, Chas. B Albany, N. Y. 

McGee. Jr. Chas Marblehead. Mass. 

McNeil. Wm London, Ont.. Can. 

MacNear. Chas. W Ashland, Mass. 

Macomber, Alice Taunton, Mass. 

Macomber, Horace W., N. Middleboro, Mass. 

Mann. Geo. E Dover, Mass. 

Maplewood Farm Adams, Mass. 

Marshall. C. E Rowley, Mass. 

Martin, Geo Marblehead, Mass. 

Martin, Jno. S Fori Dover. Can, 

Mathews, Armstrong A Co.. Norwich. Conn. 

Mattison & Toel S. Shaftsbury. Vt. 

Maxwell, Jr.. Geo Newton Centre, Mass., 

Merrill, H. C Maiden. Mass. 

Miner & Walker Brattleboro. Vt. 

Mitchell. Wesley H. ..New Hampton. N. H. 
Monadnork View Poul Farm. Athol. Mass. 

Monmouth Poul. Farms Freeman. N. J. 

Moodv. A. M Newburyport. Mass. 

Moodv. Geo. F Lynn. Mass. 

Moody. Wm. D Freeport. Me. 

Morehouse. A. C Beverly. Mass. 

Morse, J. E Tanuton, Mass. 

Morse. Jr.. Jno. T Boston. Mass. 

Morton. V. C Freeport, Me. 

Mountjoy. B. J London. Ont., Can.. 

Munroe. Howard M I..exlngton. Mass. 

Nichols. Leon A Barrlngton. R. T. 

Nicholson, Haldle Leonminster. Mass. 

Nickerson, F. H Natick. Mass. 

Northrup, Jr., Jno. H... Apponanmg. R. I. 

Noyes, Geo. E Newburyport. Mass. 

Noyes, P. W New T.>ondon. Conn. 

Xuttirig. Frank J Plalnfleld. Vt. 

Oflicer. Robt N. Grafton. Mass. 

()ke «!t Murray T.,ondon. Ont., Can. 

Old Acres Wrentham, Mass. 

Owen Farms Vineyaid Haven. Mass. 

Paine. Amasa I .Whitman. Mass. 

I'aine, Jr., Robeit T Boston, Mass. 

Patterson, Robt Walpole, Mass. 

Pearson, Alonzo C Peabody. Mass. 

Peck, Fred W N. Plymouth, Mass. 

Perkins. Jas. E N. Stoughton, Mass. 

Peterson. C. F reatG Harrington, Mass. 

Pfonts, P. R Crawford County, (^hin. 

I'holan. H. L Brockton, Mass. 

I'hinney, H. Chester. Monmouth Beach. Mass. 

Piersori. Wallace R Cromwell, Conn. 

Pine Top Poul. Farm . . . . Hartwood. N. Y. 

Pittstield Poul. Farm Pittsfleld. Me. 

Pleasant Hill Poul. Yds Athol, Mass. 

Poch Bros Walpole. Mass. 

Pope. C. H Brockton, Mass. 

Porter, C. Harold Brockton, Mass. 

Porter, Horace Ridgefleld, Conn. 

Porter. R. S Ridgefield, Conn. 

Powers &• Son.. C. R Randolph. Mass. 

Pratt. Chas. W N. Abington, Mass. 

Prescott. Mrs. H. B. ..Derry Village, N. H. 

Prescott. Heni-y B Derry Village, N. H. 

Preston, A. O. Concord. N. H. 

Princeton Bantam Yds Princeton, Mass. 

Pyne. W. H Milford. Mass. 

Qtiinn, W. D. & W. W Westneld, Mass. 



■ I 




" " Page 34 

Raddin. J. A Cllftondale. Mans. 

Ranker, L. W Tiffin. Ohio, 

Rankin Robert Sanford, Me. 

Ranney. W. F Westminster. Vt. 

Read. Frank D Fall Kiver. Mass. 

Reed. A. B Everett. Mass. 

Reel. Sam Canaan, conn. 

Klce & Sears Boston, Mass. 

Richardson & Son. C. W Apponaup, R. I 

Richardson. Waldo Wollaston. Mass. 

R. I. Red Poul. Yds Klnderhook. N. Y 

Roberts. T. B Norway. Me.' 

Robertson, R. A. ..Warehouse Point. Conn. 
Robinson, Mrs. E. J Lakevllle. Mass. 

Kockandotte Farm Southboro, Mass 

Rogers & Packard Montello. Mass. 

Rose. HuRh A Welland. Ont., Can. 

RunnelKs. Edw. G., Concord, N H. 

Russell, Joseph Toronto, Ont., Can. 

Saltonstall. End. P Chestnut Hill. Mass. 

Sanborn, Dr. N. W Holden, Mass. 

Sargrent, Arthur H S. Hamilton, Mass 

sawyer. Frank H Woburn. Mass. 

Schriver. H. W Chester. N. Y. 

Scott. Harry L Worcester. Mass. 

Scott. W. Edw Woodsford. Me 

Sedgwick Bros. Lenox Dale Mass' 

Seely, Chas. I Alton. N. Y. 

Shaffer, Ed M Somerset. Pa. 

oi ^^ ' ^' ^ Adams. Mass 

Shaw. J. W Brockton, Mas.«i. 

Shay or. C. H Lee. Mass. 

Shaylor, W. M Dalton. Mass. 

Sheldon, Geo. H Wakefield. R. I. 

Shepard Bros Alton. R. I. 

Shepherd & Son.. J. H. Ashland, Mas.«s. 

Snipman, Jno. N Randolph, ATass 

Shove, D. P Fan River, Mass. 

Silloway. Frank E Newburvport Mass 

Simmons Bro.s . Stockton, 111 

Sitterly. Dr. A. T Schenectady. N Y 

S atton. W. W Norfolk, Mass' 

Slessor, W. J London, Ont., Can.' 

Smith. Alex New Rochelle N Y' 

Smith. Mr.s. C. O Woonsocket R l' 

Snider & Warner Napanee Ont., Can 

Staples, E. W Taunton, Mass 

Statia. F. J Granville. N. Y. 

Stephen.s. Wm. C Foxboro. Mass. 

Stokes, Warren J West Roxburv. Mass 

Stoney Brook Farm Bedford, Mass' 

Stowe. F. D. E Brattleboro. Vt 

Sunny Brook Farm West Orange N T 

Swartwout. M. C Groton." N ' Y 

Tabor, F. C Worcester, N. Y 

l\^^^[\ ^.^^ Darien, Conn. 

Tirrell, Wm. W N. Ablngton, Mass 

Thompkins, Lester Concord Mass' 

Tower. C. A Franklin. Mass. 

Ju'Z'^'^l'^'J'y^- ^ Rutland. Vt. 

Little Robt. C Hartford, Conn. 

;\ an Alstyne. J. F Niverville N Y 

T\ade. Wm E Rockland. Mass! 

w n"",' '^''41'"!: Rockvllle. Mass. 

^akley. PA Hlgganum. Conn. 

^A^ard. E. E Marlboro. N H 

^J.«';''i'?^t«"' J- H Ontario, Can! 

A^^aterhouse. Chas. E. . . Swampscott Mass 

TVatson. R. C. Milton. Mass! 

\J^eeks, Harry W Framingham, Ma.ss. 

V;. rl^' ^''anklin C Ballston Spa N Y 

S:: f. ^T ^- T Readvllle, Mass! 

5^ I ' J."''- ^"^ Melro.se. Mass. 

\Vert. Elmer E Gloversville N Y 

Westfall. Wat.son savre Pa 

Weston, W. P HancoS N h' 

Whee er, Chas. A Natick Mass! 

AA heeler, Robt. K. ..Great Barrlngton, Mass. 

^'mT.^^'i Wm J Worcester. Mass. 

S^u r ^'""^^ P""'- Farm. Bridgewater. Mass 
wril"S^i^^"^ E Plalnville, Mass! 

w fi" n '^ ^^ Natick, Ma.ss. 

\\ d Goose Farm Copfagne. N. Y. 

5m h"' * S''"^^- ^ Natick. Ma...s. 

w ''"'''• 2; 2 ""^'-'-^^ Mass. 

W r"^- ^- ^. Vr Whitman. Ma.s.s. 

T\ ills. Fremont H Brockton, Mass 

5 .'"""' J'-- ^as^ F Athol. Mass. 

J\lnchester, E. P .Lamaica Plain, Mass 

S-^' • /^^''^^ Top.sfield. Mass. 

w^ !,K* F''^*^"^an Fitchburg. Mass. 

S."":^^"'^:- -^""^^ rornish. Me. 

TVoodhead, .T. H Leicester. Mass. 

AWARDS AT BOSTOX, MASS. 

BARRED PIA-^IOUTH ROCKS. 

Latham: r,. ck: 1. fi. hen; 1 2 pul 
Copen Bros.: 2, ck ; 3. ckl. Shavlor: 4 ck • 
3. pul Pittsfleld Poul. Farms': 1. ck; 2 
hen: 5, ckl. Pine Top Poul. Farm.s- 3 ck* 
fi, hen: 4. 6. ckl. Shaffer: 3, ck. Brook- 
side Poul. Yds.: 4, hen: 6, pul. Nicholson: 

1, ckl. Ovxon Farms: 2. ckl; 4 ."^ pul 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 
Porter: 5. ck. Knowlrs: 4. ck. Walkley: 

3. ck. Owen Farms: 1, 2. ck ; 1. 2. 3, hen; 

2. 6, ckl. Chalker: 4, fi. hen; n. ckl; 3 fi 
pul. Wade: .''). hen. McCaffrev: 4 ckl 
Rockandotte Farm: 1. 3, ckl. Chapman- 

4, pul. Tilley: L 2, pul. Elm Poul. Yds • 

5, pul. 

BUFF PI.Y.MOI TH ROCKS. 

Four Oaks Farm: f). ck ; 4, jiul. Corey: 
2, ck; .'">, fi. hen; 4. 6. ckl; 6. pul. Frasle'r: 

6. ck; 4, hen; 1. 3. ckl; 6. pul. Fall: 4 ck 
Duclos: L 3. 6, ck : 2, 3, 6. hen; 6. 'ckl; 
2. 5. pul. Adams: L hen. Noves: 6 hen 
Carpenter: .''>. fi, ckl. Kelleher: 6, ckl Bliss- 
2, ckl. Cobb: 1, 3. 6. pul. 




POULTRY FANCIER: 



PARTRIDGE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Alden: I, ck; 1, 3. hen. Brown: 2. ck; 
2. hen; 3. ckl; 2, pul. Wheeler: 2. ckl; 3, 
pul. 
SILVER PENCILED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Peterson: 2. ck ; 1. pul. Gilbert: 1, ck ; 
2. pul. Ballantine: 2, 3, hen; 2. ckl; 4, 5, 
pul. 

COLUMBIAN PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Munroe: 1. ck ; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 1, 2. pul. 
Allen: 3. ck ; 2. hen; 2. ckl; 5. pul. Wood- 
head: 5. 6, ckl; 3, pul. Lee: 3. 4, ckl; 
4. (3. pul. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. 
Powers &' Son: 1, ck. Martin: 3, 4, 6. ck; 
4. hen; ."i. ckl; 2, 3. 4. pul. Russell: 5, ck; 
4, ckl. Owen Farms: 2. ck; 2. 6, hen; 3, 
:?kl; 5. pul. Hollis: 3, hen; 6, pul. An- 
drews: 5, hen; 1. 2. 6 ckl. 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. 
Foster: 5, ck. Smith: 3, ck. Sanborn: 
4, 6, ck; 3. 6. hen; 3, ckl; 6, pul. Mat- 
tison & Toel: 1. 2, 6, ck ; 1, 2, 4, 6, hen; 
1. 4, 5. ckl; 1, 2. 3. 4. pul. Willis: 5, hen. 
Hrooks: 6, ckl. Dunn: 2. ckl. Greene- 6 
ckl. Phinney: fi. pul. Foss: f, pul 
GOLDEN WYANDOTTES. ' 
Ben way: 4. ck. Brown: 2. ck- 9 3 4 
fi hen; 6 ckl; 1. 3. 4, .'"., pul. Chase: 5', 6,' 
ck;_ o ckl. Wood & Freeman: 1. 3, ck: 
1.0. hen; 1. 2 3. ckl; 2. pul Dillon: 4 
ckl. Simmons Bros. : 6 pul 

„..,^.'I^VER LACED WYANDOTTES. 
TNilliams: 2, 6. ck ; 1, 2. 4, ckl- 9 6 
?u Q ^f^'^J^"--- I' ^k. Wood & Freeman": 1, 
Ck 3, 4, o, 6, hen; 4. f). pul. Jodrev: 3. ck- 

cic "' Jh"i'^ ^' ^'^ '■'''= ^' P"'- Kennard: 6. 
Whiting ^'l%^u..'' ^'- ^-^'-^= 6. ckl. 

PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES 

Coffin: 1. 2, 4. ck: 1. 2. 4, hen; l.V 3, 4^ 

f»^l. 1. 2. 4, pul. Atwood: 6, ck. Have- 

meyer: 3. 5. ck; 5, 6. hen- r, ckl- 3 r ? 

pul. Hall: 3, hen. Birch 6 ckl ' ' ' 

SILVER PENCILED WYANDOTTES 

Hathaway: 1. 2. 5, ck; 1, hen- 1 2 3 

Pope-S^k- t'r^e^^'^^ 5, hen;'6.%ki: 

M^se VJ:enf'.\l^i.^^,,^-Y^L-i' 
pul. Robers g, Packard: 1 3 4 duI 

cobb^^^^^'^'^^ wyand6ttes" 

Hillhurst Farm- 4 nUi -^'^'i«r. 0, cKl. 

Eastman: 2. puV. ^Robirlson? T'^Sf '' ^"'• 
AH to ^I'anf '^ ^^^^^^"OTTES. 

r-u ,,.^- ^- '^^'f^I' ORPINGTONS 

Chains: 4, ck ; 5. hen; 4, ckli 5, pul 
ck. Hooker: 1 3 ck • «> ■? c 
•>. okl; 1. pul. Doehr- 6 ck- 3 cvV 
Owen Farms: 2, ck ; 1. 4. hen: 1 2* ckl : 
-. 3. 4. 6. pul. Goodhue: fi. ck\ ' ^• 

Roothb'^::^i.«.\7^^ferr''^^?- . 
Haupt: 2. hen; 2 ckL ' '''''= ^' P"'- 

8 C. BLACK ORPINGTONS 

Prescott: 4 ck • ", b..r>- /'^"•y-^'^- 

.^.^ L- „• S^- ■' l\»'n. •1. ckl. Mathews. 

'. ck; 1, 2. hen. 




Prescott: ;>. 
hen: r^. cki 



Armstrong & Co 



1. ck; 1 hen- '-."cui AT -^r "' Knapp: 
r'cl-i~ '% ^- ^^^^nS:n:V^J: 

Prescott^ fi^^'I'^^A^^^^'^^'TONS. 

Owen Farms 1 ok- 1 3 ho«' ''i"' ^- ^'^'- 
1 o o J - '• '*^' 1. -i. hen; 1 9 piri • 



6. hen. 



Adams: .5. ckl" *""• '^'^P-'^fi^l^^ 

R. C. WHITE ORPINGTONS 

Haupt: 2 ck ■ •> hf.n '',;"'"'7'^- 
Farms: l ck 1 h"en 1 Wi' 1 ^'"'- ^^^'^^ 
ardson: 2, cki; 2 pul' ' ^- P"'" ^^^h" 

ANY OTHER VARIETY ORPINGTONS 

Morse: 1. 2 ck • ■> 4 hc.r^■^^\!' 
Prescott: L 2. hen ;- 2. 'ck^ ' ' '^'= '' P"'" 
S. r. RHODE ISLAND REDS 

Railey: i. ck. Read: 3 ck- 1 hen- 'i 

'-'"'• 1.,^^''^'" "'''^•'^ ^«"'- Farm: 4 'e" "ok: 
■.. ckl. Tompkins: 2, r., ck; 3 4 hen- 4* 



r^ 



ITK 



T^rrr-rr'. 



February,J10 




ckl; 3, 6. pul. Prince: 2, hen. Weston: 5^ 
hen. Coinforth: 6. hen. Coblne: 2, ckl. 
Pierson: 6. ckl; 2, pul. Garriepy: 3, ckl. 
Chapin: 1, ckl: L pul. Ward: 4. pul. 
R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 
Coblne: 2, ck. Bean: 3. ck ; 2, hen; 1» 
ckl; 1. pul. Kaufman &- Windham: 4. ck^ 
4, pul. Tuttle: 1, ck; 1. 5. 6. hen; 2. 5, 
ckl; 2. T). 6. pul. Almy: .^). ck; 4, hen. Cof- 
fin: 3. hen. Davis & Bro. : 6. ckl; 3. puL 
Pleasant Hill Poul. Yds.: 3, ckl. Win- 
chester: 4, pul. 

BUCKEYES. 
Hills: 3. ck; 3, 4, hen; .">, ckl; 5. pul. 
Miller: 4, ck; 3, 4, ckl. Robertson: 1, ck; 
2, ckl; 1. 2, pul. Wheeler: 2, ck ; 2. hen. 
Earl: 5, ck; 5. hen. Harris: 1. hen; 1, ckl. 
Andrews: 3. 5. pul. 

LIGHT BRAHMAS. 
Darling: 2. ck ; 6. hen. Shaw: 1, 3, 5, 
ck; 1. 3, 4. r., hen; 1. 2. 3. 4. ckl; 1. 3. 4. 5, 
pul. Fairview: 4. ck; 2. hen; 6, ckl; 6, pul. 
Blodgett & Drake: f^, ckl: 2, pul. 
DARK BRAHMAS. 
Lott: 4. ck; 1, hen; 6. ckl. Lane & 
Burns: 2. 3, ck ; 4, .'1. hen; 2. 3. ckl; 1, 2. 4, 
6. pu' Leach: 1, ck; 2, 3, hen; 1, ckl; 3, 5, 
pul. 

BUFF COCHINS. 
All to Rose. 

PARTRIDGE COCHINS. 
Silloway: 3. ck ; 3. pul. Bavlies: 1, 2. ck; 
1. 2. 3. 6. hen; 2. 3, ckl; 2. 4. 5, 6. pul. 
Rose: 4. ck; 5, hen; 1. ckl; 1, pul. Wells: 
u, ck; 4, hen. 

BLACK COCHINS. 
Williams: 2. 3, ck ; 1. 2. 3, 4, hen; 1, 2, 3,. 
4, ckl; 1, 2. 3, 4, pul. Elm Poul. Yds.: 1, 
ck; 5, hen. 

WHITE COCHINS. 
All to Rose. 

BLACK LANGSHANS. 
Colprit: 3. ck ; 4. hen; 2, pul. Gibson: 
1. 2. ck; 1. 2. 3. 5, hen; 4. .'), ckl; 1, 5, 6, 
pul. Hickford: 6, hen; 2, ckl. Bisbee: 1^ 
ckl. Ives: 3. fi. ckl: 4. pul. Lee: 3, pul. 
WHITE LANGSHANS. 
All to Ives 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 
Weeks: 2, hen; 3. ckl; f,. j.ul. Brown: 1, 
hen; 1. pul. Exmoor Farm: 3, hen. Pres- 
ton: f), ckl. Runnells: 14. ckl. Kennard: 2. 
ckl. Cook, Jr.: 2. 3, 4, fi pul 

R. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 
Mrs. Inches: 1. 3. 4. .">. ck ; ." G hen; 6,. 
ckl; .5, 6. pul. Gale Poultrv Piace: 2, ck; 
1. 2. 3. 4. hen; 3, ckl; 1, 2. 3, 4, pul. Peck: 
4, ckl. Tabor, 1. 2. :", ckl 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS 
Waterhouse: 2. ck ; .". hen; .".. pul. Pine 
Top Poultry Farm: 1, 4. .".. ck ; L 2 4. hen- 

1. 3, 4, ckl; 1, 3. 4, pul. Elm Poultrv Yards: 
3. ck; 3. hen; 2, ckl; 2. pul. Holmes: 
;i, ckl. 

R. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 
Ranney: i, ck; 1, hen; 1. 2. ckl; 1, pul. 
Docker: 3. 4, ckl. 

BUFF LEGHORNS. 
JefTeries: 3. ck ; fi. hen; 1. ckl; 1 pul 
Monmouth Poultrv Farms- " 4 ck - 1 *> 4 
hen:_ 2 4. fi, ckl; 2. 3. ',. pul.' Ranker":' 1,' 
ck; ;.. hen; 3, ckl. Hurt: H. ck. Swartwout: 
3, hen; r,, ckl. Cregar: 4. fi ],ul 
BLACK LEGHORNS. 
Baxter: 1, ck; 2, pul. Bab.'^on: 4. puL 
McAndrew: 1. 3. pul. 

.ANCONAS. 

All to Quinn. 

S. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 

All to Faulds 

R. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 

Mount.ioy: 1, ck. Faulds: ' 3 4 ck • 1 
3. hen; L 2. 4. ckl; 2. 3. 4. .-,. pul. 'Bailey: 

2. hen. Lee: 3, r,. ckl; 1. pul 

BH E ANDALUSIANS. 
Gunning: 1. ck; 3, hen; :,, ckl; 1. pul. 
Morse: 3. :,. ck ; r>. fi. hen; 1, 3 ckl; 2 4 

3 . .^ Vu^' "' ^' "^'- ^' -■ ■*■ '^^"= 2 4/-kf: 

WHITE FACED BLACK SPANISH. 

(aiier .>,. ck; fi. hen; .-,. pul. .lob- 2 4 

ck^ l'- 0^*^"= r J^' *•, ^^'- Warrington:' 1, 
iK. 1. 2. 3. 4. hen: 1. ckl: 1-^34 nul 

WHITE CRESTED BLACK POLISH 

Seely: ;i, ck : fi, hen; 2, ckl- 4 -, fi nnl. 
Tlolbrook: f5. ck. Andrewsro' V 4 ek^ 2 

4. hen; 3, ckl; 2, pul. McNeil, l". ck: 1. 3,' 



Lt. BRAHMAS and S. C. Brown LEGHORNS 

mi/"'"'"^' ''j^'l,?'^^'* ??"'='' '" <^^ery particular. Winners for years Record 
hs season at llhno.s State Show and at Decatur. 7 firsts. 10 seconds 4 

Brahmas '"'' """ '""'""'• '"^'"'""« '«^'*' "shaped male !nd?cm^it 

Light Brahmii Eggs from Winners. $5 and $3 per 15 
bingle Comb Brown Leghorns, $3 and $2 per 1 5 

hi«hfr,X"'' R;.f $r^er''lT'^ *' "*-'■" '''■ ^'"""•"*" »-"- Turkeys 
I absolutely guarantee satisfaction and can more than please you. 



L H. JOSTES, Rte. 2, MA CON. ILL. 




ft 



• 



% 



• 



# 




• 






February, '10 

hen,- 4, 5, ckl; 1, 3, pul. Lincoln, Jr.: 

^, Civ 1. 

PLAIN GOLDEN POLISH. 

Holbrook: 6. ck. McNeil. 1, 3 ck; 1 2 

^''^\\ h S!*'- ^' 2. 5. pul. Holcomb: 2,' 
ck; 3, 4, 5. hen; 3. 4, ckl; 3, 5. pul. Hall: 
b, hen; 5, ckl. 

SILVER POLISH. 

Holbrook: 1. ck; 2, hen. McNeil: 2 3- 

^l }' ^' J' ^^"' 1' 2, ckl; 1. 2, 4, 'pui 
Schriver: 3. ckl; 3, pul . . , p » 

PLAIN WHITE POLISH. 

All to McNeil. 

BEARDED GOLDEN POLISH. 

Holbrok: 1. ck. McNeil: 2. 3, ck; 1 2 3 

hen; 1. 2, ckl; l, 2, 3, pul. Schriver:' 4,' 

pul. ' 

BEARDED SILVER POLISH. 

All to McNeil. 

BEARDED WHITE POLISH. 

McNeil: 1, 2. ck; 1. 2. hen; 1. 2. ckl; 

1, 2, pul. Schriver: 3, ck. Holbrook: 3. 
pul. ' 

BUIT LACED POLISH. 

H. Hubbard: 3, ck; 2. hen; 1, 5. 6. ckl; 
4, 5, 6, pul. Holbrook: 1 3, hen McNeil- 

i^ ^ K^' !• ^V «• h*^": 2,' 3, ckl; 1, 2. pul! 
E. Hubbard. Jr.: 4, ckl 

HOUDANS. 

Marshall: 1, ck. 

SALMON FAVEROLLES. 

Nichols: 1. ck; 2. 3. hen. Waite: 1, hen 
LAKENVELDERS. 

Mitchell: 2, ck; 2. hen; 1. 2. ckl; 2, 3, 
pul. Green: 1. ck ; 1. hen; 3, ckl; 1. pul. 
WHITE DORKINGS. 
Harrington: 2. ck ; 2. hen; 1. ckl; 1 pul. 
Hales: 1. ck : 1, hen. 

SILVER GREY DORKINGS. 
Inches: 1. ck ; 4, hen; 4, ckl; 4, 5. 6, pul. 
Jacobus: 5, ck; 3. 5, hen; 6, ckl. Officer: 
4, 6. ck; 6. hen. Westfall: 1. 3. ck ; 2 hen- 

2, 3, 5. ckl; 1, pul. Weld: 1, hen; 1. ckl; 

2, 3, pul. 

COLORED DORKINGS. 

Inches: 1. ck; 1, 2, 3. 4, hen. Warring- 
ton: 31. ck. 

GOLDEN SPANGLED HA3IBrRGS. 

T^owell: 1, 2. ck; 1. 2, 3, 4, hen; 1. 3, 
ckl; 1, 3, pul. Fessenden: 3 4 ck - 5 6 
hen; 2, 4, 6. ckl; 2, 5, 6, pul. Oke & Mur- 
ray: {3. ckl; 4. pul. 

SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURGS. 

Lowell: 3, ck ; 2. 5, hen; 1, 3, ckl; 3, pul 
Lee: 5 ck. Weld: 2. ck; 6, ckl. Allen:' 
6._ck; 5. 6. pul. Paine: 2. ck ; 1, 4, 6, hen; 
2o, ckl; 1, 2, 4. pul. Oke & Murray; 4. ck- 

3, hen: 4. ckl. 

GOLDEN PENCILED HAMBURGS. 
Fes.senden: 3. ck ; 1. 3. hen; 3, ckl; 3 4 
pul. Jacobus: 2, ck : .^, hen. Oke & Mur- 
ray: 1, ck; 2. 4. hen: 1, 2, ckl; 1 " nnl 
SILVER PENCILED HAMBURGS. 
Lowell: 1. ck. Oke & Murray 2 ck- 1 2 
hen; 1, ckl: 1. 2. pul. 

WHITE HAMBURGS. 

All to Lowell. 

BLACK HAMBURGS. 

Lowell: 1, ck ; 1. 3. hen; 3. ckl. Fessen- 
den: 5, ck; 6. ckl; 3, pul. Saltonstall: 
6, ck; 6, hen; 2, ckl; 5, 6. pul. Forbes: 

4, ck; 5, ckl; 1, 4, pul. Lovell: 2. ck; 2, 5, 
hen; 1. ckl. Oke & Murray: 3, ck ; 4, hen; 
4, ckl; 2. pul. 

CAMPINES. 

All to Jacobus. 

A.MERICAN DOMINIQI^ES. 

Carter: 2, ck ; 2, hen! 1, 2, ckl; 1. 2 pul 
Austin: 1. ck ; 3. hen. Atherton: 1 hen; 
4, pul. Moody: 3. ckl; 3, pul. 

BLA( K BREASTED RED G.AMES. 
Horte: 1, ck ; 1. hen. Wheeler: 2 ck- 
2, hen; 1. ckl; 2, pul. Lingard: 1,' pul.' 
BROWN RED GAMES. 
All to Wheeler. 

GOLDEN DUCKWING GAMES. 
Wheeler: 1. ck ; 1. hen; 2. ckl; 2. pul. 
Lingard: 1. ckl; 1. pul. 

SILVER DUCKWING GA3IES. 

All to Wheeler. 

RED PYLE GAMES. 

All to Wheeler. 

BIR( HEN GAMES. 

All to Wheeler. 

BLACK GAMES. 

All to Wheeler. 

.^ CORNISH INDIANS. 

„,f^"wn: 1, ck; 1. hen; 2. ckl; 2, pul. 
Wheeler: 2. ck ; 2, hen; 1, ckl; 1. pul. 
WHITE C ORNISH. 
Brown: 1. ck ; 1. hen; 1. ckl; t. pul. 
Wheeler: 2, ck ; 2. hen; 2, ckl; 4. pul. Ma- 
comber: 3, 4, ckl: 2. 3, pul. Gav: ;'. ckl. 
WHITE LACED RED CORNISH. 
All to rJurbank. 
BLACK BREASTED RED GAME BAN- 
TAMS. 
Berry: 1. 3, ck ; 5, 6. hen. Stonv Brook 
Farm: 4, ck ; 3, 4, hen; 4, T->, 6, ckl; 3, 4. 
5, pul. Havemeyer Bros.: 1. ck; 1. hen; 
2. ckl; 1, pul. Wild Goose Farm: 5, ck; 

2. hen; 1. 3. ckl; 2, pul. 

BROWN RED (J.\ME BANT.\MS. 

Havemeyer Bros: 1. ck ; 1. ckl; 1, pul. 
Stowe: 1. hen; 2. pul. 
GOLDEN DUCKWING GAME BANTA:\IS. 

Havemeyer Bros.: 1. ck; 2. hen; 2, pul. 
Wild Gose Farm: 2, ck ; 1, hen; 1. pul. 
Stowe: 1. ckl. Miner & Walker: 3. pul. 
SILVER DUCKinNG GAME BANTAMS. 

Havemeyer Bros.: 1. hen; 1. ckl; 1. pul. 
Stowe: 2, 3, ckl; 2. pul. Miner & Walker. 

3, pul. 



POULTRY FANCIER 



RED PYLE BANTAMS. 

Havemeyer Bros.: 1, ck ; 2. hen; 1, ckl; 
1, pul: Wild Goose Farm: 1, hen; 2, pul. 
Princeton Bantam Yds.: 2. ckl 

BIRCHEN GAME BANTAMS. 

Cook: 2, ck; 2, hen; 2. ckl; 2, pul. Have- 
meyer Bros.: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul. 
Stowe: 3, ckl > ^ . v 

WHITE GAME BANTAMS. 

All to Havemeyer Bros. 

BLACK GAME BANTAMS. 

Wheeler: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1, pul. Horte: 
1. ckl. 

a:<y other variety game bantams. 

w^?""^'^""-..^' ^*^; 1. h^": 2, ckl; 2, pul. 
Wild Gose Farm: 1, ckl; 1. pul. 

GOLDEN SEBRIGHT BANTAMS. 

Oke & Murray: 1. ck; 1. 2. 3. 4. hen; 

1, 4, ckl; 2, 3, 4, 5, pul. Rose: 3. ckl; 1, 
pul. D^bney: 5, ckl. Wild Goose Farm: 

2, ckl. 

SILVER SEBRIGHT BANTAMS. 

Oke & Murray: 1, ck ; 1, 2. 4. 5 hen- 

1, 3. ckl; 1, 2, 4, 5, pul. Sitterly: '4. ck! 

Fl.ske: 2. ck. Dabney: 5, ck; 3, hen. Wild 

Goose Farm: 3, ck. Rose: 2. ckl; 3. pul 

R. C. BLACK BANTAMS. 

Porer: 4, ck; 5, pul. Tilley: 1. 2. ck; 1. 
4 hen; 2, 4. ckl; 2, 3. pul. Dabney: 5, 
ck. Grove Hill Poul. Yds.: 3, ck; 2, hen 
Oke & Murray: 5. hen; 5. ckl; 1, pul. Wild 
Goose Farm: ?. hen; 1. 3, ckl; 4, pul 
R. C. WHITE BANTAMS. 

Oke & Murray: 1. 2, ck ; 1, 3, 4, 5. hen; 
1, 2, ckl; 1. 2. 3. 4, pul. Wild Goose Farm: 

3, ck; 2, hen. 

BOOTED WHITE BANTAMS 
Kiley: 1, ck ; 1, hen; 1, 2, ckl: 1. 2. pul. 

BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Rose: 2. ck; 2, hen; 3. ckl. Wild Goose 
Farm: 1, ck ; 1, hen; 2. ckl; 1, pul. Max- 
well: 4. ckl; 3 pul. S. Reel: 1. ckl; 2, pul. 
PARTRIDGE COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Staples: 1. ck; 2, ckl; 1. pul. Morse: 2, 
ck; 2. hen; 1. ckl; 3, pul. Hillside Ban- 
tam Yd.«!. : 1. 3, hen; 2 pul. 

WHITE COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Eaton: 3, ck ; 3. 4. hen; 1. ckl; 1, 2. pul. 
Fox: 2, ck; 1, hen. Wild Goose Farm: 
1. ck; 2. hen. 

BLACK COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Poch Bros.: 4, r>, ck ; 1, 2, hen. Fox: 
1. ck; 1, ckl; 1, pul. Slessoe: 3, ck: 3, hen; 
3, ckl; 2. pul. Fraleigh: 2, ck; 4. ckl; 4. 5, 
pul. Paine: 4, hen; 5. ckl. Flske: 5, hen. 
Wild Goose Farm: 2. ckl; 3. pul. 

LIGHT BRAHMA BANTAMS. 
Hayden: 1, ck ; Ty, hen; 1, 2. ckl; 1, 2, 
pul. Watson: 2. 3. 4, hen. Wild Goose 
Farm: 1. hen. 

DARK BRAHMA BANTAMS. 
All to Wilson. 
JAPANESE BLACK TAILED BANTAMS. 
Oke & Murray: 2, ck ; 1. 2, 4, .">. hen; 
1, 2, ckl; 2, 3. pul. Albers: 3, ck ; 3, hen; 
1, pul. Tilley: 1. ck. 

BLACK JAPANESE BANTAMS. 
Oke & Murray: 1, ck; 2, hen; 1, ckl; 1, 
pul. Wild Goose Farm: 1, hen; 2, pul. 
WHITE JAPANESE BANTAMS. 
Oke & Murray: 1, ck; 2. hen; 1, ckl; 1, 
pul. Wild Goose Farm: 1. hen; 2, pul. 
WHITE J.^PANESE BANTAMS. 
Oke <Sr Murray: 2, ck ; 2. hen; 2. pul. 
Albers: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1, pul. Daniels: 1, 
ck; 3. pul. 

ANY OTHER VARIETY BANTAMS. 
Oke & Murray: 2, ck; 1, hen; 2, ckl; 2, 
pul. Hales: 4. ck; 4. hen. Wild Goose 
Farm: 1. ck ; 2. hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul. Dan- 
iels: 3, ck; 3. hen. 

POLISH BANTAMS. 
Wild Goose P'arm : 2, ck ; 1. 2, hen; 1, 
pul. Kiley: 1, 3, ck; 3. 4. 5, hen; 1, 2, ckl; 
2. 3, 4. pul. 

BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCK B.4NT.4M8. 
All to Shaylor. 

ANY OTHER VARIETY BANTAMS. 
All to Wild Goose Farm. 

PEKIN DUCKS. 
Cobb: 1, old drake; 2. old duck; 1. young 
drake; 1, young duck. Ranney: 2, old 
drake; 1, old duck. I^ippitt: 2. young drake; 
2. young duck. 

ROUEN DUCKS. 
Baerman: 1. old drake; 1. old duck; 1, 
young drake; 1, young duck. liippitt: 3, 
young drake; 3. young duck. Weld: 2, 
young drake; 2, young duck. 

GRAY CALL I>ITCK. 
All to Tilley. 

WHITE (ALL DUCKS. 
All to Tilley. 

WOOD DUCKS. 
All to Tilley. 

EAST INDIAN DUCKS. 
All to Tilley. 

CRESTED Dl CKS. 
AH to Hawkins. 

COLORED MUSCOVEY DUCKS. 
All to Job. 

INDIAN RUNNER DUCKS. 
Tilley: 1. 2. old drake; 1. 2. 3, old duck; 

1. 2, young drake; 1. 2. young duck. Mun- 
roe: 3, old drake; 4. old duck. 

ANY OTHER VARIETY ORNAMENTAL 

Dl'CKS. 
All to Tlllev 

ANY VARIETY WILD DUCKS. 
Harwood: 4. old drake; r>, old duck; 3, 
young drake. Tilley: 1. 2. 3, old drake; 

2, 3, 4, old duck. Ford & Farrar: 5, old 
drake; 2, young drake: 1, young duck. 
Inches: 1. old duck; 1, young drake. 




All to 



3, old 
der; 1, 
5, old 
goose ; 



Shepard 
der. Cain: 
ANY 

Inches: 
ley: 1, 3, 
gander; 2, 
gander; 1, 

All 

All 

All 

All 

All 
ANY 

All to 



MANDARIN DUCKS. 

Tilley. 

TOULOUSE GEESE. 

Cobb: 1. old gander; 1, 3, old goose; 2, 

young gander; 2, young goose. Ranney: 2» 

gander; 2. old goose; 1, young gan- 

young goose. Shove: 5, old gander; 

goose. Cain: 4, old gander; 4. old 

3, young gander. 

EMBDEN GEESE. 
Ranney: 2. old gander. Shove: 1, 3, old 
gander; 1, old goose. Cain: 4, old gander; 
2. 3, old goose. 

BROWN CHINESE GEESE. 
Cain: 2, old gander; 1, old goose. Lit- 
tle: 1, old gander; 2. old goose 
AFRICAN GEESE. 
Bros.: 1, old goose; 2 young gan- 

1. young gander. 
OTHER VARIETY GEESE. 
2. old gander; 2, old goose. Til- 
old gander; 1. 3, goose; 2, young 
young goose. Little: 1, young 
young goose. 
BRONZIC TURKEYS. 
to Lord. 

WHITE HOLLAND TURKEYS. 
to Macomber. 

BLACK TURKEYS. 
to Shepard Bros. 

NARRAtJANSETT TURKEYS. 
to Shepard Bros. 

BOURBON RED TURKEYS. 
to Shepard Bro.s. 

OTHER VARIETY TURKEYS. 
Shepard Bros. 

EXHIBITION PENS. 
Light Bramas — Hutchinson, 4; Balch & 
Brown. 1; Fletcher, 2, 3. Chicks— Shaw. 3; 
Hutchin.son, 2; Balch & Brown, 1; Fletcher, 
4, 5. 

Dark Brahma.s — 1. 

Black I^angshnns — Elm Poul. Yds. — 1. 

Silver Gray Dorking.s — Jacobus. 1. 

Barred Plymouth Rocks — Latham, 1; Owen 
Farm. 2; Pittsfleld Poul. Farm, 3. Chicks — 
Capen Bros.. 3; Shaylor, 2; Pittsfleld Poul. 
Farms, 1; Pyne, 4; Pine Top Poul. Farm. 5. 

BufC Plymouth Rocks — Adams. 1. Chicks 
— Cobb, 1 ; Lunt & Curtis. 2. 

Columbian Plymouth Rocks — Woodhead, 
1; Munroe, 2; Allen. 3. 

White Plymouth Rocks, Chicks — Owen 
Farms. 1; Knowles. 2; Lynch, 4; Chapman, 
5; Tilley. 1. 

Partridge Plymouth Rocks — Smith. 1. 

White Wyandottes — Fairfield Farm, 4; 
Powers & Son, 3; Foster, 5; Wilgus & Son, 
2; Hutckins Farm, 6; Owen Farms. 1. 
Chicks — Mann, 3; Owen Farms, 2; Martin, 
4. 

Silver Wyandottes- — Van Alstyne. 1. 

Columbian Wyandottes — Black & Son, 4: 
Sunnybrook Farm, 2; Hillhurst 
Brayton, 1. Chicks — Robinson, 
brook Farm, 4; Van Alstyne, 5; 
Farm. 6; Doehr, 1. 3. 

Buff Wyandottes — Mattison & Foel 
Chicks— King & Whiting. 4. 5; Mattison 
Foel. 1, 2. 3. 

Golden Wyandottes — Brown, 1. 

Buff Laced Polish — Hubbard. 1. 

White Crested Black Polish — Seeley, 1, 
Andrews, 2. Chicks — Andrews. 1. 

Partridge Wyandottes — Coffin 1; 
3; Kendall. 2. Chicks — CofTin, 
meyer. 2; Job, 3. 

S. C. Rhode Island Reds — Old 
Chicks--PIerson, 2; Old Acres, 



Farm, 3 
2; Sunny- 
Hillhurst 



1. 



Fletcher, 
1 ; Have- 
Acres, 1. 
5; White 



I. Red Poul. Yds. 



Chicks — 
3; Almy, 



Poul. 



Birch Poul. Farm, 6; R 
4; Tompkins, 1; Read. 5. 

R. C. Rhode Island— Harris. 1. 
Bean. 4; Kaufman «fc Windham. 
2; Tuttle. 1. 

S. C. White Leghorn.s — Pine Top PouL 
Farm, 1 ; Elm Poul. Yds., 2. Chicks— Mon- 
mouth Poul. Farm, 1. 

S. C. BufC Leghorns — Monmouth 
Farm. 1. 

R C. Black Minorcas — Moody, 1. 
Blue Andalusians — Cuddahy, 1. 
Silver Spangled Hamburgs — Paine. 
White Faced Black Spanish — Job. 
Brown Breasted Red Pet Games — Hill, 1. 
R. C. White Orpingtons — Chicks — Richard- 
ardson, 1. 

S. C. White Orpingstons — Jordan, 3; Elm 
Poul. Yds.. 2; Owen Farms, 1. Chicks — 
Chains, 2; Shepard & Son, 3; Carrier, 6; 
Bessom, 5; Owen Farms, 1; Prescott, 4. 

S. C. Black Orpington.s — Knapp, 2; Elm 
Poul. Yds., 1. Chicks — Owen, 1; Crutten- 
den. 

Ducks — Baerman, 1. 
Runner Ducks — Munroe. 1. 
Black liantams — Grove ' Hill Poul. 
Tillev 1. rhlck.s — Tillev. 1. 



Jr., 
1. 



Rouen 
Indian 
R. C. 

Yds.. 2: 



WHUt WY AN DO LIE hGGS 

for hatching. After March 1st. from hens and 
pullets rconng from 1)2 to 94' 2. price $2 00 per 15. 
Eja:gs guaranteed. Elizabeth Dupons, 

Kenosha, Wis. 



MAKE YOUR MENS I^AY \ 


pv 


PRICE PER 100 LBS. 


( ^^^^.^^-^ 


Reefs, raps $S.7» 


s ""^ 


Meat.ind Hone - - 2.2 6 


\v ' w 


I'.round Hone • - 2.26 


#^^-^*^^' 


Alfalfa Clover Meal - 1.,-iO 
Medicated Chart oal - HO 


'^KC^ipL_„-e^>' 


Hroken Oyster Shells - .65 




Mica Crystal Grit • . ^V.", 




Pearl Or If ... .00 


J. G. HERMANN & CO., InHJan^polJ.. Ind. | 




Page 36 ^ 




POULTRY FANCIER- 




Awards at Enid, Okla. 



EXHIBITORS AT ENID. OKLA. 

Alfred, S. W Sharon. Kas. 

Allison. J. W Stillwater. Okla. 

Anderson. J. F Waldron. Ark. 

Arnote, Mrs. E. R Isabella. Okla. 

Athey, Chas Goltry, Okla. 

Bailey. Dr. C H Wynnewood. Okla. 

Baty, W Medford. Okla. 

Beamer. F. P Guthrie, Okla. 

Behmer, Geo Cherrydale. Kan. 

Bickerdike. C. L Wakita. Okla. 

Bonifleld, Wm Okemah, Okla. 

Borders, W. B Wichita. Kas. 

Brady, M. S Richards, Mo. 

Bretz, Robert Ei Reno. Okla. 

Bretz, W. J El Reno, Okla. 

Brewer. E. E Stillwater, Okla. 

Bridges. J. P Douglas. Kas. 

Brown. Mrs. Rachel Enid, Okla. 

Bruce. J. W Arnett. Okla. 

Brunker, J. H Jefferson, Okla. 

Brunner, Henry L. Newton, Kas. 

Buck Bros Guthrie, Okla. 

Bury, T. J Enid, Okla. 

Butler, A. M Wichita, Kas. 

Campbell, Jessie B Kingfisher, Okla. 

Chestnut. H. W Centralia, Kas. 

Clark, Hanford Enid Okla 

Collier, J. W Enid, Okla. 

Cooper. H Guthrie, Okla. 

Crane, Chas Enid. Okla. 

Crane., E. V Waukomis. Okla. 

Crow. Otis H Hutchison. Kas. 

Cullum. Mrs. V Earlsboro. Okla. 

Curnutt. Alice Montserratt Mo. 

Darling. Mrs. C. L Enid, Okla. 

Davids, H. C Oswego. Kas. 

Davids. R. L Oswego, Kas. 

Davis. Will T Oklahoma Citv. Okla. 

Dunphy, T. N Nevada. Mo. 

Eckhardt, Mrs. L Waukomis. Okla. 

Edmonson. Ed Clinton. Okla. 

Edwards. Chas. D Perrv. Okla. 

Elgin. Mrs. W. D Enid.' Okla. 

Enos. Mrs. L, Enid. Okla. 

Eyansmayd Farm Chandler. Okla. 

Faatz, F. H Maramec, Olcla. 

Fair, Chas. C . Sharon. Kas. 

Field. D. M Willis. Tex. 

Fife. S Pawnee. Okla. 

Friedley. G. A Guthrie. Okla. 

Gregg. Geo. T Ames, Okla. 

Gregory, Wm Guthrie. Okla. 

Grimes. O. T Hunter. Okla. 

Guthrie, H. C Oklahoma Citv. Okla. 

Hall. F. C Lone Wolf Okla. 

Hangartner. Cha« Garber. Okla. 

Harris. W. J Mangum. Okla. 

Harrisburger. L. J Enid. Okla. 

Hawk, C. C Shawnee, Okla. 

Henderson. Mrs. C. C Solomon. Kas. 

Hill, C. B Guthrie Okla. 

Hinton. Mrs. H. P Lockney. Tex. 

Hoag. C. C Woodward, Okla. 

Hobson. W. H Britton, Okla. 

Hodson. J. W Edmonds. Okla 

Holden, W. S Douglas. Kas! 

Holderman. C. E Pawnee Okla. 

Horner. Mrs. H. N Enid.' Okla. 

Horton. A. B Cashion. Okla. 

Hudson, Frank Pawnee Okla. 

Hughes. G. W Pawnee. Okla. 

Jarrett, A. J Mangum. Okla. 

Jones, Mrs, D. V Shawnee, Okla. 

Kester. H. J Enid. Okla. 

Kremer. F Manchester. Okla. 

Lamport. A. B Mangum. Okla. 

Langford. Dr. W. M Wynnewood Okla. 

Lindamood. C. C Walton. Kas. 

McAllister. C. H Carmen, Okla 

McHarg. Sam Wakita. Okla. 

^f,!;*'"-, ^^- ^ Shawnee. Okla. 

Mill. Glenn R Enid Okla. 

^"•- J. R- • Enid. Okla. 

Moon. D. N Guthrie. Okla. 

Moon. J. D Guthrie. Okla. 

Moon, R. E Guthrie. Okla. 

Morris. J. T Comanche. Okla. 

Morris. Lloyd Guthrie. Okla. 

^ay. Geo. M Enid. Okla. 

Noland. Mary Hennessey Okla. 

O^f^'l- A Pond Creek, Okla. 

Owen Bro.«3 Oklahoma Citv. Okla. 

Parnell. E. R Douglas's. Okla. 

Potter. John H Stillwater, Okla. 

Preston. C. O Chilocco. Okla. 

Ragsdale, Russell W.. Oklahoma City Okla. 

Rainey. W. T No. Enid. Okla. 

Regier, Isaac Enid, Okla. 

Rehkopf. F. D Topeka, Kas. 

Reynolds, H. C Stratford. Okla. 

Roderick, Mrs. W Topeka Kas. 

Roe. Mrs. J. B Shawnee, Okla. 

Rogers, S. A Dover. Okla. 

Rnrk. Mr Lalioma. Okla. 

Rouse, Fred C Waukomis, Okla. 

Rueb. T>. S Perry. Okla. 

Rusmissel, A. T Drummond. Okla. 

Rusmissel, Guy Drummond, Okla. 

Scott. R. L Ardmore. Okl;i. 

Schultz. C. F Enid, Okla. 

Spalding Stock Farm No. Enid, Okla. 

Stone. ,Iohn Medicine Lodge. Kas. 

Scott. Wm Abilene, Kas. 

Sinclair. Grover Stillwater. Okla. 

Stearn. Willie Enid. Okla. 

Sanborn, C. I^ Gainesville. Tex. 

Smalley. W. P Shawnee, Okla. 

PTianaleffer, S Douglas, Kas. 



Searl, Mrs. Lulu H Sedan, 

Shoop, L. G Perry. 

Scherick. Mrs. I. W Enid, 

Success Poultry Farm Orange, 

Stowe. E. J Wynnewood, 

Taggart, J. A Waukomis, 

Taggart, S. E Waukomis, 

Tallant, Wm. C Edmond, 

Taylor, Thomas Stillwater, 

Thomas, Geo. H Britton, 

Thompson, Alberta Enid. 

Thompson, L Enid, 

Thompson, Milton Okarche, 

Thompson. Mrs. V Enid, 

Trice, T. H Sharon, 

Trimble, K. S Oklahoma City, 

Tucker, W. A Clinton, 

Tyer, R. L Perry, 

Tyner, H. C Waukomis, 

Tyner, M. E Waukomis, 

Waddell, H. A Wichita, 

Wallis, S. M Shattuck. 

Ward, L. E Wichita, 

Watkins. M. A Enid, 

Watkins, Mrs. M. A Enid, 

Wheeler, J. N Wynnewood, 

Wheeler Poultry Farm Marshall, 

Wilson, T. A Kingfisher, 



Yeokum, Geo. 
Yeoman. Mrs. 
Yoder, B. C. . 



Oklahoma City, 

M. A Enid, 

Ringwood, 



Kas. 
Okla. 
Okla. 

Tex. 
Okla. 
Okla. 
Okla. 
Okla. 
Okla. 
Okla. 
Okla. 
Okla. 
Okla. 
Olcla. 

Kas. 
Okla. 
Okla. 
Okla. 
Okla. 
Okla. 

Kas. 
Okla. 

Kas. 
Okla. 
Okla. 
Okla. 

Tex. 
Okla. 
Okla. 
Okla. 
Okla. 



AWARDS AT ENID, OKLA. 



BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Hall: 1, ck; 3, hen. McAlister: 2, ok; 1, 
pul; 2, pen. Buck Bros: 1, ck; 1, 2, 3, hen; 
3, ckl; 1, pen; specials for best shaped hen 
and cockerel, best colored pullet and cock- 
erel. First 10 highest scoring birds in class. 
Anderson: L ckl. Bretz: 2, ckl. Mrs. Roe: 
2, pul. Second 10 highest scoring birds of 
class. Regier: 3, pul; four best pullets. 

WHITE PLY^IOUTH ROCKS. 

Beamer: 1. ck ; 3. pul; 3. pen; White Ply. 
Rock Club Badge on cock. Hughes: 2. ck. 
Pair: 3 ek ; 1, 3. cRl ; 1. pul; 1. pen; special 
for best male and female. Noland: 1. 2. 
hen: White Ply. Rock Club Badge on hen. 
Preston; 3, hen; 2. ckl; 2, pul; 2. pen; White 
Ply. Rock Club Badge for cockerel and pul- 
let; Hudson special for best male head. 

BLFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Gregory: 1. ck; 2. 3, hen; 1, ckl; 2. pul; 

1. pen; special for best surface coloi-. Fried- 
ley: 2. ck; 1, hen; 1. ckl; 1. pul; 2. pen. 
Rueb: 2. ckl; 3, pul; 3, pen. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. 

Morris: 1, ck; 3. pen. Smalley: 2. ck; 1, 

2. 3. hen: 1, 2, ckl; 1, 2, 3, pen; 1. 2, pen; 
Special of $20; A. P. A. Gold Medal. Kes- 
ter: 3, ckl. 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. 

Hill: 1. ck; 1, i', hen; 2. ckl; 1, 3. pul; 

1, 2, pen; Special for best female and best 
colored female. Stone: 2, ck ; 3. hen; Club 
Ribbons for best shaped cock. Reynolds- 

3. ck; 1, 3, ckl; 2, pul; 3, pen; Special for 
best female. 

GOLDEN LACED WY.AXDOTTES. 

Plr'ii".'"?-,^' ^'.~\''' ^^"' •" l''^"- Buck 

Bros.: 2. 3, ck; 1. hen; 2, pen. Shoop: 1, 
ckl; 13, pul; 1, pen. Crane: 2, ckl; 2, pul. 
Reynolds: 3, ckl. 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTE.S. 

Schultz: 1, 3, ck; 2, ckl; 2, pen. Alfred; 

2, ck; 1. 2. hen; 1. ckl; 2. pul; 1. 3, pen. 
Harrisberger: 3, hen. Reynolds: 3. ckl 
Mrs. Henderson: 3. pul. Guthrie- 1 nul 

PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES 

All to Hill. 

SILVER PENCILED WYANDOTTES 

All to Buck Bros. 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES 

All to Holden. 

S. C. BUFF ORPIN(irONS. 

Borders: 1. ck; 1. 2, 3. hen; ], 2. ckl; 1, 

-, 3, pul; 1, 2, 3, pen; Silver Cup from club 

tor each best cock, cockerel, hen and pul 

House: 2, ck. Tyre: 3. ck. Parnell: 3, ckl! 

S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. 

Morris: 1. ck; 2. 3. hen; 2. pul; 2. pen. 
Mrs. Roe: 2. ck ; 1, hen; 1. ckl; 1. 3. pul- 
1, pen. *^ • 

S. C. WHITE ORPINGTONS. 

Hodson: 1. ck; 1. 2. hen; 1, 2. ckl; 1, 2. 3 
l)ul; 1, pen. Setter: 2, ck ; 3, hen. Horton' 

3, ckl. 

BUCKEYES. 

Mrs. Hinton: 1, pul. 

S. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Bonifield: 1, ck. Lampert: 2 ck Tag- 
gert: 3. ck; 3, hen; 2, ckl; :!. pul; 2, pen 
Special lor shape male and best colored male 
and female. Beamer: 1. hen. Stowe- '> 
hen; 1, ckl; 1, pen. Clark: 3, ckl. Bretz' 
1, pul; Special for highest scoring pen in 
show, and highest scoring pen in American 
class, and Special for best shaped female 
Tallant: 2, pul. Brewer: 3, pen 

R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Searle: 1. ck; 2, hen; 3, ckl; 3. pen. Reh- 
kopf: 2. ck. Bretz: 3. ck ; 2. ckl; 1 2 3 
pul; 1, pen. Roderick: 1. hen. ' Rogers' 
3. hen. Grimes: 1. ckl; 2. pen 
LIGHT BR.AHMAS. 

All to Kester. 

DARK BRAHMAS. 

All to Wheeler Poul. Farm. 



February, '10 

^/z -;'■•?,'•:• ,•>-/ -■- <^^''~. .-^>vF:sg?.r 




Davis : 



BUFF COCHINS. 

1. ck; 1, 2, 3, hen; 1. 



ckl • 1 "^ 

pul; 1. pen; Cup on best cock, hen, cock- 
erel and pul. Wallis: 2, ckl; 3, pul; 2, pen. 

PARTRIDGE COCHINS. 

Tyner: 1, ck; 1, 2, 3, hen; 1, 2, ckl; 2, 3, 
pul. Buck Bros.: 2, ck; 1, pul. 

BLACK LANGSHAN8. 

Bruce: 1, ck; 1, 2, hen; 2, ckl; 1, 2, pul; 

2, pen; Kennedy Cup for best pen in Asiatic 
class. Taylor: 2, ck. Watkins: 3, hen; 1, 

3, ckl; 3, pul; 1, 3, pen. 

WHITE ^.ANGSHANS. 

Buck Bros.: 1, 2, hen. Arnote: 3, hen; 
1, 2, pul. 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 

Moon: 1, ck; 2, 3, hen; 1, ckl; 1, 2, 3, 
pul; 1, 2, pen; Knower Cup for best pen in 
Mediterranean class. Buck Bros.: 2, ck; 

1, hen; 3, ckl. Elgin: 3 ck. Horner: 2, ckl. 

R. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 

Buck Bros.: 1, ck; 1, 3, hen; 2, ckl; 1, 
pul; 1, pen. Crow: 2, 3. ck; 2, hen; 1, 3, 
ckl; 3, pul;2, 3, pen. Tyer: 2, pul. 
S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 
Langford: 1, ck ; 1, hen; 2, pen. Moon: 2, 
ck; 2, hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul; 1, pen. Mor- 
ris: 3, ck. Crow: 3. hen; 3, ckl; 2, pul. 
Rainey: 2, ckl. Bickerdike: 3, pul. 
R. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 
All to Crow. 

S. C. BUFF LEGHORNS. 
Crow: 1. 2, 3, ck; 2, 3, hen; 2, 3, ckl; 

2, 3, pul; 2, 3, pen. Kremer: 1, hen; 1, ckl; 

1, pul; 1, pen. 

R. C. BUFF LEGHORNS. 
All to Crow. 

S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. 
All to Crow. 

SILVER DUCKWING LEGHORNS. 
Buck Bros.: 1, ck; 1, hen; 2, pen. Crow: 

2, 3, ck; 2, 3, hen; 1, 2, 3, ckl; 1 ,2, 3, pul; 

1, 3, pen. 

MOTTLED ANCONAS. 
All to Crow. 

S. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 
Sanborn: 1, ck; 3, ckl; 1, 2, pul; 2. pen. 
Crow: 2, 3, ck ; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 3, pul; 1, 
pen. Buck Bros.: 2, hen. Owen Bros.; 3, 
hen; 2, ckl; 3, pen. 

R. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 
Buck Bros.: 1, 3, ck; 2, hen; 2, pen. 
Crow: 2. ck; 1, 3. hen; 2, 3, ckl; 3, pul; 1, 

3, pen. Davids: 1, ckl; 1, 2. pul. 

S. C. WHITE MINORCAS. 
All to Crow. 

BLUE ANDALUSIANS. 

All to Crow. 

RED CAPS. 

Crow; 1. ck; 2, 3. hen; 1. 2. 3. ckl; 1. 2. 
3. pul; 1, 2. 3, pen. Buck Bros.: 2, ckl; 

WHITE F.4CE BLACK SPANISH. 

Buck Bros.: 1, ck. Crow: 2, 3 ck- " 3 
hen; 3. pul; 3, pen. Chestnut: 'l, hen";' 1.' 
ckl; 1. 2. pul. 

WHITE CRESTED BLACK POLISH. 

All to Buck Bros. 

C;OLDEN BEARDED POLISH 

All to Buck Bros. 

SILVER BEARDED POLISH. 

All to iiuck Bros 

PLAIN GOLDEN POLISH. 

All to Buck Bros. 

BUFF LACED POLISH. 

All to Buck Bros. 

^ , HOUDANS. 

Buck Bros.: 1, ck; 1. ckl; 1. pul. Yoder: 

2, 3, ck;l. 2. hen; 2. ckl 

LAK EN V ELDERS. 

All to Yoeman. 

SILVER SP.ANGLED HAMBUR<iS. 

Hawk: 1 ck. Thomas: 2. ck ; 1. 2. ckl; 
1. -'. 3. pul; 1. pen. Yeokum: 3. ck. 
BLACK H.AMBURGS. 

All to Crow. 

CORNLSH INDLAN (JAMES. 

Evansmayde Farm: ]. 2. ck ; 1. 2. 3. hen; 

fAv"'K ^r • ; -','■'' P"'= '• -• P^'n; Special 
roi best cockerel in show room. Spalding 
^tock Farm: 3. ck ; 3. ckl 

WHITE LACED CORNISH. 

All to HoldermaTi. 

SILVER GRAY DORKINCi. 

All to (row. 

^M . ''AI'ANESE PHOENIX. 

All to ^ ooinMii 

M. . ^XI«K« ^N imMIMQUES. 

All to Crow. 

PIT GAME8. 

nn?"'i ^^''^^L,!' Ck; 2, hen: 2, .!, ckl; 1, 3. 
h-h'^o ,"""•, ?"''y- 2. 3. ck: 1. ckl; 2, pen 
Edwards: 1, hen. Bailey: 3, hen. Harris: 
-. pul; .!. pen. 

,,, , \Y"*TE INDIAN GAMES. 

All to Buck Bros. 

^n , ^l^^^^ SUMATRA GAMES. 

All to Buck Bros. 

M, . r, '**^'* '*^^^^ GAMES. 

All 1o Buck Bi-os. 

.,, V**'vP^^\'*^^^'^^^>^« GAMES. 

All to Buck Bros 

xn ,'^"^VER DUCKWIN(; (iAMKS. 

All to Buck Bios. 

BROWN RED GAMES. 

All to Buck Bros. 

BIRCHEN (iA.MES. 

All to Buck Bros. 

WHITE GAMES. 

All to Tiuck Bros. 

BLACK BREASTED RED GAMES. 

Edwards: L ck ; 1, 3, hen; 1. l- puL 1 

pen Ruck Bros.: 2. ck; 2. hen; 1*. ckl'; 3,' 
pul; 2, pen. 



# • 



• 



• 



# 



# 



• ,• 




February, '10 




RED PYLE GAME BANTAMS. 

Rouse: 1, 2, ck; 1, hen; 1, pul. Buck 
Bros.: 2, 3, hen. 

BIRCHEN GAME BANTAMS. 
Buci< Bros.: 1, ck; 1, 3, ckl; 1, pul. Rouse: 
2.,«i. ck; 2. pul. Taggart: 2, ckl. 
SILVER DUCKWING GAME BANTAMS. 
All to Buck Bros. 
GOLDEN DUCKWING GAME BANTAMS. 
All to Buck Bros. 
BLACK BREASTED RED GAME BAN- 
TAMS 
Rouse: 1, ck; 1, 2, hen; 1, 2, ckl; 1, 2. 
3, pul; 1, pen. Buck Bros.: 2, ck. 

BROWN RED GAME BANTAMS. 
Buck Bros.: 1, ck; 1, hen. Taggart: 2. 
hen ■ 2 ckl 

WHITE GAME BANTAMS. 
Taggart: 1, ck; 1 hen. Buck Bros.: 1, 
ckl. 

R. C. BLACK BANTAMS. 
Smalley: 1, 2, ck; 1, hen; 1, pul; 1, pen. 
Clark: 2, hen; 1, ckl; 2, 3, pul. Crow: 3, 
hen. 

BOOTED BANTAMS. 

All to Buck Bros. 

LIGHT BRAHMA BANTAMS. 

All to Ragsdale. 

BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 

Moon: 1, ck; 1, hen; 2, ckl; 2, pul; 1, 
3, pen. Crow: 2, hen; 1, 3. ckl; 1, 3, pul; 
2, pen. Hoag: 3, hen, 

PARTRIDGE COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Rouse: 1, ck; 1, hen. Buck Bros.: 2, 
ck; 2, hen. 

WHITE COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Watkins: 1, ck; 1, hen; 3, pul; 1, pen. 
Buck Bros.: 2, ck; 3, hen; 1, pul. Crow: 
2, hen; 1, 2, 3, ckl; 2, pul; 2, pen. 

BLACK COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Buck Bros.: 1, 2, ck; 3, hen; 1, 2, ckl. 
Yeokum: 3, ck; 1, 2, hen. 
BLACK TAILED JAPANESE BANTAMS. 
Buck Bros.: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1, pen. Tag- 



POULTRY FANCIER: 



gart: 2, ck; 2, hen; 2, pen. Chestnut: 3, 
hen; 1, ckl; 1, 2, 3, pul. 

WHITE JAPANESE BANTAMS. 

All to Stearns. 

(iOLDEN SEBRI(;HT BANTAMS. 

All to Allison. 

SILVER SEBRIGHT BANTAMS. 

All to Buck Bros. 

BRONZE TURKEYS. 

Brown: 1, ck; 2, hen. Watkins: 1, hen. 
Darling: 1, ckl; 1, pul. 

WHITE HOLLAND TURKEYS. 

Arnote: 1, ck; 1, hen; 2, ckl; 1, pul. Wat- 
kins; 1, 3, ckl; 2, 3, pul; 1, pen. 
PEKIN DUCKS. 
Darling: 1, 2. 3, ck. Watkins; 1. 2. 3. 
hen; 2, ckl; 1, 2, pul; 1. 2, pen. Buck 
Bros.; 1, ckl; 3, pul. Hinton; 3, ckl. 
ROUEN DUCKS. 
All to Allison. 

GRAY CALL DUCKS. 
All to Buck Bros. 

EAST INDIA DUCKS. 
Ail to Buck Bros. 

WHITE MUSCOVY DUCKS. 
Allison: 1, ck; 2,3, hen; 1, ckl; 1, 3, pul. 
Buck Bros.: 1, hen; 2, pul. 

COLORED MUSCOVY DUCKS. 
All to Buck Bros. 

INDIAN RUNNER DUCKS. 
Buck Bros.: 1, ck. Davids: 2, ck ; 1, 2, 
hen; 2, ckl; 1, 2, pul; 1, pen. Wilson; 1, 
ckl; 3, pul; 2, pen. 

TOULOUSE GEESE. 
Watkins: 1, ck; 1, hen. Arnote: 2, ck ; 
2. hen. 

EMBDEN GEESE. 
All to Wallis. 

WHITE CHINESE GEESE. 
All to Buck Bros. 

BROWN CHINESE GEESE. 
All to Buck Bros. 




Awards at Scranton, Pa- 



EXHIBITORS AT SCRANTON, PA. 

Alexander. Edgar L Chinchilla, Pa. 

Aukuzinas, Anthony Scranon. Pa. 

Asiaic Bantam Yards Horeheads, N. Y. 

Atkinson, Walt E Glyndon, Md. 

Aherton, H. F Moosic, Pa. 

Ackerson, H. W Washington, N J. 

Bright, Thomas Scranton, Pa 

Burgess, David Olyphant, Pa. 

Bell, Wm. C Binghamton. N. Y. 

Bryan, Ed Olyphant. Pa. 

Burd. Howard J Washington. N. J. 

Brown, J. W., and wife Scranton, Pa. 

Belmonte. Wm Pittson, Pa. 

Bissell, Mrs. Clara S Montrose. Pa. 

Biesecker, S. & Sons Elmhurst, Pa. 

Budwesky, Otto Pittston. Pa. 

Black Diamond Orpington Farms 

Scranton. Pa. 

Benjamin. Wm. F Tavlor, Pa. 

Buff Leghorn Poultry Yards. .Annville, Pa. 

Bower, Arthur W Dunmore, Pa. 

Bickel, M. B AUentown. Pa. 

Barton, Jas. P Scranton. Pa. 

Bower, E. Zeigler Scranton, Pa. 

Brown, Wm Philadelphia. Pa. 

Bailey, Thomas, & Son Scranton, Pa. 

Blowers, John I Scranton. Pa. 

Brown. Thos. & Sons Scranton. Pa. 

Canterbury. Joseph Scranton. Pa. 

Close, A. W Dunmore, Pa. 

Clancey. J. P Syracuse, N. Y. 

Coburn, Robt Rendham, Pa. 

Clarke, John A Pittston, Pa. 

Cooper, A. J. and wife Duryea, Pa. 

Cohen. Arthur K Scranton, Pa. 

Collins. John. & Son Scranton, Pa. 

Dunlap, E. B Clark's Summit. Pa. 

Drumheller, Howard Hazleton, Pa. 

Dence, J. H. & Son Gloversville, N. Y. 

Dence. Mrs. Geo. . Gloversville, N. Y. 

Davis. Thomas Mill City. Pa. 

Dunn. David lermyn. Pa. 

Davles. D. B Taylor, Pa. 

Doidge &■ McNeill London, Can. 

Davies, H. R Scranton, Pa. 

DIx, D. N Mill City, Pa. 

Edwards. Dr. Geo. B Lacevville, Pa 

Elliott, Harry Olyphant, Pa. 

Erk, Russell Seelvville, Pa. 

Easterle, Geo. H Scranton, Pa. 

Evans, James M Scranton, Pa. 

Fltzpatrirk, Wm. A Scranton Pa 

Fowler, G. A Carbondale, Pa. 

Forster, Sylvester Scranton. Pa. 

Furman, C. C Bloomsburg, Pa. 

Falrbank. Dr. S. J West Utlca. N. Y. 

Freeburn, Wm. B Sparkhlll. N. Y. 

Frost. H. B.. Jr Wyckoff, N. J. 

Griffiths. E Scranton, Pa. 



Gelatt, E. L Jermyn, l»a. 

Geisshardt, Mis. Anna Scranton, Pa. 

Grau, Cha.s. C Crone, L. I.. N. Y. 

Gerbig. Carl W Archibald. Pa. 

Gates. Harry H Mt. Morris. N. Y. 

Hodgson, Thomas C I'eckville, Pa. 

Hughes, T. W Mos5cow, Pa. 

Howe, Wm Hudson, Pa. 

Hillcrest Farms Oakford, Pa. 

Hughes, W. H Scranton, Pa. 

Heft, E. G Wyoming, Pa. 

Harris, L. H Scranton, Pa. 

Heil & Weibel Scranton, Pa. 

Hazel Poultry Yards Hazleton, Pa. 

Hagen, W. H Scranton, Pa. 

Hagen & Welsch Scranton, Pa. 

Jones, Henry J Carbondale, Pa. 

Jones. Wm. J Pleasant Mt., Pa. 

Jones, Wm Old Forge, Pa. 

Jones, Alf Taylor, Pa. 

Keith, W , Brooklynville. Md. 

Kummer, Wm Scranton, Pa. 

Kinnane, E Pittston. Pa. 

Kime & Williams Scranton, Pa. 

Keller, Claude E Larksville, Pa. 

Lof tus, E. J Scranton, Pa. 

Lawrence, A. D New Albany, Pa. 

Llewellyn, D. J Scranton, Pa. 

McWade. F. M Moscow, Pa. 

McDonnell, John Scranton, Pa. 

Megargee, F. O. & Co Scranton, Pa. 

Meredith, Reese Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

May, Wm Plymouth, Pa. 

Morse. E. D Scranton. Pa. 

Morris, Clarence Scranton. Pa 

Miller. H. B Clark's Summit, Pa. 

Miner & Faun Scranton, Pa. 

Meter. E. B. S Cellarville, Pa. 

Munn, Arthur W Scranton, Pa. 

Overhill Farm Pittston. Pa. 

Oyster. Edward Strawberry Ridge, Pa. 

Osterhout. B. M Scranton. Pa. 

Philbin. .las. P Scranton. Pa. 

Proctor. Harry Carbondale. Pa. 

Powell & Sons, J. B Taylor, Pa. 

Pearson, Abraham Scranton. Pa 

Payne, Donald & Robt .. Clark's Summit, Pa. 

Payne, O. W Scranton. Pa. 

Powell. Bennie Avoca. Pa. 

Porter. C. Harold Brockton. Mass 

Pier, Wm. F Avoca. Pa. 

Pier, W. B. and wife Elmhurst. Pa. 

Partington, Peter Taylor, Pa 

Pendred. Geo lermvn. Pa 

Phillips. J. T Jermyn. Pa. 

Rippon, C. W Olyphant. Pa. 

Roy, J. A Netcong, N. Y. 

Rogers, W. J Dickson City. Pa. 

Relder. R. D Middletown. Pa. 

Rhoades. H. A, and wife.. .Wilkes-Barre. Pa. 



Page 37 




REDS 



Rose, J. A Scranton, Pa. 

Ree.se, J. B Peckville, Pa. 

Reed & S(m, N. E Scranton, Pa. 

Rodham, Thos. B Scranton, Pa. 

Ricker, E. C Scranton, Pa. 

Shire.s, Elsie G La Plume. Pa. 

Speece, C. J Scranton, Pa. 

Schwenker, Carl F Red Bank, N. J. 

Sitterly, A. T Schenectady, N. Y. 

Swartz., Mrs. and Sons Lake Ariel, Pa 

Snaieth & Von Bergen Scranton, Pa. 

Snvder. J. H Burns, N. Y. 

Stephens, Joseph White Mills, Pa. 

Seidel, Wm. D Washingtonville, Pa. 

Sophia, W. S New Milford, Pa. 

Smith. J. J. & Son Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Spare, John E Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Shamrock, Joseph Scranton, Pa. 

Snaith. Wm.. Jr Scranton, Pa. 

Scheible, Jr.. Mrs. J. W Duryea, Pa. 

Stephens, John T Peckville. Pa. 

Savage, C. P Dunmore. Pa. 

Stoeckel Bros Scranton. Pa. 

Schwenk. Robt. E Scranton, Pa. 

Sprandle. Chas. J Scranton. Pa. 

Seamans. Earl Factoryville. Pa. 

Schroeder, Philip G Scranton. Pa. 

Snyder, Dr. M. D Dunmore. Pa. 

Samuels. R. & N Nanticoke, Pa- 
Tinner, .John Sugar Notch, Pa. 

Tyson, Edward Olyphant, Pa. 

Tuthill, Marion T Dunmore, Pa.- 

Tidd, Howard Taylor, Pa.. 

Tidd, S. J Taylor, Pa . 

Turner, John Old Forge, Pa. 

Thurston, J. R Factoryville, Pa. 

Teeple, I. E Feindale. Pa. 

Tiffany, E. J Brooklvn. Pa. 

Tobey & Son, C. E Scranton, Pa. 

Teeter, George S Hawley, Pa. 

Von Storch, C. H Scranton, Pa. 

Vallamont Poultry Yards. .Williamsport, Pa. 
Wide Awake Poultry Farm. Lake Ariel. Pa. 

Wintermute. Wm. J Moosic. Pa. 

Wilson. T. W Moscow, Pa 

Wallace, N. A Clark's Summit, Pa. 

Wilkinson. H Miff linburg. Pa. 

"Wnikins. R. L Afton, N. Y. 

Wilkins. C. Alton Afton. N. Y. 

Willman. Elmer J .Ashley. Pa. 

AVhite. Wm Moosic. Pa. 

Watts. R. D Moscow. Pa. 

Williams. Enoch and wife Taylor. Pa. 

Wheeler. R. E Clark's Summit. Pa. 

Watson, W. H Sunburv. Pa. 

Widdowfield. W. H Clark's Green. Pa. 

Ware, B. B Bridgeton, N. J. 

AWARDS AT SCRANTON, PA. 

BARRED PLY.MOUTH ROCKS. 

Hillcrest Farm: 1, 2. ck; 2, 3. hen; 1. ?, 
4. ckl; 1. 3. pul; 1. pen. Cooper and Wife: 

3. ck; 4, .'.. hen; 5, ckl; 2. 4. pul. Tiffany: 

4, ck. McWade: 1. hen. Speece: 3, ckl. 
White: 5, pul. Seamans: 2, pen. 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Wide Awake Poul. l^'arm ; 2. ck ; L 2. 
hen; 1. 2. ckl; 1. 2. pul; 1. pen. Reed & 
Son: 1. ck; 3. hen; 2. pen. Keller; 3. ck; 
4. hen. 

BUFF PLY.'MOUTH ROCKS. 
Keller; 1, ck ; 1. hen. Reese; 2. ckl; I„ 
inil; Hodgon; 2. jnil. 

SILVER PENCILED PLY.MOUTH ROCKSv 
Hillcrest Farm: 1. ck ; 2, hen; 1. ckl; 2. 
pul. Osterhout; 1, 3. hen; 1, 3. pul. 

PARTRIDGE PLY.MOUTH ROCKS. 
Atkinson: 1. ckl. 

COLl .MBL4N PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 
Swarts i\L- Sons: 1, ck ; 2. 3. hen; 2. ckl; 
2, 3. pul. Wilson; 1, hen; 1, pul. Forster: 
1. ckl; 4. i)ul. 

BLACK PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 
Brown iSL- Wife; 2. pul. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. 
Tuthill; 4. ck. Loftus; 3. ck; 2. ckl. 
Rhoades & Wife; 1, ck ; 3. hen; f.. ckl; 2, 3. 
pul. Furman; 2. ck ; 1. hen; 1. ckl; 1. 
pul. Burd; .">. hen. Biesecker & Sons; 4. 
hen. Blowers; 2. hen: 3, ckl. Wheeler: 
4, ckl; 4. pul. Jones; .'>. pul. Davis; 1, 
pen. 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. 
Griffiths; 1. 2. ck ; 2. hen; 1. ckl; 4, pul. 
Clancy: 3, .5. ck ; 1. 3. 4. hen: 2 4. ckl- 
1, 2. pul; 1. pen. Wheeler; 4. ck ; 3. ckl' 
'.. pul. Widdowfield; 3. pul. 

<.OLDEN WYANDOTTES. 
Rogers; 1. 2, hen; 2. ckl; 1. 2. pul. May: 
1. ckl. 

SILVER WY.\NDOTTES. 
.Jone.s; 1. hen; 2, 3. ckl; 1. 2, pul. .Spran- 
del: 1, ckl. 

P.4RTRIIHJE WYANIH)TTES. 
Hagen & Welch: 2, ck ; 2. 3. hen; 12 3 
ckl: 3. 5. pul. Gates; 3. ck; 1. hen;' 4.' 
ckl; 4, pul. Burge.ss: 5. hen. Snyder: 4 
hen; 1. 2. pul. Wilkins: .'',. ckl. Bright' 
1, pen. ' 

SILVER PENCILED WYANDOTTES. 
Smith & Son: 1. ck; 2. ckl; 3. pul. Oya- 



R. C. and S. C. Rhode Island Reds 

Hundraism birds for sale at reasonable prices. Exhibition and breeding birds of highest 
quahty. Birds on approval. Satisfaction or your money hack. Mated pairs, trios and pens 
K-^K ** «r. .^t.. ^. a specialty. Catalogue Free. AMERICA'S LEADING JUDGES recommend mv birds in 

rle'winneTs'' " ^^^''' Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Toledo, Detroit. Milwaukee. Get some eggs f^m rv beTt'pensanS 

EDWIN R. CORNISH, 1426 Pontiac Street, ANN ARBOR, MICH^ 




■4 K 



r?^^!k^<\>_ ^age 38 



^-POULTRY l^NClER ^^February/loJ ^ 



s^SSMSSSESl 




ter: 2, 3. ck; 1, 2, hen; 1, 3, ckl; 1. 2, 
pul. 

COLUMBIAN WVANDOTTES. 

Close: 2, 3, ck ; 1, 2. hen; 3, pul; 1, pen. 
Miller: 1. ck; 3. 4, hen; 1, 2, 3, ckl; 1, 2, 4, 
pul; 3, pen. Shires: o, ck ; 5, pul; 2, pen. 
Brown «SL' Son: 4, ck. Stephens: 4, 5, ckl. 
Pier: 4, pen. 

S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. 

Edwards: 2, ck; 3, ckl; 4, pul. Dence & 
Son: 1, ck; 2, hen. Rodham: 3, ck; 4, ckl. 
Ackerson: 4. ck; 3. 5, hen. Black Dia- 
mond Orpinjjton Farm: 1, hen; 1, 2, ckl; 
1, 3, 5, pul. Thurston: 4, hen. McDonnell: 
5. ckl; 2, pul; 1, pen. 

S. C. WHITE OKriNCiTONS. 

Wilkins: 1, ik, 1, hen; 3, ckl; 4, 5, pul. 
Gerbig: 2, hen; 1, pul. Brown & Son: 

3, hen; 3, pul. Roy: 4, ckl. Turner: 2, 
ckl; 2, pul. Seidel: 1, ckl. Dence & Son: 
5. ckl. Jones: 1, pen. 

S. C, BIFF ORPINGTONS. 
Fitzpatrick: 1, 2, hen; 3, ckl; 3, pul. 
Shamrock: 3, hen. Howe: 2, ckl; 1, 2, pul. 
Partington: 1, ckl. Hughes: 4, ckl. 
R. C. Bl FF ORPINGTONS. 
Shamrock: 1, hen. Hughes: 1, ckl; 1, 
pul. 

s. c. jiBiLEE orpin<;tons. 

Dunn: 1, ck; 2, hen. Atherton: 1, hen; 

1, 2, ckl; 1, pul. Partington: 2, pul. 

8. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 
Rose: 2, 3, ck; 1, 4. hen; 3, ckl; 2, 3, 4, 
pul. Spare: 5, ck. Teeper: 1, ck. Dix: 

4, ck. Rippon: 2, hen. Daris: o, hen; 1, 
ckl; 5, pul. Harris: 3, hen; 2, pen. Tidd: 

5, ckl; 1, pul. Coburn: 4. ckl. Pier & Wife: 

2, ckl. Kumnicr: 1, pen. 

R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 
Sophia: 1. 2. 3. ck; 2. hen; 4, ckl; 1, 5, 
pul; 1, pen. Gelatt: 1, ckl: Phillips: 2, 3, 
■ckl; 2. 3, 4, pul. 

LKiHT BRAHMAS. 
Bell: 1, ck; 1. 4, hen. Over Hill Farm: 

2, ck; 2. 3, hen. 

BUFF COCHINS. 
Watson: 1, hen. 

WHITE COCHINS. 
"Watson: 1. pul. Schroeder: 1. ck; 1, hen. 

PARTRIDCiE COCHINS. 
^Vllklnson: 1, 2, ck; 1, 2, hen; 1, ckl; 
1. pul. 

BLACK LANGSHANS. 
Snaith Von Bergen: 1, ck; 3. hen; 2, 3, 
ckl; 1, pul; 1, pen. Snaith, Jr.: 3. ck; 5, 
hen; 2, pul. Bower: 2, ck ; 1, hen. Free- 
burn: 5, ck. Payne: 4, ck; 1. ckl. Bel- 
monte: 2. hen. Williams & Wife: 4, hen; 
5, ckl. Aukuzinas: 4, ckl; 4, pul. Steph- 
ens: 3, pul. Collins & Son: '>, pul. 
WHITE LANGSHANS. 
Belmonte: 1, ck; 2, hen; 2. ckl; 2, pul. 
Powell & Sons: 1, hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul 
S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 
Lawrence: 2, ck; 1, 2, hen. Kime & Wil- 
liams: 1, ck; 4, ckl. Reed & Son: 3, ck; 

3, 4, hen; 2, 3. pul; 1, 2. pen. Davies: 5, 
hen; 1, 3. ckl; 1, pul. Snyder: 2, ckl; 4, 
pul. 

R. C. WHITE LE(i HORNS. 
Gerbig: 1. ck; 2, hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul. 
Jones: 1, hen. 

S. C. BROWN LE(; HORNS. 
Wintermute: 2, ck. Drumueller: 4, ck. 
Heft: 3, ck; 2, hen; 2, pul. Vallamont Poul 
Yds.: 1, ck; 2. ckl. McWade: 1, hen. Watts: 

4, ckl. Kimo & Williams: 3, ckl. Snyder: 
1. ckl; 1, pul; 1. i>en. 

R. C. BROWN LECiHORNS. 
Bissell: 1, ck. Osterhout: 2, ck. Fowler: 
1, ckl. 

S. C. BUFF LEGHORNS, 
Buff Leghorn Poul. Farm: 2. ck ; 1, hen; 



2. 3, ckl; 1, 3, pul; 1, pen. Watson: 1. ck; 

3, hen; 1. ckl; 2, 4, pul. Brown & Wife: 
3, ck; 2. hen. Kime & Williams: 5, pul. 

S. C. BLACK LEGHORNS. 

Brown & Wife: 2, hen. Von Storch : 1, 
pen. 

ANY OTHER COLOR LE(iHORNS. 

All to Bailey. 

8. C. GOLDEN DUCKWING LECiHORNS. 

All to Dunn. 

S. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 

Elliott: 2, hen; 1, ckl. Pearson: 1; hen. 
Jones: 2. ckl. 

R. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 

Pearson: 4, ck. Tobey: 1, 2, 3, ck; 1, 2, 3, 
hen; 1, 2, 3, ckl; 1. pul. 

8. C. WHITE 3IINORC AS. 
All to Beiijaniin 

R. C. WHITE MINORCAS. 
All to Benjamin. 

MOTTLED ANCONAS. 
Bower: 1, ckl. 

SALMON FAYEROLLE8. 
All to Hughes. 

HOUDANS. 
Canterbury: 2. ck ; 1, pen. Partington: 
3. ck. Tiffany: 1, ck; 3, hen; 4, ckl; 1, pul. 
Proctor: 2, hen; 4, pul. Ware: 1, hen; 
2. ckl; 5, pul. Wilkinson: 1, 3, ckl; 2, 3, 
pul. 

SILVER (JRAY DORKINGS. 
All to Dunlap. 

SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURGS. 
Budwesky: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1, 2, ckl; 1, 2, 
pul. Gi-ay: 2, hen; 3, ckl. 

CORNISH INDIAN GAMES. 
E\ans: 1, ck; 3, hen; 2, ckl; 3, pul. Will- 
man: 2, ck ; 2, hen. Bryan: 1, hen; 1, ckl. 
Tinner: 1. 2. pul. Reider: 2. pen. 
WHITE INDIAN G.\MES. 
Pow(>ll & Sons: 1, hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul. 

BLACK BREASTED RED GAMES. 
Clarke: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul. Fair- 
bank: 3, ckl; 2, pul. Frost: 2. ckl. 
BROWN RED GAMES, 
All to Clarke. 

RED PYLE STANDARD GAMES. 
All to Clarke. 

BLACK BREASTED RED PIT GA3IES. 
Barton: 2, ck; 3, hen; 1, ckl. Teeter: 
1, 3, ck. Wallace: 1, 2, hen. Miner & 
Finn: 2, ckl. 

CiOLD OR SILVER DUCKWING PIT 

G.AMES. 

Barton: 1. ck ; 1, ckl. Teeter: 2, 3, ck. 

ANY OTHER COLOR PIT GAMES. 

Meter: 1. ck: Teeter: 2. 3, ck; 1, 2, hen. 

BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Megargee & Co.: 2, ck; 2. hen; 1, 3, ckl; 
1. 3. pul; 1, pen. Doedge & McNeill: 1, 
ck; 1. hen; 2, ckl; 2, pul; 2, pen. Cohen: 
4, pul. 

WHITE COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Megargee & Co.: 4, ck; 1. 3, 4, hen; 3, 5, 
ckl; 3. 5, pul. Smith & Son: 3, ck ; 5, hen. 
Doidge «fe McNeill: 1, 2, ck; 2, hen; 1, 2, 
ckl; 1, 2, pul; 1, pen. Samuels: n. ck; 4, 
pul. 

BLACK COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Megargee & Co.: 1, ck; 1, 2. 3, hen; 2, 3, 
ckl; 2. 3. pul. Doidge & McNeill: 2, ck; 4, 
hen; 1. ckl; 1, pul; 1, pen. Bickel : 4. ck; 
.'), hen. Tyson: 3. ck. Tiffany: 5, ck. Hazel 
Poul. Yds.: ;"), ckl; 5, pul; 2, pen. 

PARTRIDGE COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Megargee & Co.: 4, ck ; 4. hen; 1, ckl; 
1, 2, pul Asiatic Bantam Yds.: 1, ck; 3. 
hen; 1, pen. Doidge & McNeil: 2, ck; 2, 
hen; 2, ckl. Bickel: 3, ck; 5, hen. Rippon: 
1, hen. 

CiOLDEN SEBRIGHT B.\NTAMS. 
Megargee & Co.: 2, ck; 2, hen; 2, pul. 



Bickel: 1. ck ; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 1. pul. Bar- 
ton: 3, ck. Portei-: 3, hen; 3, pul. 

SILVER SEBRIGHT BANTAMS. 

Tidd: 4. ck ; 2, hen; 1. 2, 3. pul. Bickel: 
2, ck; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 4, pul. Sitterly: 1, 3, 
ck; 3, 4. r>, hen; 2, 3, ckl; 1, pen. Porter: 
5, ckl. Samuels; 4, ckl; 5, pul. 

R. C. BLACK BANTAMS. 

Porter: 1, ck; 2, pul. May: 3, 5, ck ; 3, 
hen; 2, ckl; 1, pul. Tiffany: 4, ck; 1, hen. 
Hagen: 2, ck; 2, hen; 1, ckl; 3, pul. Bickel: 

' ^^ R. C. WHITE BANTAMS. 

All to Porter. 

WHITE JAPANESE BANTAMS. 

Samuels: 1, ck; 1, hen. Tiffany: 2, ck; 

2, hen. 

BOOTED WHITE BANTAMS. 
All to Bickel. 
BLACK TAILED JAPANESE BANTA3IS. 
Bickel: 1, ck; 1. hen. Samuels: 2, hen; 
1. ckl. 
WHITE BEARDED POLISH BANTAMS. 
All to Bickel. 

WHITE SILKIE BANTA3IS. 
All to Bick.-l. 

BIRCHEN BANTAMS. 
All to Brown. 

LIGHT BRAHMA BANTAMS. 
Asiatic Bantam Yds.: 3, ck; 3, hen; 2, 
ckl; 4, pul. Geisshardt: 1, ck ; 1, pul. Bick- 
el: 2, ck; 2, hen. Schwenk: 1, 4, 5, hen; 

1, ckl; 2. 3, pul. 

DARK BRAHMA BANT.VMS. 
A.siatic Bantam Yds.: 1, ck; 4, hen; 1, 
ckl; 1, pul. Bickel: 2, ck; 5, hen. Stoeckel 
Bros.: 3. ck ; 1, 2, 3. hen. 

BLACK BREASTED RED GAME BAN- 
TAMS. 
Dunn: 1. ck; 1, hen; 4, pul. Fairbank: 

3. ck; 2, hen; 1, ckl; 2, pul. Ricker: 2, ck; 
3, hen; 2, ckl; 1, pul; 1, pen. Brown &. 
Son: 4. hen. Wm. Brown: 3, pul. Schwen- 
ker: 2, pen. 

BROWN RED GAME BANTAMS. 
Wm. Brown: 1, ck ; 1, 2, hen; 1, ckl; 1, 
Di'.I. 

RED PYLE (iA.ME BANTAMS. 
Heil cSt Weibel: 2, ck; 2, hen; 5. 
ckl; 2 pul. Schwenker: 1, ck; 1, hen; 2, ckl; 
3, pul. Brown & Son: 3. hen; 4, ckl. Ren- 
dered: 3, ckl; 4, pul. Fairbank: 1, ckl; 1, 
pul. 

<iOLDEN DUCKWING GAME BANTAMS. 
Ricker: 1. ck; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul. 
Brown: 2, ckl. 
SILVER I>UCKWING GAME BANTAMS. 
Ricker: 1, ck; 1. hen; 1, 3, pul. Dunn: 

2. ckl; 2. pul. Wm. Brown: 1. ckl. 

OLD ENGLISH SPANGLED (JAME BAN- 
TAMS. 
Morris: 2. ck; 2, hen. Dunn: 1, ck; 1, 
hen; 1. ckl; 1, pul. 

CORNISH INDIAN GAME BANTAMS. 
Bickel: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 2, pul. 
Doidge «& McNeil: 2. 3. hen; 2. ckl; 1, pul. 
BRONZE TURKEYS. 
Schiebel: 3, ck ; 2, hen; 2, pul. Easterle: 
2, ck. Tiffany: 1, ck; 1. hen; 1. ckl; 1, pul. 
WHITE TURKEYS. 
All to Easterle. 

WHITE PEKIN DUCKS. 
Tiffany: 1. ck; 1. hen; 1, ckl; 2, pul. 
K<^ller: 2. ckl; 1. pul. 

TOULOUSE GEESE. 

All to 1 iffanv. 




BARRED ROCKS, 

RHODE ISLAND REDS, Both Combs 

BUFF TURKEYS, 

We have a fine lot of cockerels and pullets to offer our customers at prices ranging 
from $1.50 to $25.00 each. Before placing your order write us describing what you 
want and receive our catalog, which will be sent without charge. We guarantee every- 
thing as represented and all orders are shipped subject to approval. Our pens will 
be mated up early in December. Our new incubator house with twenty large 
machines will be ready for use in a few weeks. When you get ready for eggs or 
day-old chicks from first class stock, write us. Addre.ss, 



WfllJAM OSBURN, GOOSE LAKE FARM, 



BOX P, MORRIS, ILLINOIS 



• • 



i 



• 



# 



# 



# # 




^*iv^^. ! .1- ' 'n-i ij 4.v,!y . ?;;r;^ 



'■JlMRKik' 



F ebruar y, '10 




POULTRY FANCIER 



Awards at Minneapolis, Minn. 



EXHIBITORS AT MINNEAPOLIS. MINN. 

inn'"' ^""'V. • • V; Marshall. Minn. 

Andenson. Dr. F. E Red Wing. Minn. 

Anderson, M. A. 3204 22nd Ave. S 

.'\ • ; Minneapolis. Minn. 

Andenson. Wm. E. Rock Creek, Rush City 
Anderson, Wm. E . ' 

.,••/• ;„V ^^^^ Creek. Rush" City,' Minn. 

Au.stinson. Theo Tyler Minn 

§o L''"''A '^t.T- ^^; Hutchinson! Minn! 

S^ff ".V^^f ^'- ^ Preston. Minn. 

Bean. W. M Anoka. Minn. 

Behrman. Wm Norwood. Minn. 

Benjamin, H. H Hutchinson. Minn 

Ben.son, M. O. ...Blooming Prairie. Minn! 

Blenc(>e Dr. Guy Alma Center, Wis 

Boll. Edw 

•1632 Grand St. N. E., MinneapolVs.Minn 
Bond, Dr. Thos. P 

.. 212 Flynn Bldg., Des Moines." " Iowa. 

-Buckanana, G. E Montevideo, Minn 

Burrill. W. T 

ISS Arthur Ave. S. E., Minneapolis.' 'Minn. 
Buskovich Bros 

-D ; • V; • • • --^ledford. Clinton' 'Falls,' 'Minn. 

Bryant. C. M sauk Center. Minn. 

±jyi-ne. C. A 

^ 4648 Blaisdell. Minneapolis, "Minn. 

<:avanaug:h, T. J Hutchin.son. Minn. 

Cedardale Poul. Farm Owatonna, Minn 

•Cedarstrom, J. A Winthrop. Minn' 

•Clay. Mrs. F^ M. . . . .R. 4. Winnebago, Minn. 

Cox. Harry G. St. Charles, Minn. 

Crowley, Ja.s. C 

..3052 15th Ave. So., Minneapolis," "Minn 

-Crowley. Jno. A Crookston. Minn. 

Darr. R C. Lakefleld. Minn. 

Davis. Chas Porter. Minn. 

^^,',J^' "\^old Sleepy Eye. Minn. 

S ?U^V, '^''^- ^ Amboy. Minn. 

Doliff Roger P Redwood Falls. Minn. 

Dymoke, H 

..4932 31st Ave. So., Minneapolis. "Minn 

Sn- '!l"^?' '^- -^ Rushrnore. Minn. 

^ w ' o J Moorhead, Iowa 

Ellison & Son. Mrs. M. E 

^ • •.• • • • • St. Anthony Park.' Minn. 

Endion Farm 

....... .506 Pallades Bldg., Duiuth. "Minn. 

Fertig. S. E.. 467 Fuller Ave.. St. Paul. Minn 

Flesland, M. O New London. Minn. 

Gladys Poul. Yards ....Stevens Point Wis 

•Goebel. Mary R. i. Rush Cltv. Minn 

Graham. Dr. C Rochester. Minn. 

praham & Son. J. R. Roberts. Wis 

Hales. Jas. A 

TT ■ ■ •.;: ^^^•'' Baldwin St., St. Paul," "Minn. 

Hamilton, B. L 

..3451 Fremont No.. Minneapoli.s Minn 

Hanna. Geo. A Stockton. Minn. 

Martin, Mrs. Geo. F 

... 3S59 6th" St. N.. MinneapoHs.' "Minn. 

Haskm.s & Son, A Jesup, Iowa. 

Hausman Poul. Farm Hillsboro N D 

Haynes, R. C '...;. 

•'^248 Grand Ave., Minneapolis, Minn 

Hebbel. Henry Windom. Minn. 

Hennlng. H. A 

...246 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis. Minn. 

Henry, Earl Albert Lea, Minn. 

Hermanson, H 

3115 E. 51st St.. Minneapolis. Minn. 



Hess. Henry Winona. Minn 

Heynen. Archllle 

4205 Aldrlch So., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Hill. W. W 

,,. 146 W. 4Sth St.. Mlnnea'poris." 'Minn. 

Hlntermister. J. H 

TT \' ■ ■; ■ •^' •; Highwood, St. Paul, Minn. 

Hobart. Paul Dickey. N. D. 

Holloway. Mrs. E 

. .1893 Waltham Av.. Merrlam Park, Minn 

Hoodecheck. Frank Hutchinson. Minn. 

Houghton, Geo. N 

. .520 University S. E., MinneapoHs." "Minn". 
Hove. Peter Stanhope, Iowa. 

YJ'u^' ^l^^^'' L«-ke City. Minn. 

Jackson. S. E 

^ 2800 Como S. E., Minneapolis. 'Minn 

Jenness. Robt. B Windom Minn! 

Johnson. Chas. O 

T :-^-^l Colfax Ave. N., Minneapolis," "Minn. 

Johnson, Donald 

^ • -357 Carter Ave., St. Paul. Minn 

Johnson F W '. . . Luther fowS: 

Kapphahn. Chas. J Alexandria. Minn 

K^t^n.^S;:' I- .^:.;;«P:'ng valley.- Minn.' 

Kln'g's'i;y;^Geo^* .^.^.'!*^.^*- ^*""^aPO»i«- Minn. 

r^ir.W • ^^r^^-^ ^^^ ^^'- ^■' Mi'nneapol'is." "Minn, 
■ivipp, \v . ti 

^,/ • : Bradley St. Sta.. St. "pavil "Minn 

KIrchers, Jr.. J. E . . 

^ J • • ; • • -822 Hood St., La Crosse", " Wis. 

Knapp, M. V Aurora. Iowa. 

^"fPP- <-^?- • • Winona, Minn. 

Kollman. J W Mankato. Minn. 

Kroening. Miss M R.7. Stillwater. Minn. 

Kruse. John 

T' u, ^"L ^"ssell N., Minneapolis. 'Minn. 

Kuhlmann Sisters Winona. Minn. 

Ladysmith Poul. Co Lady.smith, Wis. 

Law. Mrs. J. W. 

..... .3515 Fremont N., Minneapolis! Minn 

Ligday. Jas. G Winona, Minn." 

Lockhart, J. L _ 

.^4434 Blalsdale Ave., MinneaipolLs. "Minn 

^■- --^t^^ Harriett. Minneapolis, Minn. 

McCrea, E. E. Alexandria. Minn. 

McCrea. Geo. M 

..... 4026 Park Boul., MInne"a'p"o"lls.' 'Minn. 
Mclntyre. H. J 

.^ 617 University Ave., St. Paul. Minn. 

McKesson. J. H. 

A^ W,;?^"^.."^''^^^" ^*- Mlnneapol'i's." "Minn. 
McMillan, G. & D 

-■ 2116 Bryant S.. Minneapolis. Minn. 

McPherson^ J. s. Stillwater. Minn. 

Madison. Geo. C 

...167 Bedford E. E., Minneapolis. "Minn 
Martin, Wm. A 

3S01 5th Ave. S.. Minneapolis. Minn 

Mathew.s Maude I Larimore. N. D. 

Michener. Harvey L 

3801 5th Ave. S'., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Milne Bros. Brandon, Man.. Can. 

Nelson. A. D Windom. Minn. 

Nekon Poul. Co Montlcello. Minn. 

New. Arthur 

2109 Broyant N., Minneapolis, Minn. 



BENDER'S 



COLUMBIAN 
WYANDOTTES 

BRED TO WIN AND LAY. STOCK AND 
EGGS FOR SALE. YOUR MONEY'S WORTH 

Address A. M. BENDER, 1231 WALTON A^'E., FT. WAYNE. IND. 




.WHITE PLYMOUTH 
ROCKS 



Allen Tucker's 
WHITE ROCKS 
again made good 
this season by winning every Bine competed for; 
also silver cup winners. Three grand pens com- 
posed of these prize winners mated for this season's 
egg trade. A limited number of choice cockerels and pullets tor sale 
at reasonable prices. 
ALLEN TUCKER - - MINERAL POINT, WIS. 




THK I»fOT>Kf. FORTABI.K HKNNKKV 



The Model Portable Hennery ^-^^'^^ 

thluKforttie city man, the breeder and for 
keeping fowls on the colony plan, a complete 
henhouse. Kcononiy Trap-Nest. Blmplest 
and most ecouomlcal on the market, nev»'r 
will j<et out of order and always work, made 
both la wood and metal. Model KroocI 
CoopH. Made of Kalvanlzed Iron, collapsaMe. 
mite and vermin proof, easily cleaned, hy 
drawing two hooks bottom drops out. Mod- 
el Setting: CoopH. Made of galvanized iron 
Just what you want when the hatching season 
comes on again, you can also use It as a brood 
coop. Write at once, catalogue free, mention 
you saw my ad In Poultry Fancier. NieiiiRiin 
llros. M fir. Co.. Hox;J77.Mt.OHv«-, II 



t Af 




Page 39 U-5- 

Ortman, A. A 

^ 1^23 Oliver N., Minneapolis. Minn. 

O.smundson. Jno Nearstrand, Minn. 

Patch Frank B Rochester, Minn. 

Pletsch W H Lake City. Minn. 

Snii^W^A ^- X. Winona. Minn. 

RetslofC. A. H Wabasha, Minn. 

Roberts. E. G Fort Atkinson, Wis. 

Rogers H. E. ..929 Miss St., LaCrosse, Wis. 

« "/ V Vxr^- A ^ebb, Iowa. 

Schutz, Wm A Mapleton. Minn. 

Shamp, H. B 

. .1!>14 Jackson N. E.. Minneapolis.' Minn. 

i"ke.'J.'^^ ^:. . : : : : : v.: : : : : : ;^":':'!'°"'. .""'""• 

..1710 Jeffer.son N. E., Minneapolis.' Minn. 
Solomonson. A. J 

3127 Morgan Ave. N.. ' Minneapolis." Minn. 
Stellwagen. M. F 

e. ■ iV ; • ;x^^^ Logan N., Minneapolik.' 'Minn. 

^tolte. I.. H Waterloo, Iowa. 

feuecess Poul. Yds Chatfield. Minn. 

Swaggart. Wm. M Wayzata. Minn. 

1^'^*^"^>'' ^i:- C. A Owatonna. Minn. 

p^^jmes. c. ii. Blooming Prairie. Minn. 

Thimsen F. P. . .Blooming Prairie, Minn. 

Vansant!"R "W.""-. . ^ ; ; '. " " ^'^^'^-'-^''^^^' Minn. 

Wailerius.''j*^F'^ ^.^''.'''^: .^.'.""l^^^^^"^' '^'^""• 

1203 Main St. N. E.. Minneapolik.* "Minn. 
\\ aters. A. E 

ix'i.;v:' ■ ■; • "^^^ ^^^ ^^•' Minneapolis, Minn. 

W estby. A. C Porter Minn 

White. J ] [ .... *^'""- 

... . . . 252 E. Howard St., 'wi'nona," Minn. 

wiVpf ""o* ^^""^ Ashland, Wis. 

u olfe, Oscar 

..2347 Upton St. No., Mi"n'n'eapolis,"Minn. 
Young, B. A 

3425 Aldrlch St.. Minneapolis. 'Minn. 

A^I'ARDS AT MINNEAPOLIS, 3nNN. 
BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Johnson: 1, ck. Osmundson: 2. ckl Goe- 
bel: 1 hen. McPherson: 2, ck. Irvine: 3 4 

;!:,« kv,"- ^^"i, ^' '^' ^- ^"': 1- pen. display 
cup. Shamp: 3, ck ; 4. hen; 1. ckl; 4 pul; 2, 
pen. Dyinokf: 3. pul > f , i., 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Endion Farm: 2. ck. Kendrick: 4, pul 

br.T.Ti,^- ""^^'h ^' ^' ^"': - P^"- Lock-' 
".^'^t: 2. hen; 3. ck. Hoodecheck: 1. ck; 1 2 
ckl; 1. hen; 1. pul; 1. pen display and sil- 
ver CUD. Holloway: 3. 4. hen; 4, ckl; 5, pul; 
3, pen. ' • *- . 

BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Bassett: 1. 4. ckl: 2. 3. 4. pul; 1. hen; 
1 uen. Ellison & Son: 1. ck; 3. hen; 3, 
Ckl. 3, pen. Bean: 4. hen. Success Poul. 
>ds.: 4. ck; 5, ckl; 2. hen; 1. pul; 2. pen; 
Sweepstakes Rock class, display and silver 
cup. Hove: 3. .5. ck. Elliott: 2 ck- 2 ckl" 
;>, pul; 5. pen. ' ' ' 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. 

Benjamin: 1. 4, ck : 3, 4. hen; 12 3 
ckl; 12. pul; 1. pen. display and' .silver 
cup. Wallerius: 5, hen. Cedardale Poul. 
Farm: 5. ck; 5. pul; 3. pen. Dr. Bond: 

1. 2. hen: 4. pul; 2. pen. Solomonson: 2. 
ck. Symes: 3. ck: 4. ckl; 3. pul. White: 
5, ckl. 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. 

Thimsen: 2. 4 ck ; 4. hen; 2. pul; 2. pen. 
Gladys Poul. Yds.: 5. pul. Barrie: 5. ckl. 
Hess: 1. 3, ck; 3. hen: 1. 2. 3. ckl- 1 3 
pul; 1 pen, display and silver cup. Bean' 
:>. ck. Success Poul. Yds.: 4. ck- 1 2 ^ 
hen; 4, pul; 3, pen ' ' 

PARTRIDE WYANDOTTES. 

Henry: 2, ck ; 2. 3, hen: 1. ckl: 3. 4. 5. 
pul; 1. pen. Ehrisman: 2, ckl. Jackson': 5* 
ck; 4, 5. ckl. Hoodecheck: 3. ckl; 1 hen-' 

2. pul: 2, pen. Crowley: 1. ck; 4 ^ hen- 

3. pen. Stellwaggen: 3. 4, ck; 1,' 3.' 4, 5*, 

GOLDEN A^TfANDOTTES. 
Osmundson: 1. 2. ck : 2. ckl; 2. hen; 2 3 

4. pul; 1, pen. Jackson: 3. ck : 3 4 .=5 o'kl' 
^>. pul: 2. pen. Solke: 5. ck; 1. 's. ' 4, s' 
hen. Knopp: 4. ck; 1, ckl; 1. pul. 

SILVER WYANDOTTES 

Dethloff: 3. 4. ck; 2. 3. 5. ckl; 1. 4, hen; 
1. 2. 5. pul; 1. pen, Sweepstakes Wvandotte 
elass, di.splay and silver cup. Swaggart • 
1. 4. ckl: 2. ck: 2. hen; 3. pul; 3. pen. Mc' 
Andrews: 1. 5. ck; 3, 5. hen: 4. pul; 2 pen 
COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. 

I^adysmith Poul. Co.: 4. ck; 5. ckl; 1, 3, 
-1. hen: 5. pul : 3. pen. Kersten: 2. hen 
Success Poul. Yds.: 3, ck; 2. 3, ckl; 5,' 
hen; 2. pul; 2. pen. Cavanaugh : 1, ckl; 
1. 3. 4, pul; 1. pen. Fertig: 4, ckl. 
8. C. BUFF ORPINGTONS. 

Nelson: 4. ckl; 2. 4. pul; 2. pen. Mathews: 
1. hen. Kruse: 2. ck; 4. hen; 3. 5. pul. Gra- 
ham: 1. ck; 1. 2. 3. .5. ckl; 2. 3. .^, hen; 
1. i)ul; 1, 3. pen. Sweepstakes English class; 
Display and silver cup. 

R. C. BUFF ORPINGTONS. 

Young: 2. ckl; 2. hen; 2. 4 T^ pul. 
Symes. 3. ck; 1, ckl; 1, 3, hen; 1. 3, pul. 
S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. 

Schultz: 4. ckl. Anderson: 2, 3. 4. ck; 
1. hen. Graham: 1. ck; 1. 2. ckl; 2. 4. ii. 
hen; 1. 3. 4. pul; 12. pen. Hasklns & Son; 
3. 5. ckl; 3. hen: 2. r>. pul; 3. ppn. 
S. C. WHITE ORPINGTONS. 

Tubbs: 3. ck; 3. hen. Plet.^ch: 1. ckl. 
Retsloflf: 1. 2. hen; .<>. pul; 1, ck; 3. 4. ckl; 
1. pen. Blencoe. 4. 5, hen; 8, pul; 3, pen. 




POULTRY FANClER-'-^J^^siio^ 



i^}-,K'irrxu.v^yw.'.,^<^'J-'-.')>%^^'f 






POULTRY F. 



Graham: 2. ck ; 2. 5. ckl; 1, 2, 4, pul; 2, 
pen. 

8. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Buskovick Bros.: 1, ckl; 2, ck; 2, hen; 
A. P. A. Grand Silver Medal. Haynes: 1, 
3. ck: 2, ckl; 1, 3, hen; 2, pul; 1, pen. 
Haskins & Son: 3. 5. ckl; 3, 5, pul; 2, pen. 
Westby: 4. ckl. Fertig: 1, 4, pul. 

R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Hartin: 1, hen; 2, ck. McKesson: 4, 
ckl. Flesland: 3, ckl; 4, pul; 3, pen. Bry- 
ant: 1, pul. Hebbel: 2, ckl; 5, hen; 5, pul; 

2, pen; Special for highest scoring cockerel 
in R. C. Red class. Houghton: 2, 3, pul; 

1, ckl; 2. 3, hen; 1, 3. ck. Ortamn: 4, 5, 
ck ; 4, hen. Fertig: 5. ckl. 

LIGHT BRAHMAS. 
Kersten: 1, 2, ck; 2, 3, ckl; 1. 2. 3. 4, 
hen; 2, 3. pul; 1. pen. Davis: 1, ckl; 1, 4, 
pul. New: 4, ckl; 5, pul. 

BUFF BRAHMAS. 
All to Bean. 

BUFF COCHINS. 
All to Clay. 

BLACK LANGSHANS. 
AH to Heynen. 

BUFF LANGSHANS. 
All to Bean. 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 
Vansant: 4. ck; 1. 3. 4, 5, ckl; 1. hen; 

3, pul; 2. pen. Johnson: 5, pul; 3, pen. 
Ball: 3 ck. McCall: 1, ck; 2, ckl; 2, 3, 4, 5, 
hen; 1, 2, 4, pul; 1, pen display, and silver 
cup. Hobart, 2 ck. 

R. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 
All to Rogers. 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 
Hinterminster: 1, 4, 5, ck; 2. 3. 5, ckl; 1, 

2, 4, 5, hen; 2, 4, 5. pul; 1, 2, pen. Hans- 
mann Poultry Farm: 3, hen; f), ckl. Cox: 1; 
elk; 1, 3, pul. 

R. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 
Acker: 1, ck; 1, 2, hen; 1, 2, pul. Ander- 
son: 2. ck: 3. 4. 5. hen; 1. 2. ckl; 3. 4. 5, 
pul. 

S. C. BUFF LEGHORNS. 
Jenness: 1, ckl; 3, pul; 1, pen. DolifC: 
1, 4. pul. Bean: 1, ck; 2. 3, 4, ckl; 1. 2, 3. 
hen; 2, 5, pul; 2, pen. Sweepstakes Leghorn 
class. 

R. C. BUFF LEGHORNS. 
All to Bean. 

S. C. BLACK LEGHORNS. 
All to Rogers. 

MOTTLED ANCONAS. 
Cedarstrom: 1, ckl; 1. 3. 4, 5, pul; 1, pen. 
Rogers: 2, pn). 

S. C. BLACK ^nNORCAS. 
Hales: 2. ck: 2. 3. 5. hen; 4, ckl; 2. pen. 
Martin: 1. ck: 1. 4. hen; 1. 2. 3, ckl; 1. 2, 3, 
4, pul: 1, pen. 

R. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 
All to Waters. 

BUFF MINORCAS. 
All to Bean, 

S. C. WHITE MINORCAS. 
All to Hanna. 

WHITE CRESTED BLACK POLISH. 

Ligday: 1. ck; 1. hen. 'Willianis: 2. ck; 
1. 2. 3, ckl: 1, 2, pul: 4. hon. Roberts: 3. 
rk; 2. 3, hen. 

SILVER BEARDED POLISH. 

Williams: 3. ok; 2, hen; 1. pul. Roberts, 

1. 2. ck: I, ;;, hen: 2, pul. 

GOLDEN BE.\RDED POLISH. 

Williams, 2. ok: 1. ckl; 3. hen; 1. pul. 
Roberts, 1, .'?, ck : 1, li. hen; 2. pul. 

WHITE BEARDED POLISH. 
William: 1, ck; 1, 2, hen; 1, pul. Roberts: 

2. ck; 3, 4. hen 

PLAIN WHITE POLISH. 
All to Roberts, 

PLAIN SILVER POLISH. 
All to Roberts. 

PLAIN GOLDEN POLISH. 
All to Roberts. 

BUFF LACED POLISH. 
Roberts: 1, 2, ck; 1. 2. hen: 1, pul. Bean: 

3. ck; 3. hen. 

HOUDANS. 
Rust: 4. ck ; 1. 3. pul: .'>. hen; 3, pen. 
Rogers: 3. ck. Wolfe, 1, ck; 1, 2, 4, ckl; 4. 
hen; 4, pul; 2. pen. McCrea, 2, 5, ck: 1, 2. 
3. hen: 3. .'>. ckl; 2, .">. pul; 1, pen. Sweep- 
stakes: Display and silver cup. 
All to McAndrews 

SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURGS. 
All to Kirchers. 

GOLDEN PENCILED HAMBURGS. 
All to Roberts. 

SILVER PENCILED HAMBURGS. 
All to Roberts. 

RUMPY GAME BANTAMS. 
All to Crowley. 

BROWN-RED GAME BANTAMS. 
All to Milne Bros. 

GOLDEN DUCKWING BANTAMS. 
.Ml to Milne Bro.«i. 

BLACK AFRICAN BANTAMS. 
All to Kingsley. 

BLACK BREASTED RED BANTAMS. 
MrMillen: 2. rk ; 2. 3. hen. Dymoke: 1. 
ck. Milne Bros.: 1, ckl; 1. hen. 

BLACK COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Roberts: 3, 4, .^. hen; 2, ckl; 1, pen. 
Kirchera. .Jr.: 3, 4, ck : 1, 3. ckl; 2, 3, 4, 5. 
pul; 2. pen. Milne Bros.: 1, 2, ck; 1. 2, 
ck; 1, 2, hen; 1. pul. 

BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Milne Bros.: 1. ckl. Klpp, 2. ckl; 5, pul. 



Stole: 4. 5. ckl; 1, 2. pul; 2, pen. Roberts: 
1, hen; 3, ckl; 3, 4, pul; 1, pen. 

WHITE COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Kipp: 1. ckl; 2, 3, pul. Milne Bros.: 1, 
ck; 1, 2, hen; 1, pul. 

R. C. RHOI>E ISLAND RED BANT.AMS. 
All to Roberts. 

PARTRIDGE COCHIN BANTAMS. 
All to Roberts. 
BLACK TAILED JAPANESE BANTAMS. 
All to Roberts. 

WHITE JAPANESE BANTAMS. 
All to Roberts. 

CORNISH FOWLS. 
Johnson: 2, ck; 2. 3. ckl; 1. 2. 4. hen; 1, 
pul; 1, pen. Hales: 1. 4, ckl; 2, 3, pul. 
Kellman: 1. ck; 3. 5, hen; 2, pen. 



BRONZE TURKEYS. 

All to Kapphahn. 

BUFF INDIANS. 
All to Bean. 

BUFF SILKIES. 
All to Bean. 

R. C. BUFF WONDERS. 
All to Bean. 

WHITE PEKIN DUCKS. 
All to Milne. 

BLACK CAYUGA DUCKS. 
All to Kingsley. 

.VFRICAN GEESE. 
All to Behrman. 

BUFF GEESE. 
All to Bean. 




Awards at Remington, Ind. 

EXHIBITORS AT REMINGTON, IND. WHITE WYANDOTTES. 

Barnes, C. E Idaville, Ind. Peck: 1, ck ; 1, 2, 3, 4, hen; 1. pu). 

Bartee, Mrs. Geo Remington, Ind. Phelps: 1, 2, pul. Mayhew: 1, 2, 3, 4, ckl; 

Bickel, Mrs. D. A Remington, Ind. 3, 4, pul. 

Brenner, B. L Rensselaer, Ind. BUFF WYANDOTTES. 

Broadie, Max Remington, Ind. Broadie: 2, ck; 1, 3, ckl; 1, hen; 1. 2. 3, 

Cowgill, A, B Remington, Ind. 4. pul; 1, pen. Gilbert: 2, ckl; 2, pen. 

Fell. Chas. J Remington, Ind. Mullen: 4, ckl. 

Geier W^ R. Remington, Ind. PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES. 

Gilbert. Lowell Rem ngton, Ind. Barnes: 2, ckl; 1, 2, hen; 1. 2. pul; ?, 

Hackley, Robt. . . .\ Remmgton, Ind. ,,^ 

Hogeland, Jim Remington, Ind. j^ f, WHITE ORPINGTONS. 

Lambert, H. A Remmgton, Ind. ^,, ,,, j.ambert. 

Lehe, Peter Remington, Ind. 

Lock, A. V Remington. Ind. S. <"'• RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Mayhew, Arthur Rensselaer, Ind. -^H to Cowgill. 

Mullen, Sam Remington, Ind. R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Peck, Geo Remington, Ind. Peck: 1, ckl; 4, pul. Shand : 3. ckl; 1, 

Peck, J. I Remington, Ind. 2, 3, pul. Bartel: 3, ckl; 2, pen. 

Peck, W. E Remington, Ind. LIGHT BRAHMAS. 

Phelps, Henry Remington, Ind. Hogeland: 1, ck; 1, hen. 

Reed, T. E Remington, Ind. S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 

Shand, Frank Remington, Ind. All to Lehe. 

.Shuster, Burt Remington. Ind. S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 

Stokes & Son, M. O Remington, Ind. All to Fell. 

Tyler, Simeon Remington, Ind. WHITE BANTAMS. 

All to Phelps. 

AWARDS AT REMINGTON, IND. LEGHORN BANTAMS. 

BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. All to I»eck 

Bickel: 2. ck ; 2. 3, 4, ckl: 1. 2. 3, 4, BRONZE TURKEYS. 

pul; 1, hen; 2, pen. Tyler: 2, hen. All to Hackley. 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. PEKIN DUCKS 

All to Geier. All to Reed. 

BUFF PLYTWOUTH ROCKS. GREY CALL DUCKS. 

Stokes & Son: 4. ck ; 1, ckl; 1. 2. hen; All to Shuster. 

2. 3. pul; 1, pen. Brenner: 1. 3, ck; 2, 3, TOULOUSE GEESE. 

ckl; 3, hen; 1, 4, pul; 2, pen. All to Hacklev. 



€ 



• 



WHITE ROCKS GRAVES STRAIN fall winnings 

1st Pen. 1st Hen. 1st Cockerel, also special for best cockerel in show. 1st, tid, 3<1 
Pullets, also special for best Pullet in show. Eggs $1.00, $2.a) and J3. 00 per 15. 



T. A. CONNERY, 



VINELAND, N. J. 



S. C 17. /. REOS '^^^s ^"o o^^ 



OLD CHICKS 



If you 
..,,,. -——want 

etfgs or chicks from birds that lay eggs the vear round, I have them. They are RED too Write 
for free mating list. "--■* 



■BUSIHESS BIRDS OF QUALITYz 



Ton Notch Poultry Farm, R. P. GugMtUI, Profit, Elcho, Wis, 




60 Years *^ IIT-^ I. K. Felch & Son 



Bred LIGHT BRAHMAS, BARRED ROCKS 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS, WHITE WYANDOTTES 

and judged all breeds in nearly every State in the union without a protest. 
Every PATRON has been satisfied with the stock for the money paid. 
WHY SHOULD THEY NOT, when none but specimens to score 90 
to 96 points find place in their breeding pen ? Which 

v^riN AND bre:e:d on 

m the hands of their patrons, for they do not exhibit, nor do they appropriate 
their patrons* winnings to their advantage. 

From Sept. 1 to May 15. Brahmas $3.50 to $10 for females; $5 to $20 
for males. White and Baired Rocks and White Wyandottes, $2.50 to $8 
for females; $4 to $15 for males. Eggs from all, $4 for 15, $7 for 30 $9 
for 45, and $ 1 5 for 1 05 eggs. From May I 5 to Sept. 1 , all yearlings before 
moulting sold at 40 per cent off of catalogue prices. For catalogue and other 
particulars address 

I. K. FELCH & SO N. Box I ?6. NATICK. MASS. 



^ 



# • 




Awards al Danville, Ind. 

T^.Ji^^V^F^^^ ^^ I)ANV1I.LE. IND. BUFF WYANDOTTES. 

Ror^i?.V.. H u ■^- ^^anville. ina. Cooper: 1. pen; 1, ck; 3. pul. Wynant: 1. 

.Bario\v, 11 11 Brownsburg, Ind. hen. Talbert: 2, 4, hen; 2. ck Dooley: 1, 2, 

«arlo\v, H. M BrownsburK, Ind. ckl; 1, 4, pul. Ragan: 4, ckl; 2, pul. Smiley: 

Brown, I.. H Danville, Ind 3. hen. 

Bunten, Elbert Danville, Ind. GOLDEN Wi'.4NDOTTES. 

Burnsides, J. J Judson, Ind Ensminger & Rudd: 1, 2, hen. Smiley: 1. 

Carter, Benj Danville. Ind ^'^'> !> 2, pul. 

Cassety, A. D n. .Salem. Ind! SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES. 

Collins, Joe C Hainbridge. Ind. Hadley: 1, 2. pen; 1, ckl; 2, ck; 1. 2. pul; 

Cooper, H. W Danville, Ind. 1. 4, hen. Masten: 1, ck ; 3, 4. ckl; 4. pul. 

Cornwell. Geo. W Carbon, Ind Barlow: 3, hen. Ensminger & Rudd: 2, 

Cox, Howard Danville, Ind. hen; 3, ck. Smiley: 2, ckl; 3, pul. 

Crane, Mary' Danville, Ind. PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES. 

Davis. C. D. .^ Bridgeport, Ind. Miars: 3. pul; 3, 4, hen. Ensminger & 

Davis, E. van B Danville, Ind. Rudd: 1, ck. Smiley: 1, hen; 2, ck. New- 
Davis, O. D Bridgeport, Ind. man: 1, ckl; 1, 2, pul. 

SJf.^frT^a^''^- ^ ^ Danville, Ind. SILVER PENCILED WYANDOTTES. 

S,^2^;^? Danville. Ind. Barlow: 1, hen. Smiley: 1 ckl; 1. pul. 

Dye Bros. •••^•••- Danville, Ind. BLACK WYANDOTTES. 

Ensminger & Rudd Danville, Ind. Smiley: 1 hen 

Ferree, Earl Danville. Ind. S. C. BUFF ORPINGTONS. 

Gentry, M. O. Danville. Ind. Barlow: 2, pen; 3. hen; 3 ckl. Burn- 

Hadley. H. K Danville. Ind. sides: 2, ckl. Porter: 4, pul; 1, hen. Gar- 

Hadley, Wilbur Danville. Ind. tf^r: 1, ckl; 1. 2. 3. pul; 1. pen. 

Hammock, Tilfred Danville, Ind. S. C. WHITE ORPINGTONS. 

Harlan, Albert Amo Ind Burnsides: 1, ck; 1, 2, hen. 

Harshbarger, Mrs. Wm Shaveland', Ind.' R- C. WHITE ORPINGTONS. 

Hays. Earl Danville Ind Smiley: 1, ck. 

Hubble. Mrs Nora Danville Ind BLACK ORPINGTONS. 

Jones, D. R Danville' Ind Burnsides: 1. ck. 

Jones. M. E Danville' Ind ^ »A ^'- RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Kurtz, Oscar Danville, Ind! , ^^^^v^T i 1,/^'' ^' ^' P"^' ^'^^'"^^'^Jl • 

MaSTBr'^r ^^ ^' ^IT.V'^' I"^" " »•' C. MODE ISLAND REDS. 

Masten Cvrus A^^o'In^' Hubble: 1, pen. Stanley: 2. ckl; 3. 4. 

M?rrft ■ Oliver J^.r.^i^2' J"t P"'" Wicker: 1, 2, pul. Baker: 1, ckl. 

Merritt, uii\ei Danville, Ind. LIGHT BRAHMAS 

^ull^' F%^^^ ^^i'^PF'^ri' J"'i- Barlow: 1, ckl; 1, pul. Temi)lin : 2, pen. 

JJ 1 t' ,,• ?V •;•• Plalnfleld, Ind. McCoun : 1, pen; 1, ck; 1, ckl; 2, hen; 2. 4, 

Mitchell. Martin Danville. Ind. pul. Burn.sides: 2. ck; 3 ckl; 3, pul. 

Montgomery, James Danville, Ind. DARK BRAHMAS. 

Neal, Tarner Brownsburg. Ind. All to Smiley 

Newman, J. A Danville, Ind. BUFF COCHINS, 

NIckerson. John Danville, Ind. Davis: 2. 3, 4, hen; 2, ckl; 2, 3, pul. 

Porter, I>ela Danville. Ind. Burnsides: 1, ck; 1, ckl; 1. pul; 1, hen. 

Ragan. Chas Danville. Ind. PARTRIDGE COCHINS. 

Ross, A. A Danville, Ind ^'^ to Smiley. 

Ruston. Walter E t^layton, Ind BLACK COCHINS. 

Sheets, H. F N. .Salem Ind ^^^ ^^ Burnsides. 

Smiley. Chas; Judson. iSS; .„. « .WHITE COCHINS. 

Soper, Fred B Danville, Ind. ^" *^ nJ^'lV-K- t Ai^^«mx*^« 

Stanley. Erwin Mooresville Ind. i, . BLAC K LANGSHANS. 

Stanley, Jno. W Mooresville InS pk?."";'^"i,. '•'. ^he^ 4 ^nP^rf"" SnnPr'^^= Ln-' 

rpniKr^..* o c! 13 x. T j cKi, z, CK, 2, Men, 4, pcn. Soper: 1, pen; 

?pmnin wm Brownsburg, Ind. j, 4, „en; 4. ckl; 4, put. Burnsides: 4. ck 

?b?.^ V.^H ^^"^'^ ^> "^- WHITE LANGSHANS. 

Tharp, Jacob Danville. Ind. \ii to Smiley 

Wi<-l<er. Simon Amo, Ind. ' g. c. BUFF LEGHORNS. 

Wright, Mrs. Ida J. Balnbridge, Ind. Miles: 1. ckl; 1, hen; 1, pul. Burnsides: 

Wynant, Chas Danville. Ind. ]. ck ; 2. ckl; 2. hen. 

AWARDS AT DANVILLE, IND. ^11 to^Smile?"^^^ LEGHORNS. 

BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 

Cox: 3, 4. hen. Neal: 1, 2, 4. pen; 2, ckl; 1, Burnsldos: 1. ckl; 3, pen. Barlow: 2, 

2, pul; 2, hen. Davis: 1, ckl; 1. hen. Har- pen; 1, 2. ck ; 4. ckl. Jones: 3, ck; 2, 3, 

Ian: 3, 4. ckl; 1. 3. ck. Barlow: 4. pul. ckl; 1, 2, :!. hon; 1. 2, 4, pul; 1, pen. Cooper: 

Centry: 3, pen. Collins: 2. ck ; 3, pul. 3. pul. 

NIckersfm: 4. ck R. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. All to Smiley. 

Cassety: 1. ckl; 1, 2, pul; 3, pen. Wright: S. C. BUFF LEGHORNS. 

2, hen; 3. pul. Mitchell: 1, pen. Barlow: Ragan: 2, ck ; 1. 2. ckl; 1, 3, hen; 1, 

1, ck; 1. hen; 2, pen. Thorp: 2, ckl; 4, pen. Smiley: 1. ck; 2. hen. 

pul. MOTTLED ANCONAS. 

BUFF PLl^MOUTH ROCKS. All to Burnsides. 

Jones: 1. ck ; 1.2. pul; 1. 3. hen; 3, ckl. S. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 

Kurtz: 1. 2, 4. ckl; 2. hen; 3, 4. pul. Mont- All to Smiley, 

gomery: 1. pen. Smiley: 2. ck : 4. hen. WHITE MINORCAS. 

PARTRIIXiE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. All to Burnsides. 

Hadley: 1. ck ; 1. hen; 2, ckl; 2. pul. BLUE ANDALUSLVNS. 

Stanley; 1. 3. ckl; 1. 3. pul. All to Smiley. 

WHITE WY.\NDOTTES. BLACK J.\V.\S. 

Sheets: 3, 4. hen; 3. ck; 3. ckl. Ham- All to Burnsides 

mock: 1, 2. pul; 1. 3. ckl; 1, pen. Ensminger AMERICAN DOMINKJUES. 

& Rudd: 2, ck; 2. hen. Barlow: 4. pul. All to Smiley. 

Bunten: 2. pen; 3. pul; 4. ck ; 4, ckl. Burn- WHITE FACED BL.YCK SPANISH. 

sides: 1, ck; 1, hen. All to Burnsides. 



PETERSON'S HOUDANS ''' 'i^:^tJ^::r'- 

Send for 80-page book on The Houdan. 30 full paged plates of prize winners, Houdan Standard, 

Mating for Exhibition, Management and many other important chapters. Postage 20 cents 

Rev. C. E. Petersen, President American Houdan Club, 1900 to 1907. Bridffton, Maine 



BOGARDUS' ORPINGTONS 

S. C. BUFF AND S. C. BLACK 



First prize winners 
a t Chicago, 111., 
Hagerstown, M d . 
Cincinnati, Ohio; 
Nashville. Tenn. I 

have the finest lot of cockerels and pullets I ever raised. Show birds that will win. Get my 

prices, I can and will please you. 

O. A. BOGARDUS, - - BOX A, WARSAW, KY. 



WHITE ROCKS 



Stock for sale that will win in the show 
room and fill the egg basket. Our birds 
arc big. White, beauties, strong in good 



WW n a a Km WW W jmwMtmmJF m # Cw choice.st matings at 



BERWYN POULTRY YARDS, 



— — ~— — liveng prices. 
BOX P., BERWYN, ILL, 



WHITE CRESTED BLACK POLISH. 

Miles: 1, pul; 2, ckl. Itoss: 1, pen. Burn- 
sides: 1, ckl; 1. hen; 2, pul. 

GOLDEN POLISH. 

Burnsides: 1, ck; 1, hen. Miles: 1, pul. 

SILVER BEARDED POLISH. 

Burnsides: 1, hen. Dickerson: 1, pen. 
Barlow: 1, ck; 1. hen. Smiley: 1. 2, ckl; 
1, pul; 2, hen. 

HOUDANS. 

Miles: 1, pul. Burnsides: 1, ck; 1, 2, 
hen. 

PIT GAMES. 

Ragan: 1, ckl; 1. ck; 1, 2, hen. Smiley: 
1, pul; 3, hen. 

WHITE GAMES. 

Burnsides: 2, hen. 

BLACK BREASTED RED GAMES. 

All to Smiley. 

RED PYLE GA.MES. 

Barlow: 1, ckl; 1, hen. Smiley: 1, ck. 

CORNISH INDIAN GA3IE8. 
Barlow: 2, pul; 2, ckl. Smiley: 1, pul; 

1. hen; 1, ckl. 

WHITE FRIZZLES. 

All to Smiley. 

BLACK FRIZZLES. 

All to Burnsides. 

BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 

Ensminger & Rudd: 3, ck; 2, ckl; 2, hen; 

2, 4, pul. Burnsides: 3, ckl. Gentry: 1, 
ckl: 2, ck; 1. 3. hen. Smiley: 1, ck; 1, hen. 

WHITE COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Barlow: 2, ck; 1. hen; 1. ckl. Smiley: 

1. ck; 2. hen. 

R. C. WHITE BANTAMS. 
All to Crane. 

GOLDEN DUCKWING BANTAMS. 
All to Smiley. 

SILVER DUCKWING BANTAMS. 
All to Smilev. 

BROWN RED BANTAMS. 
Smiley: 1, hen 

GOLDEN SEBRIGHT BANTAMS. 
Barlow: 1, pul; 2, hen. Smiley: 1, ck; 

2, pul: 1, hen. 

SILVER SEBRIGHT BANTAMS. 
Barlow: 1. ckl; 1, pul. Smiley: 1, hen. 

RED PYLE GAME BANTAMS. 
Barlow: 1. ckl; 3, hen. Smiley: 1, hen; 

2 CK 

BL.4CK TAILED JAPANESE BANTAMS. 

Barlow: 1, ckl 

BLACK COCHIN BANTAMS. 

All to Smiley. 

BRONZE TURKEY. 

All to Mahan Bros. 

NARAGANSETT TURKEYS. 

All to Gentry. 

WHITE HOLLAND TURKEYS. 

Davis: 1, ck; 3. ckl; 1, 2. hen; 2, 4, pul. 
Wright: 1, 3, pul; 1. 2, ckl. 

WHITE EMBDEN GEESE. 
Jones: 1, old; 2, young pair. Wright: 2, 
old pair. Barlow: 1, young; 4, old pair. 
Smiley: 3, old pair. 

CANADIAN GEESE. 
All to Brown. 

WHITE CHINESE GEESE. 
Barlow: 1, 2, young pair. Smiley: 1, old 
pair. 

AFRICAN GEESE. 
All to Smiley. 

INDIAN RUNNER DUCKS. 
Ross: 1, 2, 4, old pair; 1, young pair. 
Barlow: 4, young; 4, old pair. Harshbarger: 
2 3, young pair. 

WHITE CALL DUCKS. 
Allto Burnsides. 

ROUEN DUCKS. 
All to Barlow. 

AYLESBURY DUCKS. 
All to Smiley. 

PEKIN DUCKS. 
Hays: 4. young pair. Burnsides: 1, old; 
2, young nair. Stanley: 1. young; 2, old 
pair. Merritt: 3, old pair. Barlow: 3, 
young; 4. old pair. 

AMATITE ROOFING 

MINERAL SURFACED NEEDS NO PAINTING 
Send for free sample. 

BARRETT M'FG CO., ^hTcYg'o 



Qrcider's Flue Catalogue 

of pure bred poultry for 1910 is bigger 
and better than ever, 200 pages, hand- 
somely illustrated, l.SO engravings, 
photos, .'W tine colored plates, de- 
scribes 65 leading varieties of land 
and water fowls. Gives low prices of 
stock and eggs, also Incubators, poultry 
supplies, etc. Calendar for each month. Tolls 
how to care for poultry, giving full details. 
The price of this book is only 10 cents, j 
Write for It to-day. -■ 

B. H. CREIDER. Box 101, Rh««ms, Pa. 




CAPON 
TOOLS 



C. p. PILLING t soil CO., 



MAKE MONEY 
WITH CAPONS 

Caponizing is easy and soon 
learned. Capons bring fancy pric- 
es and are always in demand. 

PILLING %m 

complete with free Instructions. 
Sent postpaid for $2. 50. Capon 
Book free. Write today. 

Arcl St,, Phliadtlphia, hi. 




^^snsES?^^ 



Page 42 




POULTRY FANCIER 




F ebruary, '10 




Awards at Ft. Wayne, Ind. 



4, pul. 
1 2 



Boughton: 4, 
ck; 1, 3, hen; 



KXHIBITORS AT TT. WAYNE, IND. 

Baker W C Bluffton, Ind 

Belle Poul. Yds., W. H. Didier, Prop 

^ • • Ft. Wayne, 

Bender, A. M pt. Wayne, 

Boughton, W. E Huntington. 

Bowser, O. J Ft. Wayne, 

Brunner, W. O Ft. Wayne, 

U,\ "^-^P Ft. Wayne, 

Clark, Oliver Ft. Wayne. 

Crise, J. W Greensburg. 

^,^f "• \\- Ft. Wayne. 

Dillon, i.dgar S Huntington, 

Eckhart, H. A Ft Wavne, 

Eckhart. H. A Ft Wayne 

Ford. Geo Ft. ' Wayne," 

Forest Park Poul. Yds Ft. Wayne 

Foster & Johnson Ft 

Frash & Son.s 

Gable. Geo. F Ft. Wayne, 

Heckman. Otto Ft. Wayne, 

Hills. L. W Ft. Wayne. 

Hoetzer, Otto Ft. Wayne, 

Hoover, G. Earl Mathews, 



Wayne. 
John Huntington, 



Jauch. Albert Ft. 

Johnson. Will Ft 

Klinkle, W. M Ft 



Koehlinger, Philip 

Koons. George 

Kucker, T. J 

Lindenberg & Bro.. W. F 

Logan. J. H ', 

Longfield Poul. Farm.... 
Mailin, J 



Wayne, 
Wayne, 
Wayne, 
.Ft. Wayne. 
.Ft. Wayne. 
. Ft. Wayne. 
. .Ft. Wayne, 
• Ft. Wayne. 
. . . .Blultton, 
Ft. Wayne. 



Meising Bros Ft. Wayne, 

^^^' '"' '■ Columbia City. 



Ohki. Chusuki 
Pape. Chas. G. . 
Phelps. Chas. A. 

Pool, L. R 

Powers, A V. . . . 
Puddy, Chas. . . . 
Reckewegg. Fred. 
Roberts, G. A. . . 
Rodewald, F. ... 
Ryan, Jas. A. . . . 



Ft. Wayne. 
.Ft. Wayne. 
.Ft. Wayne, 
. .Ft. Wayne, 
. .Ft. Wayne. 
. .Ft. Wayne. 

Warren, 

.Ft. Wayne, 
Ft. Wayne, 



^^' Reading, 



Sage. J 

Stoner, Chas. R Peabody 

Suter, Albert Roanoke. 

Terry. J. John Ft Wayne 

Towne «S: Stapleford Ft' Wayne' 

Tuttle. Morton Huntington.' 

Wiese, Carl G New Haven. 

"Wise & Son.s, J. J Ft. Wavne 



Witte. F. H. 
Wolf, Herbert 
Y'eagle, Clyde 
Young, H. A. 



T. 
J. 



Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 

Ind. 
Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 
Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind 

Ind. 
Ind. 

Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
IndT 

Ind 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Mich. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 



. Hoagland, 
.Ft. Wayne. 
. .Sturgis, Mich. 
Ft. Wayne, Ind. 



«> 
4, 



3. 



ck 

o 



AWARDS AT FORT W.WNE, IND. 
BARRED PIA'MOITH ROCKS. 

Hoover: 1, ck; 1. 2. ckl; 1. 2. hen: 1. 

3, pul; 1, pen. Dillon: 3. ckl. WItte: 
ckl. Rodewald: 5. ckl. 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Sage: 1, ck ; 1. 2. pul. Young: 3. ckl; 

4, 5, pul. 
BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Carl: 1. ck; 1, 2. ckl; 1. hen; 4, pul. 
Johnson: 1. 2, 3. 5 pul 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. 
Bowser: 5. ck; 1. 4. 5. hen. Hoetzer: 1, 
; 1. ckl; 5. hen; 4, pul; 1, pen. Ehrmann: 
ck: 1, 3. 5. pul. Ohki: 4, ck. Tonne & 
Stapleford: 3. ck; 2, ckl; 2, hen; 2. pul 
Wie.se: 3. ckl. ^ ' 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. 
Yeagle: 1. ck; 1, 2. hen; 1. 2, pul. 

f J OLDEN WYANDOTTES. 
All to Wiese. 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. 
Bender: 3. ckl; 1. 2. pul; Koehlinger: 1, 
ck; 1. 2. rkl: 1. 2. 3, hen; 3. 4. 5. pul 
PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES. 
All to Roberts. 

BUFF ORPINGTONS. 

Pool: 2. ck; 2, 3. hen; 1. 2. pul. Terry: 

3, 5, ck; 5, pul. Phelps: 5. hen; .-.. pul; 1. 
pen. Wi.se & Sons: 4, ck; 1. 2. ckl; 1 4 
hen; 3. 4. pnl. MaiHn: 3. ckl. 

WHITE ORPINGTONS. 
Poole: 3. .^.. ckl; 2, hen; 3. pul. Suter: 
1. hen. Brunner: 3, 4, ckl; 1 pul 
BLACK ORPIN(iTONS. 
Tuttle: 5, pul. Phelps: 3, 4. ck; 2, ckl; 
1. 4, 5. hen; 2. pen. Frash & Sons: 3 ft. 
ckl; 3. hen; 1, 2. .5. pul. Foster & Johnson: 
1, 2. ck; 1, 4. rkl; 2, hen; 3. 4. pul; 1, pen. 
S. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 
Longfield Poultrv Farm: 1. 2, ck ; 1. 2. 3 
ckl; 2. 3. 4. hen; 1. 2, 3, pul; 1. pen. Stoner: 

4, ckl; 5, hen; f), pul. Gable: .^. ckl. 

R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS 
Longfield Poultry Farm: 1. 3. ckl; 1 2. 
3. 4. pul: 1. pen. Wiese: 4. 5. ckl; 1, hen; 

5, pul. Kucher: 3. ckl. Hills: 1, 2, ck; 2, 
ckl. Rerkeweg: 3. ck. 

BLACK LANGSH.4NS. 
Baker: 3, ckl; 4, 5, hen; 3. 4. r>, pul; 
pen. Crise: 1. 2, ckl; 1, 2. pul; 1, 2, 
hen; 1. 2. pul; 1. pen. 

LIGHT BRAHMAS. 
All to Clark. 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 
Rodewald: 4. ckl. Puddv: 4. n, pul. 
Meislng Bros.: 1, 2, 3. ckl; 1, 2, hen; 2, 
3, pul. 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 
Logan: 2. ok; 1, ckl: 1. 3. r^, hen; 1, 2. 
5. pul. Dean: 1. 3. ck; 2. 4. hen; 3. 4, 
pul. 



2, 
3, 



S. C. BUFF LEGHORNS. 

Ford: 3, ck; 1, ckl; 3. hen; 1. 2, pul. 
Boughton: 2, ck; 2, hen. Lindenberg & 
Bro.: 2, ckl; 1. hen; 3. 4. pul. 

R. C. BUFF LEGHORNS. 
Belle Poul. Yds.: 1. 2, ckl; 1 ' 
S. C. BLACK MINORCAS.' 
Heckman: 3, ckl. Pape: 1, ck; 
1. 2. 3, hen; 2. pul; 1, pen. Rvan : 
4, pul. Lindenberg & Bro.: 2, ck; 
4, 5, hen; 1, 3, 5, pul; 2, pen. 

R. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 
Wolf: 3, ckl; 4, lien; 1, 2, pul. Jauch 



pul. 

1, 
4. 
2. 



ckl; 
ckl; 
ckl; 



3, ck; 2. ckl; 2. hen; 
ckl; 3, pul. Eckhart: 
5, pul. 

WHITE FACED BLACK SPANISH. 

All to Forest Park Poul. Yds. 

WHITE CRESTED BLACK POLISH. 

ck; 1, 2, 3, ckl; 1, 2, 3, 
1. pen. 

HOUDANS. 

All to Powers. 

BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 

All to Carl. 

R. C. BLACK 

Dean: 1, ckl; 1. pul. 
pul. 



Kemkle: 
hen; 1. 3. 



1, 
pul; 



4. 



BANTAMS. 

Koons: 2. 



ckl; 



Awards at Baltimore, Md. 



EXHIBITORS AT BALTIMORE. MD. 

Adams. Robt. P Lynchburg, Va. 

Alsenborn Farm Pikesville. Mass. 

Andrus. Dr. J. C Canandaigua, N. Y. 



Ankeny. D. R Clear Spring, 

Arbuckel, M. D. J. A Elkins, W 

Atkinson, Walter E Glyndon, 

Bacon, H. A Bianchville 



Bailey & Spahr 

Ballard, E. A 

Beahan, J. Sheridan 
Bienstein, Fred C. . 

Bird Bros 

Bixler, W. O 

Black, Jr., Van Lear 



Blanton, 

Boileau, 

Boquet, 

Bossert, 

Bowers, 

Bowers, 



R 
W. G 

F. G 

S. S 

Wm. R.. 
Mrs. Wm 

Brace. Wm. F. . . . 

Braner, Albert C. 

Breitigan, Jas. H 

Brish Bros 

Brown, Irwin M. 

Brown, Ray 

Buck, Walter 

Buff Cochi 



. . Hagerstown. 
Chestnut Hill. 

Clearfield, 

. . .Baltimore, 
. . . .Me.verdale, 
. . .Glen Roclc, 
. . . .Baltimore. 

L Richmond. 

Middletown, 
. . Owego, N. 
Spring City, 



Md. 

Va. 
Md. 
Md. 
Md. 

Pa. 

Pa. 
Md. 

Pa. 

Pa. 
Md. 

Va. 

Md. 

Y. 

Pa. 



Devries, H. A Pikesville, 

Diffenderffer, C. M Baltimore 

Diffenderffer, W. O Baltimore,' 

Dodd, W. J Baltimore, 

Dowling. Jas. M Belair. 

Drager, W. C Boiling Springs. 

Dudley. T. N Middleburg, 

Early Francis M Roslyn ' 

Early, Jno. D Roslyn'. 

Dallastown, 
.Belair. 



E^berly. Jacob 

Edeler, W. H. . . . 
Eisinger, Robt... 
Ellenwood Poultry 
Engle, Milton T. . 
Enterprise Poultry 



Farm, 
Yards, 



Baltimore. Md. 

R....Owings Mills. Md. 

Victor. N. Y. 

Belair. Md. 

Lititz, Pa. 

Frederick, Md. 

Garrison, Md. 

S' Allentown, Pa. 

H Baltimore, Md. 



Everhart & Ragers Keyser 

Eyler. Ed. J "^ 

Farrall, Jas. J 

Fillman, Wm 

Pincke & Thornton... 

Fix. C. F 

Foos, Miss Gertrude E. 

Ford. H. M 

Forthman. W. M 



Baltimore. 

. . . Halboro, 

.Frederick. 

Yoe, 

W. 

Waynesboro, 

. . . Halethorpe, 

Red Hill. 

. . . Vineland. N 
. . . .Dallastown, 
Baltimore Co., 
. . . .Baltimore. 
Sykesville, 



Md. 

Md. 

Md. 

Md. 

Md. 

Pa. 

Va. 

Md. 

Md. 

Pa. 

Md. 

Md. 

Pa. 

Md. 

Pa. 

Va. 

Pa. 

Md. 

Pa. 

J. 

Pa. 

Md. 

Md. 



S ^^i ^^L "^Vt ^ Sykesville. Md. 

^raleigh. Howard Forest. Canada 

G^bb ^^-' ^"-' Nazareth. Pa. 



n Poultry- Farm °''' ^''- n^^\ ^^°- .^ Stewartstown? Pa 

m i-ouiiry i^ arni . . . . . . Goldsborough. A. T Weshington b C 

-•■;•• Roland Park. N. Y. Goodwin, Wm. D P kesvn'le Md 



Burnside P 
Busick, Harry 
Byrnes, T. C O 
Carroll. Mrs. Chas. 
Catlett. Mrs. L. C 
Cedar Cove Poultry Farm 

Charmsbury. Dr. T. H 

Chestnut Hill I'oultry Yard 

Chestnut 



Hagerstown. 

.Ellicott City. 

Gloucester. 

.Roiiinson. 

Hanover, 



Jas. 
B. . 



Clark, Jr., 
Clark. Jas. 
Clungston, 
Coffman. J. N 
Conner, W. J. . . . 
Cook & Sons. Wm 
Corkins. D. W. . . 

Council, V. H 

Cregan. Wm. P. . . 
Crisp. Miss M. E. 
Crocker. E. M. . . . 
Cromwell. Jr. 
Davis. Amos 
Davis, B. S. 
Davis. F. W. 
Davis, M. D.. 
Davis. .1. Jos 
Dayhoff, L. 
Defandorf. J. 



Hill, 
. . Baltimore. 
Ellicott City, 



G.^ E Chambersburg, 

E'denburg. 

Carlisle. 

.Scotch Plains. N 
Riverdale, 

Warrenton, 

Riders, 

. .Howard Park, 

...Roland Park, 
. . .Lake Roland. 
.... Hagerstown, 
.Rockingham, N. 

Keyser. W. 

. . .Pleasantville, 
Pikesville. 

Mid vale. 

. .Garrett Park, 



M. J, 



F. 



Geo. W, 

• •••••■•• 

S 

F 



Md 

Md. 

Va. 

Md. 

Pa. 

'pa. 
Md. 
Md. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 

J. 
Md. 
Va. 
Md. 
Md. 
Md. 
Md. 
Md. 

C. 

Va. 

Md. 

Md. 

Pa. 

Md. 



,^ _ , Augusta. 

Gwyn, Jr., Lawrence S Baltimoie 

Haggin, Louis Lee Lexington, 

Arlington, 

Arlington. 
Baltimore. 



B. 



B 



Hall, A. B 

Hall, Robt. S. . 

Hart. Mrs. Geo. 

Hayner. Jonas. . 

Heagy, J. M. . . . 

Heffner, Geo. R. 

Hennighausen. L. T. . . . 

Henmann, Karl L 

Hicks. Calvin 

Hillen, Mr.s. T. O'Donnell 

Hoch & Frederick 

Hodge & Son. D. J 

Hoen. Berthold Mt. 

Holland, Mrs. R. w 

Hoopes, W. P 

P 

^ 

A 

Mr. & Mrs. G. D. 

H. A 

Stuart S 

Baker 



Ga. 
Md. 
Ky. 
Md. 
Md. 
Md. 
Y. 
Md. 
Md. 
Md. 
Md. 
Md. 
Md. 
Pa. 
Va. 



Hopper, 
Ide. M. 
Iverson. 
.Taeger, 
.Janney, 
.Johnson 
Kart. Geo. L 
Kaston. Chas 
K.en. H. C. . 



• Livingston. N. 

Rockville. 

Overlea, 

Govans. 

. . . .Baltimore. 
. . . .Rockville. 

Eccleston. 

Chambersburg. 
Lincoln, . „. 

Washington, Md. 

Belair. Md 

Forest Hill, 

York, 

.Woodstock. 

. .Baltimore, 

. .Baltimore, 

. . .Garrison, 

. .Lewiston, 

Carlisle, 

• Baltimore, 

Belair. 



Md. 

Pa. 
Md. 
Md. 
Md. 
Md. 
Md. 

Pa. 
Md. 
Md. 



R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 



Pullet; l.st. 3d Cockerel; 2d. .5th Hen; 4th, 5th Cock: 3d 
Also R. I, Red (State Cup) the fourth year in .succession, 
best Cockerel. Some good stock to spare yet. 



My Red.s lead again at the big Missouri 
State Show, St. Louis, Dec, 1909. 1st, 2d 
Pen in a class of 148 R. C. Rhode Island Reds. 
Cup for best Male and Female, special for 




• 



VIRGIL BLAKEMORE. Fayetie, M 



O. 



HIGH 
CLASS 



S. C. R. I. REDS 



strong competition. 
Daglf Judges. * 
MOTTO. 

FRANK CHALUPA, 



Hxhihition cockerels for sale. 



SATISFACTION GUARTANTEED OR YOUR 



My winnings for 1909 are as follows : Packwwud 
Iowa Nov. 17-20. 1st cockerel, 1st and 3rd pullet 
and 1st pen. Kichland Iowa. Dec, 14-17 l>t and 
3rd. 4th and pullet 1st pen in 
Score cards bv Russell and 
MONEY BACK." IS MY 



2nd cockerel 2nd 
Hge^s in season. 



ROSE COMB RHODE 

quill and possess the 



in America. They are red to the _ 
length of body and symmetry of form so de,«irable in a typi- 
cal Red. We solicit your orders and guarantee satisfaction. 
LUMBERTON POULTRY CO., JAY B 



PLEASANT PLAIN , IOWA 

A choice lot of youngsters for sale, breds 
from the best winning and laying strain 

ISLAND REDS 



DEUTSCH, Mgr., ANTIGO. WIS 



Partridge Plymouth Rocks 

THE WOLVERINE BRED TO LAY STRAIN 

J. A. HAGEMAN, . . CHARLOTTE, MICH: 

President Partridge Plymouth Rock Club 



f. 



C 






• 



• ,• 





iJs^;^Siy,;^ltPOVUniY FANCIER 



i^-7ii^?'lr 



Kellerstrasij, Ernest Kansas City. Mo. 

Kelly, B. Frank Bishopville. S'. C. 

Kllpatrick. M. C Valencia. Pa. 

Kinloch Farm Cockeysville, Md. 

Klnsell. W. D Hanover, Pa. 

Klsling:, Norman L Belair, Md. 

Klemm, Emil J Howard Park, Md. 

Knapp. A. M Catonsville. Md. 

Knisely, R. J York, Pa. 

Koon.s Farm Treichler. Pa. 

Kress, Edw Baltimore. Md. 

Kuepper, B. H Clear Spring Md. 

Kuhn, P. T Frederick, Md. 

Linder. Geo. H Baltimore, Md. 

Lineweaver. P. L Baltimore. Md. 

Little. Frank Frederick, Md. 

Loetz. H. E Ellicott City, Md. 

Low. D. W. A Catonsville. Md. 

McCormick, J. L. & J. M Belair, Md. 

McCulloch, Rev. Duncan Glencoe, Md. 

McDonald. Bruce Imwood. W. Va. 

McDowell. T. K Rising Sun, Md. 

McLane, Miss F. K Garrison, Md. 

MacGill. Lloyd T Frederick. Md. 

Mann. Howard Catonsville, Md. 

Markell. V. X. S Glen Rock, Pa. 

Matsinger, Chas. A Baltimore. Md. 

Matthews. Dr. Robt. M Gambrills. Md. 

Metcalfe, Arley C Baltimore, Md. 

Minnich. Wm. G Carlisle Pa. 

Mitchell, J. S. & J. M.... Ellicott City! Md. 

Morris. E. M Fawn Grove, Pa. 

Moyer, Ralph W Orwigsburg. Pa. 

iviyei , IViJs.s Al. J Roslyn, Md. 

Negley, Mrs. M. D Baltimore. Md. 

Nelson. Jno. E Baltimore, Md. 

Nelson, Will Neuse. X. C. 

Nevins. J. D Philadelphia. Pa. 

Newell. Harry S Brookland. D. C. 

Noll, Adam F Allentown. Pa. 

North. Miss Gladys L Walbrook. Pa. 

North, Mrs. Cora I Walbrook, Pa. 

Oke & Murray London, Can. 

Oelko, Jno. G Raspburg. Md. 

Orangeville Poultry Yards. . .Baltimore, Md. 
latrifeu. John Waters Pikesville, Md. 




WATCHEMOKET 
POULTRY YARDS 

SEASON OF 1909. 
EGGS FOR HATCHING 



Argonauts : 
Phoenix Fowls 



: $f>.(^0 per dozen 
: 3 00 per dozen 

Only a strictly limited number of eggs will 
be sold. The Argonaut is a pea combed bird, 
buff colored, yellow shanked, general pur- 
pose fowl. The Phoenix is the unique long- 
tailed breed produced by the "Yankees of 
the Orient", the wonderful little Japanese. 
Cash in advance with all orders. 

H. S. BABCOCK 
77 Summit St., • Elast Providence, R. I. 



SMITHES 
WHITE 
ROCKS 



We win wherever we 
show, includmg Madi- 
son Square, New York 
1908-09. Why not 
place your order where 
you know you can and 
will gel the best. Write 
me for mating list and 
■^"^■■■"■■■■■■■■^ photos of male birds 
heading my breeding pens. I want to build 
up a big business with Poultry Fancier read- 
ers and I'll give you the very highest quality 
at most reasonable prices. 

CHAS. L. SMITH 
RTE. 58; NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



POULTRY FENCE 

jl STOCK STRONG— RUST PROOF 

Made ofextra heavy double galvanized wires. 

No top or bottom boards required. 
Chick tight — bottom wires only 1 in. apart. 

COSTS NO MORE THAN NETTINQ 

yet will last five times as lonj:. 

Send for catalog: — we have 

too st^'les and 

can save you 

money. 
Write today 




"-Wf PAYTHt 







BROWN FENCE & WIRE CO. DEPT. 94. CLEVaAN D.OJ 



Pattison, Saml. W Baltimore, Md. 

Peterson, C Baltimore, Md. 

Phipps, Joseph Towson, Md. 

Pierce. Wm. E Dulaneys Valley. Md. 

Pike. Wm. S Catonsville. Md. 

Placide, S Baltimore. Md. 

Pleasants. Mrs. A. W Cockeysville, Md. 

de Potestad, Mrs. Robt. ... Ellicott City, Md. 

Price, Mrs. D. T Belcamp, Md. 

Price, J. McD Belcamp, Md. 

Raab. H. M .• Dallastown, Pa. 

Rehmeyer, W. H Shrewsbury, Pa. 

Reich, Miss Nannie Monrovia. Md. 

Reider, R. D Middletown, Pa. 

Reiff. Jos Fayetteville, Pa. 

Relp & Aires Laurel, Md. 

Remsen, O. E Annapolis, Md. 

Ridenour. O. Fred Middletown. Md. 

Ridgely of H.. Mrs. J Towson. Md. 

Rlggs, Jesse B Catonsburg Md. 

Riley, Henry D Strafford, Pa. 

Ritter. E. Frank Woodlawn, Md. 

Rockland Farm . Benson, Md. 

Rosenstock, S. H Frederick, Md. 

Rumbold. Jno Baltimore. Md. 

Sauter, Chas. C Ellicott City. Md. 

Scarff, J. E Mt. Washington. Md. 

Schrade. Geo Skyesville. Md. 

Schriver, Hiram W Chester. N. Y. 

Seeley, Gay lord B .Chester, N. Y. 

Seitz Allen M Glen Rock, Pa. 

Shanabrook & Spltal Chambersburg, Pa. 

Sharpe, Edw. H Frederick, Md. 

Shirk, Chas. S Hanover, Pa. 

Shriver, Chas. M Pikesville, Md. 

Shriver, Jr.. Geo. M Pikesville. Md. 

5- ilver Brook Wyandotte Farm 

Allentown, Pa 

Smith. B. Alton Sta. F, Baltimore, Md. 

Smith, J. Emlen Philadelphia. Pa. 

Smith. Wm. A Metuchen, N. J. 

Smith, J. W Dallastown. Pa. 

Smith, Nathan R Brookiandville, Md. 

Spease, Frank Carlisle, Pa. 

Spencer, Mrs. W. D.Waverly. Baltimore. Md. 

Sprecher, Dan'l B Skyesville, Md. 

Springer, Paul G Bridgeton, N. J. 

Strober, Geo. M Woodlawn. Md. 

Sunswick Poultry Farm .. So. Plainfleld, N. J. 

Swartz. Geo Baltimore, Md. 

Sweeting. Geo. W Sharon, Md. 

Taylor, Geo. Winship Catonsville, Md. 

Theobald, F. De Wolf Baltimore, Md. 

Thiele F Arlington, Md. 

Thomas, Martin Delto. Pa. 

Thompson. Lignon Ellicott City, Md. 

Tiffany. S. E Elkins. W. Va. 

Todd, David Relay. Md. 

Turner. Mrs. Thos Baltimore, Md. 

Verdery, H. H Augusta, Ga. 

Wack. Henry E Baltimore, Md 

Walden, R. J Middleburg, Md. 

Walker, Henry M Owings Mills. Md. 

Warner & Son. A. E Baltimore, Md. 

Warner. Mrs. J. H Owings Mills, Md. 

Warner. N. B Hamilton, Va. 

Weldner, H. E Allentown, Pa. 

Weyler, Jno. F Baltimore, Md. 

Wheeler & Son. Geo Penn Yard. N. Y. 

Whyte Bros Ruxton, Md. 

Wiggers. Mrs. Chas. F Fallston, Md. 

Wolfe. Dr. J. S Bloomfleld, N. J. 

Wyleyhurst Farm Winsted, Conn. 

Yoder, Albert Munhall, Pa. 

Yingllng. Edgar C Westminster. Md. 

Young, Newton J Hagerstown, Md. 

Zimmerman, F. G Lime Kiln. Md. 

AWARDS AT BALTIMORE. MD. 

BAKKKI) l*LVMOLTH KOC KS, 

Chestnut Hill Poultry Yards: 2. 3. ck; 
1. 3. ckl; 1. 2, .^i. pul; 2. pen. Boileau; 5. 
ck; 4. hen; 2. ckl; 3, pen. Riley: 4, ck; 
1. 2. hen; 5. ckl; 3. 4. pul; 1, pen. Clark: 
1. ck; f), hen; 4. ckl; 4. pen. Kelly: 3, 
lien. Kuhn: 5. pen. 

WHITE PLY.MOUTH ROCKS. 

Kllpatrick: f>, ck; 4, .'), hen. Hall: 4. ck ; 
4. '). pen. Walker: 1. ck. Defandorf: 2, 
ck ; 1, 3, hen; 3, 4, pul; 2, pen. Springer: 
:?, ck; 2. hen; 1. ckl. Early: 3. ckl; 5, pul; 
1. pen. Rosenstock: 2. 5, ckl; 1, 2, pul. 
Hoper: 5. ckl. Heffner: 3, pen. 

BUFF PLYMOl^H RO€KS. 

Busick: 4. ck ; 3, ckl. Kuepper: 1. 2, 3, 
ck; 1. 2, 3. hen; 1, 2. ckl; 1. 2, 4. pul; 1, 3. 
pen. Bowers: 5, ck; 5. hen. Brlsh Bros.: 
4, hen. Ridenour: 3, 5, pul. DayhoflC: 2, 
pen. 

PARTRIIKJE ri>YMOlITH ROCKS. 

Matsinger: 1, 2. 3, ck; 1, 2, 5, hen; 1, 2. 
3, 4. ckl; 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, pul; 1, pen. Drager: 

3. 4, hen; 5. ckl. 

SHAVER PENCILED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Negley: 2. ck; 5. hen; 4, ckl; 3. pul. 
Bowers: 1. 4. ck ; 1. 2, hen; 2. 3, ckl; 4. 
.'). pul; 1. pen. Breitigan: 3, ck ; 3, 4. hen; 
."). ckl; 2. pul; 2, pen. Atkinson: 1. ckl; 
1, pul. 

WTIITE WYANDOTTES. 

Llndec* 3, ck; 4, hen; 4, ckl; 1, pul; 5, 
pen. Remsen: 1, 4, ck; 3, hen; 1. ckl; 1, 
pen. Farrall: 2, ck; 3, pen. Guess: 5. ck; 

1, 2, hen; 5. ckl; 3. .pul. Turner: .'i. hen; 

4, 5, pul; 2, pen. Kinloch Farm; 2, 3, ckl; 

2, pul. Riggs: 4, pen. 

BITFF WYANDOTTES. 
Raab: 1, f>, ck; 5 hen; 2, ckl; 1, 2, pul; 

2, pen. Morris: 3. ck; 1, 2, hen; 3, 4. .'>. 
ckl; 4. r». pul. Hicks: 2, 4, ck; 3, hen; 1, ckl; 

3. pul: 1, pen. Byrnes: 4, hen. Brish 
Bros: 3. pen. 

GOLDEN WYANDOTTES. 
Everhart & Rogers: 1, ck; 2, 4, hen; 4. 



'^^f'aT-y^rf^- ^^-: 



^if-"'^7-.^ 



Page 43 




r^^^.';>ny>f.'^.>M'-.l:^^i.;..i.A:^^:. 



ckl; 5. pul. Ritter: 2. ck; 1. hen; 2. ckl; 
1. pul. Sliver Brook Wyandotte Farm: 3, 4. 
ck; 3. r,, hen; 1, 5, ckl; 3, 4, pul. Little: 
3. ckl; 1', pul. 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES. 
Bacon: 5, ck. Sbirk: 1. ck; 2. hen; 1, 
ckl; 1, pul. Verdery: 4, ck; 5, hen. Klnsell: 
3, ck; 4, 5, pul. McDowell: 2, ck; 2 ckl; 
3, pul; 2, pen. Goldsborough: 1, hen. 
Charmsbury: 3, hen; 4, ckl. Fix: 4. hen. 
Tiffany: 3, ckl; 2. pul. Silver Brook Wyan- 
dotte Farm: 5, ckl. S*trober: 3. pen. Turner: 
1, pen. 

PARTRIDGE U'YANDOTTES. 

Enterprise Poultry Yards: 5. ck; 4, hen; 

3, ckl; 1. pul; 1, 2, pen. Silver Brook Wyan- 
dotte Farm; 4, ck ; 5, pul. Bird Bros.: 

1, 2, 3 ck; 1, 2. 3. hen; 1, 2. ckl; 3, 4. pul. 
Arbuckel: 5, hen; 4, .5. ckl; 2, pul. 

SILVER PENCILED WYANDOTTES. 
All to Silver Brook Wyandotte Farm. 

COLUMBIAN W\'.ANDOTTE.S. 
Tiffany: 2, 4, 5, ck; 2. 4, 5. hen; 2, 3, 
ckl; 1, 2, pul; 1, 2, pen. Andrus: 1, ck; 1. 
hen; 1, ckl; 5, pul. Guess: 3, ck; 4, ckl. 
Beahan: 3, hen. Turner: 5, ckl; 3, pul. 
Smith: 4, pul; 3. pen. 

BLACK WYANDOTTES. 
Silver Brook Wyandotte Farm: 

2, 3. hen. Sharpe: 1, hen. 

SINGLE COMB BUFF ORPINGTONS. 

Cook & Sons: 1, ck; 2, ckl; 1, pen. Suns- 
wick Poultry Farm: 2. ck; 1, 2, hen; 4 5, 
ckl; 3. pul. Brish Bros.: 3, ck; 1, pul. 
Knisley: 4, 5. ck; 3, 4, hen; 1, 3, ckl; 2 4. 
o, pul. Carroll: 5, hen. Sweeting: 3, pen. 
Scarff: 5, pen. Griffith: 4, pen. Davis: 2, 
pen. 

ROSE COMB BUFF ORPINGTONS. 

All to Cook & Sons. 

SINGLE COMB BLACK ORPINGTONS. 

Sunswick Poultry Farm: 2, 4, 5, ck; 3, 
hen; 4. 5. ckl; 1. 3, pul; 3. pen. Davis. 3, 
ck: 4, pen. Brown: 1, ck; 2, hen; 5, pul. 
Cook & .Sons: 1, hen; 1, 2, ckl; a pen. 
Griffith: 5. hen; 5, pen. McCormick: 4. 
hen. Knisley: 3. ckl; 1. pen. Burnside 
Poultry Farm: 4. pul. Clark: 2, pul 

ROSE COMB BLACK ORPINGTONS. 

All to Cook & Sons. 

SINGLE COMB WHITE ORPINGTONS. 

Sunswick Poultry Farm: 2, 5, ck; 4. hen; 

4. pul; 4. pen. Kellerstrass: 3. 4. 5, ck; 



1, ck; 



3. 



hen; 1, 2. 5. ckl; 1, 5, pul; 1. 2, 



pen: Cook & Sons: 2, hen; 3. 4, ckl; 3 pul; 
3, pen. Haggin: 2, pul. Griffith: .'>, pen. 
DIAMOND JUBILEE ORPINGTONS. 

All to Cook & Sons. 
ANY OTHER VARIETY ORPINGTONS. 

All to Davis. 

SINGLE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Davis: 2, ck. Griffith; 1, 4, ck. Riggs: 
3, ck; 3, 5. hen; 4, pul; 3. pen. Ellenwood 
Poultry Farm: 5, ck; 1, 4, hen; 1. 2. ckl; 
1. 2, pul; 1, pen. Rehmeyer: 2, hen; 2, 
pen. Devries: 4, 5, ckl; 5. pen. Kart: 3, 
ckl. Sweeting: 5. pul. Atkinson: 3, pul. 
Pike: 4, pen. 

ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

McCulloch: 3. 4, ck; 4. '>, hen; 3. ckl; 3. 
5. pul; 2, pen. Ellenwood Poultry Farm: 
1, 2, 5. ck: 1. 3. hen; 1, 2. 4. ckl; 1, 2, pul; 
1. pen. Brlsh Bros.: 2, hen. Henmann: 5, 
ckl. Aukeny: 4, pul. Creagan: 3, pen. 

LIGHT BRAHMAS. 

Davis: 1. ck; 1. hen; 2. pul. Rumbold: 

3. ck; 4. 5. hen; 2, ckl. Nevins: 2. ck; 2, 
hen; 1, ckl; 1. pul; 1, pen. Todd: 4, ck. 
Iverson: 3, hen. 

DARK BRAHMAS. 

All to Mlnnlch. 

BUFF COCHINS. 

North: 1, 2. ck; 1. 2. 3, 4. hen; 1. ckl; 
1. 2, pul. Minnich: 3, ck; 5, hen. 
P.ART RIDGE COCHINS. 
Burnside Poultry Farms: 2, 3, hen. Min- 
nich: 1, hen. 

BLACK COCHINS. 
Mlnnlch: 1. hen; 1, pul. 

WHITE COCHINS. 

All to Minnich. 

BLACK LANGSHANS. 

Walker: 4. ck; 5, hen; 2, 3, ckl; 3. pul. 
Weldner: 3. ck ; 4. hen; 1. ckl; 1, 5. pul. 
Hodge & Son: 1. 2. ck; 1. 2. hen; 4. 5, ckl; 

4, pul; 2, pen. Holland: 3, hen; 2, pul; 1 2, 
pen. 

WHITE LANGSHANS. 
Minnich: 1, ck. Bailey & Spahr: 1. 2, hen; 
1, pul. 

SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORNS. 

Relff: 2, ck; 2, hen. Eyler: 5. ck; 3, hen; 
Wheeler & Son: 1. 3. 4, ck; 1. 4, 5, hen; 

1. 3. 5. ckl; 1, 4. 5, hen; 1, 3. 5. ckl; 1. 4, 
pul; 1, 2. pen. Dayhoff: 4, ckl; 2, 5, pul. 
Klsling: 2. ckl. Griffith: 3. pul. 

ROSE COMB WHITE LEGHORNS. 

Clugston: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1. pul. Relff: 

2, ck: 2, hen. 

SINGLE COMB BROWN LFX1HORN8. 
Brace: 1, ck ; 2. hen; 1, 5, ckl; 2, 4, 5, 
pul; 2. pen. Bowers: 2. ck; 1, hen; 2, 4, 
ckl; 1. 3. pul: 1, pen. Yoder: 3. rkl. 
ROSE COMB BROWN LEGHORNS. 
All to Yoder. 

SINGLE COMB BLACK LEGHORNS. 
Cart: 1, 2. ck; 1, 3, 4. hen; 5, ckl; 1. 5, 
pul. Noll: 3, 4, ck; 2, 5, hen; 1, 2, 3, 4, ckl; 
2, 3, 4. pul; 1. pen. 

SINGLE COMB BUFF LEGHORNS. 
Adams: 1, 2. ck ; 2. 4, 5, hen; 4. ckl. Coff- 
man: 3, hen: 5, ckl; 5. pul. Edeler: 1. hen; 

1. pul. Dayhoff: 1, 2. 3. ckl; 3, 4, pul; 1, 

2, pen. 




■• ' Ti' f> - ^^y -^r - 'j:^ ~ 



^^^^^agej^_^POU LT R Y FANCIERr 





SINGLE COMB DKKVVlNCi LKGHOKNS. 

All to Spease. 

ANCONAS. 
All to Todd. 

SINGLE COMB BLACK MINOKCAS 

Remsen: 5, ck; 2, 3. hen; 3, 4, ckl; 3. 4. 
pul; 2, pen. Kress: 4, ck. Smith: 1, 2, 3, 
ck; 1, 4, 5. hen; 1, 2, ckl; 1, 2. 5, pul; 1. 
pen. Brish Bros.: 5. ckl. Hillen: 4 pen. 
Early: 3, pen. 

ROSE COMB BLACK MINOKCAS. 

Brish Bros.: 2, ck; 3. hen; 3. pul. Rock- 
land Farm: 1, 3, ck; 4, 5, hen. Reip & 
Aires: 1, hen; 4, pul. Thomas: 2, hen; 2, 
ckl. Smith: 1, 3, ckl; 1, 2, pul; 1, pen. 
WHITE MINOKCAS. 

Peterson: 2, ck; 2. 3, hen; 1, 2, ckl; 1, pul. 
Smith: 1, ck ; 1, 4. hen; 3, ckl; 2, pul; 1. 



r., ckl; 3, 4, 5, pul. Eyler: 



pen. Swartz: 
4 ckl. 

BLUE ANDALUSIANS. 

Bailey & Spahr: 1, ck; 2, hen; 3, pul. 
Council: 1, hen; 1. ckl; 1, pul. Warner: 
2, 4. pul. 

WHITE CKESTED BLACK POLISH. 
All to Yingling. 

SILVEK POLISH. 
All to Schriver. 

WHITE POLISH. 
All to S'eelv. 

HOUDANS. 
Metcalfe: 3, ck; 5, ckl; 4. pul; 5, pen. 
Smith: 2. ck; 3, hen; 3, ckl; 5, pul; 1, pen. 
Reider: 1, ck; 3, pen. Spencer: 5, ck ; 2, 



Ballard: 4, ck; 1, hen; 
pen. Hoopes: 2. ckl; 



4, 5, hen; 4, ckl 
1. ckl; 1. 2, pul; 
3, pul; 4, pen. 

SALMON FAVEKOLLES. 
Potestad: 2, ck; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 1. 2, 3, 4. 
pul. Orangeville: 1, ck ; 2, hen. 

GOLDEN SPANGLED HAMBLKGS. 
All to Oke & Murray. 

SILVEK SPANGLED HAMHBLKGS. 
Wolfe: 1, 3, 4, ck ; 2. 3, 4, a, hen; 2. 3. 4, 

5, ckl; 1, 3, 4, 5, pul; 1, 2. pen. Oke & 
Murray: 2, ck ; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 2. pul 

GOLDEN PENCILED HAMBUKGS. 
All to Oke & Murray. 

SILVER PENCILED HAMBUKGS. 
All to Oke & Murray. 

BLACK HAMBUKGS. 
All to Oke & Murray. 

BLACK BREASTED RED GAMES. 
Bofjuet: 1, ck; 1. hen; 1, pul. (Iwin 
ckl; 2. 3, pul. 

BROWN KED GAMES. 
All to Boquet. 

SILVER DUCK WING GAMES. 
All to Boquet. 



1. 



RED PVLE GAMES. 

All to Boquet. 

BIRCHEN GAMES. 

All to Boquet. 

CORNISH INDIAN GAMES. 

Dowling: 2. ck ; 1, 2. ckl. Riggs: 1. ck ; 
2. hen; 3, ckl; 4, pul. Sauter: 5, hen; 1, 
pul. Young: 3, 4, hen; 5, pul. Low: 1, hen; 

4, o, ckl. Fowble: 2, 3, pul. 

CORNISH WHITE INDIANS. 
All to Eberly. 

BLACK SUMATRA. 
All to W^arner. 

PIT GAMES. 
Mann: 2. ck ; 5, hen; 3. pul. Thoobold: 

5, ckl; 2. 3, ckl; 4, 5, pul. Dodd; 3. 4, ck; 
2, 3, 4, hen; 1, 4, ckl; 1, 2, pul; 1. pen. 
Cart: 1. ck; 1, hen. 

ANY OTHER VARIETY FOWLS. 
All to Kaston. 
BLACK BREASTED RED GAME BANT.V.>IS 
Fincke & Thornton: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1, 2, ckl: 
1. 2, pul. Dudley: 2, 3, ck ; 2, hen; 3. pul. 
Bo\yers: 3, hen; 3, ckl. 

BROWN RED GAME BANTAMS. 
All to Fincke & Thornton. 
SILVER DUCKWING GAME BANTAMS. 
All to Cromwell. 

RED PYLE GAME BANT.\3IS. 
All to Fincke & Thornton. 

BIRCHEN GAME BANTAMS. 
All to Fincke & Thornton. 

ANY OTHER GAME BANTAM 
All to Fincke & Thornton. 

GOLDEN SEBRIGHT BANTAMS. 
Oke & Murray: 1, ck; 1, hen; 2, ckl; 1. 
pul. Diffenderffer: 2, hen; 1, ckl; 2, pul. 
SILVER SEBRIGHT BANTAMS. 
Oke & Murray: 1, ck; 1, hen; 2, ckl; 2, 
pul. Diffenderffer: 2. hen; 1, ckl; 1 pul. 
ROSE COMB BLACK BANTAMS. 
Diffenderffer: 1, 4, ck ; 2, henj ], f), ckl; 

1. pul. Eberly: 3, ck; 1, hen. Oke & 
Murray: 2, ck ; 3, hen; 2, ckl; 3, pul. 
Hall: 3, ckl; 2, 4, pul; 1, pen. Bowers; 
4. ckl; 5, pul. 

ROSE COMB U HITE BANTA3IS. 
Diffenderffer: 2, ck : 2, 3. hen; 1. 3, ckl; 

2, pul. Oke & Muiray: 1, ck; 1, hen; 2. 
ckl; 1, pul. 

BOOTED BANTA3IS. 
All to Oke & Murray. 

BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 

Mrs. C. I. North: 3, ck ; 3, hen; ?,, rkl; 

".. pul. Diffenderffer: 1, 2, ck ; 1. 2, hen; 

2. ckl; 1, pul. Miss G. L. North: 4'. hen; 

4, f), ckl; 3. 4. pul. Fillman; 1. ckl; 2. pul. 

WHITE COCHIN BANTAMS. 

All to Diffenderffer. 



February, *10 

BLACK COCHIN BANTAMS. 

Diffenderffer: 2, ck; 1, hen; 5, ckl; 2. pul; 
1. pen. Fraleigh: 1, ck; 3, 5, hen; 2, ckl; 

3, 5, pul. Bowers: 3, ck; 2, hen; 3, ckl; 1, 
pul; 2. pen. Parrish : 4, hen; 1, ckl. Conner: 

4, ckl; 4, pul. 

PARTRIDGE COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Early: 2, ck ; 3, pul. Diffenderffer: 1. ck; 
1. hen; 1, ck ; 1, pul; 1, pen. Shriver: 2^ 
ckl ; 2, pul. 

WHITE JAPANESE BANTAMS. 
DilTenderffer: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 2, 
pul. Oke & Murray: 2, ck; 2, hen; 1, pul. 
Markell: 3, hen; 3. pul. 

BLACK JAPANESE BANTAMS. 
DiffenderfTer: 2, ck; 1. hen; 2, ckl; 2, 
pul. Oke & Murray: 1, ck; 2, hen; 1, ckl; 
1. pul. 

BLACK TAILED JAPANESE BANTAMS. 
All to Oke & Murray. 
ANY OTHER VARIETY" JAPANESE 
BANTAMS. 
All to Oke & Murray. 

BEARDED WHITE POLISH BANTAMS. 
Diffenderffer: 1, ck; 2, hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul. 
Oke & Murray: 2, ck ; 1. hen. 

LIGHT BRAHMA BANTAMS. 
Fry: 1, pen. 

PEKIN DUCKS. 
Dayhoff: 1. 3, old drake; 1, 2, old duck; 

1, young drake; 3, 5, youner duck; 1, pen. 
Springer: 2, 4, old drake; 1, 4, old duck; 

3. 4, 5, young drake; 1, 4, young duck; 2, 
pen. Alsenborn Farm: 5, old drake; 5 old 
duck. Orangeville Poultry Farm: 2, young 
drake; 2, young duck. Price: 3, pen. 

ROUEN DUCKS. 
Wyleyhurst Farm: 1, old drake; 1. young 
<luck. 

MUSCOVY DUCKS. 

Eisinger: 1, old drake; 3, old duck. 

Brown: 2, 3, old drake; 1, 2, old duck; 2. 3, 

young drake; 2. 3, 4, young duck; 1, pen. 

Pleasants: 3, young drake; 1, young duck; 

2, pen. 

INDIAN RUNNER DUCKS. 
All lo Orangeyille Poultry Farm. 

BRONZE TURKEYS. 
Zimmerman: 3, 4, ck; 5, ckl; 2, 3, pul. 
Bird Bros.: 1, 2, 5. ck; 1, 2. 3, hen; 1, 3, 

4. ckl; 1, 4, 5, pul. Rehmeyer: 4, 5, hen. 
Hoopes: 2, ckl. 

WHITE HOLLAND TURKEYS. 
Dayhoff: 1, 2. 3, 4. ck; 2. 3. 4, 5. hen. 
Zimmerman: 1 hen. 

BOURBON RED TURKEYS. 
All to De Potestad. 

WTLD TURKEYS. 
All to Blanton. 



EDGAR BRIGGS 
Poultry Expert 



T. . «-""''""" ™^ ^'♦"JGS SYSTEM WILL DO FOR YOU 

SUCCESS WITH POULTRY ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED DY THE USE OF BRIGGS 

SYSTEM AND SECRETS 

Feed for p^wln. «hlot, .„d m.kln, ,„. .t lio. per l>u.l>el expltiacd b, th. B,i„. 8,.t.m. No m.chh,.rr „„ cookln, 

95% OF ALL CHICKS HATCHED CAN DE RAISED 



i • 



• 



2000 layen and .^Ono rbirks can be rared for without help 
by one person and still liavc time for other wmk. 

$2r,m sHTPd on tvpry Inuidred chicks raised to maturity 
by this wondtrful lirigi^s system. 

EndorM'd by hundrfdii of Irndlnir fHioceMnfiil 
poultrymcii Hundred* of unuu»liU«d teatimonials 
In oar poasession. 

"PRORTS IN POULTRY KEEPING 



SOLVLO 



It 



This great book by l-.l^ar Briggs tolls bow to increase 
your pre.'»c]it prolits or start a pr<ilitnl)le and easy occupa- 
tion. Failures unknown wiicn tlie llrlcir« «*y«tem is used. 
It meefn every condition aii>l covers every part of the busi- 
ness. Keepa hens in the pink of condition and producea 
more crrs than any other Bystcni; molts hens early, and 
fowls are rarely sick when this wonderful system is followed. 

THE SECRET OF TURKEY RAISING iS 
ALSO OARED 

ThU book han never been nold for lenii then 
#5.00 per <M»py, Hnd tlioiiRainis cr)V(rinR several editions 
are being followed by an equal number of successful poultry 
raisers. 

WE fiAVfj iTiRCHASKT) TTTE SOLE BIGHTS OF 



PUBLICATION FKOM THE AUTHOTl. MR BTII008 
and have just reduced the price from «5.O0 to H»l.a6 

per copy, including one years subscription to 'I'oixtrt 
Sr. CKS8, " regular price 60 cents, so umier the great offer you 
git the Brings System book for only 7r, cents We have 
also just taken off the prrs.^ •'Rrl|rKn Secreln In Poultry 
Culture," contnining most valuable and mver b<t.. re pub- 
lished secrets that have produced wonderful and easily ob- 
tainable results. These secrets are alone worth the price 
of the book, but under our great offer you get them FK££. 

SF=>EOIAL- 0»="F="E:IR 

While the prcaent edition of the Itritfira Svatem 
and Hceret Uooka luata. 

IF VOU W ILL KLMIT US $1 2.-. WE WILL SEND 
I.MMEDIATELY A COl'Y OK BKIGGS WONDERFUL 
SYSTEM BOOK.Yiz : PKOFITS IN I'OULTKY CDLl URB 
80LVLI). aiKO a set of BKKJGS SECRETS IN POITf TkV 
CULTURE- and include also POULTRY SUCCESS i!,^ 
year. Even if you already have a copy of 'Profits in Poultry 
Keenmg Solved you are losing money every dav by not 
having the supplemental publication '^Mecretii in Poultrv 
Culture." POULTRY SUCCESS ia admittedly the worlds 
leading and best POULTRY JOURNAL. 20 years old M 
to Ui4 pages, beautifully illustrated and printed Most coin^ 
petent and experienced writers in the country 50 cents a 



# 



' 



# 



• • 



HOSTERMAN PUBLISHING CO., Bhggs Desk 25 SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 




^{"February, '10 




POULTRY FANCIER 



Awards at Providence, R. I. 



KXHIBITOHS AT PKOVII>ENrK, K I 

Adams, Darius M . . . . East Providence R I 

Alden. A. E West Brldgewater,' Mas.^! 

Alden. Frank H Foxloro, Mass. 

Almy, F. S West Wrentham, Mass. 

Andrews, Frank L Fall River, Mass 

Anthony. Stephen B Riverside, R I 

ArmstroniE:, Dwight H Woonsocket R I 

Armstrong. Helen Lakewood,' R I 

Armstrong. Joe Lakewood, R I 

Arnold. C. O Woonsocket, r' I 

Auburndale Poultry Yards .'. 

Providence, R. I. 

Austin, O. R Providence, R. I. 

Baker, Earle North Attleboro, Mass 

Bemis. Robt. H Spencer. Mass 

Benson. Elmer F Whitman. Mass 

Berry, J. B Pawtucket. R. I 

Bessom. Geo. E Man.sfield. Mass 

Bi.shop. R. w Guilford, Conn. 

Blaokmar, Oscar R South Scituate, R I 

Booth. Star L Bristol, R. I 

Boothby. W. B Westbrooke, Me. 

Bradbury, Jas. H Fall River. Mass 

Brown, C. Allen Waverly Mass. 

Brown, C. M Mlllburv," Mass. 

Browning, Cha.s. A Opponong R I 

Bufflngton. H. C Swansea, Mass. 

Bufflngton. H. C Somerset. Mass 

Burns. Fred G Taunton, Mass. 

Carter, Arthur B.... North Attleboro. Mass. 

Caswell. .John. Jr Prides Crossing, Mass 

■Caswell. Phillip Newport, R I 

Cedar Spring Farm Wickford, R. I 

Chalker, R. S Higganum. Conn. 

-Chapman. H. L Westerlv R I. 

Clift Poultry Yards Yantlc. Conn. 

Coffin, Chas. E Olneyvllle, R. I 

Coffin, Melvin, H Whitinsville. Mass. 

Cole, A. R .m. Georgiaville. R. I. 

•Cole. W. L Providence. R. I. 

Colvin, F. E Danielson, Conn. 

Congdon, Wm. H Oak Lawn, R. T. 

Cook. C. S.. Jr West Newton, Mass. 

•Cook, E. W Forestdale, R. T. 

Corbett. Harry L Revere. Mass. 

Cornforth. E. O Slatersville. R. I 

Covell. Arthur F Barrington. R. T 

Coyle, Leo Pawtucket. R. I. 

Crockford. J. E. & O. F Bristol, R T 

Croome, S. J Providence, R.I. 




If you want to be a good pen- 
man, learn by correspondence. 
Write for free booklet. 
Luther System of Penmanship 
23 Risley Ave Morton Park., III. 



Thousands of People in the South 

Are looking for Good Stock and Eggs 

The Southern Poultry Magazine 

OF NASHVILLE, TENN. 

Reaches the cream of the Southern Trade. 
Subscription 50c per year. Send for adver- 
tising lates. 



S. C. Brown Leghorns, S. C. 

RlarL- Minnrrnc ^'*^'y exhihition and 
DiaCK minorcaS breeding cockerels for 

sale. Bred from high scoring, prize winning 

stock. Also yearling stock both male and 

female. My birds score to 95 and win the 

blue wherever shown. 

G. A. GAGE, LA GRANGE, IND. 



F. L. POULTRY FARM 

I>l7f"^C This ad will tell you where some 
*^*-**-''^ of the prize winners at Chicago, 
Hagerstown, Pittsburg, McKeesport and But- 
ler are bred and raised. Stock for .sale at all 
times. Eggs in sea.son. Satisfaction guar- 
ranteed or your money back, 

F. L. OBER R. F. D. No. 1, Verona, Pa. 



Bskrred PlyrnontK 

R(r\#^§€^ jyjjjjjpy.j. Ringlets .Tre 
^^V,^ »*'«-' good Rocks. Won 1st 
cockerel 1st pen chicks at Nebraska State Fair 
\Sf^^ Write me for stock and eggs. Eggs 
ll.'iOand 12 .')0 for l.^i. 

CHAS W. MULUOY 

BOX lo. fre:mont, nebr.. 



Cruttenden, Tyler Norwich. Conn. 

Daniels. W. J Whitman. Mass. 

Darling, B. E Natick. Mass. 

Davol, Chauncey M Whitman, Mass. 

Doehr. A Wallingford, Conn. 

Doehr, Emil R Wallingford, Conn. 

Draper, Fred Z North Attleboro, Mass. 

Dunlap Schwind Co Chatham, N. Y. 

Eaton, S. H Brockton, Mass. 

Eddy, F. R Providence. R. I. 

T. C. Eldredge & Son Bourne. Mass. 

Evans. John Cranston. R. I. 

Fanning Bros Greenville. R.I. 

Fisher, Chester. E Plainville, Mass. 

Fitton. W. H Worcester, Mass. 

Frasier. F. S Montello. Mass. 

Frost. Morton F Rumford. R. I. 

Gardiner. H. G Providence, R.I. 

Garriepy, F. A Stillwater. R. I. 

Gay. C. Herbert Knightsville. R. T. 

Gluck, T. C Keene. N. H. 

Handy, Russell H Manville, R. T. 

Harris, Gilbert Stoughton, Mas.-^. 

Harris & Tolman Stoughton, Ma.ss. 

Harwood. R. G Littleton, Ma.ss. 

Havemeyer. Horace Stamford. Conn. 

Hawes. A. S Riverside. R. I. 

Hawes. Howard H Riverside, R.I. 

Hawes. Rus.sell Riverside, R. I. 

Houghton. J. W West Brookfield, Mass. 

Hyde. Wm Pawtucket. R. T. 

Inches, Mrs. Geo. B... North Grafton, Mass. 

Jowett. J. Willie Granitevllle. R.I. 

Keeling, Ernest West T.ynn. Mass. 

Kenyon. John F Pawtucket, R. I. 

Knowles. Leroy W W«»st Kingston. R.I. 

Knowles. Samuel Lexington. Mass. 

Kriegel. F Foxboro. Mass 

Kusterer. Clark Myricks. Mass. 

Lamb, Geo. A . . .Spencer. Mass 

Lamberts Poultry Farm.. Apponong. R. T. 

Lawrence. W. A Portsmouth. R.I, 

Lewis. Albert H Attleboro. ' Mas<5. 

Lillibridge. H. R Apponaug. R. I. 

Loveland. E Barrington Centre. R. T. 

Lucier. Mozart Providence. R. I. 

McDougall. John Pawtuckett. R. I. 

McGrath. Mrs. P. H Natick. Mass. 

Mcintosh, Nelson Providence. R.I 

McMurray. Jas Brookline. Mass. 

McNulty Bro New Bedford. Mass. 

Macomber. Alice Taunton Mass. 

Magee. Miss E. W Holliston. Mass. 

Martin, Wm. A Warren R. I 

Mason. M. F Attleboro. Mass. 

Metcalfe. Harry C.rey stone. R. I. 

Milan. A. Brayton «fe Son. Fall River, Mass. 

Miller. Mrs. J. W Pawtucket. R.I. 

Miller. Jr.. J. W Pawtucket, R.I. 

Morse, J. E Taunton, Mass. 

Moulton. Lewis E Somerset. Mass. 

Moulton. Willard C Somerset. Ma.ss. 

Mt. Vernon Polish Yards. .Braintree. Mass. 

Munger. B. B East River. Conn. 

Nichols, I.,eon A Barrington. R.I. 

Nobb.s Wm. H Davisville, R. I. 

Northrup, J. H. Jr Apponaug. R. I. 

Noyes. P. W New London, Conn. 

Perkins. James E....West Stoughton, Mass. 

Perry. R. H Lakeport, N. H. 

Peter.sen. Peter Arlington R.I. 

Poch. Bros Walpole. Mass. 

Porter. C. Harold Brockton. Mass. 

Pratt. Chas. W North Ablngton. Mass. 

Pratt. H. Arthur West Harrington. R. I. 

I'rinceton Bantam Yards ..Princeton. Mass. 

H.'UKlnll. Chas. H Foxboro. Mass. 

Uatcliffo. Harriet Auburn. R.I. 

Red Feather Farm. Twertonv Corners. R. I. 

Reinhardt. Wm. O Edgewood. R. I. 

Remington. John S Greenville. R. T. 

Remington. Wm Natick. R.I. 

Rhodes, Fred M T'nlonviile. Mass. 

Richardson. W Wollaston. Mass. 

Richardson & Son. C. W. .. Apponaug, R.I. 

Robinson. Mrs. E. J I^kevlUo. Mass. 

Rodman. S. I.,yman Gould. P. I. 

Schurman. F. R Riverside. R.I. 

Sliarp, Herbert Centredale. R. T. 

Shepard Bros Alton. R.I. 

Shonfleld. J. W West Lvnn. Mass. 

Shool. Daniel P Fall River. Mass. 

Sknnberg. A. G Norwood, R. I. 

Spargo. A. E Westerly. R. I. 

Smith. Chas. W Fall River. Mass. 

Smith. Fred Manton, R. I. 

Smith. John J Somerset, Mass. 

Smith. Jesse P Taunton. Mass. 

Sweeney, E. .T Providence. R. 1. 

Sweet. Fred O Thorntown. R. I. 

Tnbbener. Thos Commlcutt. R. I. 

Tnrment, .Tohn H Foxboro, ' Mass. 

Thompson, Goo. D Hop©. R. I. 

Tilley. E M East Greenwich. R.I. 

Tlrrell. Wm. W North Arlington, Mass. 

Tucker, Geo. E Greenville. R.I. 

Washburn. Harry T Tauton. Mas-. 

Weeks. Chas. H Providence. R. I 

Weeks. Clifton F Bourne. Mas'* 

Welcome, F. E New Haven, Conn. 

Wheeler, W. J Worcester. Mas^. 

Whltcomb Farm Riverside. R. I. 

White. Wm. J Boston. Mass. 

Whiting. Frank E Plnlnvllle. Mas*. 

Wilbur. Edw. R Limerock. R. T. 

Wilcox, Amos E Riverside. R.I. 

Williams. W. S Whitman. Mass. 




Page 45 }] 




Willis. Freemont H Brockton. Mass. 

Wilson. J. C Somerset, Mass. 

Woodward. Clifford N Taunton, Mass. 

AWARDS AT PROVIDKNC'E, R. I. 

BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Browning: 4, ck; 3, hen. Whltcomb 

Farm: 1, 2. 3. ck; 1, 4, hen; 1, 2, 3, ckl; 1, 

2, pul; 1. 2, pen. Arnold: 2, hen; 4, ckl; 8, 

pul. Smith: 4, pul; 4, pen. Magee: 3, pen. 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Chalker: 1. ck. Northrup: 4, ck; 2, 3, 
hen; 2, pul; 1, pen. Davol: 3, ck; Lewis: 

2, ck; 4, hen; 4. ckl. Auburndale Poultry 
Yards: 1. hen; 3, pul; 3. pen. Lucier: 1, 
ckl. Rhodes: 3, ckl; 4, pul. Smith: 2, ckl. 
Knowles: 1, pul; 2, pen. Dunlap Schwind 
Co.: 4. pen. 

BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 
Coffin: 3, ck; 3. hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul. Fra- 
sier: 2, ck; 2, hen; 2, pul. Noyes: 1, 4, ck; 
1, 4. hen; 2, ckl. Tarment: 4, ckl. Spargo: 

3. ckl. Cole: 3. 4, pul; 1, pen. Hyde: 2, 
pen. Anthony: 3, pen. 

COLUMBIAN PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 
All to Evans. 

PARTRIDGE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 
Washburn: 1, ck; 1, hen. Randall: 2, 
ckl; 1, pul. Tarment: 1. ckl; 2, pul. 
WHITE WYANDOTTES. 
Havemeyer: 1, 2, ck; 1, 2, 3, 4, hen; 1, 2. 

3. ckl; 2, 4, pul; 1, pen. Tirrell: 4. ck; 4, 
ckl; 3. pul. Brown: 3, ck. Richardson & 
Son: 1, pul; 4, pen. Cedar Spring Farm: 
'_'. 3, pen. 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. 
Booth: 1, ck; 3. 4. hen; 2, 3, pul. Pratt: 
.'}, ck; 1, hen; 3. ckl; 1, pul; 2, pen. Coffin: 
L', ck; 2. hen; 1. ckl; 4. pul; 1, pen. Willis: 

4, ckl. Rodman: 2, ckl. 

BLUE WYANDOTTES. 
All to Smith. 

GOLDEN WYANDOTTES. 
Kenyon: 1, ck; 1, hen; 2, ckl; 2, pul. 
Whiting: 1. ckl; 1. pul. 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES. 
Robinson: 2, ck; 1. 3, hen; 3. 4. pul. Lil- 
libridge: 1. ck; 1.' hen. Whiting: 2, ckl; 
1. 2, pul. 

PARTRID<;E WYANDOTTES. 
Coffin: 1, ck; 1, 2. hen; 1. ckl; 1, 2, pul; 
1, pen. Robinson: 2, ck. Alden: 3. pul. 
SILVER PENCILED WYANDOTTES. 
Robinson: 1, ck; 2. 3, hen; 2, ckl. Morse: 

1. hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul. 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. 

Robinson: 3, ck ; 3, 4, hen; 2, ckl; 1, 3. 
pul; 2. pen. Gardiner: 1, ck. Harris A 
Tolman: 3. ck. Brayton & Son: 2. ck; 2, 
hen. Doehr: 1, hen; 4. ckl; 4, pen. Per- 
kins: 1. 3. ckl; 4, pul. Benson: 2, pul; 3, 
pen. Evans: 1. pen. 

SINGLE COMB BL.\CK ORPINGTONS. 

Houghton: 1, ck ; 2. ckl. Remington: 2, 
hen: 1, ckl; 2. pen. Cruttenden: 1. 3, hen; 
3, ckl; 2, 3, pul; 3. pen. Wilson: 4. ckl. 
McGrath: 1. 4. pull; 1. pen. 

ROSE (OMB BLACK ORPINGTONS. 

-Ml to Houghton. 

SINGLE COMB WHITE ORPINGTONS. 

Doehr: 1. ck ; 2, hen; 3. 4. ckl. Darling: 

2. ck; 1. hen; 1. ckl; 2. pul. Moulton: 3. 
hen: 4, pul. Petersen: 2. ckl; 1, pul. Rich- 
ardson Si Son: 3, pul; 1, pen. 

ROSE COMB WHITE ORPINGTONS. 

All to W. Richardson. 
SINGLE COMB BUFF ORPFNGTONS. 

Doehr: 1. ck ; 1. hen; 2, 4. ckl. McMur- 
ray: 3, ck; 3. 4, hen; 3. pul. Bessom: 2. 
ck; 2. hen; 1. 3. ckl; 1. 2, pul; 1. pen. 
Cruttenden: 4. ck. 

ROSE COMB BUFF ORPINGTONS. 

Ail to Poothbv. 
SINGLE COMB RHODE ISL.\ND REDS. 

Caswell: 1. 3, ck. Bradbury: 4. ck. Corn- 
forth: 2, ck; 3, hen; 3, ckl; 2. pul; 1, pen. 
Gorriepy: 1. 2. 4, hen; 4. pul; 3, pen. El- 
dredge 8i Son: 1, 2. 4. ckl; 3, pul: 4. pen. 
Munger: 1. pul. Blackmar: 2. pen. 

ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Harris: 2, ck : 1. pul. Ca«!well: 4. ck ; 3. 
pul; 2. pen. Red Feather Farm: 3. ck : 1. 
f. hon; 1. ckl: 2. 4. pul; 1. pen. Knowles: 

1. ck ; 3. 4. hen; 3. pen. Alden: 3. ckl. 
Bradbury: 4. ckl. Mxinger: 2. ckl. 

LKJIIT BRAHMAS. 
Wilcox: 1. 4. ck; 1. hen. Nobbs: 3. ck : 

3. hen; 3. ckl; 2. pul. Darling: 2, ck : 2, 
hen; 1, ckl; 1. pul; 1. pen. 

DARK BRAHM.AS. 
Burns: 1. rk ; 1. hen: 1. ckl; 2. pul. 
A\'ashburn: 2. ckl: 1. nul 

BUFF COCHINS. 
Coffin: 1. ck; 2, hen. Andrews: \. hen; 

2. ckl; 1. 2. rul. 

BLACK COCHINS. 
All to Wi'linms. 

BLACK LANGSHANS. 
rorbctt: 4. ck ; 3. hen; 1. ckl; 1. pul: 2. 
pen. Remington: 1. 2. 3. ck ; 1, 2. hen; ?. 

3. 4. ckl; 2. 3. 4. pul; 1. pen. Bishop: 4. 
hen 

SINGLE COMB BROWN LEGHORNS. 

Allen: 1, ck; 1. hen; I, ckl; 2, pul. 
Haw(^s: 2. ck. Croome: 2, ckl. Cook: 1. 
pul. 

ROSE COMB BROWN LEGHORNS. 

Inches: 2. ck ; 1. lun; 4. ckl; 1. pul. John- 
son: 1 r-k ; 1, 2. ckl. Tucker: 3. ckl; 2, 
pul. T^ndnian: 3 pul. 

SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORNS. 

Glnck: 1. ck : 3, hen. Covle: 2. ck : 2. 



\ 




SBSSESSBSSSE 



Page 46 




hen; 3. ckl. McDougrall: 3, ck; 1, 4. hen; 

1, 2, ckl; 1. pul. Knowles: 4, ckl: 2, pul; 
3, pen. Croome: 1, pen. Dunlop Schwind 
Co.: 2, pen. 

SINGLE COMB BUFF LEGHORNS. 

All to Keeling:. 

ROSE COMB BUFF LEGHORNS. 

All to Adams. 

COLUMBIAN LEGHORNS. 

All to Evans. 

SINGLE COMB BLACK MINORCA8. 

Evans: 1, ck ; 1. hen. Smith: 2. 3. ok. 

ROSE COMB BLACK MINORCA8. 
All to Rodman. 

BLUE ANDALUSIANS. 
All to Shepard Bros. 

WHITE FACED BLACK SPANISH. 
All to Carter. 

WHITE CRESTED BLACK POLISH. 

All to Andrews. 

SILVER POLISH. 

AJl to McNulty Bros. 

GOLDEN BEARDED POLISH. 

Mt. Vernon Polish Yards: 1, 3, 4, ck; 1, 

2. 3. 4. hen; 1, 2, 3. 4. ckl; 1. 2, 3. 4, pul. 
Gardiner: 2. ck. 

BUFF LACED POLISH. 
All to McNulty Bros. 

HOUDANS. 
Wilcox: 1. ck; 2. hen. Shove: 2, ck; 1, 
hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul. 

FAVEROLLES. 
Woodward: 2, ck; 2, hen; 2, pul. Nich- 
ola: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1. ckl; 1, pul. 

FAVORDOTTES. 

All to Nichols. 

LAKENVELDERS. 

All to Shonfield. 

SILVER GRAY DORKINGS. 

Inches: 1, ck; 1, hen. Cedar Spring Farm: 
1, pen. 

COLORED I>ORKINGS. 

All to Inchp.s. 

CORNISH INDIAN GAMES. 

All to Wheeler. 

BLACK BREASTED RED GAMES. 

All to Wheeler. 

BROWN RED GAMES. 

All to Whef'ler. 

GOLDEN DUCK\\1NG GAMES. 

All to Wheeler. 

SILVER DUCKWING GAMES. 

All to Wheeler. 

RED PYLE GAMES. 

All to Wheeler. 

WHITE GAMES. 

All to Wheeler. 

BLACK GAMES. 

All to Wheeler. 

BIRCHEN GAMES. 

All to Wheeler. 

WHITE INDIAN GAMES. 

Wheeler: 1, ck; 1, hen; 2, ckl; 3, pul. 
Macomber: 1. 3. ck; 1, 2, 4. pul. 

BLACK RED MALAY GAMES. 

All to Wheeler. 

BLACK SUMATRA GAMES. 

All to Wheeler. 

PIT GAMES. 

Wheeler: 1. ck; 1. hen; 2. ckl; 1. pul. 
Hawes: 2. hen; 3. ckl; 3, pul. Metcalf: 1. 
ckl; 2. pul. 

BLACK BREASTED RED GAME 
BANTAMS. 

Welcome: 3. ck; 4, hen; Weeks: 4, ck; 3. 
pul. Berry: 1. 2. ck ; 1. 2. hen; 1. pul 
Conpdon: 3, hen; 1. 2. 3. ckl; 2. pul. Arm- 
strong: 4, ckl. Mcintosh: 4, pul 

BROWN RED GAME BANTAMS. 

All to ConK^don. 

GOLDEN DUCKWING GAME BANTAMS. 

Armstrong: 1. rk ; 3. hen; 2. pul. Fitton- 

2, hen; 2, ckl. Congdon: 1. hen; 1. ckl; 1, 

SILVER DUCKWING GAME BANTAMS. 

Armstrong: 2. ck; 1, hen; 2. pul. Cong- 
don: 1. ck: 2. hen; 1. ckl; 3. pul. Weeks: 

3, hen; 2. ckl; 1, pul. 

RED PYLE GAME BANTAMS. 

Cook: 2. ck. Mcintosh: 3. ck ; 4. hen 
Congdon: 1, 4. ck; 1. 2. 3. hen; 3, ckl; 1, 2. 

3, 4, pul. Princeton Bantam Yards: 1 2 
ckl. ' 

WHITE GAME BANTAMS. 

Congdon: 1. ck : 1. hen; 1, ckl; 1. pul. 
Wheeler: 2, ck : 2. hen 

BLACK GAME BANTAMS. 
Congdon: 2. ck ; 2. hen; 1. ckl; 1, pul. 
Wheeler: 1, ck ; 1 hen 

BIRCHEN GAME BANTAMS. 
Congdon: 1. 2. ck ; 1. 3. hen; 1. 2. ckl; 1. 

4, pul; 1. pen. Cook: 3, 4. ck ; 2, 3 hen- 
3, 4. ckl: 2. 3, pul. 

GOLDEN SEABRIGHT BANTAMS. 

All to Porter. 

SILVER SEABRIGHT BANTAMS. 

Congrlon: 1, ck ; 1, hen. Porter- 2 ck' 
2, hen: 1. ckl; 1. pui. Daniels: 2, pul'. 
ROSE COMB BLACK Ii.\NTAMS. 

All to Porter. 

ROSE COMB WHITE BANTAMS. 

All to Porter. 

BOOTKD WHITE BANTAMS. 

All to Congdon. 

BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 

Jewett: 1. ck ; 1. pul. Congdon: 1. hen. 
Armstrong: 2. pen. 

PARTRIDGE COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Congdon: 2. ck ; 1. hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul. 
Morse: 1. ck; 2, hen. 

WHITE COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Eaton: 1. ck ; 1, 2. hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul; 1, 



POULTRY FANCIER 



pen. Kriegel: 3. ck; 3, hen. Congdon: 2, 
ck; 1, hen. 

BLACK COCHIN BANTAMS. 

Poch Bros.: 1, 2, ck; 1, 2. hen; 1. ckl; 1, 
pul; 1, pen. Perry: 2, ckl; 2, 3, pul. Gay: 
2. pen. 

LIGHT BRAHMA BANTAMS. 

Congdon: 1, ck ; 1. hen; 1. ckl; 1, pul. 
Harwood: 2, ck ; 2, hen; 2, ckl; 2, pul. 

DARK BRAHMA BANTAMS. 

All to Congdon. 

BLACK TAILED JAPANESE BANTAMS. 

Daniels: 1, ck; 1, hen. Auburndale Poul 
Yds: 2, ck; 2, hen; 1. ckl; 1, pul. 

BLACK JAPANESE BANTAMS. 

All to Daniels. 

WHITE JAPANESE BANTAMS. 

All to Congdon. 

BUFF JAPANESE BANTAMS. 

All to Daniels. 

POLISH \VHITE CRESTED WHITE 
BANTAMS. 

All to Congdon. 
BUFF LACED POLISH BANTAMS. 

All to Ratcliffe. 

ROSE COMB BUFF BANTAMS. 
All to Congdon. 
CORNISH INDIAN GAME BANTAMS. 

All to Congdon. 
BLACK RED MALAY GAME BANTAMS. 

Congdon: 1, ck; 2, hen; 2, ckl. Wheeler: 
2. ck; 1. hen; 1, ckl; 1. pul. 

COLUMBIAN BANTAMS. 
Evans: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul. 
Sweeney: 2. ckl; 2. 3. pul. 

RHODE ISLAND BANTAMS. 
All to Ratclifife. 

ANY OTHER VARIETY BANTAMS. 
Cook: 1, ck. Berry: 1. hen. 

BRONZE TURKEYS. 
Shepard Bros.: 1, ck; 1, hen. Sweet: 2, 
hen. 

NARRAGANSETT TURKEYS. 
All to Shepard Bros. 

SLATE TURKEYS. 
All to Shepard Bros. 





i February, '10 



WHITE HOLLAND TURKEYS. 

Cedar Spring Farm: 1, ck. Shepard Bros.: 

2, ck ; 1, hen. 

BLACK TURKEYS. 
All to Shepard Bros. 

BOURBON RED TURKEYS. 
All to Shepard Bros. 

WHITE PEKIN DUCKS. 
All to Knowles. 

ROUEN DUCKS. 
All to Wheeler. 

CAYUGA DUCKS. 
All to Wheeler. 

GRAY CALL DUCKS. 
All to Wheeler. 

WHITE CALL DUCKS. 
All to Wheeler. 

BLACK EAST INDIAN DUCKS. 
All to Wheeler. 

COLORED MUSCOVEY DUCKS. 
Miller: 2, old drake; 2, old duck. Frost: 

3, old drake; 3, 4, old duck. Wheeler: 1, 
old drake; 1. old duck. 

WHITE MUSCOVEY DUCKS. 
Miller: 2, old drake; 2, old duck; 1, young 
drake; 1, young duck. Wheeler: 1, old 
drake; 1, old duck. 

INDIAN RUNNER DUCKS. 
Wheeler: 3, old drake; 1, old duck. Shep- 
ard Bros.: 2, old drake. Lambert's Poultry 
Farm; 1, old drake; 1, young drake; 1, 
^oung duck. Kusterer: 4, old drake; 3, 
young drake; 2, 4, young duck. Crockford: 
2. young drake; 3, young duck. Wilbur, 1 
pen. 

WILD DUCKS. 
Austin: 2, old drake; 2, old duck. Har- 
wood: 1, old drake; 1, old duck. Shepardl 
Bros.: 3, old duck; 1, young drake. 
TOULOUSE GEESE. 
Lamberts Poultry Farm: 1, old gander; 
1, old goose. Richardson & Son: 1, young 
gander; 1, young goose. 

EMBDEN GEESE. 
Richardson X- Son; 2, old gander; 3, old 
goose. Shepard Bros.: 3, old gander; 2, old 
goose. Shove: 1, old gander; 1, old goose. 
AFRICAN GEESE. 
All to Shepard Bros. 



Awards at Parsons, Kas. 

EXHIBITORS AT PARSONS, KAN. R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Bausman. A. C Parsons, Kas. Lant: 1, 2, ckl; 1, ck ; 1. 2, 3, 4, hen; 

Bernardin, E. P Parsons, Kas. 1. 2, 3, 4, 5, pul; 1, pen. Wokott: 3. ckl. 

Blaker. A. E Parsons. Kas. DARK BRAHMAS. 

Braunsdorf, A. C Parsons, Kas. All to Carson. 

Brow nlee, Ralph Parsons, Kas. BUFF COCHINS. 

Brunson, C. T Parsons, Kas. All to Dunn. 

Carson, Cleveland Mound Valley, Kas. BLACK LANGSHANS. 

Castle, R. L Parsons, Kas, Humphrey: 3, pul; 5, ckl. Castle: 1. 2, 

Castleberry, M McCune, Kas. ck ; 1, ckl; 2, 4, hen; 4, 5, pul; 2. 3, pen. 

Davis, A Parsons, Kas. Castleberry: 1, 2, 4, pul; 1, 3. 5, hen; 2, 3, 

Dunn. J. A Parsons, Kas. ckl; 1, pen. 

Elder, J. W Parsons, Kas. S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 

Fritz Bros Chanute, Kas. Inman: 1. 2, ckl; l'. ck ; 1, pen. Brunson: 

Hess. Wm. A Humboldt, Kas. 1, ck ; 3, 4, ckl; 1, 2. 3, .o. hen; 5, pul; 2, 

Humphrey. Harry A.... Mound Valley, Kas. pen. Braunsdorf: 1, 2, 3, 4, pul; 3, ck ; 

Inman, Fred H Dewey, Okla. 5, ckl; 4. hen; 3. pen. 

Kincaid. W. E Galena, Kas. CORNISH INDIAN GAMES. 

Lant, E. F Parsons, Kas. All to Massey. 

Laqua, F Pittsburg. Kas. GOLDEN SEBRIGHT BANTAMS, 

McDown. J, P Parsons, Kas. Thurston: 1. 2, 3. hen; 2, ckl. Bernardin: 

Maloney, Robert Parsons, Kas. 1, 2, 3, 4. 5, pul; 1, ckl; 1, pen. 

Massey, G. R Parsons. Kas. BLACK COCHIN BANTAMS. 

Taylor, J. M McCune, Kas. All to Malonev. 

Thurston. Wayne Parsons. Kas. BRONZE TURKEYS. 

Ward. J. S Parsons, Kas. All to Braunsdorf. 

Wayman, L Parsons, Kas. PEKIN DUCKS. 

Wick, E. A Parsons, Kas. All to Braunsdorf. 

Wolcott, W. H Parsons, Kas. 

Wyble Bros. Chanute, Kas. ~ "^ ' ' 

^'^^^^ pSV,^rT'i^'^RO?iS: ^"^ ^'•'^^f EVENTUALLY Alway, one story. 

Laqua: 3, ckl; 4, pen. Taylor: i. pen; J"'* natures Always warm and 

I. 2. ckl; 3. 4, pul Blaker: 1. 4. ',. ck ; way. Always CLOUGH'S dry fits all sizes 

I, 2, 3, 5, hen; 5, ckl; 3, pen. Braunsdorf: i ( / , ('. , *"*>"» 

I, pul; 4. ckl; 3. ck; 4, hen; 2. pen. Baus- «"y "om chick chicks or fowls. 

man: 5. pen. Spicer & Son: 2. ck; 2, 5, pul. heat and oerfect LAMPLESS i/ Ar.-,^r, » 9nn 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS neai ana perieci UMmrLtdd ^ dozen to 200 

All to Davis. * ventilation. En- si2e only $5 

All to'^Hel ^'^^^^^'I'M ^">^K8. dorsed by all that BROODERS! Principle and 

WHITE WYANDOT TES. u»e them, even ex- r e s u 1 1 s are 

^^■"^^'■'^y^.^ls\'{!-^;TUl perimenul ,.a,io„.. WHY NOT nKh,;,.„« 

hen; 2, pen. Ward: 2, 3, ck ; 2, hen; 4, pul; A perfect remedy for 95 to 100 

4, 5, ckl: 3, pen. Laqua: 1. pul; 2, ckl. ' all rhirlt rli«5/»aM.« T« MnU/'> . t 

SILVER LACED WVANDOTTES. ail cmcK diseases, lo NOW? percent of 

McDown: 3, pul; Elder: 1, 2. ckl; 1, 2, be used out or indoors. the hatch. 

S. C. WHITE ORPINGTONS. 't will not m^ke ash piles of the home of the chicks. 

All to^ca^rso^^^^^ ORPINGTONS l^ ^y '^"'' b^»" than the average mother hen. 

All to Wick. ■ rree literature. Address 

S. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS /^. #«..»..,» . .- 

All to woieott. ^ CLOUGH'S LAMPLESS BROODER. Aurora, III. 

JOSEPH DAGLE. Manager OAK HILL POULTRY FARM 

EXPERT JUDGE AND BREEDER Member Aniencan Poultry A.ssociation. Member Buff Rock 
eggs.- RICHLAND fo^^r"'^"""" '"^'^^^ *^°"°^ ^"^ '''' ^^" ^^«^ "'^^ ^-^^'^^ 



IQOO 



KDKLMTEIS STIVA.IN 



I'ilO 



S. C. WHITE LEGHOFLNS H.>Kl^-st«tioned. Low-tailed. Chalk 



scorinjs^ to 



or.'/ 



100 



cnrkprHs^p,nirt=; njul bev^ f,„ ^.,,^ ., ^m and pens malted for ih7t,g\r tr'^a^^.^ 

WHITAKfcIV (SL McCUNE, i%iHTABULA, OHIO 



i • 



• 



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,^^.rs^.:i'j iw.fM >?.v.-^-^...qgif^ 



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POULTRY FANCIER^CZFilllM 




Awards at West Haven, Conn. 



EXHIBITORS AT WEST HAVEN, 

Auchincloss. E. S Darien 

Bailey. A. S Cobalt,' 

Barnum, E. S Bridgeport 

Beebe, H. E Waterford, 

Bishop, F. W Guilford. 

Bishop, R. W Guilford. 

Bolinder, Alfred. Meriden 

Booza, W. T WallinKford. 

Bottamly Bros Glenbrook 

Brundage. Bur Danbury' 

Burrall, Anna L Union City 

Capen Bros Bloomfield,' 

Catlin, H. H Shelton, 

Chovets, A. M Wallingford. 

Clark. A. J New Haven, 

Clark, C. H Cobalt, 

Clark, E. B West Haven, 

Clark, M. T West Haven, 

Coggins & Rossbach Meriden, 

Copes Poultry Farm Meriden 

::uttenden. J. J Waterford. 

Davis. N. Evan Mlddletown, 

Doehr, Emil R Wallingford, 

Duning. H. P Robertsville. 

Emmerson, A West Haven 

Even. C. W Hartford, 

Farnsworth, H. W New Haven, 

Felsmere Farm Branford] 

Foster, J. W Seymour, 

Fowler, F. E Meriden. 

Gale Poultry Place New Haven 

Gilbert. W. A 

Grimm, Henry A. . . 

Hart. R. H 

Hastings, Mrs. T. S' 

Hays. Mis.s Mary Manchester,' 

Hillside Bantam Yards Shirley, 

Hofacker, W. C New Haven, 

House, Clarence Southlngton, 

Howard, H. S New Haven. 

Howes, A. F Sheffield, 

tves. Paul P Guilford, 

Kiernan. J. P Derby, 

Klatt, E. A Seymour, 

Knecht, J. E Mt. Carmel, 

Lamb, Merton J Plainville, 

Langbein, J. F New Haven, 

Livandu.ski, J. T Rockfall, 

Maher. W. J West Haven. 

Munger, B. B East River. 

Vettleton, Geo. H New Haven, 

Oelkuct, Ed Burnside, 

O'Neil. Jos Holyoke. 

Pattison, R. T Mlddletown, 

Payne Bros Portland, 

Peck, C. A West Haven, 

Penfield, H. E Newington Jet., 

Pratt. J. F Meriden, 

Quackenbush, A. & B Darien. 

Roberts, H, C Shelton. 

5choenfield. W. A Meriden. 

Shute. Joshua Meriden, 

Smith, J. B New Haven, 

Stevens, F. F Canaan. 

Sutterlin, S. E Meriden, 



. Allingtown, 

Windsor. 

. .New Haven, 
. .East Haven, 



CONN. 

Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conrti 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Mass. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Mass. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Mass. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 
Conn. 



I .still have a few fine yearling BARRED 
ROCK breeders to sell and 200 of the best 
chicks I ever owned. Order now and get 
your pick. Prices right. 

E. F. PEIRCE 

RTE. 1, PORT CUNTON. OHIO 

Breeder of Prize Winning Barred Rocks 



LEGHORNS, HOUDANS 



ROCKS 



Houdans for January 3, 
to date 929. Send for my 
show record for 1909-10. 



HF DOrFPQ 929 MISS STREET 
. C. IVUUi:.lViJ, LA CROSSE. WIS. 



C* \ C L D^ Over S'K) prlzeH 

omgie tomb Brown won at large 

I orrk^rnc CHAMPIONS HbowH in 2o yearB 
t> or me west p^, nij^ht color 

and size with yellow legs. 1 have a fnw breeding 
hens lo spare, good ones Will let them go at 
^l.-W each to make room for my young stock 
Clrrulnr free. 
O. F. and J. I..anGr, La CroKHe, Win. 



S. C- Rhode Island Reds 

Some fine cockerels %\ each. Eggs 
from birds scoring 90 to 93, |1.50 per 
15. One cock and 6 hens. Partridge 
Wyandottes for sale cheap. 
D. E. MILLER, ROME CITY, IND. 



Swift, W. T West Haven. Conn. 

Talmage, S. L West Haven, Conn. 

Thayer, Mrs East Haven, Conn. 

Warrinn, M. A Bridgeport, Conn. 

Welcome, F. E West Haven, Conn, 

Whiting. E. H Meriden. Conn. 

Wilbur. M. E New Haven, Conn. 

Wilkinson, J. H Mlddletown, Conn. 

Wilson, A. J Manchester, Conn. 

Zwick, F. S Seymour, Conn. 

AWARDS AT WKST HAVEN, CONN. 
BARKED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Bishop: 4. ckl. Bottomly Bros.: 2, 3, hen; 
2 ckl; 2, pen. Clark: 1, 2, 3, pul. Capen 
Bros.: 1, 2, ck; 1. 4, hen; 1, 3. ckl; 4. pul; 

1, pen. Auchincloss: 3, ck; 3, pen. Emmer- 
son: 4, pul. Swift: 4, ck. 

\%TIITE PLYMOUTH ROCK. 
,„Grimm: 1. ckl.; 1, pul. Smith: 1, ck.; 
13, hen; 2, ckl. Swift, 2. ck. Maher: 1, ck. ; 

2, hen; 34, ckl.; 2, pul.; 1, pen. 

Bl FF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 
Foster: 1, ck. ; 2, ckl.; 2, pul. Zwick: 
2, ck. ; 1. 2, 3, hen; 3, 4, ckl.; 1. 3, 4. pul.; 
1, pen. Doehr: 1, ckl. 

PARTRIDGE PLYMOUTH BOCKS. 
All to Klatt. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. 
Clark: 1, hen. Talmage: 4, pul. Nettle- 
ton: 1, ck; 2, hen; 4, ckl: Gould: 3, ck; 
4. hen; 3, 4, pen. A. & B. Farm: 3, hen. 
Quackenbush: 2, pen. Farnsworth: 2, 4, 
ck; 3, ckl; 2, 3. pul. Wilbur: 1. 2, ckl; 1, 
pul; 1, pen, 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. 
Penfield: 1, 2, pul. G'Niel: 1, ck; 1, hen; 
1, ckl; 3, pul; 1, pen. 

GOLDEN WYANDOTTES. 
All to Penfield. 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES. 
All to Barnum. 

PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES. 
Clark: 1, ck ; 1, 2, 3. hen; 1, 3, ckl; 2, 3. 
4, pul; 1, pen. Oelkuct: 2, ckl; 1, pul. 
Clark: 4, hen. 

SILVER PENCILED WYANDOTTES. 
All to Levanduski. 

COLUMBIAN A^TANDOTTES. 
Doehr: 1, 3, pul. Auchincloss: 1, ck; 3, 
hen; 1. 2, ckl; 2. 4, pul; 1, pen. Knecht: 

1, 2, 4, hen; 3. 4, ckl. 

S. C. BUFF ORPINGTONS. 
Shute: 4, ck; 1, hen; 1, 3, ck; 1, 2, pul. 
Howes: 1, ck. Cruttenden: 4, pul. Doehr: 

2, 3. ck; 2. 3, hen; 2. ckl; 1, 2, pen. Pratt: 
4, ckl; 3, pul. Hastings: 4. hen. 

S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. 
Cruttenden: 2, ck; 2, hpn; 1, ckl. Doehr: 

1, ck; 1, hen; 1, 2, pul; 1, pen. Whiting: 

3, ck; 2, ckl; 3, 4. pul. 

R. S. BLACK ORPINGTONS. 
All to Cruttenden. 

S. C. WHITE ORPINGTONS. 
Johnson: 3, pul. Doehr: 1, 2, ck; 1, hen; 

2, 3, ckl; 2, pul; 2, pen. Pratt: 2. hen; 1, 

4, ckl; 1, 4, pul; 1, pen. 

S. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 
Dunning: 1, 4, ck; 1, hen; 4, ckl; 2, 3, 4, 
pul; 3. pen. Davis: 4, pen. Munger: 1, 
pen. Smith: 2, ck. Swift: 3, ck. Bailey: 
2. 3, 4, hen; 1. 2, 3. ckl; 1, pul; 2, pen. 
R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 
Howard: 3, pul. Payne Bros: 1, 3, ck; 
1, 2. hen; 1, 3, 4, ckl; 1, 2, 4, pul; 1, 2, pen. 
W^ilkinson: 2, ck; 2, ckl. 



PARTRIDGE COCHINS. 

Burrall: 1, pen. 

BLACK LANGSHANS. 

Ives: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1,2, ckl; 1, pul; 1, 
pen. Bishop: 2, ck; 2, hen. 

WHITE LANGSHANS. 

All to Ives. 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 

Warrinn: 1, ck; 1, 2, pul. Chovets: 1, ckl. 

8. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 

Stevens: 3, ck; 2, hen. Gale Poultry Place: 

2, ck; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul. Felamere 
Farm: 1, ck; 2, ckl. 

R. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 

Coggins & Rossbach: 1, ck; 2, hen; 1, ckl; 

3, pul; 1, pen. Clark: 2, ck ; 2, pen. Thayer: 
3, pen. Gale Poultry Place: 1, 3, hen; 1, 2, 
pul. Hart: 2, ckl; 4, pul. 

S. C. BUFF LEGHORNS. 

All to Pattison. 

R. C. BUFF LEGHORNS. 

All to Zwick. 

ANCONAS. 

Catlin: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1, 3, ckl; 3, 4, pul; 
1. pen. Beebe: 3, ck; 4, hen; 2, pul. Even: 
3, hen; 4, ckl. Kiernan: 2, ck; 2, hen; 2, 
ckl; 1, pul. 

S. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 

Sutterlin: 1 2, ck 1, 2, hen; 1. ckl; 1, 
pul. Gilbert: 1, pen. 

DOMINIQUES. 

All to Fowler. 

PLAIN SILVER POLISH. 

Copes Poultry Farm: 1, ck; 1, 2, hen; 
1, ckl; 1, pul. House: 2. ck; 2, pul. 
GOLDEN POLISH. 
Bolinder: 2, ckl; 2, pul. Schoenfeld: 2, ck; 
3, ckl; 3, pul. Copes Poultry Farm: 1, ck; 
I, hen; 1, ckl; 1, pul; 2, pen. Felsmere 
Farm: 1, pen. 

WHITE CRE.STED BLACK POLISH. 
Roberts: 2. ck; 2, hen; 2, ckl; 2, pul. 
Copes Poultry Farm: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 
1, pul. 

PLAIN WHITE POLISH. 
All to House. 

HOUDANS. 
Hays: 3, 4. ck; Langbein: 1, 2, ck; 1, ckl; 
1, pul. 

CORNISH. 
All to Lamb. 

W. L. RED CORNISH. 
All to Wilson. 

BLACK BREASTED RED GAME 
BANTAMS. 
Booza: 2. ck. Welcome: 1, ck; 1, hen; 
1, ckl; 1, pul. 
SILVER DUCKWING GAME BANTAMS. 
All to Welcome. 

RED PYLE GAME BANTAMS. 
All to Booza. 

SILVER SEBRIGHT BANTAMS. 
All to Hofacker. 

GOLDEN SEBRIGHT BANTAMS. 
All to Hofacker. 

BUFF COCHIN BANT.\3IS. 
Peck: 2, hen; 4, pul. Hillside Bantam 
Yards: 1, ck; 3, hen; 3, ckl; 3, pul. Brun- 
dage: 2, ck; 1, 4, hen; 1, 2, ckl; 1, 2, pul; 
1, pen. 

WTOTE COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Peck: 1, 2, hen. Hofacker: 1, ck ; 3, hen. 
Lamb: 1, ckl; 1. pul. 

COLORED MUSCOVEY DUCKS. 
All to Clark. 

BRONZE TURKEYS. 
All to Auchincloss. 



Awards at Lamont, Mo. 



EXHIBITORS AT LAMONTE. MO. 

Bell. W. L Lamonte. Mo. 

Buckley, T. J Lamonte, Mo. 

Buckley, Mrs. T. J Lamonte, Mo. 

Connor, S'. C Lamonte, Mo. 

De Jarnett, Mrs. J Sedalia, Mo. 

Doffing, Mrs. M Lamonte, Mo. 

Hon. Edward Deepwater, Mo. 

Hurlbut, W. E Sedalia, Mo. 

Johnson. Mrs. W. C Hughesville, Mo. 

Johnston. John W Lamonte, Mo. 

Kemp. Mrs. Henry Dresden, Mo. 

Landes, Lester Hughesville, Mo. 

McGruder, Mrs, H. L Lamonte, Mo. 

McNair, D. E Lamonte. Mo. 

Meuschke, Harry Sedalia, Mo. 

Scheerer. Mrs. Fred Hughesville, Mo. 

Sims. D. W Lamonte. Mo. 

Staples, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. ... Lamonte, Mo. 

Staples. J. F Lamonte, Mo. 

Staples, Mrs. J. L Lamonte, Mo. 

Staples, Lucille Lamonte, Mo. 

Wheaton, W. F Dresden, Mo. 

AWARDS AT LAMONTE, MO. 

BARRED PLYMOUTH RO<KS. 

Wheaton: 2, ck; 2, 3, hen; 3, ckl; 1, 2. 3. 

pul; 1. pen. Mrs. Doffing: 1, ckl; 2. pen. 
Hon: 3. pen. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. 

Johnston: 1, ck; 1. 2. 3. hen; 1, 2, 3, pul; 
1, 2, 3, ckl. 

SILVER LACEI> WYANDOTTES. 

All to Connor. 

COLUMBIAN WYANI>(>TT»S. 

All to Staples. 



8. C. BUFF ORPINGTONS. 

Landes: 2, ck ; 2, hen. Staples: 3. ck; 
3, hen. Johnson: 1, 2, ckl; 3, pul. McNair: 
3. ckl. Hurlbut: 1, 2, pul. 

S. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Staples: 1. 2, ckl; 1. pul. Kemp: 3, ckl; 
3, pul. Buckley: 2, pul. 

R. S. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

hen; 1, 2. 3, ckl; 1, 2, 3, pul; 1, 2, pen. 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 

All to McGruder. 

BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 

All to Staples. 

BRONZE TURKEYS. 

Buckley: 1, ck; 1, ckl. Sims: 2, ck; 2. 3, 
ckl; 1, 2, hen; 1. 2, 3. pul. Wheaton: 3, 

BLACK TURKEYS. 

All to Bell. 

WHITE HOLLAND TURKEYS. 

All to De Jarnett. 

BOURBON RED TURKEYS. 

Scheerer: 1, ck; 2, hen. Connor: 2, ck; 
1, hen. 

Scheerer: 1. ck; 1. 2, hen; 2, 3, ckl; 1, 2, 
3, pul. 

BLACK LANGSHANS. 

Plainview Poultry Yards: 1. 2. 3. ck ; 1,2, 



IDEAL ALUMINUM LEG BAND 

To Mark Chickens 
CHEAPEST AND BEST 

12 for l.V-; a'>— liV, 6<u_ 4(k'. liKu TfKV 
SfuiipU' limi.l Mm)I<'iI f.,r Vr ^^'iinnK, 

Frtnk Myers Rlfr. B0168. Frttpori.UU 





Page 48 



>P' 



* / m. itI %^ A WLi/ My^ 





Awards at Bridgeton, N. J. 

EXHIBITORS AT BKIDdKTON, N. J. 2. pul ; 1. pen. Wright: 4. hen; 5. pul; 

Ballard, E. A Chestnut Hill. Pa. 3. pen 

Barker, W. F Woodstown, N. J. BUFF PLYMOUTH BOCKS. 

Barker. W. T Bridgeton. N. J. All to Rlchman. 

Batty, Herman L Sewell. N. J. WHITE WYANDOTTES. 

Belmar Poultry Farm SchwenksviUe, Pa. Sayre: 1, ck; 3, 4, hen; 1, 2. ckl; 3. 

^ethel, W. S Millville, N. J. pul. Deptford Poultry Farm: 2, 4. ck; 

Bonham, E R Bridgeton, N. J. Stout: 3, ck; 1. 2, hen; 1. pul. Barker: 

Carman & Simon Bridgeton. N. J. 5. hen; 2. pul. Hagerman: 3. ckl. Husted: 

Carpenter, B. S Dunellen, N. J. i, ckl. Kille; 5. ckl. Lewis: 5. pul. 

^f-JJ' .peo. . Lakehurst. N. J. SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES. 

Clitt, Jos. B Sewell. N. J. Siekler: 1, ck; 1, 2, hen; 2, pul. Carman: 

Cooper, B W.... Moorestown, N. J. 2, ckl; 4, pul. Wright: 1, 5, pul. John- 

Danner. Wilson H Butztown, Pa. son. 3. pul. 

Deptford Poultry Farm Sewell, N. J. PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES 

Fairfield Poultry Farm Fairton, N. J. Carpenter: 1. ck; 4. pul; 3. pen. liamlyn: 

Fisher, John D Bridgeton, N. J. 5, ck; 2, hen. Holmes: 3. 5. ck; 1. 3, hen; 

Fogg. Jos..... Shiloh, N. .T. 1, 3, 4, ckl; 1, 2. pul; 1. pen. Johnson: 

Fralinger. R A... Bridgeton. N. J. 4. ck; 5, pul. Smith: 4. hen. Belmar 

Frederick. Geo. E Wenonah, N. J. Poultry Farm: 5, hen. Sowden : 2, ckl; 

Gangler, Wm. L Limerick. Pa. Ware: 5, ckl. Woodside, 3 pul. Carpenter: 

Hagerman. John Toms River, N. J. 4, pul. Fralinger: '^ pen 

Hamlyn, Geo. F Bridgeton, N. J. COLU3IBIAN WYANDOTTES. 

Hatch, L. F.... Vineland, N. J. Deptford Poultry Farm: 1, ckl; 3. pul. 

Homes, Chas. t . . . . Bridgeton, N. J. Barker: 2, ckl; 1, pul. Cooper: 3, ckl; 

Holmes, Mrs, Wm. B Bridgeton, N. J. 2. pul. Clift: 4 ckl 

Husted. Geo Bridgeton. N. J. S. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Husted. Spencer A ^...Shiloh. N. J. Cole: 1. ck ; 1, hen; 1. ckl; 1. 2, pul. 

Johnson, Lewis S Bridgeton. N. J. Bonham: 3, pul. Batty: 4. pul. 




A prize-winning Houdan, bred and owned l,.v \V. H. Pippin, Newton, 111., who has a 

large flot k of excellent birds. 



Kllle. Jos. A Clavton. 

Lewis. Edgar C Merchant vi lie. 

ii*e.sc»i. J. Wm Trenton, 

Meickelbach. Fred Bridgeton. 

Minch Bros Bridgeton 

Moore. Daniel R Bridgeton. 

Mooris. Wm. L Greenwood 

Ogden Elmer D Bridgeton, 

Richman, Ewald Bridgeton. 

Rosenow. Chas. F Vineland 

Sayre, j. l Vineland.' 

Slckler. Wm. B Salem. 

Smith, J. Emlen Chestnut Hil 

Smith, St. Clair Southold 

Souder. Daniel Bridgeton 

Sowden. Wm. H Wenonah.' 

Springer. Paul G Bridgeton. 

Stout. Harry S Trenton. 

Todd. W. C Greenwood 

Wallace. Walter T Millville 

Ware. B. B Bridgeton,' 

Ware. Elsmore Bridgeton. 

Ware, Thuma.<=! Bridgeton. 

Woodside. Noah Salem. 

Wright. D. Watson Greenwich 

Wright. Wm. C WInslow Jet..' 

AWARDS AT BRID<.ETON. N. J. 
BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Morris: 1. ck; 1. 2, 3, hen. 4 ckl; 1, pul. 
Ware: 2. ck; 5. hen; 1, 2. 3. ckl; 4. pul; 
I. 2, pen. Rosenow: 4. hen; 5, ckl; 5, 
pul. Danner: 2, 3. pul 

WIUTE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Fairfield Poultry Farm: 1, 4. ck; 2. 5. 
hen; 1, 2, 3. ckl; 1. 3, 4. pul; 2. pen. 
Springer: 2. 3. 5. ck; 1, 3. hen; 4. 5. ckl; 



N. 


.1 


N. 


.1 


N. 


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N. 


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N. 


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N. 


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Del. 


N. 


,J. 


N. 


J. 


N. 


J. 


N. 


J. 


N. 


J. 


I. : 


Pa. 


N. 


Y. 


N. 


J. 


N. 


J. 


N. 


J. 


N. 


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Del. 


N. 


J. 


N. 


J. 


N. 


J. 


N. 


J. 


N. 


J. 


N. 


J. 


N. 


J. 



R. C. RHODE 1SL.4ND REDS. 

Cole: 1, ck; 1. 3, hen; 3. 4. ckl; 1. 2. 

pul; 1, pen. Todd: 2, hen; 1. ckl. Mickel- 

bach: 2, ckl; 3. pul. Frederick: 4, 5, pul. 

LIGHT BRAHMAS. 

Holmes: 1. ck; i;, hen. Souder: 2, ck ; 

1, hen; 1, pul. 

PARTRIDGE COCHINS. 
Moore: 1, ck : 3. lien; 4, ckl; 3. pul; 
1. pen. Minch Bros.: 2, ck; 1. 2, 4. hen; 
1. 2. 3, ckl; 1, 2. 4, pul; 2. pen. 

S. C. WHITE LE(i HORNS. 
Hatch: 1, ck; 1. 2, 3. 4, hen; 1. 2, 4, 
ckl; 1, 2, 3, 5. pul; 1. 2. pen. Carr: 2. ck. 
('arman & Simon: 3. ck; 5, hen; 3. pen. 
Clift: :{. ckl; 4. pul. 

R. C. WHITE LECiHORNS. 
All to Batty. 

ANCONAS. 
All to Fogg. 

R. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 
Mickelhach: 1. ck; 1. pen. Hughes: 2. 
ck; 1. 2. hen; 1, 2, ckl; 1. 2, pul; 2, pen 
SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURGS. 
Husted: 1. 4, ck; 3. 5. hen; 1. 2. 3, 4. 
ckl; 1. 3. 4, r>, pul; 1, 2, pen. Carr: 2. 
3. ck; 1. 2. hen. Wallace: 4, hen; 5. ckl; 
-', pul. 

HOUDANS. 
Gangler: 1, ck. Ware: 2, ck. Odgen- 
3, ck: 3. hen; 1. ckl; 3, 4, pul. Ballard: 



4, rk; 



hen; 



5, pul; 3, pen. Smith: 



ck; 1, 2. hen; 2, ckl; 1, pul; 1. pen! 
Fisher: 4, hen. 

BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 

All to Fairfield Poultry Farm. 



February, *10 

WHITE COCHIN BANTAMS. 

All to Liesch. 

GOLDEN SEBRIGHT BANTAMS. 

All to Ware. 

PEKIN DUCKS. 

Springer: 1, 2. 4, old drake; 1. 2. 3. old 
duck; 1. 2. young drake; 1, 2. young duck. 
Danner: 3, old drake; 4. old duck. 
TOULOUSE GEESE. 

All to Bethel. 



I^. H. Jostes, Route 2, Macon, 111., is en- 
titled special consideration from Poultry 
Fancier readers who expect to purchase 
stock or eggs in his varieties. He breeds 
Light Brahmas and S. C. Brown Leghorns 
and has for years been winning the lion's 
share of the prizes wherever he exhibits. 
He not only has the very highest quality 
of stock, but he knows how to breed the 
best and how to select stock that will best 
suit the needs of his customers. At the 
Illinois State Show at Springfield this sea- 
son he won the specials for best shaped 
male and female in the Light Brahma 
class and also 2nd cock, 2nd hen, 4th pul- 
let, 4th cockerel and 2nd pen. He won 1st 
pullet and 3rd cockerel in S. C. Brown 
Leghorn class on three entries. He won 
at Decatur, 111,, on Light Brahmas every 
first, second, third and fourth prize on 
cockerels, pullets and hens, also 1st, 2nd 
cockerel, 1st, 2nd pen in strong competi- 
tion. He won on S. C, Brown Leghorns 1st 
cockerel. 2nd, 4th pullets and 2nd pen with 
eight exhibitors in the class. Look up his 
ad on another page and write him for 
prices on what you may want. 

O. L. Prouty, Box 115, New Lothrop, 
Mich., who is one of the acknowledged 
leaders in Partridge Plymouth Rocks, 
writes us that he is selling eggs from his 
best pens this season at $3 per setting and 
prepays express. He has a special bargain 
at the present time in a trio of good birds 
which he offers for $8 if taken at once, 

F, L. Ober, Route 1, Verona, Pa., made 
the following wlnning.s on his Rhode 
Island Reds at the big Butler, Pa., show 
this season: On Rose Combs 1. 2; cocks. 

1, 2; hens, 1, 2; cockerels. 1. 2, 3; pullets. 
1; pen. On Single Combs. 1; cockerel, 1, 

2, 3. 4; pullets, 1; pen. No old birds en- 
tered. He won the silver cup for the best 
display of Rose Comb Reds, also the 
shape and color specials offered by the R, 
[. Red Club of America and National Rose 
Comb Club, in addition to eight other 
special prizes. Mr. Ober can please anv of 
our readers who are looking for extra 
quality in Reds and his prices are reason- 
able. 



SP RRnWM Choice cockerels 
. V^. DIXV^VVl^ for sale. Bred in line 

imi-IOPMQ f"'" several years. Cock- 
LilliVftinvyiXl^O erel bred females to spare 
Kxcellf^nt lavers Prices reasonabie. 
H. E MAROUARDT. WAUSAU. WIS. 



PRIZE WINNING BARRED PLY- 
MOUTH ROCKS oTb^;?id?rVa^.fd 

young stock. 

HARRY W. PRICE. RTE 2. LA GRANGE. IND. 



W. THEO. WITTMAN 

ALLENTOWN, PA. 

General Judge all varieties Poultry, Careful 
and straightforwardly honest work in the show 
room, 30 years a poultryman. 



BIG BROWN BEAUTIES 

Rkrs from peti scoring 188'/4 hy Shellaberger 
Oiilv li»Tiited number of orders taken. Jl^ to $5 
p*-rl5. Pullet or cockerel mating Brown I^eghorn 
Pnultrv Farm T H Rvan Prop., Kenosha, Wis. 



Prouty's Partridge Plymouth Rocks 

Good trio for $« if taken at once, are worth nioie 
but I must have the room. Eggs |3 per .setting, 
express prepaid. O I.,. PROUTY, 

Box )lf) New Lothrop, Mich. 

R. C. R. I. REUS ac tsui-h PlYMOUI H ROCKS 

A tew grand red cockerels for sale at rea.sonable 
prices. My birds have won manv prizes at the 
leading northern Indiana shows. ' rCggs now for 
$2 00 perl.'i fiom pens tnaied to produce iiigli cla^s 
exhihnion stnrk Har ry Sower. Rome City. Ind. 

WHITE ANI> SILVKR LACED WYAN- 
IM)TTE COCKERELS. HOIDAN COCK- 
ERELS. Hred from noted Htrnlns. Satlfactlon 
guaranteed. Get prices. 

B. H. BACON, R. F. D., Elroy, Wis. 



i 



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• 






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t • 




POULTRY FANCIE 




siasissis^ 



^■ ' " '•■ i ' ^^ f' i 



^ 



. V Page 49 




^ Af- 




i. ■^■t' em m m avmai^mm^ ^ . imm ii g it i ^imi 



wft«ife'a«MEii»Wj:sMi!m^*w*itta^ 



THE BOOK THAT EVERYBODY IS BUYING— 

Secrets of Expert Exhibitors 

And Easy Lessons in Judging— By Frank Heck 

A book that is new in character and the most valuable and interesting production ever published 
for breeders of exhibition fowls. No other book or similar publication comes within gunshot of it. It is 
in a class by itself. 

The time has gone by when a breeder can pick up birds right out of the yards and win with them without 
special preparation. This is true even in the smaller shows. There are always at least a few hustling, 
enterprising breeders in nearly every locaHty who are keenly alive to the financial profit and th« honors ac- 
cruing from winning over all competitors. These breeders use all legitimate methods for putting their birds 
in show condition. 

FAKING AND LEGITIMATE PREPARATION - BOTH LAID BARE. 

Faking is certainly wrong and it should not be practiced, but even in legitimate show preparation what 
chance have you to win over one or more honest competitors who may have a copy of this book and 
thereby possess the knowledge which enables them to fix up their birds in scores of ways that are not known 
to you. Consider also the immense advantage you would have in being able to detect such forms of faking 
as can be discovered in cases where there may possibly be a dishonest exhibitor in the class. 

Wouldn't You Like to Know 



How to Straighten Lopped Spikes or Blades of Combs. 

How to Bring Out the Bright Red Color of Combs, Face and 
Watties. 

How Small Patches of White are Covered up in Red Ear 
Lobes. 

How Back Plumage is "Fixed" to Reduce the Angle at the 
Tail and Give a Nicer Curve to the Back. 

How to Clean the Plumage of Partl-Colored fowls for Show 
Without Washing. 

Removing Creaminess and Brassiness from White Birds. 

Covering up Off-Color in Black Plumage Including Purple 
Barring, 

How to Improve the Color of Any Parti-Colored Bird. 

How to Make a Bird of Its Own Accord Pose In the Show 
Coop. 

How to* Add Lustre to Plumage of Dark Colored Fowls. 

How to Add Weight to Exhibition Birds Quickly. 

Coloring Yellow Legs. 

How Side Sprigs are Removed Without Leaving a Scar. 

How Foreign Color is Removed from Beaks, 

How the Plumage of Red Birds is Treated to Secure a Dark- 
er Shade of Color and Lustre. 

How White Tips are sometimes Removed from Barred Rock 
Plumage. 

Removing Traces of Stubs Pulled from Legs. 

How Foreign Color is Removed from the Edges of Large 
Feathers. 

How Dark Streaks are Removed from the Quill of White 
Feathers. 

How Unscrupulous Exhibitors Have Been Known to Pre- 
vent a Competitor's Birds from Showing Properly. 

Putting Birds in Show Condition that Have Missing or 
Broken Feathers in Main Tail or Wing. 

Preventing Purple Barring in Black Fowls. 

Preventing Show Room Growth and Lopping of Comb. 



How Feathers are Spliced. 

Feeding to Produce a Darker Shade of Buff. 
How White Ear Lobes are treated for Small Defects In 
Color. 

A frequent Cause of Large, Beefy and Lopped Combs and 

How to Prevent Them. 
How to Artificially Moult Fowls In Nearly Half the Regular 

Time. 
How to Secure and Hold Profuse Toe and Leg Feathering on 

Feathered Legged Varieties. 
A Practically Unknown Cause of Lopped Combs and the 

Remedy. 
How to Prevent Light Colored Le^s. 
How to increase Gloss Sheen and Depth of Color In Moulting 

Male Birds, 
A nood Stimulant and Preventive of Colds In Birds Shipped 

to Shows in Extreme Cold Weather. 
How to Prevent Combs from Freezing when Birds are Ex- 
posed. 
One of the Causes of Off-Colored Feathers In Partl-Colored 

and Black Fowls. How to Remedy the Defect. 
How Sickle Feathers are Shortened without Clipping the 

Ends. 
What to Feed to Promote Feather Growth. 
Tonic for Maintaining Health and Appetite In Show Birds 

and to Counteract the Effects of Confinement. 
Preventing Brassiness from Appearing in White Birds. 
How to Clean Paint from Birds that have Come In Contact 

with Newly Painted Coops or Houses. 
How to Prevent Color Cuts on Plumage by Stopping the Flow 

of Blood from Comb. Wattles, etc., when injured In the 

Show Room, 
Complete Detailed Instruction for Washing and Chemically 

Bleaching White Birds. 
How Black or Gray Specks In White Plumage are Hidden. 



THE ABOVE SUBJECTS ARE ONLY A PORTION OF THE CONTENTS. There are many other 
equally interesting, important and valuable secrets, many of them being alone worth the price of the book. 
There are many seemingly "little" things that are of great importance and that you would never think 
of. THE EASY LESSONS IN JUDGING ARE ALSO A FEATURE OF THE BOOK AND WILL 
TEACH YOU THE PRINCIPLES OF SCORING FOWLS. 

ALL THE METHODvS, DRUGS, CHEMICALS AND VARIOUS MODES OF 
PREPARING BIRDS FOR THE SHOW ROOM ARE FULLY EXPLAINED. 

You need the book to protect yourself against the dishonest fakir and you need it to put yourself on 
an equal footing with your honest competitors. It will save you dollars in useless entry fees, and it will 
show you how to win the coveted prizes and honors which your rivals would otherwise receive. 

Have you ever bought a poultry book on general topics or disclosing some system or so-called secrets, 
and upon receipt of it had your expectations drop with a dull thud of disappointment? Well! this isn't that 
kind of a book. 

THE PRICE OF THE BOOK IS $2 AND IT IS WORTH THE PRICE. 

BiCH PURCHASER AGREES TO NOT DIVULGE THE SBCRKTS OF THE KOOK EXCEPT TO MEMBERS OP HIS FAMILY. 

DON»T PUT OFF SENDING YOUR ORDER. YOU NEED THE BOOK NOW. ADDRESS 

SUCCESSFUL POULTRY JOURNAL frank heck 355 qearBORN SL. CHICAGO, ILL. 



1 




Pag e 50 



"<^ 




POULTRY FANCIER 




'**^.„** 



Answers to Questions 

Readers are invited to use this department freely. Write to the 
editor for any information desired. There is no charge for the service 



Question.— I have two Buff Orpington 
cockerels and wish to exhibit one of 
them the latter part of February, but do 
not know whicli to select. One has an 
extra srood 5 point comb and shows a lit- 
tle white in the ear lobe. The other 
has a g^ood ear lobe but has 6 points on 
his comb. Which one had T better send*' 
The quality is about equal in other ways. 
About what is the usual cut for white 
in ear lobes in Buff Orping-tons? 

Answer.— It is hardlv possible for us 
to give you reliable information without 
having an opportunity to examine the 
birds, and you will therefore have to 
make allowances in that respect. The 
extra point on the comb would be cut 
one-half point, in addition to the other 
comb defects. A very little white in 
ear lobes should be cut one-half point 
The cut ranges from one-half to one and 
one-half. If the lobe is more than one- 
third white, the bird would have to be 
disoualifled. 

The impression gained from the de- 
serir)tion of the two birds is that the 
cuts on head points would be iust about 
the same. 

Question.— In buff fowls, which is the 
most objectionable, black or white? 

Answer.— The Standard of Perfection 
attaches the same importance to each of 



these defects. Itut nearly all experienced 
breeders consider white the most objec- 
tionable. 

Question. — When introducing new blood 
into a fiock is it better to do it through 
a male than a female? 

Answer. — Using a male 
and is usually best, but 
lished line-bred flock it 
a female. 

Question. — In breeding for fancy pur- 
poses is it advisable to nut birds in the 
breeding pen that score less than 90 
points? 

Answer. - 
fects are 
such that 
breeding. 



is much quicker 
in a long estab- 
is better to use 



—No, unless some of the de- 

the result of accidents or are 

are not transmissible through 



•3f ^ 

Does one parent have more 
the .size of the progeny than 



Question. - 
influence on 
the other? 

Answer. — It is believed bv manv ex- 
perienced breeders that the female influ- 
ences size and the male, color. 

Question. — What would be the score of 
a pen of birds in the show room if each 
bird in the pen was perfect? 

Answer. — 200 ooints. 




Nis^-ws or 



POULTRY SHOWS (Si, 
SPECIALTY CLUBS 

Notices sent to us by secretaries wifl be pub- 
lished in this department v^ithout charge 




AMERICAN WHITE WYANDOTTE 
CLUB. 



The American White Wyandotte Club 
numbers among its members some of the 
leading breeders in the country. Its 
membership is not as large as that of 
some other specialty clubs, but what it 
lacks in numbers is made up in enthusi- 
asm and character of its members. The 
officers are: President, Horace Havemey- 
er, Stamford, Conn.; vice-president, F W 
Corey, Ossining, N. Y. ; secretary-treas- 
urer, Geo. W. Dakin, Roxbury Crossing, 
Mass. The executive committee is com- 
posed of Wm. Barry Owen, Arthur G. 
Duston and C. F. Titus. The next annual 
meetmg will be held at Boston show and 
valuable prizes will be offered. The mem- 
bership fee is $5.00, which includes the 
first year's dues. The secretary will be 
glad to answer all inquiries regarding the 
club. 

NATIONAL S. C. BLACK ORPINQTON 

CLUB. 



The annual meeting of the club took 
place at Chicago Dec. 8 at 3 p. m., in 
connection with the Chicago show. 

The secretary-treasurer's report showed 
an increase of over 100 per cent in mem- 
bership during the year and for the first 
time In the club's history a substantial 
sum in the treasury. St. Louis was fa- 
vored as the place for the next annual 
meeting and members will vote on the 
mat*' ■• l"»er. 

Numerr us prizes were voted for the eev- 
eral shows next year. A goodly sura wag 



also set aside as an advertising fund to 
adyertise the breed. 

A club emblem was decided upon and 
will be for sale to members for their own 
use only. 

A committee was appointed to recora- 
m.®"^ , c-ertain changes in the Standard. 
Ihe clul) catalog goes to press Jan. 1. 

All old officers were renominated except 
the vice president and ballots will shortly 
bo sent to all members for their choice of 
onicers. 

Milton W. Brown, Sec, 

Cincinnati, O. 

INTERNATIONAL ANCONA CLUB. 

The interest being manifested in this 
Club by breeders of Anconas is far be- 
yond the expectations of any of its pro- 
moters. It seems that the Ancona breed- 
ers have been waiting for just such an 
opportunity as the International Club of- 
fers them, to place their fowls forward 
into pul)licity, and I wish to say to every 
breeder of Anconas, come with u.s and 
lend us your co-operation and l)y so do- 
ing secure benefits for yourself that will 
bring you better birds, better prices and 
advantages that you cannot secure as in- 
dividuals. MembershiT) feos and dues $1 
per year. We are daily mailing Club rib- 
bons to members who have won them at 
shows in November :ind December Our 
Annual Meeting will ])o held in connection 
with Cleveland show, .Tanuary 24 to 29 
where a large lot of specials will bo of- 
fered—something for everybody If vou 
can bo with us do so, if not. tlien join at 
once and let th-? Club assist vou in vour 



February, '10 







■%?*■ 



local shows. If interested in the least, 
write for Club catalogue, free. 

W. P. McNary, Sec'y-Treasurer. 
Bannock, Ohio. 

PARTRIDGE PLYMOUTH ROCK CLUB. 



At the meeting of the Partridge Ply- 
mouth Rock Club held at the New York 
show this season the following officers 
were elected: J. A. Hageman, president, 
Charlotte, Mich.; R. A. Johnston, vice- 
president. Ottawa, Can.; M. Harvey Goins. 
secretary, Langhome, Pa. Executive Com- 
mittee. Edw. G. Noonan, Alex. Smith, 
Wm. F. Potterall and the president and 
secretary. The aim of the club is to 
l)ooin the Partridge Plymouth Rocks and 
to benefit every breeder of them. All 
who are interested should write to the sec- 
retary for information. 

AMERICAN BUFF COCHIN CLUB. 



The seventh annual meeting of the 
American BulT Cochin Club was held in 
Madison Square Garden. New York. N. Y. 
Thursday. Dec. 30. 1909. The following 
officers were elected for one year: Presi- 
dent, Dr. J. J. Hare, Whitby. Ont. ; first 
vice-president. H. J. Jenner, Pocahontas, 
111.; second yice-])resident. Dr. A. W. 
Bell. Winnipeg. Can.; third vice-presi- 
dent, Thomas Curry, Anderson. Ind.; 
fourth vice-president, C. W. Coolige. Bris- 
tol. N. H. ; secretary and treasurer, C. W. 
Case, Rochester, Mich.; assistant secre- 
tary, C. W. Best, Charlotte. N. C. Ex- 
ecutive Committee: H. N. Hanchett. 
ackson, Mich.; T. A. Heffner. Cedar Rap- 
ids, la.; Hugh Wyatt. London. Can.; F. 
C. Hare. Quincv. 111.: C. M. Atwood. Den- 
ver, Colo.; D. C. Peoples, Urichsville, O.; 
A. Sprankle. Lima. O. ; Mrs. Cora I. 
North. Wallbrook, Md. The next meet- 
ing of the Club will be held at Buffalo. 
N. J.. January. 1911. 

This Club deserves the support of 
every Cochin breeder in America, as it 
is a great benefit to them and their 
breed. The membershin fee is only one 
dollar. Send to C. W. Case. Secy.-Treas., 
Rochester. Mich. 

AMERICAN BLACK MINORCA CLUB. 



The fifteenth annual meeting of the 
American Black Minorca Club was held 
January 1. 1910, at Madison Square Gar- 
den, New York. The following ofi[icer&- 
were elected for the ensuing year: Presi- 
dent, Hon. J. P. Hilldorfer, AUeghanv. 
Pa.; vice-president, R. H. Armstrong. 
Richmond Hil' L. I., N. Y. ; secretary 
and treasurer. Frank McGrann. Lancas- 
ter, Pa. Directors: W. F. Lindenberg, 
Ft. Wavne. Ind.; P. S. Klee. Blauvolt. 
N. Y. ; Henry Dunne. Toronto, Cknada; 
O. E. Remsen. Annapolis, Md. 

A large list of new members were 
elected and the affairs of the club are In 
excellent condition. 

MISSOURI STATE SHOW AT KANSAS 

CITY. 



The Missouri State Poultry Show has 
been located at Kansas Citv and will be 
held in Convention Hall. November 2S- 
December 3. 1910. Ernest Kellerstrass. 
the Great White Orpington breeder, of- 
fered to furnish the hall to the State 
Poultry Board and decorate it as no show 
room was ever decorated before. The 
show will be cooned with Empire Coops, 
and you can begin now to get ready for 
one of the best shows ever held in the 
world. Kellerstrass savs ho wants tbe 
Missouri Poultry Board to eclipse any 
show ever held in anv nlaco at anv time. 
T. E. Qiiisenborry. Secy. 
•3f -X- 



NOTICE TO BREEDERS OF R, 
BLACK MINORCAS. 



C. 



The sixth annual meeting of the In- 
ternational Rose Comb Black Minorca 
Club was held December 29. 1909 In 
Madison Square Garden. New York The 
meeting was well attended. The secre- 
tary's report showed a gain of thlrtv- 
seven new members during the past year 
and the affairs of the clul) are in good 
conditon. The present show season has 
seen great advancement in the number of 
entries of Rose Comb Black Minorcas 
classes of fifty or more being nuite com- 
mon. The club offered specials at over 
400 shows the nast season. 

Mr. Geo. H. North rup. who has served 
as secretary and treasurer of the club 



• • 



• 



• 



• 



• 



• • 







25rw 



i'^'lf February, '10 




since it was organized, has announced 
that he would decline to serve the elSb 
in his capacity longer on account of his 
retiring from the Minorca business 
Hence the election of officers was looked 

^ T^^^/"J?.':^?^ ^".d. resulted as follows 
T. A. McKittrick, Hudson N Y- ores! 
dent; T A Faulds. London. 'Ont'., vfce-" 
president: Llo.vd C. Mishler, North Man- 
chester Ind. secretary-treasurer. Mem- 
bers of the Board of Directors were an - 
pointed as follows: Thomas C. Samuels 
Manticoke Pa.; H. A. Keister. Bangor 
Micli.; J. G. Yates, Spickard. Mo.; Dr L 
P Holbrook. Olympia Wash 

The mejnbership fee and first year's 
dues are $2. Members received novv win 
be credited with dues to July. 1911 Send 
to the secretary for application blank and 
a copy of the club catalogue. 

Of Interest to Langshan Breeders. 

The National Langshan Year Book, the 
^'^'■''^^^'■f^^^ome of The National Lang- 
shan Club, will be shortly issued, the cofy 
for the same being at date of this writ- 
ing (Jan 5. 1910) in the hands of the 
printer. This book will be mailed free to 
the members of the club and to others 
making application who will send 10c to 
coyer postage, etc. The book con ain2 
valuable information, including articles 
on breeding, qualities, etc., from such 

olhlrs'" if ni "^^ ^^.^^^ ^- M- Black ami 
others. It al.so contains the club stand- 
ard, constitution, and rules for the state 
championship contest for the splendid 
bronze medals given away each year 
Every one interested either as fancier or 
utilit.y raiser of either Black or White 
Langshans should send for this book for 
this club aims to interest the brogders of 
both varieties and for both purposes. In 
this connection it should be remembered 
that this is the club which causTd the 
revival of interest in the "best all round 
breed on earth," and is now in the field 
June""!'- ."^Jf^.^^^oin^r^clumng dues o 
June 1. 1911, is but $1. Every breeder 
having the interest of this breed at heart 
shoud join. Poultry show secretaHes 

thrl^}L^ ""^^ ^"'" ^''^ ^^^^^b"" i-Jshts for their 
•snow s. 

Personaly I will be glad to answer any 

L vl"',i^f: f/''' r'"^ ^^"^® I ^^^as unable to 
give my attention to the needs of the 

anri .,«"{ TT ^ """^ ^" ^^'^ harness again, 
and as I belieye most thoroughly in this 
breed intend to do all that I can to put 
it where I. K Felch says it belongs, ^'^n 
the front ranks. 

«?r.rir,c,fi 11 ^^r^'^" Aldrich, Scc-Trcas. 
bpringfield, Mass. 



•Jf 



M. 



American Black Wyandotte Club. 

iQ^'n^^ annual meeting held December .31, 
iv : i^^ J-^^^ ^^^ York Poultry Show 
elected Frank C. Sites, North Doven 

?o^''''t4'''';^''^'-'"^= ^^^- "• ^oyd, Wa.shing- 
S • t ^•' y^^ president; A. .L Fisher. 
Riverhead. L. L, treasurer; Edwin H 
^nV'^r, ''^I^''^''™' N. Y., secretary, who', 
with Ihomas Flanagan, C. H. Nesbitt and 

rp, • ^^iTiith form tho executive board. 

the treasurer's report shovyed a balance 
On hand. 

Edwin H. Morris, Sec'y. 

^ -X- 

National Partridge Wyandotte Club. 

The first annual meeting of the Na- 
tional Partridge Wyandotte Club was held 
in connection with the Chicago show, De- 
cember 10. 19(19. 

A motion was made and unanimously 
carried that the secretary-treasurer com- 
municate with the .secretary of both the 
New York and the WLsconsin State Part- 
ridge Wyandotte Club, urging their con- 
solidation with the national club; as a 
special induc<^ment. the members of said 
clubs to be admitted to membership into 
the National Partridge Wyandotte Club, 
upon tlie payment of $1 each, which will 
include the annual dues for the ensuing 
year. 

W. A. Doolittle suggested that a spe- 
cia fund be raised by a subscription of- 
fering of the members present, said fund 
to lie used at the discretion of the sec- 
retary-treasurer, for the purpose of con- 
tinuously advertising the club by circu- 
lars, etc.. same to be furnished to each 
member, who will bo kindly asked to fa- 
vor the club liy enclosing said circulars 
with their personal correspondence per- 
taining to their poultry business, such as 
their annual mating list, catalogs, etc., 
as a means b.v which to increase the club 
membership, also adding prestige to their 



FANCIER 



personal standing in the poultry fra- 
ternity; the suggestion was well taken 
and a fund of $50 was subscribed by the 
members present. 
. C. E. George and W. A. Doolittle were 
tied, on a $5 prize, as a settlement, they 
jointly donatod same to be used as a spe- 
cial premium at the next club show. 

A motion was made and unanimously 
carried that a club cup be offered at 
every state show in each state where 
the club membership was ten or more. 

Water Fowl Club of America. 



The annual meeting was held Decem- 
ber 30, 1909, at the New York Poultry 
Show, electing Eugene Sites, North 
Dover, Ohio, president; John C Kriner 
Stettlersyille, Pa., vice president; Edwin 
H. Morris, Sparkili, N. Y., secretary- 
treasurer, and 14 state vice presidents. 

The treasurer's report showed a bal- 
ance on hand. Provision was made for 
cups and ribbons to be ottered at the 
principal show of each state. 

Edwin H. Morris, Sec'y. 

How About Your Fences? 



No mistake among the poultry raisers 
IS as common or more expensive than 
that of buying light weight, cheap poul- 
try fence. In fact most of the so called 
"poultry fence" is not a fence at all, be- 
ing little better than ordinary netting 
made of cheap wire that cannot be ex- 
pected to give protection nor to last. 
Don't make that mistake. A good fence 
costs much less in the long run Send 
to the Brown Fence & Wire Co., Dept 94 
Cleveland. Ohio, for President Brown's 
eye-opening book on this fence question 
He manufactures fence of all kinds but 
seems to take especial pride in the fence 
lie makes for poultry raisers. While so 
closely woven as to answer every purpose 
of the poultry fence, they are heavy 
enough and substantial enough to be used 
as a general farm fence. At the bottom 
the wires are run one inch apart The 
top or border wires are male of No 914 
hard high carbon steel so that they re- 
quire no boards or rails with them. 

The substantial construction of the 
fence enables you to set your posts farth- 
er apart than is required by the ordinary 
poultry fencing, so that you can erect a 
real Brown fence strong enough to turn 
any animal on your place for less money 
than it would cost you to put up cheap 
poultry netting. 

Another feature which must not be 
overlooked is the extra heavy galvanizing 
of the Brown fences. In recent years 
much of the f^nce on the market has 
rusted out in a short time, owing to the 
poor galvanizing. The Brown fence is 
treated by a process which amounts to 
double galvanizing and easily doubles the 
life of the wire. 

Y^ou are certainly interested in this 
fencing (piestion. Got Brown's book and 
get down to the root of the matter It 
will pay you to investigate. 

In the report of the New York Show 
which appeared in the January number 
A. A. Winkler. Rutherford. N. J. was 
given credit for winning ,5th on pullet in 
the Black Langshan class. This was an 
error, as Mr. Winkler was awarded 2nd 
His birds are of the highest quality and 
they win for him and his customers in 
the strongest competition. 

^ -X- 

Readers who are interested in Partridge 
Plymouth Rocks should write to Paul 
Lafromboise, Mt. Pleasant, Mich., for 
prices on stock and eggs. His excellent 
record at such shows as Chicago. St. 
Ijouis and Detroit is convincing evidence 
of the quality of his birds. He makes a 
specialty of this handsome variety of 
fowls and has bred his strain to the high- 
est point of excellence. His prices for 
stock and eggs are reasonable and buy- 
ers who send him their orders are as- 
sured of getting the right nuality at the 
right price, as he guarantees to please 
his customers. 

Mrs. W. Jones Williams May wood. 111., 
is one of the R. C. White Leghorn breed- 
ers who can supply customers with the 
very highest quality in this variety. Her 
birds have won first prizes at Chicago 
and in other strong conetltion and there 
is no question about the superiority of 
her strain of R. C. White I.,eghorns. Her 
prices aie reasonable and we take pleas- 
ure in recommending her to our readers. 



1 Page 




ABOUT SOME P. F. ADVERTISERS. 



Notes by Judge Hackett. 

We wish to call the attention of Fan- 
cier readers to the ad of Mr. Jas. Mc- 
Guan of Baraboo, Wis., who is a suc- 
cessful l)reeder of S. C. Black Orpingtons. 
Mr. McGuan has in his breeding pens 
this season some of the best blood lines 
in this country, and are full of quality. 
His best pen is headed by a cock bird 
which won first prize at the Baraboo 
Valley Show in January, and was first 
cockerel at La Crosse and at the Wis- 
consin Poultry Show at Stoughton. 1909, 
and is a grand bird. Mr. McGuan is a 
very conscientious fancier who has 
spared no expense to secure the best, 
and those who entrust their egg orders 
to him will not be disappointed. Look 
up his ad and write him. 

The ad of W. R. Abbott, Ft. Atkinson, 
appears in this issue of Poultry Fancier. 
Mr. Abbott has some most excellent speci- 
mens of Standard White Plymouth Rocks 
which he raises exclusively. He won at 
the recent Milwaukee show 1st Pullet, 
3rd Cock. 4th Cockerel and 7th Hen on 
four birds entered. At the Ft. Atkinson 
show January. 1910, he won all firsts, 
several minor prizes and the "Gold Spe- 
cial" for best display in the American 
class. Mr. Abbott has two pens mated 
for the breeding season. 1st pen headed 
by 3rd cock at Milwaukee will contain 1st 
^Milwaukee pullet and five other puHets of 
equal quality. 2nd Pen headed by 4th 




S 



First prize Houdan cockerel at Kansas 
City, 1910. Owned and exhibited b.v 
Frank Wickizer, St. Joseph. Mo. 



Milwaukee cockerel and contains five ex- 
cellent hens, including Milwaukee and 
Ft. Atkinson winners. 

A limited number of eggs will be sold 
from these choice matings. and those de- 
siring to start right or improve their 
present stock will do well to secure eggs 
from Mr. Abbott. We can cheerfully 
recommend Mr. Abbott and his stock. 

Mr. F. W. Catlin, whose ad. will be 
found elsewhere in this issue, has some 
of the finest S. C. Buff Leghorns we have 
seen this winter. Mr. Catlin is strictly 
reliable and vyill give his customers a 
square deal every time. You will make 
no mistake in dealing with him if in 
need of S. C. Buff Leghorns. 

Clifford Capener. proprietor of Highland 
Poultry Farm at Baraboo. Wis., made a 
fine showing of over forty birds at the 
Baraboo show, winning most of the prizes 
offered in White Wyanodttes and R. C. 
Brown I^eghorns. He also made a good 
winning with S. C. Buff Leghorns and 
R. C. White Legliorns. He also made 
good at the Madison show, where he 
showed White Wyandottes and R. C. 
Brown Leghorns. Mr. Capener is a very 
conscientious and enthusiastic young 
man. and those who trust their orders to 
him will not be disappointed with the 
results. Write him for anything you 
need in his line. Look up his ad. in this 
issue. 

North Freedom, Wis. 



THE EMERSON KIND. 



Cement. Texas. January 31st. 1910. 
A. L. Emerson, Inkster. Mich.. 

Dear Sir: — The Cockerel pen of "Regal 
Blue" Barred Rocks have been received 
and are a wonder in shape, color and 
barring. Had I paid $100 for this pen. I 
would not have expected better qu.ility: 
I know that I now have the finest pen 
of Barred Rocks in the State of Texas. 
Thanking you for the prompt and careful 
manner in which you shipped this pen, 
believe me. very sincerely vours, 

Frank H. Keller. 

Cement. Texas. 




Page 52 




POULTRY FANCIER:»*C>ei;^^^'l5 








.li»lfb« JTnlfirJ"**'*!! ** !i" ***" department under the following condition. : The size 
IdvertSer t« t^ .'k ^ *** occupying three-quarter, of an inch .ingle column Each 
advertuer to UM the same .pace each month. Ad. may be changed everv three 

"iTpVr ye1Sr"%^;vmen^**r H *^^ ^**'J*" than twelve mSnfh.*! The^co^irU 

LVdreYc^ptiora'irfow on Vhr.';:c:ortr"- "** «-'»*-»• *» *»»- -«- ^he pnce i. 



REICHERrs FARM RAISED 
White Rocks and R C. White Leghorn. 

the kind the new standard calls for. Of Hi 
entries won 6 firsts and 4 seconds. Pens 
headed by these grand cocks and cockerels. 
Eggs from these pens by the setting or hun- 
dred. Satisfaction guaranteed. Write your 
wants. E. H. Reichert , Virdin. III. 



Rose Comb Brown Leghorn Eggs 

from special mated pens, Madison 
Square, Chicago and Boston winners 
circulars. JAMES CRAWFORD. 

Cameron Mill., N. Y. 



Dr. Holmes' Trap-Nested. Standard-brrd, 

I'iSt Rhode Island REDS 

Bred for vigor, size, shape, color. Stock and 
eggs in .sea.son. Free catalog 

RED ROBE POULTRY PENS 
We.t Main Street. EVANSTON. ILL. 



Buff Cochins That Win 

On ten birds at Cedar Rapids, I wren all firsts and 
special for best 10. I can help you win too, If 
you send me your order for stock or eggs. Grand 
birds for sale and eggs that will produce wlaners. 
•3 per 15. $5 per 30. I will more than please you. 
J. C. MITCHEM. Mar.halltown. Iowa 



COLUMBIAN WYAN- 

DOTTF^ Bred from the best stock 
*^^ * A X-.IJ money can buy (Keating's 
Strain Satisfaction gauranteed. Kges $2 00 
and 13 00 per .setting. 
LOUIS WESTFALL, R. 3 WAVERLY. N Y. 



R. C. & S. C. Rhode Island 

Da^Io None better. 40 first and second 
*^^'^*» prizes at at Sedalia and Kan.sas 
City. 150 grand birds at special prices to 
quick buyers Place egg orders now. 

I>. J. HLISK. Carthasre, Mo. 



Anrnna c EXCLUSIVELY. Leaders For 12" 
/^ucuuas yeans. Hundreds of prizes in 
hot competition won by us and our austomers. 
Young and old stock $1.50 and up. Prices low 
for quality. Our stock and eggs will put you 
up among the leaders. W. H. Branthoover. 
6115 Station St., East End. Pitt.burg. Pa. 

President Aticoiia Club of America 



won 
blue 



PEACH GROVE STOCK T. ..„ 

ribbons at New York. Syracuse and Rochester 
for three years. Grand young Houdan and 
BuflF Wyandotte stock at right prices. Write 
me. 

MRS. R. Y. BOWDEN. Clifton Spring.. N. Y. 




^^^^ 



Kelleratrass and Cook Strain of 

S. C. White Orpingtons 

Kggs 12.00 per Ifi. al.so extra fine Barred Ply- 
mouth Rock eggs $1.50 per !.•). Satisfaction 
guaranteed. A. J. WALDSCHMIDT. 

Washington, lowi 



i LINE BRED FOR 20 YEARS > 

( Some very fine cockerels for sale. Kggs at S 
} right prices. Illustrated circular free. ( 

5 E. M. BUECHLY, Box 10, Greenville. Ohio 5 



Single Comb White Leghorns 

Greatest utility strain known. Noted for 
.size {i}4 to 7 lb. hens) color, typical shape, 
deep bay eyes, great vigor and greatest pos- 
sible egg producers. Eggs |1.25 per 15; $5 00 
per 100. Honesty guaranteed. if 

R. S. MOSELEY. CambridRe. N. Y.. Poultry Judge 



fi^n^ifct^'bRed Cockerels ^&\^,^„l 

Special cockerel of Decatur, 111. in a class 75. 
Al.so Rose Comb Reds. Beck strain direct. 
Score cards furnished after November 27th. 
Prices|2 00up. 

FERD. W. OERTEL, BRIGHTON. ILL 



sinole: comb t 

BUFF ORPINGTONS 

Eggs from exhibition and utility stock Send 
for Mating List. A few breeding cockerels 
for sale. H BREVOOR7 ZABRISKIE. 

17 Elm St., Woburn. Mass. 



Cornish Indians. Superb Matings. 

Best imported and domestic blood 
hatching. Have bred Cornish 
Cockerels for sale. Can help you. 

T. D. Moore. Box 92, Hopkinsville. Ky 



Eggs for 
18 years. 



K. C. White Leghorns. Won 1st at great'Mil- 
waukee show. Won every place at Fond du 
Lac. & $60 cup for highest scoring collection 
of birds in the show. 1st pens cores UV. to 
95^. Also S. C. W. & S. C. Brown Leghorns 
winners of firsts. Write for circular. Booking 
orders now. Also cockerels & trios for sale 
4^;^t^,.AtrvPhmpL^^ 



White Plume Farm P^^'^uces 

ff uuc 1 luiuc rarin you „eed to buiid 

up your flock. All prize winners White 

Tx ?'^°V,'^,^°il^• ^^*^^ African Guineas, 
White Holland Turkeys, White Pekin Ducks 
White Embden Geese. Write for prices on 
eggs. Satisfaction guaranteed 
J. C. BAKER. Pron^Rt. 1, Plainville. Ill 



BARRED ROCK COCK- 

pPpf C Best I ever rai.sed. Guaranteed 
M^A^M^M^^ to please. $.3 00 to $.'5.00 each . 

GEO. O. ANDERSON 
R. 5. BOX 0022. RUSHVILLE. IND. 



EGGS FOR HATCHING 

from S. C. Brown Leghorns, S. C. Black and 
White Minorcas, White Wyandottes Barred 
Rocks and R. C. Rhode Island Reds. 

C. Jackson, Buchtel, Ohio, L. Box M- 



SilverLace*! WyaiulutteH, White Cre8t«-d 
Itlack Polish and Itarred Plymouth 
UockH. Direct desceudantH from Madison Square 
and Chicago winners. Won twenty eight regular 
prizes and two diplomas at Oelweln. Iowa, .Jan. 
4-!>. 1H09, In strong competlon. Choice stock for 
sale. Circular free. Cascade Poultry Yards, 
Wm. Neiera. Prop., L, 11.45, Cascade, la. 



IVCCU O R c. RHODE ISLAND REDS 

Winners of first at Chicago.Kewanee. Prince- 
ton and Illinois State Shows. Get my de.scrip- 
tive circular of six grand matings for the egg 
season. DR. F. M . REED. 

Wyanet. Til 




?1??V- .-^U-: ,J rn^^.^'-f 



LisHt Brahmas, Felch Strain Direct 

Kggs from high-scoring prize winning stock 
$2 00 per 16. On 11 entries at New Castle. Pa. 
'09, won 11 prizes and |10 gold special for best 
display in Asiatics Pens headed bv 93 and 94 
pt. males. ^ Females score from 92K ^o •>'>• 
.3d prize ck. score 92^ and ckls. for sale. 
Mrs.Ed. Bartlett lfi9i/i OnkSt Newcastle V;i 



CRYSTAL WHITE ORPINGTONS 

We head the Kellerstrass strain and hav^ 
defeated the strongest competition at leading 
shows. You don't take chances when you 
send us an order for stock or eggs. Both for 
.sale now. Write us. D. A WEDGE, 
215 Galena Street Aurora. III. 



S. C. R. L REDS 

Kggs for hatching from some grand pens 

$5.00 and $3.00 per 15 

J. E. SCHUTTE, Lebanon, So. Dak. 



PRIZE WINNING 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ^l'^' %«„rbVt' 

DQr^I^C ter than ever this year. Prices 



ighl 
OSCAR E. WOOD 



UNION. IOWA 



S. C. and R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS 

Single combs direct descendants from \ew 
York Champion, his sire "Old Glory" and "Red 
Cloud." Rose comb descendants of O. E. Miles 
first pen. superior color, fine combs. Best stock 
obtainable. For stock and eggH write 
Dr. E. B. CRAMBLIT, AMES, IOWA 



Choice Collie Puppies SSS^oml.rt 

as I make a .specialty of Whites. I do not place 
as high a value on the colored ones that come 
along with them and so offer them at low 
prices. SERVOSS COLLIE KENNELS 
BOX 220. - EDISON PARK, ILL. 



Barred Rock, AVhite Wyandottes, AVhite 
OrpiDfiTtuns. Mammoth Bronze Turkeys 

Hens, cockerels and pullelH for sale, grand birds* 
Prize winners wherever shown, excellent layers 
leading strains. Give me an order. My motto to 
please. Prompt shipment and satisfaction guar 
anteed. Prices reasonable One ^ wild. H bronze 
Tom for sale. Miss Clara Smith, Cro.xton, Va 



COCHINS HOME. Ileadqunrters for Amer- 
ica's greatest Cochins and Brabmas First priz * 
andsllvcrcup wlnnerHailWinnepeg. Can., Sea't'e 
A.Y.P.. Minn.. 111., and S. Dak. State Fairs. Man- 
kato, Minneapolis and Madison Square Garden. 
N.Y. Get my prlcee before you buy birds of 
quality. Satisfaction guaranteed 
C. M. Atwood, Box Z, 35, I>undee, Minn 




BUFF ROCKS Yo , 

. o t o c k 

sired by a 95 point male. Also yearlings. 
Speciai prices for short time. 
A. L. Fawcett, Box 8, New Albany, Pa. 




Columbian riymouth RockH (Sweets 
Strain.) Hla<'.k-tall»Ml .Japanese and Hufif Cochin 
Bantams. Barred liocks. A few choice cockerels 
of each variety for sale. Let me book your 
order early for eggs from my choicest matings 

Si.*'f' .!!';w>^''^' •o)?^ ^'^^ ^^- Bantam eggs at 12.50 
per 1.*), 14. (K) per 30. 

K. B. ROBKRT.S CANASTOT\ N Y 



Single Comb Reds fi^f^^-ysTvELY 

has the Nicest Ueds here In Rrlgbton whv-^ny.^ 
cause niy Strain comes from Bennett's famous 
pr zewlnners scoring from !X; to 94. Kecel ed ? 
prizes lately. | Write forprh-es of eggd. Matlne 
Ifsr^ready Feb. 15. Satisfaction gaurJnteed '^ 
.T. P. Lamport, Brighton. Ill 



I 



• • 



( 



m 



# 




• 



• 





February, '10 




Columbian Wyandottes 



Heck's 

o^ • . - Royal 

Strain are prize winners. They win for me 
they win for my customers. They will win 
for you. Old and young stock for .sale, prices 
reasonable, write your wants. Jacob Heck 
Leeseville, Mich. Station 23, Detroit. Mich' 



S. C. Rhode Island Reds and ^^»* 



win. 



Barred Plymouth Rocks fud'hl'eeS- 



ing stock for sale 

and prices 

E. H. DOWNS. 



Write us for description 
RTE. 20. IDAVILLE. IND. 



America's Foremost Strains Jufu t y 

Hirprf *"^ lowest prices on S. C. Reds, S. 
UllVi,l C. White Leghorns, Duckwing and 
Pit Games, Buff Cochin Bantams. Write for 
show record and prices. Egg orders booked 
before February 15th, ,5 eggs free. 
Chas H. Ziegenfuss. Box Z. Bethlehem. Pa. 



PHILLIPS' S. C. BLACK MINORCAS 

Noted for shape, size and color, bred from 
the best blood obtainable and winners at the 
leading shows. Write for prices and full 
particulars. 

THOS. H. PHILLIPS State Vice President. 
S. C. B. Minorcas Club, Dover, N. J. 



WHITE WYANDOTTES Jid'sfi^e" 

Cups at Mo. and Kas. State shows. '08. First 
pen Mo. State Fair Oct. 09. First pen (> 
straight years at Sedalia .shows. Sweepstake 
pen Dec. '09. over all breeds. Males 95^. 
females to 9(1 Be«t eggs $2 50 per 1.5. 
S. G. WHIPRECHT, Box H, .Sedalia, Mo. 




Barred Plymouth STlo^i"^ 

RftnLc EXCLUSIVELY leading shows in 
I\UCK» ltK)8-1909 . Also their layingqualities 
cannot be excelled. Last years breeding stock 
also cockerels and pullets for .sale. Write us 
for prices. S R. Patterson. Centerville, Iowa 



"THE LITTLE RED HEIN" 
Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds 
Originators of Manataug Strain. 

If you are looking for red birds without smut, 
write us. • 

John E. Davis Sc Bro. Marblehead, Mass. 



TOULOUSE GEESE 



that win. Al.so 
White Chinese 
Geese and Fawn Headed Indian Runner 
Drakes for sale. Breeder and shipper of fancy 
land and water fowls. Write for prices. 
W. M. SAWYER. Box F, Lancaster. Mo. 



PFILE'.S CATALOGUE gives 
prices of all the leading varieties of 
land and water fowls. J'arm raised 
stock for sale and egge in season. 
Send 2 cents for my Poultry Book. 

HENRY PFILE 
Freport, IIL Dept. A 



Quality Strain I$AKKEI> ROCKS have 
been line bred for Itt years from foremost win- 
ners In America. Winners at leading shows. 
Cocks, hens, cockerels and pullets both matings 
for sale, from these winners or bred in line. 

C. C. DRAKE & SON, 
Lock Box »3'4, La Harpe, IIL 



At INDIANAPOLIS February 190*;, my 
Rfk^v-A^l Da/«L<. won 1st cockerel, 2d cock. 
Darrea IVOCKS silver Cup; Feb. 1908, Ist 
cock, 1st cockerel; Sept. 1909, Ist and .3d cocks, 
1st pen. I breed Rose Comb Reds- Indiana- 
polis winners too .Stcn k with <]nalitv for 
sale. W. W. ZIKE. MORRLSTOWN. IND 



Btiff RocKs, Boff ar^a Silver 
L« a c « d AV y A n di o 1 1 e s* and 
lVHit« Hollarkd TtirKey^s, choice 
Cockerels for .sale from prize winning stock. 
Egg orders booked now. prices reasonable. 

L. C. VOGT. LYONS, WIS. 



POULTRY FANClEReC"^^^ 



^2^SE, 



B. P. ROCKS & S. C. W. LEGHORNS 

Egg orders booked now from my 200-egg 
strains. Trap nests used. 1 know Just what I am 
doing. BlrdH scoring 91 to i>.'j with a famous egg 
record behind them. Have the shape, color and 
size. Write me for a square deal. 

H. O. SWIFT.— F. Castlewood, So. Dak. 



Golden Wyandottes ?S?caS" D^eV'V" 

12. 1909. 66 in class, won .5th cock, 4th cockerel 
8rd pullet, with 4 birds. Mo. State Show St! 
Louis. Dec. 6-11, 1809. 64 in cla.ss. won 2d cock 
M cockerel, 4th pullet, with 5 birds. 

S. Penninston, Box F. Plainfield, III. 



Langshan - Hills Poultry Farm, 
Home of Barnes' Black Lang- 

Shans, winners whenever shown. Write 
your wants; Cockerels and Pullets $2..W each. 
Hens $1.50. Napoleo a J. Barnes 
R. D. 7. Box 16. Winchester. Ky. 



LAKE 8HOKK I»<)1;LTRY FARM 

lireedei'H of 

Hiarh Class Silver Laced Wyandottes 
Kxclusively. Stock for sale at all times. Egg 
odrers hooked now. 

H. F. BKRGNEIi. Pres. HENRY MAU, Mgr. 
South Chicago. Ills. R.F.D. No :14, Kenosha. Wis. 



100 Barred Plymouth Rocks 100 

from prize winning stock which I am going to 
5h11 at reasonahle prlres. If you want healthy 
\ I>,'«)rou8 stock write. Satisfaction jiuarauLek'd. 

Chas. F. Schlueter. - Box K. Reynolds. III. 



S. C. BlacK and MTKit* Minor* 

cae bred for size and egg production. 
Stock and eggs for .sale in .season. All cor- 
respondence answered promptly. 

G. B. StnitH (Sb Sot% 

Box 4i"»4 North Baltimore, O. 



; 



SILVKR LACKI) and AVHITE WYAN- 
J>OTTKS FOR SALE. Utility and Exhibi- 
tion Stock that has pleased others and they will 
please you If you will Klve us a trial. Eggs In 
season from prize winning stock. Every Bird In 
breeding pens a high scorer. FOUR SISTERS 
POULTRY FARM. K. 8, Box A, 

Will P Yetter. Prop., New Bavaria. O. 



BIJFF "WYANDOTTES Exclu- 

sivelx. Ideal .shape, solid buff color. 
Guaranteed to please you. Eggs and Baby 
chicks. Write me today. 

GLENN H. BURGOTT, 
EDEN CENTER. - N, Y 



Faultless" Hotidans. 287 
£^|^ Strains. Five caiefully mated pens 
of large, crested, dark colored birds, de- 
.<<cended from the greatest prize winners in 
America. Book your orders now for Spring. 
.\ few males at low prices. Circular free. 
Wm. C. Snider, Box 105. Kansas. Ills. 



R.iniflet Barr«d PlymoutH 
Rochs won all brsts at Oshkosh, 1909. two 
silver cups, clean sweep. Cockerels $1 50 up. 
Kggs, be.st matings f.3..50 per \^ |.5 per 30. gen- 
eral stock $1 .')p. LAKK ViKW POI'LTRY FARM. 

T. W. Critchette, Markesan, Wis. 



Buff Rocks, S. C. Black Minorcas 

and R C R I Rpdft Bggs for hatch- 
dUU I\. V. I\. 1. IVeaS ing from prize 

winners at $1.50 per 15. Incubator eggs 
$5.00 per 100. * 

H. S. WENTZ, OUAKERTOWN. PA. 



Columbian Kocks, Columbian Wyan- 
dotteH, K. C. Kutt'LesrhornH, bred from New 
lork. Buffalo and Rochester winners, 5 firsts 2 
seconds on 7 entries at Rochester show Dec 1909 
Cockerels i;^ totlU pullets 12 to »6, Trios $7 toils. 
Eggs t3 per IS, 15 per 30. Free setting from best 
pen with ench $10 order. Stock puaranteeed 
F, A CAMPIJELL HONKOYE, N. Y. 



S. C. BLACK 

ORPINGTONS 



Won all first prizes 
at Columbus show 
1909 also several at Ocon- 
omowoc and silver cup 
for best pen. Several choice cockerels for .sale 
Eggs from pen No. 1 $') per 15 : pen No. 2 $2 
per L5. Dora James Pick Fall River, Wis. 



CLASS Single Comb Rhode Island 

Ra#1c ^''i^e Winners Eggs from 1st pen, 
l\CUa setting 15 eggs $2.50 Eggs from 2nd 
pen. setting L5 eggs $2.00. Special prices on 
orders of 100 or more. Guaranteed .satis- 
faction William Kenney. Sparland. HI. 



S. L. ANL> W. WYANI>OTTE.S, K. C. 
RHODE ISLAND RI^D.S Winners at the 
big Centerville. Iowa and St.Louls shows Write 
for cataloj?ue descrlblijg the largest pure bred 
Poultry Farm In North Mo. Fancy and utility 
matlDfTS a specialty. Egg orders booked. Guar- 
antee 9 chicks to the setting or will replace. 
JOHN KEARSE, R. 1, Coatsville. Mo. 



WHITE PLYMOUTH ^^fflTs To^ 

ROPIC ^*'^- Birds score from 94% to 96 
*^^*-'^-'*^ and will improve your flock. 
Prices rearonable. Eggs for sale from this 
quality of stock. 
W. R. GEIER REMINGTON, IND. 



LIGHT BRAHMAS 

Twenty years a Breeder 
Twelve Extra Cockerels for .Sale now. 
JNO. F. WOODS 
Utility Farm. R. 19. Owen»viIIe, Ind. 



FOR SALE. M. BRONZE 

Tl IRICPY^ sired by my great prize 

* ^ IxIVU I III? winner and d i p I o ma 

Tom. Finest stock to be found. Also S. L. 

Wyandottes C. J. KAPPHAHN 

R. 8 ALEXANDRIA, MINN, 



WYANL)OTTE.S AND LANG.SHAN.S. 

Winners at St. Louis Show. 19()9. also two $25.tKj 
silver cups at big Perry county 19(>9 show In hot- 
test class of Wyandottes ever shown. Partridge 
and Huff Wyandottes $2 per 1.5. 8 setting for f5. 
lllack Langshans l.-W per 15. Buffs Bred by R- B. 
Schlndler, Partridge and Langshans bred by.Iohn 
Allen. Allen & .Schindler I»erryvill«. Mo- 




I inHT EXCLUSIVELY 12 years a breed- 
*^*^^* * * cr. My stock is excellent, high 
RR AHMA^ scoring, great layers. 
DlV/^iniVI/^O will please the mo.st 
particular. Flock of 200 to .select from. Prices 
right. Eggs, single settings or incubator lots. 
HAROLD DAVIS SLEEPY EYE, MINN 



s. c. BUFF LEGHORNS Siftrirt:: 

1910. Pen headed by Madison Square winner. Some fine scored cockerels for sale, reasonable. Egg 
$3 pel 15. $5 per 30. Satisfaction guaranteed. F. W. CATLIN, BAR A BOO, WIS. 



WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS 



Winners at Miiwaukee. January 
1910, 1st pullet, Srd cock. 4th cock- 

,, c J V J ^'■^' ^"d ^thi hen. At Ft. Atkinson. 

wron all hnsts and Uold Special tor best display in American class. Two grand pens tnated for 
tlie egg trade headed by and including these winners with other females of equal quality Eggs 
from these matings at $.3 00 per !.■>. without reserve. A few choice cockerels and pullets lor sale 
.Satisfaction guaranteed. 

QUAUTY WHITE ROCK POULTRY YARDS, W. R. ABBOTT. Prop.. Fl Atkinson. Wis. 



I 







Page 54 




POULTRY FANCIER 






^"-^r-r'^ ■:tmemw.tf^ 



ASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Numbers and initials count the same as words. 

30 words or less one month, $1. For more than 30 words 
add two cents for each additional word. 

30 words or less, three months, $2. For more than 30 words 
add 3 cents per word. 

For any lime longer than three months the rate is two cents 
per word per month, but no ad will be accepted for less than 50 
cents per month and the ad must appear each successive month. 

A discount of 1 per cent given on ads running for 1 2 months. 



All classified advertising is payable in advance. Positively no 
exceptions to this rule. The rates are so low that we cannot 
afford to take the time and trouble and incur the expense neces- 
sary to keep book accounts with these ads. 

Send money order, currency, draft or registered letter. Stamps 
accepted fc'" amounts less than one dollar. 

Poultry Fancier is published the 15th of each month. All 
ads must reach us not later than the 5th. Advertisers receive 
the paper free each month that their ad appears. 



BREEDERS' SEVERAL VARIETIES. 



BREEDING STOCK FOR SALE NOW IN 
Black and White Langshans, IJght Brah- 
mas. White and Brown Leghorns and W. C. 
Black and Golden Polish. Address Caton 
Poultry Yards. Zane^ville, O. 3-9-12 

THIS WAY FOR YOUR HIGH CLASS S. C. 
Black Minorcas and Partridge Cochins. Birds 
have good shape and are fine in all "points. 
Stock for sale. Eggs $1,50 per 13, Mention 
this paper. H. S. Fegley, Gilbertsville, Pa. 
__^ 12-3 

WHITE FACED BLACK SPANISH WHITE 
Plymouth Rocks, Houdans and Java cock- 
erels and trios for sale. The very best 
strains. Eggs in season, Theodore A. 
Moritz, 569 St. Georges Avenue, Rahway, N. 
J. 12-4 



BUFF WYANDOTTES. ORPINGTONS AND 
Rocks. Solid Buff cockerels and pullets that 
will win in the show room and fill the egg 
basket. Our birds are big, blocky, golden 
beauties, strong in all points. Write Buff 
Poultry Farm, F, A. Poertner, Prop.. Berea, 
2. ••^-9-12 

S. S. HAMBURG AND BARRED ROCK 
cockerels for sale. Birds fine in all points. 
If you could see the m I know I would get 
your order. Be sure and get my prices. 
Correspondence answered promptlv. Egg 
orders booked. Mrs. C, R. Thompson, Box 
23, Randall, Iowa. 1.3 



ST. LOUIS AND STATE FAIR SHOW 
birds. Won, l.st cockerel, 2n(l pullet. 1st 
pen. Black Leghorns and Black Javas. 
Birds, $2 to $5. Eggs. .$2 per 15. Also 
choice White Wyandottes. Trv a specialist. 
H. C. Hunt, Dclav an. 111. 1.3 

FRENCH SALMON FAVEROLLES. SICIL- 
ian Buttercups and Indian Runner Ducks. 
Non-setting hens. Booking orders now for 
spring delivery. Eggs per setting, hens $1 
per 13 eggs. Ducks. .$1 to $2 per setting 
12 eggs. Send order now. Davis & Dvnes. 
R, 30, Zionsville, Ind., Sunnyside Poultry 
Farm. i.'^ 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. McINTOSH 
strain. Eggs. $1.50 per 15. White. Golden 
and Buff Wyandottes. Rose and Single Comb 
Brown Leghorns, Kulp's strain. From prize 
winning stock. Eggs, $1 per 15. Circular 
free. M. L. Musselman. Bet hlehem. Pa. 1-3 

EGGS AND STOCK FOR SALE. BUFF 
and White Leghorns, Rocks, Silver Ham- 
burgs,. Partridge Cochins, Pearl Guineas, 
Toulouse Geese, Pekin Ducks, English Phea- 
sants, Belgian Hares, White Rabbits, Canary 
Birds. a. W. Zoigler, Harmony. Pa. 1-3 

FOR SALE. I OFFER STOCK AND EGGS 
for hatching from the following: S. C. 
White Leghorn.^. Brown Leghorns, Black 
Minorcas, Buff Orpingtons. Light Brahmas, 
White Rocks, White and Columbian Wyan- 
dottes. Also day old chicks. Get my prices. 
Jos. M. Fay, 808 Howard Ave., Altoona, Pa. 
1-3 

DON'T DELAY ABOUT SENDING IN 
your egg orders. Now is the time to raise 
your prize winners. Let me fill your order 
and get In the winning line. Have Barred 
Rocks and Brown Chinese Geese. Eggs at 
living prices. M. C. Flagg, Boylston, 
Mass. S-9-12 

QUALITY R. C. BROWN LEGHORNS, 
Kulp & Gale strain. Greens Curgh and 
Unlontown winners. 1st pens, 1st cock, 2nd 
ckl., 1st, 2d pullet, Ist, 3rd hens. Eggs 
both matings. Closing out R. C. W. Leg- 
horns. Show birds, first prize winners at 
bargain prices. Write me. W. Hipkiss, 
Scottdale, Pa. I-3 

RINGLET BARRED ROCKS. CRYSTAL. 
White Orpingtons, Pure strain, prize win- 
ners direct. BggB $2 and $3 per 16. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. Write for list. Jno. Had- 
den. Norwich, O. 2-9-12 





COCKS AND COCKERELS CHEAP— 
Houdans, Minorcas, R. C, R. I. Reds and 
Spanish. Also eggs in afiason — 60 for $3, 15 
for $1. 25 varieties. 28 ^ ears as breeders, 
<Mrcular free. Whitney & Son, Triangle, 
N. Y. 12-3 

YOUNG STOCK OF QUALITY^ FOR SALE, 
4 firsts on 7 entries at Greenfield, 111., Nov. 
15-20. 1909: 8 firsts, 5 seconds and 2 thirds 
on 16 entries at Pittsfield, 111.. Dec. 15-18. 
1909. S. C. W. Leghorns, B. P. Rocks and 
White Holland Turkeys. Write your wants 
to Thos. M. Stubblefleld, R. fi, .Tack.sonville, 
111- 6-9-12 

PENS, TRIOS AND COCKERELS OF 32 
varieties poultry, including Wyandottes 
Brahmas, Cochins, Rocks, Polish, Reds, Ham- 
burgs. I^eghorn. Andalusians, Houdans and 
Minorcas. Booking egg orders now for spring 
delivery. Stamp for catalogue. Simon C. 
Kulp. Box S'. S.. Hatfield . Pa. 1-3 

THOROUGHBRED BREEDERS FOR SALE 
for 1910, Silver Wyandotte, Barred Rock 
cockerels and Toulouse geese. Winnei-s at 
all Austin Shows and Fairs. Eggs for sale 
in season at reasonable rices. Write Mrs. 
F. H. Pike, Austin, Minn., Pinedale Poultrv 
Farm. 12-3 



I>IGHT BRAHMAS. COLUMBIAN WYAN- 
dottes and Black Tailed .lapanese Bantams. 
Egg orders booked now. At Trl-State Show, 
Keokuk, Iowa, in November, won 1st cock! 
1st hen on Brahmas: 1st cockerel, 1st, 2nd. 
3rd pullet. Few cockei-els. Edw. Miller. 
Donnellson. Town. 12-3 

HOUDANS FOR SALE, BOTH YOUNG 
and old birds, some with score cards. Fine 
big birds, great layers. Place egg orders 
now for Barred Rocks or Houdans. If you 
could see my birds I know I would get 
your order. Let me hear from you. Elmer 
.1, Johnson, R. 2, Box 26, Argvle, Wis, 

12-3 



FINE COCKERELS — WHITE WYAN- 
dottes. Barred Rocks. S. C. Reds, White 
Leghorns, Black Minorcas. Pure stock, own 
raising. Big quality: little ad — save you 
money. Many of these would be prize win- 
ners in show room. Ernest Haynes, Prairie 
du Rocher. 111. ' 12-3 

BARGAIN SALE OF COCKS AND COCK- 
erels. Single Comb Rhode Island Reds, 
White and Buff Rocks. Orpingtons, An- 
conas. Langshans, Leghorns, Minorcas and 
others. See my large circular, illustrated 
in colors. 3? breeds bred for laying. Eggs 
for hatching. John E, Heatwole. Harrison- 
burg. Va. 12-3 

COCKERELS FOR SALE — DUSTON 

White Wyandottes and Rhode Island Reds 
(both combs), at $1.25 each and up. Or- 
ders booked now for eggs and baby chicks. 
Cash 10 days prior to shipment. Forrest- 
dnlo Poultry Farm, R. 2, Forrest, 111. 12-3 

liEFORE PLACING YOUR ORDER GET 
my prices on eggs and stock. S. C. Buff 
Orpingtons. Barred Rocks, Mammoth Bronze 
Turkeys and Indian Runner Duck.^s. Birds 
have farm range and are strong and healthv. 
Mrs. Higgs, R. 1, Henry, 111. 2-4 

BOURBON RED TURKEYS AND R. C. 
Brown I..eghorns our specialty. We also 
raise White Wyandottes, Tnilian Runner 
Ducks and Pearl Guineas. Eggs for hatch- 
ing at right prices. Mr. and Mrs, G. W. 
Price. Belmont, O. 2-3 

BLACK AND WHITE LANGSHANS EGGS 
for sale at $1,50 setting. Birds score 90 to 
94. Cockerels $3. pullets $2; pair $4: trios 
$5. My birds win wherever T take them. 
John fi: Gust Shonk. Lancaster, Ohio. 2-3 

TWO 2-YEAR-OLD COLUMBIAN WYAN- 
dotte cocks for sale at $5 each. Columbian 
Wyandotte and Barred Rock eggs $2 per 
13 from Al stock. Frederick Pfaff, Box 
638, Anadarko, Okla. 7-9-12 



EGGS $2 PER 13, 3 SETTINGS $5 FROM 
Kellerstrass Yhite Orpingtons and Brown 
& Coleman's Black Orpingtons. Black 
Minorca eggs 10 cents each, any quantity, 
Alson Indian Jiunncr Ducks of finest quality. 
Berry & Sawyer strain. J. A. Dickson, 42- 
Division St.. Ashtal>ula. O. ' 2-4 

CLAY HILL POl'LTRY FARM, FULTON. 
Iowa., .lay Bi-eeden, Piop. Breeder of Black 
Langshans. White and Silver Laced Wyan- 
dottes. Eggs from pens scoring ninety-five, 
$3 pel- 15; pens scoring ninety. $2. Cock- 
erels ff.r sale cheap. My bli-ds are prize 
winners. o.^ 

FINE HOURHOX MFA) TUIiKEV EGGS, $3 
per ten. Rhode Island Red eggs. $1 per 
1'; $5 uer hundred. Orders given prompt 
attention. Send me ytiuis. Mrs. A, G. Friesz 
Keytcsvill<\ Mo. ' 0.4 



BREEZE L,\WN POULTRY YARDS. MRS. 
Clara Reichenbach, prop., Coopersburg, Pa,, 
offers 500 yearling hens, pullets and cock- 
erels, from Reds. Rocks, Wyandottes, 
mas. Games. Cochin and Polish. 
$1.50 up. Show birds a matter of 
spondence. Eggs, $5 per 100, $1 per 




BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 



BARRED ROCKS AT ('LOSE PRICES. 
Either cockerel or pullet bred. Satisfaction 
guaranteed on all stock or eggs shipped. 
Eggs in season from fine pens, mated for 
best results. Have some good exhibition 
birds, J. W. Freeman, R. 4, Benton Har- 
fior. Mich. 12-3 



BARRED ROCK COCKERELS AND PUL- 
lets bred from first prize winners at Spring- 
field, Birds are good in all points and will 
please. Place egg orders now. Plymouth 
Rock Homer Pigeons, fine ones at right 
prices. Write Wm. R, Rollston. R. 9, Box 
24. Springfield. Mo. \2-3 

WATSON'S BARRED ROCKS HAVE NEV- 
er been defeated, and are better this year 
than ever. Have been breeding this strain 
ahe Royal Blue) for 14 years. My matings 
for 1910 will be very fine. Satisfaction 
guaranteed, Geo, W Watson Eldorado 
111; _ 12-3 

UTILITY BARRED ROCKS. FINE LAY- 
ers. Pullets. $1.50 to $3. Yearling hens, 
$2. Eggs any time after the first of Feb- 
ruary. Book your orders early. Eggs, 
$1.50 per 15. Samuel Wickham, Palmyra, 
Mich. i2-3 

GET MY CIRCULAR ON BARRED ROCKS. 
Have some fine ones for sale at prices that 
will surprise you, considering the quality. 
Let's get in touch with each other. I know 
I can please you. Egg orders booked. J. 
W. Bell, Box H.. Chetek. Wi.'^. 1-3 

BARRED ROCKS, HIGHEST QUALITY, 
Eggs from special prize matings, $1 and $2 
per 15; $5 per 100; utility flocks, $1 per 26; 
$3.50 per 100. Choice cockerels, $2 and $3 
each. Circular free. Chas. Spangler, Kent- 
land, Ind. 1-3 



BARRED ROCKS. O. C. K. STRAIN. 
Something grand In either cockerel or pullet 
matings. A few good exhibition cockerels 
and pullets. Prices reasonable for quality. 
Eggs, $3 per 15; $5 per 30. Write for mat- 
ing list. Mrs. Minnie McConaughy, Martelle, 
Iowa. 1.3 

"PEERLESS" BARRED ROCKS. BREED- 
ing Barred Rocks our exclusive business. 
Our manager a poultry expert. Breed only 
line bred stock. Announcement 1910 sent 
free. Fifty-cent booklet. "Incubation anr! 
Brooding," sent for 20 cents during Febru- 
ary, March and .-Vprll to all who mention 
this "ad." Our show record almost clean 
sweep in hot competition. We can please 
you. Peerless Poultry Plant, Inc., Clinton. 
Wis, 2-4 



• 




• 





^"-L" '» •!'>> ''' "'■^ y% 



l[ February, '10 




SPECIAL BARRED ROCK SALE. ON Ac- 
count of lack of time I will dispose of 2 
very good dark cocks, one pullet breeding 
cock, 25 cockerel bred hens and pullets and 
15 cockerels. Get prices now. Dr. F. A. 
Shuffelton, Saint Marys, O. 




BARRED ROCKS, KNOXDALE STRAIN. 
Well barred and very strong in vitality, 
good size and splendid layers. Stock pro- 
duced from careful mating with the double 
mating system. Eggs, $2 per setting; $S 
jier hundred. Orders given prompt atten- 
tion, C. W. Coleman, 200 Jeffras Ave., Find- 
hiy. <). 2-4 

THE FAMOl'S ORCHARD STRAIN BAR- 
red Plymouth Rocks, l)red for vitality and 
pi-odu<'tiveness. Eggs, $2 per 15. Send for 
booklet, "Starting with I^oultry." Orchard 
Poultry Farms, Doyiestown. Pa. (Hatching 
1 ).l)artment. ) 2-4 

RINGLET BARRED ROCKS. E. B. THOMP- 
SON strain. Nicely barred, good yellow 
legs, fine layers. 13 eggs $1, 26 for $1.50. 
Honorable dealing. Orders promptly filled. 
E. H. Harden. North East, Pa. 2-3 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

WHITE ROCKS — STOCK FOR SALE THAT 
will win in the show room and fill the egg 
basket. Our birds are big, white beauties, 
strong In all good points. Eggs from our 
choicest matings at living prices. Berwyn 
Poultry Yards. Box P. Berwyn, 111. 12-4 

QUALITY WHITE ROCKS. STANDARD 
bred, white, hardy and vigorous. They 
will improve your flock and raise you win- 
ners. Improved each year for fifteen years. 
Book vour orders for eggs now. Stock for 
sale. Mrs. C. .\. Brown. Toluca. Til. 12-3 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS WITH PURE 
white quills, bay eyes and yellow shanks. 
Stock scoring 961/^ in show room. Kansas 
City and state show winners. Scored stock 
for sale; prices right, quality considered. 
Mrs. L. L. Higgins. R. 1. S heldon, Mo. 12-3 

WHITE' ROCKS, PRIZE WINNING STOCK, 
Snow white cockerels. $2.50 up. One year- 
ling cock, few hens and pullets, trapnested. 
Fishel strain. Excellent layers. Three pens. 
Eggs, 15 for $3, $2 and $1. Send esg or- 
ders now. Rev. James A, Slack, Yorktown. 



la. 



12-3 




WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS— BREEDERS 
and exhibition birds for sale at reasonable 
prices. They have the size, shape and can 
win in the strongest class. Write F. F 
Carr. Kenton. O^ ^j^'-^ 

WHITE ROCKS. HEAVY WINTER LAY- 
ers. Pullets from this stock laying at 5 Va 
months this season without forcing. Not 
one dis.satlsfied customer last season. Book- 
ing e^R orders, $2 per 15. S. P. Evans. 3838 
E. TSth Street. Clevela nd. O. _«__ 

FISHEL STRAIN WHITE ROCKS EXCLU- 
sivelv. Eggs from first pen, $2 for 15; sec- 
ond pen. $1.50 per 15, 10 cockerels for sale, 
$2 to $5 each; pullets. $1.50 to $5 each. 
Order early. A. L. McLaughlin, Sparland, 

111. . hi 

WHITE R()(^KS EXCLUSIVELY. "FISHEL 
Strain." Eggs from large, snow white farm 
raised birds, 15 $1.50, 30 $2.50, 100 $6. 
Special pen of high scoring exhibition birds, 
(Russell. Judge,) $2.50 per 15. Jes.se C 
Brabazon, Route 4 . Box E^ Delavan, Wis. --4 

WHITE ROCKS, FISHEL STRAIN, CHALK 
white, grand shape. My birds are as good 
as the best. Eggs only $2 per 15. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. W. R. Greer. Auburn. 

Ind, . „ ."-1 

WALKER'S WHITE ROCKS AT NEW 
Castle won In a class of 63, 1st cock, 1st 
cockerel: 1st, 2d. 3d hen; 1st. 2d, 4th Pull/^t; 
1st, 2d hen. Eggs $3 and $5 Per 15. Bob 

Walker. 233 Porter St.. New Lastle. Pa. I-^ 

WHITE PLYMOUTH RO(^KS, WINNERS 
at Peoria. Ottawa, Galesburg. etc. Three 
vards, headed by exhibition and prize win- 
ning males. Eggs, $2 per 15. From good 
utility stock on range. $1 per 15, $3 per bO. 
Wm. C. Goodwin, Ch illicothe, 111. J-^ 

BUFF PLYMOUTH BOOKS. 



BUFF COCKS. ORDER EGCiS FROM 
(lualitv birds. Eggs from pen headed by 
New York and St. Louis winners. $5 per 15; 
others, $1, $2 and $3, John D Wilklns 
Pocahontas, 111. ^'^ 

BUFF ROCKS. THE FARMER'S FRIEND. 
Prize winners 1st cockerel, 2d pullet, at 
Jeffersonvllle, Ohio, Poultry Show, Dec, 
1909. Eggs. $2.50 the 15. The Buff Rock 
Poultrv Farm, Jeffersonvllle. O, 



1-3 



GOLDEN BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 
Large, golden, glittering buffs. Heavy layers 
of big, brown eggs. First prize winners at 
Chicago and other bigr shows. Eggs from 
prize winners. $3 per setting. Catalog free. 
P. C. Jungels, Box 1, Lemont, HI. 



POULTRY FANCIER 



WHY NOT GET THE BEST? I HAVE 
it In Buff Rocks and you can get It at 
prices usually asked for much lower qual- 
ity. A breeding bird or a few eggs from 
my yards will put you on top. Write 
me. Phil Fell, Buff Rock Specialist and 
Poultry Judge, Canal Dover. O. 3-09-12 

PARTRIDGE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 




WHY TAKE CHANCES? SEND ME YOUR 
order for Partridge Plymouth Rocks and 
you are sure of the best. Don't take my 
word for it. Look at my show record at 
Chicago, Detroit and other strong shows, 
consider the competition and you will see 
who has the quality. Some choice breeders 
at reduced prices and young stock that will 
please, Paul LaFromboise, Mt. Pleasant, 
Mich 4.<)_i2 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES, NOTED PRE- 
mler strain. Farm raised, blocky, white, 
unexcelled layers, vigorous constitutions, 
l^lne bred cockerels, $5 to $10; cocks. $5 to 
$10; pullets, $2 to $3; hens. $2 to $3; eggs, 
$3 to $10. W. H, Humlston, Cleveland, 
Ohio. 12-3 

BUSINESS WHITE WYANDOTTES. OURS 
are great layers, have farm privileges, essen- 
tial to success. We aim above all to please 
customers. Write your wants. Stock, $3 
to $5 each. Eggs, $1.50 per setting. C. 
N'. Hostetter, Manheim. Pa. 1-3 

SUTTON'S WHITE WYANDOTTES WIN 
again. On an entry of sixteen birds I won 
1st cock. 3rd cockerel, 2nd hen, 1st, 3id 
pens, 1st, 2nd pullets, silver cup, best dis- 
play, best cock hen, cockerel, pullet and 
pen. More prizes, than all competitors. 
Eggs $10 antl $5 per 15. F. D. Sutton. 68 
St. Louis .\ve., Voungstown. Ohio. 2 4 

WHITE WYANDOTTES — EGGS FOR SALE 
from choice m.atings. Strong, vigorous stock, 
l)iire wliite and good shape. Write for circu- 
lar containing prices and description. Men- 
tion this paper. Richard Bloom, Fulton, 
Mo. 2-4 

EGGS PROM MORROW'S PRIZE WINNING 
White Wyandotes. At Montezuma. la., I 
won 1st pen, first, second sweepstakes. Eggs 
from exhibition matings, $3 per 15; other 
grand matings, $2 per 15. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. Address Frank Morrow, Barnes 
City, Iowa, 2-4 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. HAVE BRF:D THEM 
since 1805. making me the oldest breeder 
of this variety In Ohio. Y''oung stock from 
my Chicago and Cleveland winners. Eggs 
fi-om the l)est matings I ever had, $3 per 15. 
\'. Crabtree. Tiffin, (::)hi(\ 2-4 

THIMSEN. BUFF WYANDOTTE SPECIAL- 
1st. Eggs from Buff Wyandottes that win in 
the strongest competition. Eggs from pen, 
1, $3 per 15; pen 2 and 3, $2 per 15. If 
you are in the market for stock or eggs I 
/ can please you. F. P. Thimsen, Blooming 
Prairie, Minn. 5-9-12 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES. 

REE'PMEYER'S SILVER LACED WYAN- 
dottes in good competition won 6 firsts, 6 
seconds. 3 thirds, $10 special and Presi- 
dent's Silver Cup. Best display, all varieties 
competing at Schenectady, N. Y., big show. 
Breeders or show birds for sale. J. Reep- 
meyer. Crai- Schdy. Co., N. Y. 1-3 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES. A SPEC- 
ialty. My pens are line-bred and prize win- 
ners, scoring 91 to 93 V^, They are bred to 
lay, weigh and win. Eggs for hatching, $2 
per 15, or $3 per 30. Try a setting. 1 
guarantee satisfaction. Peter J. Becker, 
Geneseo. 111. 2-4 

NELLIS' SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES, 
I'rize winners wherever shown. Score at the 
big show of The Western Connecticut Poul- 
try Association held at Wlnsted, Conn., 1907- 
1909: 911^, 92, 92, 92%, 94 »4; pen. 184 1/^. 
First and third pullet, third cock. Eggs 
for setting, $3 for 13. Orders booked now. 
E. A. Nellis, Wlnsted, Conn. 2-3 

PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES. 

I'ARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES, WINNERS 
at Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Shelbyvllle and 
Greensburg. Stock and eggs for sale. Stock 
$2 to $25. Eggs $3.50 per 15. Walter Rob- 
bins, R. 6, Greensburg, Ind, 2-1 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. LOOKING 
for good blocky shaped ones, nicely laced 
tails, clean hackles? Farm raised from New 
York and Boston winners. Great vigor. Eggs 
very fertile. You must be satisfied or Its 
no sale. Address Ralph Woodward, Box 82, 
Grafton, Mass. 1-3 




Page 55 



COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES A SPECIAL- 
ty. Prize winners and good layers. My 
pens this year are better than ever, headed 
by finely marked cockerels. I am now ready 
to book orders for eggs. Prices reasonable. 
Cockerels for sale, J, A. Roscoe, Norwalk, 
O^ 12-3 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES, THE GREAT 
coming variety. A few trios and pens for 
sale. Birds scoring 90 to 93^4. Will furnish 
score cards if preferred. Book orders now 
for eggs and baby chicks. Jacob Gerig, 
Noble, la, 12-3 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. EGGS FROM 
choice matings, the same that I use to pro- 
duce my prize winners, $3 per setting. Fine 
trios. $7 to $10. O. R. Eddy, Box F. Ocono- 
niowoe. Wis. .t-9-12 



BUFF COLUMBIANS. 



START NOW WITH A RISING BREED. 
Buff Columbians are the coming buffs. No 
finer birds anywhere than In my "Origina- 
tor's Strain." E^tra setting free to first 
1910 customer from each state. Correspond- 
ence will do you good. Edwin Cone, Mus- 
kegon. Mich. 12-3 

ORPINGTONS. 



THIS WAY FOR COCKEREL BARGAINS 
In S. C, Buff Orpingtons, Fine, large, 
strong, vigorous birds, true Orpington type 
and fine color, bred from a prize winning 
strain. Get prices. Can please you. Five 
choice pens mated for eggs. Place orders, 
W. I. H arrington, Brunswick. O. 12-3 

150 S. C, BUFF ORPINGTONS AT PRICES 
that will satisfy, quality considered. Have 
pleased many. Let us show you. Get our 
egg circular after Feb. 1 and place your 
order early. Major Griffin, R. 27, Glenwood, 
Ind, 12-3 

BOOK ON ORPINGTONS! SEND 10c TO- 
day for club book! Tells why Blacks are 
best of Orpingtons. The favorite of all who 
breed the three varieties together. Tells of 
Australian Government proof of laying su- 
premacy; most rapidly maturing fowl; 
largest per cent of white meat; largest and 
most beautiful of Orpingtons. Milton 
Brown, Secretary, Cheviot Poultry Farms, 
Cincinnati. O. 12-10 

ORPINGTONS. SINGLE COMB BUFF, 
Choice cockerels and pullets for sale, $2, $3 
and $5 each. Large early hatched birds. 
Eggs for sale after Feb. 1 from six pens at 
$2 per 15, $10 per 100. B, S, Long, Little 
Sioux, la. 12-3 

S, C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. EVERY ONE 
a show bird, winners in the leading shows 
of Northern New York, Cockerels, $5 and 
up. Orders booked for eggs at $2 and $3 
per 15. Day old chicks, 25 cts. each. 
Brook View Stock Farms, Rte, 3, Pulaski, 
N, Y. 12-4 

FOR THE BEST ORPINGTONS'. ANY OF 
the varieties, you must send to their origi- 
nators, who, naturally, have the best. Send 
six cents for catalog, history of Orpingtons 
and hints on Poultry keeping. William Cook 
& Sons, Box C., Scotch Plains. N. J. 
1-10- 12 

12 FINE S. C. WHITE ORPINGTON COCK- 
erels, $2.50 to $6, according to score. These 
birds will put new vigor in your flocks. 
Have mated some extra fine pens. eggs. $3 
per 15; 30 for $5. You will be sure to be 
pleased If you send me your order. Jas. 
C. Olson, Harlan, Iowa. 1-3 

SINGLE COMB BUFF AND KELLER- 
strass White Orpingtons. Eggs from 3 pens 
Buffs correctly mated. $2, $3 and $5 per 15. 
I..imlted number eggs from 2 pens extra 
fine Whites $5 and $10 per 15, Circular 
free. Alice J. Morrlss. Big Rock. 111. 1-3 

S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. OWEN BROS', 
strain. Pine stock for sale from prize win- 
ners. Eggs from choice mated pens. Prices 
within reach of all. Mrs. H, Wedderspoon, 
Cooperstown, N. Y., Perthmoose Farms. 
1-3 

BLACK ORPINGTON CARRY THE 

world's record for best winter layers. Eggs 
for hatching in season. Scored cockerels for 
sale. Write me for prices. W. J. Schmltt, 
Donnellson, Iowa. 1-3 

(^LEAN SWEEP ON S. C. BUFF ORPING- 
tons at Omaha and Lincoln. Neb., winning 
1st cockerel, 1st pullet and Ist pen at each 
show, besides other prizes and specials, plac- 
ing our Buffs unquestionably In advance of 
competition In the middle west. Ask for 
free 1910 mating list. Prewltt, Box W. 
Onawa, Iowa. 2-3 

S. C. WHITE, BLACK. BUFF AND DIA- 
mond .Tubllee Orpington eggs, $2 for 15; 
chicks three weeks old, 40c each; all guar- 
anteed. Hamilton & Kaufman, Two Rivers, 
Wis. 2-5 




Page 56 







S. C. BUFF ORPINGTONS FROM CIITCA- 
go. New York and Canadian winners. Will 
have but one very choice pen of rich, even 
colored birds. Sound in hacltle and saddle. 
Bggs $10 per 15. Few cockerels to spare. 
V. Crabtree. Tfffln. O. 0-4 



S. C. BUFF ORPINGTONS. Mv 
the size, shape and that deep.' 
color. Every breeding pen headed 
first prize bird. Egrgs $3 per setting, 
for circular. Club member. H. A. 
Kinsman. O. 



bird.s liave 

rich under 

bv a 

Write 

Sislev. 

2-1 



RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS THAT 
are right. Prize winners at leading Missouri 
shows. Can please the most exacting. Cor- 
respondence answered promptly. Place esE 
orders now. Grand pens mated, headed by 
cockerels from first prize pen at Trenton 
f5how. Day old chicks. Write Arthur S. 
Clapp. T"^nionville. Mo. 12-."^ 



BE IN THE FASHION AND RAISE 
Rhode Island Reds. Some choice Rose Comb 
cockerels and pullets at prices that will suit 
you. Let me fill your order. Eggs when 
you want them. Place order now. Wiiber 
Bellows. L. Box 405. Anoka, Minn. 12-3 

25 R. C. RED COCKERELS'. $2 TO $3 
each, according to quality. Some dandles 
among the lot. Get your pick. All fine big 
birds. Eggs, .$1 per 15. Book your orders 
now. Red and White Poultrv Farm, Colts 
Neck. N. J. 12-3 

R. C. AND S. C. RHODE ISLAND RED 
cocks and cockerels. Have good color and 
shape, descendants of Buffalo and Boston 
winners: some have score cards. My birds 
were winners at Oconomowoc, Milwaukee 
and Waukesha. Prices reasonable. Egg or- 
ders booked now. Chas. G. Wheeler, Dous- 
man. Wis. 12-3 

S. C. R. I. REDS. SELECT COCKERELS 
for sale. Healthy, vigorous, good color and 
free from smut. My stock has won the 
blue ribbons in strongest competition for 
seven years. Write for description. Eggs 
for sale. V. Hlbner. Aurora, 111. 12-3 

MEADOW LAWN POULTRY YARDS. 
Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds exclusively. 
Some nice, large cockerels for sale from 
prize winners at leading shows. Eggs from 
choice matings In season. Send for mating 
list. Correspondence solicited. H. .1. Mil- 
ler. Albert T.,ea. Minn. 12-3 

E. S. BECKER. PROP. GLEN VIEW 
Poultry Farm, Route 3, Elmira, N. Y.. 
offers fine bargains in high scoring S. C 
Rhode Island Reds. Book orders now for 
eggs and day old chicks. Several fine cock- 
erels for sale. Correspondence solicited. 

12-3 

MY ROSE AND SINGLE COMB RHODE 
Island Reds are first prize winners wherever 
shown. Won the lion's share at Sprlngflelrl 
and Holyoke. Can send you birds that will 
improve your flock. Eggs. $3 per setting. 
Valley Farm, 94 East Main St., Amherst. 
Mass. 1-3 

SINGLE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS 
Exclusively. I showed 6 pullets and 4 cock- 
erels at Peoria. 111., Dec, 1909, and won 8 
prizes. I showed no old birds. Will sell 
the four cockerels. Also eggs In season. 
Write for prices and matings. Davis Crows. 
Hanna City. 111. 

S. C. R. I. RED COCKERELS FOR SALE. 
Fine birds at reasonable prices. Eggs from 
best matings at $2 per 15. Free range 
stock, $1 per 15; $5 per 100. Mrs. H. L. 
Alsop. Sylvia. Iowa. 1-3 

HIGH CLAS^ S. C. R. I. REDS FOR SALE. 
Original birds direct from Lester Tompkins. 
Scoring 91 to 93. Eggs from pens 1, 2. 3, 
$1, $2. and $3 per 15. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed. Isaac H. Painter, Chrisney. Ind. 

1-3 

LIBERAL POULTRY YARD. SINGLE 

Comb Rhode Island Reds. Eggs: First 
pen, $2.50 per 15; second pen, $2 per 15; 
third pen, $1.50 per 15. Incubator eggs 
from other pens, $4 per 100; farm range, 
$2.50 per 100. C. I. W. Adkisson. Galatla, 
111. 1-4 

ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS. WON 
first at Peoria. Dec. 14 to 18. 1909; first 
at Lincoln, Dec. 14 to 17, 1909. Eggs. $3. 
$2 and $1 per 15. Utility, $5 per 100. .7 
B. Garber, Hopedale. 111. 1-3 

TO BREEDERS OF S. C. R. I. REDS. I 
have a limited number of eggs to sell from 
my prize winning pen. None better. F. C. 
Eldridge & Son, Bourne. Mass. 9-9-12 

SINGLE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS. 
Eggs In season from excellent laying strain. 
Pen No. 1, $2 per 15; pen No. 2, $1.50 per 
15. Utility flock. $1 per 15 or $5 per 
hundred. Mrs. Harvey Trultt, R. 1, Farm- 
Ington, 111. 1-3 



H.VVE YOU DECIDED WHERE YOU ARE 
going to place your order for S. C. R. I. 
Red, stock of eggs. If not, write a postal 
to U. S. A Poultry Yards, Antwerp, O., for 
their catalog. Six years exclusive breeding. 
2-4 

CHOICE fiJNGLE COMB RHODE ISLAND 
Reil cockerel.s for sale. Eggs In season, all 
frcm excellent sock. Maple Grove College 
Poultry Yards. Miss Minnie Alston. R. 3. 
Coulrcrville. III. 2-\ 

ROSE COMB REDS. AFTER FIVE YEARS 
careful mating for eggs, size, shape and 
color, (uir Keds lay Hive T..eghorns, and grow 
like IMymouth Rocks, with female plumage, 
that pure deep red. First time to offer 
( ,i?gs from these grand Reds. Prize win- 
ners in fM'ery pen. Eggs $2 per lu; $3 per 
30. Sample feathers. Ernest E. Lienard, 
Route S. Box 21. Lancaster, O. 2-1 



LANGSHANS. 



TWELVE YEARS A BREEDER OP BLACK 
Langshans exclusively. Some nice cockerels 
bred from prize winners for sale. Eggs after 
March 1, I'JIO, at $1.50 per 15. Write your 
wants to Mrs. L. A. McCracken, Bonaparte, 
Iowa. 12-3 

THE QUALITY OF MY BLACK LANG- 
shans is proved by their show record. You 
don't take chances when you send me your 
order. I can start you right or Improve 
your flock with some of the grand birds I 
now have for sale. Scores to 95 M; In 
show room. Prices right. Eggs in season. 
Write me. Mrs Frank Camerer, Gazette, 
Mo. 1-6 



L'l YEARS A BREEDER OF THE BEST 
Black Langshans. Have a show record un- 
der leading judges unequaled by any other 
l)reeder. Male birds each season score to 
!>5^. females 96 1/2- Buy where you know 
that you will get the highest quality at 
reasonable prices. Have some grand cocks 
and cockerels to spare, scoring from 94 
to 9514; also some extra choice hens. Made 
a clean sweep at the Eastern Wisconsin 
show this season and won silver cup for 
best pen in the show three years, all breeds 
competing, score 191%. A. Stranskv. Pres. 
Eastern Wis. Poultry & P. S. Assn., Chilton. 
yi^- 11-9-lL' 

i'RIZE WINNING BLACK AND WHITE 
Lang.shan eggs, .'52 per setting from pens 
headed by blue ribbon winning male birds 
W. H. Hefner. R3. Colu mbia City. Ind. 2-4 

I AM THE WHITE LANGSHAN MAN. 
liirds fine as silk. Eggs for setting, 3 
from each of five pens at $2 ner sotting. 
Kirst premium winners at the largest show 
in the west. R. S. Messner. C. No. 18. Rock- 
ford, 111. 'y,2 



BUFF COCHINS. 



OUR BUFF COCHINS HAVE FOR YEARS 
been acknowledged leaders. Their record at 
the largest shows has placed them in the 
front rank. My birds have been given the 
highest possible scores by many of Ameri- 
ca's leading Judges. They are clear buff 
true to type and grandly feathered. My 
Buff Bantams are equally as good. Eggs 
$3 and $5 per 15. Leslie Parlin, 19 Phalen 
Ave., St. Paul, M inn. 3-9-12 

SOME DANDY BUFF COCHIN COCKER- 
els for sale. Hanchett strain, good buff 
color. Only a limited to dispose. Write 
quick if you want one. Correspondence an- 
swered promptly. C. J. L. Ware, 551 Marl- 
boro St.. Keene, N. H. 12-3 

BUFF COCHIN SPECIALIST TEN YEARS. 
Have two finest pens mated for the egg 
trade in the United States, bred from the 
world's best winners at leading shows. Val- 
uable illustrated catalogue for stamp, show- 
ing prices and winnings. S. Berger, Pleasant 
Hill. O. 12-3 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 



SUNCREST SINGLE COMB WHITE LEG- 
horns. Line bred ten years. We have 
pleased hundreds of customers. Can please 
you. Write for catalogue. Suncrest Poultry 
Farm, R. 1. Box F. Grand Rapids, Mich. 
3-9-12 

«^ C. WHITE LEGHORN EGGS' FO^ 
hatching after Feb. 1, from heavy laying 
standard bred stock, at $1 per 15, $4 per 100 
Fertility and .satisfaction guaranteed. C. H 
Zurburg, R. 1.. Tope ka. 111. 12-3 

BUFF COCHINS FOR SALE, HENS, PUL- 
lets or trios. My stock Is first class. Won 
27 prizes In 1909. Send In your order now 
lor eggs. Win ship when you want them. 
.J. C. Baughman. Topeka, Kan. 2-3 

BLAKE'S S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS WIN 
at Springfield. 1st cock, 1st hen and 3d 
cockerel, 5 entries. At Madison Square, New 
York., I made 3 entries, winning 1st pullet 
Egg.s $2 per setting. W. J. Blake. Burn- 
side. Conn, 2-10-13 



SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORNS FOR 
sale from leading prize winning strains. 
Good shape and color cocks, $1.50; hens 
and pullets, $1 each. I am selling out 
my entire stock of Leghorns, therefore will 
make these low prices. E. H. Olson, R. 1. 
Thor, Iowa. 1-2 

BARGAINS IN S. C. WHITE LEGHORN 
cockerels $1 and $2 each for dandy birds. 
Order now and get your pick. Eggs $1 
and $2 per 1"., according to quality. Either 
mated pen or range flock. Reasonat)ie hatch 
guaranteed. .James Keegan. R. 1, Box 72. 
Thor. Iowa. 2-4 



SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORNS. 
Choice stock for sale. We make a spec- 
ialty of supplying breeders with foundation 
stock. Prices from $2 to $10 for pullets 
and cockerel.s. according to merit. Eggs 
for liatching. $2 per 15; %'> per 50. Boavor 
Dam Poultry Farm. Montgomery. .V. Y. 2-r; 

R. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 

I OFFER Y'OU THE HIGHEST QUALITY 
in R. C. White Leghorns, both in stock and 
eggs and my prices are reasonable. Some 
choice trios for sale. Eggs from my Chi- 
cago first prize pen shipped promptly. My 
l>irds are first prize winners at Chicago In 
competition with the best in the west. Mrs. 
W. Jones Williams, The Maples, Mavwood. 
Til. ' 2-4 

liOSE COMi: WIIITIO F.EGHORNS, THE 
woiid's record for best layers. Have bred 
Leghorns for nineteen years. Get the best — 
"Phillips Strain." Eggs $3 per 15; stock 
for sale. Write for catalog. Rockv Vallev 
Poultry Co.. No. 66 "The Oaks." Deerfield, 
TH. 2-3 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 



S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS, BRED FOR 
shape, color and laying qualities. Pullet 
bred cockerels, the finest show and laying 
breeders in existence, cheap. H. M. Moyer. 
R. 2, Bechtelsville, Pa. 11-9-12 

20 CHOICE S. C. BROWN LEGHORN 
cockerels at special prices to close out. De- 
scribe just what you want. I know I can 
please you. Egg orders booked now, either 
Brown or Buff Leghorns. Prices right. O. 
R. Rice, Delavan, Wis. 12-3 

PRAY'S POULTRY FARM. PRAY'S S. C. 
Brown Leghorns have been bred for show 
purposes and heavy e^E production. Have 
free range and are fine. Show birds, $5 
each; breeding cockerels, $2; eggs, $1.50 to 
$3 for 15, $6 per 100. Geo. L. Pray, Ovid 
St.. So. Elsie. Mich. 12-3 

INVINCIBLE S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS 
won four fii-sts, Athens. 1910. Cock scoring 
93%. pullets 91, pen 180%. Eggs. $2 to $3. 
Mating list ready soon. Harry T, Trainer, 
Carpenter, Ohio. u-!»-12 

R. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 



R. C. BROWN LEGHORN (242-EGG 
strain), female line, eggs and stock for .sale 
reasonable, according to quality. I won the 
highest honors on all that I entered at 
last Schenectady show. Correspondence 
licited. Wm. Gaffey, South Worcester, 



the 

so- 

N. 

2-4 



BUFF LEGHORNS. 



S. C. BUFF LEGHORNS— SOME FINE 
cockerels for sale. They are beauties at $2. 
$3 and 5 each, sired by a son of first cock. 
Madison Square Garden, 1908. Eggs, $2 per 
15. F. D. Kemp, Sparta, Wis. 12-4 

ROSE COMB BUFF LEGHORNS. OUR 
birds are good layers, large and healthy 
with good combs and good buff color. Just 
the kind you want. Eggs, $1 for 15, $5 for 
100. No stock for sale. Sunnyside Poultrv 
Farm, C. C. Glasgo, Loud onville. O. 1-3 

BUFF LEGHORNS, SINGLE COMB. BRED 
from Chicago winners. Two pens mated. 
Produce show specimens only. Low, well 
spread tails guaranteed. Elegant, golden 
even buff. Eggs, $3 per 15, produce speci- 
mens equaling the best. Dr. C. E. Hoover, 
i'ldgerton. O. 1.3 

BLACK MINORCAS. 



ROSE COMB BLACK MINORCAS. EXHI- 
bition and breeding cockerels, $2 up. Pure 
Northup strain. Grand large birds. EVery 
one a bargain. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Circulars. Eggs, $2 for 15. Book your or- 
ders now. James F. Gleason, Michigan City 
I"<1- __^^^^ ^2-3 

PURE ROSE COMB BLACK MINORCAS. 
A few choice cockerels for sale, bred from 
winning stock at the leading shows In this 
state. Book your egg orders early from 
three choice pens. Dr. E. H. Drews", Madi- 
son, Wis. 12-3 



• 




• 





• .• 



MUST SELL AT ONCE. FEW VERY FINE 
K. C. Black cockerels from my noted "Oul- 
cout" Minorca. Booking egg orders. Blacks 
and whites. Pullet record, 27 eggs In 
Jan., 1909. Six ribbons on 7 entries 1909 
Oscar F. Sampson, Franklin, N. Y. 1-3 

I BREED FOR QUALITY AND SIZE. S 
C. Black Minorca eggs, $2 per 13. Cockerels 
for sale. I. Allison, Flore nce, Neb. 1-4 

SINGLE COMB BLACK MINORCAS, Ex- 
clusive winners of 5 firsts at Shelbyvllle 
Lebanon and Sheridan poultry shows. 
Scores, 93 to 94^, by Judges McCracken, 
Kummer and Greer. Eggs, $1.50 and $2 
per 15. Fertility guaranteed. H, A. Brat- 
lin, Brazil, Ind. ^.3 

S-^?.^ ^^^^ BLACK AND ROSE COMB 
\\hite Minorcas. First prize winners at 
New Yoiii. Chicago, St. Louis and all large 
shows. Breeding stock and eggs for hatch- 
ing guaranteed. Large stock. Great layers 
Catalog mailed free. G. A. Clark, Sey- 
mour Ind. ' j^3 

BLACK MINORCAS, ROSE AND SINGLE 
^"^h ^?'*^at size and shape. Pens headed 
by Madison Square and Rochester winners 
Stock and eggs. Circular. M V AIIpo' 
Ovid, N. Y. 2-1 

GLEN OAK MINORCA YARDS. ROSE 
Comb Black Minorcas exclusively. Clean 
sweep at Peoria with one single exception 
which resulted in a tie. Stock and eggs 
guaranteed. $2.50 per 15; $6 per 50- JIO 
per 100. Charles White. Route 36. Peoria 

ilL 2-4 

ROSE COMB BLACK MINORCAS. WIN- 
ners of 7 first and 3 cups at AUantown, 
Wiiiamsport and Scranton this season! 
Judge T. F. McGrew, In reporting Scranton's 

?^^}lZ ^^''^' ^^y""'- '•M''- Tobey has on 
exhibition a:n number of specimens of such 
remarkable quality as to call for the high- 
est praise; anyone who can rear Black Min- 
orcas and show them In such beautiful con- 
dition, has the right to claim the honor of 
being an expert with poultry." C E Tobev 
Scranto n, Pa. ' 2-3 

SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURGS. 

SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURGS. STAN- 
dard bred. Lot of fine cockerels, some few 
choice pullets, for sale. Great layers. Egg 
orders booked now for spring delivery. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Denton Wareheim 
T.iincboro. Md. 11-i 

FOR SALE— LINE BRET) SILVER SPANG- 
led Hamburgs. Winners 17 ribbons one 
?l^?.y-.. ^^®° highest scoring eight birds, 
vv 111 dispose of cocks, hens, cockerels pul- 
lets. Eggs in season. None better for 
breeding and eggs. Write Wauconda Poul- 
try Farm, Benton Harbor, Mich. 12-3 

FAVEROLLES. 



BREED SALMON FAVEROLLES. CAN 
send you some fine ones, all bred from 
first prize winners at leading shows. This 
popular breed of French fowls is unexcelled 
for utility and fancy. Egg orders booked 
for spring delivery. C. P. McAndrew, Ells- 
worth, Wis, 11-8 

CORNISH 



CORNISH FOWL. MADISON SQUARE, 
Jamestown Exposition. Allentown, Trenton, 
Hagerstown, Philadelphia winners. Old and 
young stock for sale. Egg orders booked 
now. Circular free. R. D, Reider, Middle- 
town, Pa. 12-3 



POLISH. 



WHITE CRESTED BLACK POLISH. LINE 
bred for 26 years. Winners at World's Fair, 
New York and Boston. Remember that See- 
ly is the veteran Polish breeder of America. 
Stock for sale; eggs In season. Chaa. L. Seely, 
Pres. Am. Po lish Club, Afton, N. Y. 5-9-12 

W. C. B. POLISH. A FEW CHOICE 
cockerels for sale. Bred from winneis at 
Herkimer, Utica, Rochester and Buffalo. 
Birds are sure to please. Eggs after Feb. 
15. Don't fall to get my prices. Warren 
W. Dickens, l^ox 93, Middleville, N Y. 1-3 



BANTAMS. 



RARE BARGAINS. GOLDEN AND SILVFIR 
Sebright, Buff and Black Cochin, Rose Comb 
Black and Black Red Game Bantams. High- 
est honors New York. 800 birds. Proper & 
Co., Sc hoharie. N. Y. 8-9-12 

GOLDEN SEABRIGHT BANTAMS FOR 
sale. Birds scoring 93 to 96%. Won at 
Newton, 111., in lively competition, first cock, 
first and second cockerel, first, second and 
third pullet. Eggs after March 1, |3 per 
setting. Dale Arnold, Newton, 111. 1-4 



GOLDEN & SILVER SEABRIGHTS' EGG8 
for sale from pens scoring from 93 V^ to 96 
The best in the west. $2 per 15. Middle 
West Bantamry, Lock Box 23, Rolfe, Iowa. 



HOUDANS. 



HOUDANS. WINNERS WHEREVER 

shown. Ist at Phila.. Allentown. Norrls- 
town. Pa.. 1908. Phila., 1909, fifteen rib- 
bons with ten entries. Stock and eggs for 
^* ®-u4 *^- JF^^en Smith. Chestnut Hill, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 3-9-12 

CHOICE HOUDANS. Cocks, cockerels, hens 
and pullets to close out at reasonable prices. 
Write, stating just what you want. Supply 
limited. Order at once If you want a bar- 
gain. Birds are good in all points and will 
give satisfaction. J. B. Belknap, R. 3, 
Council B luffs. Iowa. 12-3 

HOUDAN EGGS FROM McAVOY'S AND 
Dr. Taylor's strain. Have raised them 3 
years. Have 50 pullets and hens, from 
which will ship eggs for hatching at $1.50 
for 15, or $7 per 100. J. D. Payne, Water- 
loo, Ind. i_3 

IT IS A RECOGNIZED FACT THAT "Q & 
B." Houdans are "the best." If you start 
with "the best" you will save time, money 
and annoyance. If you want a flock of prize 
winners and record layers, demand "Q & 
B." Houdans. Write for our beautiful de- 
scriptive catalog; It is free. Eggs, $2.50, 
$5 and $10 per 15; ten chicks guaranteed to 
hatch. Quimby & Brown, 109-U High St., 
Ipswich, Mass. 2-4 

HOUDANS — MY BREEDERS ARE TRAP- 
nested and bred for eggs; also have some 
fine show birds. Won all flrstp and 2 
seconds on 6 entries. Eggs pen 1 $2 per 11 
pen 2 $1.50 per 15; guarantee 10 fertile or 
replace setting free. John C. Meyer. R 9 
Oconto Fal ls. Wis. 2-4 

LARGE CRESTED, HEAVY LAYING HOU- 
dans. Eggs from four grand pens. Ten 
.Vears a breeder. Guarantee good hatch. My 
first year with Orpingtons, Whites and 
Blacks. Hattie P. Franks. Worth, 111. 5-9- 12 

LABLENVELDERS. 



LAKENVELDER'S. FOUND AT LAST 

what this paper is dedicated to: "The 
most beautiful in fowls." Exhibition stock 
Eggs in season. Anson van Voorhees Mar- 
shall, Mich. ' 2-4 

DORKINGS 



SILVER GRAY DORKINGS. BEST TABLE 
fowls. Splendid layers year around; New 
York and Boston winners. Finest yards in 
America. See Camplne advertisement. 

Cherry Grove Farm. M. R. Jacobus, Prop., 
Ridgefield. N . J. ' 3-6 

SILVER CAMPINES. 



SILVER CAMPINES. ORIGINAL INTRO- 
ducer improved strain Belgiums. Great egg 
producers. Largest white eggs. First prize 
whitest dozen eggs in show, Boston, 1910. 

§?dgeLid:T j':""'"^' "^ ^- ^^*^«^"«' ^-p«' 



GAJVIES. 



CrAMES — INDIAN GAMES, WINNERS 
wherever shown. If you want a show bird 
or breeder write me. I have the goods. 
Grand lot cockerels; also 30 pit game cocks 
and stags. 18 years a breeder and exhibitor 
l^ggs in season. J. Boyce. Summitville! 
^- y- 12-3 

DOMINIQUES. 



DAVENPORT'S AMERICAN DOMINIQUES 
won at New York 1908 every first prize of- 
fered; 1909 six of the ten firsts and seconds 
Write for circulars and prices. W. H. Dav- 
enport. Coleraine, Mass. 5-9-12 



BABY CHICKS. 



E AND D. HATCHERY, YARDLEY. PA. 
shippers of day-old chicks and egg.s from 
high grade stock of the leading varieties 
Express paid and safe arrival guaranteed 
east of the Mississippi river. Write for 
list of varieties and prices 1.3 



PHEASANTS. 



PHEASANT BREEDING PAYS 800 P»R 
cent better than chicken raising. A pair of 
pheasants ar« worth from $26.00 to $150.00 
to a breeder yearly. Read the Reliable 
I'heasarit Standard, the recognized authority 
on pheasant breeding, and learn all about 
this rich Industry. 75 cents a copy by mail 
from A. V. M«»rsch, Poughkeepsle. New 
York. 9-08-tf 



ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANTS, $5 A 
pair. China Ringneck Pheasants, $7.50 a 
pair. Write Jennie Milner. Bloomington. 



Ill 



•-• 



TURKEYS. 



BRONZE TURKEYS. First cockerel, sec- 
ond, third, fourth pullet, first pen at Illi- 
nois state show 1909; first cockerel, first 
pullet at Peoria. 1908. William Ringhouse, 
R. 2, Box Y. H avana. 111. 3-9-12 

FOR SALE MAMMOTH BRONZE TUR- 
keys. A fine strain of good layers, large 
bone and frame, and nicely marked; bred 
from prize winning stock from Madison 
Square Garden. Order early. Prices rea- 
sonable considering quality. Mrs. Mary 
Schoonma ker. R. 1, Meshoppen, Pa. 1-4 

BRONZE TURKEY EGGS. $2 PER 10, AND 
genuine Wild Mallard Duck eggs, $1.50 
per 10. Order early. Will ship when 
wanted. H. W. Fairall, Iowa City, Iowa. 

1-4 

" - ■ - 

DUCKS AND GEESE. 



THOROUGHBRED TOULOUSE GEESE'. 
$10 and $12 per pair. My geese are prize 
winners. Fancy White Rocks and Rouen 
Ducks. Eggs in season from each variety. 
Mrs. L. L. Swinford. Oakland. 111. 12-3 

BLACK CAYUGA DUCKS AND WHITE 
Holland Turkeys for sale. Also a few Afri- 
can Geese (females only). Let me book 
your orders now for eggs from the above 
varieties. Satisfactory hatches guaranteed. 
Correspondence solicited. Floyd S. Beau- 
mont. R. 15. Kansasville, Wis. 12-3 

PIGEONS. 

I OFFER GUARANTEED MATED HOMERS 
in any quantity, at $1.00 a pair, and chal- 
lenge squab corapaaies or dealers to produce 
better stock at twice this price. Beautiful 
White Homers. $1.50 a pair. Get my prices 
on Runts. Carneaux and Maltese Hens, and 
save dollars. Charles K. Gilbert, 1563 East 
Montgomery Ave.. Philadelphia. Pa. 8-9-121 

WANTED— 5,000 COMMON OR HOMER 
Pigeons. Pay at least 25c pair. Higliest 
prices paid for Guinea Fowls. Live Rabbits 
and Guinea Pigs. S. Gilbert, 1128 Palmer 
St., Philadelphia, Pa. 12-5 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

•WANTED"-- -PIGEON DUNG. WRITE 

Pflster & Vogel Leather Co., Milwaukee, 
Wis., for prices, etc. 10-3 

A FINE 160-ACRE FARM IN THE WHEAT 
belt of Kansas. 19 miles from Abilene, 
county seat Dickinson county. Four miles 
from R. R. Now being used for pasture, 
good wire fence, good water the year round. 
Will sell below the market on reasonable 
terms. Non-resident widow owns it and 
has no use for it. Some improvements. 
Address K. F., care Poultry Fancier, 357 
Dearborn St., Chicago. 111. 

"WANTED" — PIGEON DUNG. WRITE 
Pflster & Vogel Leather Co., Milwaukee, 
Wis., for prices, etc. 1-3 

POULTBY SUPPLIES. 

POULTRY P^EED — PRICE PER 100 LBS. 
Beef scraps $2.75, meat and bone $2.25, 
ground bone $2.25, hen scratching grains 
$1.85, chick scratching grains $2, poultry 
mash $1.80, pigeon grain $2.25, alfalfa 
clover meal $1.50, crushed oyster shells 
65c, crushed clam shells 60c, mica crystal 
grit 65c, pearl grit 60c, medicated charcoal 
$1.50. The meat and bone, shells, grit 
and charcoal In both hen and chick size. 
Give us a trial order. J. G. Hermann & 
Co.. Indianapolis. Ind. 11-6 

PRINTING. 



PRINTING — POULTRY. GENERAL, NOTE- 
heads, envelopes, postcards, labels, cards, 
tags. 100 either, 40c; 250, 75c; 500, $1.25, 
postpaid. Circulars, everything. Finest en- 
gravings. Beautiful saraple.s for stamp. 
Model Printing Co., Manchester, la. 10-9 




TRAP NEST 

inailo In a few inhmtos 
verv Hlinple and relia»>le 
complete plan» 10 centH. 
Geo. StlrdlvRut, Box 8, 
Sheboygan Falls. Wis. 




Page'56 



^■POULTRY FAN C I E IVf F^bruaryTiO^^ 




S. C. P,T'FF ORPINOTOXS FROM rilTCA- 
STO, New York and ranadian winiifrs, AVill 
ha\e but one very choice pen of rich, even 
eoloreil birds. Sound in hackle and saddb^. 
Egps $10 per 1.".. Few cockeiels to spaie. 
V. Crab tree. TiHin, O 0.4 



S. (\ VAVh' ORPTXCJTOXS. .My birds ha\e 
tlio size, sliape and that deep." rich under 
• •'ibu-. E\ery brtedinpr pen headed 
liisr pri/.f' l)ird. Fg-gs $.1 per settlnir. 
for circular. Ciu]> member. TT. A. 
Kinsrn.'xn. (). 



hv a 
Writ<- 

Sisley. 
2-1 



RHODE ISLAND REDS. 



TiOSE rOMH RHODE ISLAND REDS THAT 
iire jjght. Prize winners at leadinpr Missouri 
shows. Can please the most exaetinp. Cor- 
respondence answered promptly. Place cRpr 
orders now. Grand pens mated, lieadod by 
cockeiels from first prize pen at Trenton 
show. Day old chicks. Wiite Arthur S. 
• Mniip. T"!iiipn\illi'. Mo. 12-:'. 

BE IN THE FASHION AND RAISE 
Rhode Island Reds. Some choice Rose Comb 
cockerels and pullets at prices that will suit 
you. Let me fill your order. E^^sjs when 
you want them. Place order now. Wilber 
P.i-llows. L. Pox 40.^,. Anoka, ATinii. ^2 ?, 



L'ij R. C. RED 
each, according 
anions' the lot. 
birds. EiTUs, %\ 
now. Red and 
Nock. N .1. 



COCKERELS'. $2 TO $.*? 

to quality. Some dandles 

Get your pick. .All fine bi.cr 

per ir>. Book your orders 

White Poultry Farm. Colts 

12-R 



R. C. AND S. C. RHODE ISLAND RED 
eocks and cockerels. Have fjood color and 
shape, descendants of Buffalo and Boston 
winners: some have score cards. My birds 
were winnei's at Oconomowoc, Milwaukee 
and Waukesha. Prices reasonable. Eprer or- 
ders 1>ooked now. Chas. G. Wheeler. Dous- 
man. Wis. ^2-?, 

S. C\ R. 1. I^EDS. SET>Er'T COCKERELS 
for sale. Healthy, vigorous, pood color and 
free from smut. My stock has won the 
blue ribbons in strongest competition for 
seven years. Write for description. Eggs 
for sale. V. Hlbner. Aurora, 111. 12-.T 



ME.VDOW 



T-AWN POI'LTRY 



Rose Comb Rhode Island Reds 
Some nice, large cockerels for 
prize winners at leading shows, 
choice matings in season. Send 
list. Correspondence solicited, 
ler. .Albert Lea. Minn. 



YARDS 

exclusively. 

sale from 

Eggs from 

for mating 

H. .1. Mil- 



E. S. BECKER. PROP. GLEN VIEW 
Poultry Farm, Route ?,. Elmira. N. Y.. 
offers fine bargains in high scoring S. C. 
Rhode Island Reds. Book orders now for 
eggs and day old chicks. Several fine cock- 
erels for sale. Correspondence solicited. 

MY HOSE AND SINGLE <'(>MH RHODE 
Island Reds are first prize winners wherever 
shown. Won the lion's share at Springfield 
Can send you birds that will 
fiock. Egg«. $3 per setting. 
94 East Main St., Amherst, 

1-:^ 



and Holyoke. 
improve your 
A'alley Farm. 
ATass. 



SINGLE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS 
Exclusively. I showed 6 pullets and 4 cock- 
erels at Peoria, 111.. Dec. 1900. and won ^ 
prizes. I showed no old birds Will sell 
the four cockerels. Also eggs in season. 
Write for prices and matings. Davis Crows. 
Hanna City, 111. 



S. C. R. I. RED COCKERELS 
Fine birds at reasonable priees. 
best matings at $2 per L'. 
stock. ?1 per L'. : $5 per TOO 
.\1snp. Sylvia. Iowa. 



FOR SALE. 

Eggs from 

Free range 

Mrs. II. L. 

1-:: 



pen. 


$2..'0 per L'j; second 


third 


pen, $1.50 per l.'j. 


from 


other pens. $4 per 


$2.r.o 


per 100. C. I. W. . 


111. 





HIGH CLASS S. C. R. I. REDS FOR SALE. 
Oiiginal birds direct from Lester Tompkins. 
Scoring 91 to 9.*?. Eggs from pens 1, 2. :?. 
?1. $2. and %?, per Iri. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed. Isaac H. Painter. Chrisncy. Ind, 

1-S 

LIBERAL POULTRY YARD. SINGI>E 

Comb Rhode Island Reds. Eggs: First 

pen, $2 per 15; 

Incubator eggs 

100; farm range. 

Adkisson, Galatia, 

1-4 

ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND liEDS. WON 
first at Peoria. Dec. 14 to 1,S, 1909: first 
at Lincoln, Dec. 14 to 17. 1909. Eggs. $.''., 
$2 and $1 per 15. Utility, $5 per 100. .1 
B. G;irber, Ilopedale. 111. 1-3 

TO BREEDERS OF S. C. R. I. REDS. I 
have a limited number of eggs to sell from 
my prize winning pen. None better. F. C. 
Eldridge ,^' Son, Bourne, Mass, 9-9-12 

SINGLE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS. 
Eggs in season from excellent laying strain. 
Pen No. 1, $2 per 15; pen No. 2, $1.50 per 



15. Utility nock. $1 
hundred. Mrs. Harvey 
Ington, 111. 



per 15 or $.' 
Trultt. R. 1. 



per 
Farm- 
1-3 



liAAE YOr DECIDED \\ilEi:E YOl' ARE 
«oing to idacu your order for S. C. R. I. 
Red, stock of eggs. If not. write a postal 
to U. S. A I'oultr> Y'ards, Antwern, O.. for 
thcii- e.'italiig. Six years exclusive lueeding. 

2-4 

• HOlCi: SlNCi,!-: fo.Mi; J{li(jDi-: LSLAND 
l\et; cockerels for sale. Eggs In season, all 
fi-om fxccllent sock. Maple Grove College 
l"oii!tr,\ Aiuds. Miss :Minnie Alston. R. 3. 

< V.Ullerville. III. -J-l 

liOSE (O.MH liEDS. AFTER FIVIO YEARS 
eaif.ful mating for eggs, size, shape and 
eolor. our Rods lay like Leghorns, and grow 
like I'lyiiiouth Rocks, with female plumage, 
that jHire drei> i-ed. First time to offer 

< ggs fn u) these grand Reds. Prize Avin- 
in >-vov\ pen. lOggs $2 ])er L". ; $3 per 
Sample fealheis. Ernest E. TJenard, 

2-1 



ners 
.".0. 

Ixoute s. Box 21. Lancastei'. fV 



LANGSHANS. 



TWELVE YEARS A BREEDER OF BLACK 

Langshans exclusively. Some nice cockerels 
bred from prize winners for sale. Eg,gs after 
March 1, IMIO, at $1.50 per 15. Write your 
wants to Mrs. L. A. McCraeken, Bonaparte, 

ii>\v;i. 12-:; 



oi-der 


I 


your 


Hock 


now 


1 1 a \ e 


show 


loom 


Writ( 


• ine. 


.Mo. 





THE QUALITY OF MY BLACK LANG 
shans is proved b.v their show record. You 
don't take chances when you send me your 
• an start you right oi- improve 
with some of the grand birds I 
for sale. Scores to 95 '-f. in 
Prices right. Eggs in season. 
Mrs Frank Camerer, Gazette, 
1"^ 

21 YEARS A JiREEDER OF THE BEST 
Black I..angshans. Have a show record un- 
d<r leading judges unequaled by any other 
breeder. Male birds each season score to 
!»5 1L., females 9GVL'. Buy where you know 
that you will get the highest quality at 

Have some grand cocks 

spare, scoring from 94 

extia choice hens. Made 

the Easteiii Wisconsin 

and won silver cup for 



reasonable prices. 

and cockerels to 

to 9514; also some 

a clean sweei> at 

show this season 

best pen in the show three years, all breeds 

eompeting, score 191 1^. A. Stransky. Pres. 

I'lastern Wis. Poultry ,V: P .«;. Assn., Chilton. 

Wis. 11-9-12 



I'Li/h: winning; black and whiti-: 

Lai,g;;lian i^ixv^is, .'«2 per setting from pens 
headed by blue ribbon winning male birds 
W. H. Hefner. ii;>. Columbia City. Tnd. 2-1 



! AM THIO \VHITE LANG SHAN MAN. 
Hirds fill., as silk. Eggs for getting, ?, 
fi-om eai.li of li\c j)ens at $2 nor setting, 
'•'iist itreiiiium wiiinci-s at the largest show 
in th.' west. R. S. Messner. C. No. IS, Rock 
ford. 111. o.', 



BUFF COCHINS. 



OUR BUFF COCHINS HAVE FOR YEARS 
been acknowledged leaders. Their record at 
the largest shows has placed them in the 
front rank. My birds have been given the 
highest possible scores by many of Ameri- 
ca's leading judges. They are clear buff 
true to type and grandly feathered. My 
Buff Bantams are equally as good. Eggs 
$3 and $5 per 15. Leslie Parlin. 19 Phalen 
Ave.. St. Paul. M inn. 3-9-12 

SOME DANDY BUFF COCHIN COCKER- 
els for sale. Hanchett strain, good buff 
eolor. Only a limited to dispose. Write 
quick if you want one. Correspondence an- 
swered promptly. C. J. L. Ware. 551 Marl- 
boro St.. Keene, N. H. 12-3 



nri'i 

Have 
t lade 
woild 
uable 



<'OCHIN SPECIALIST TE.V YEARS, 
two finest pens mated for the egg 
in the United States, bred from the 
s best winners at leading shows. Val- 
illustrated catalogue for stamp, show- 
ing prices and winnings. S. Berger, Pleasant 
Hill, O. 



12- 



S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 



SUNCREST SINGLE COMB WHITE LEG- 
horns. Line bred ten years. We have 
pleased hundreds of customers. Can please 
you. Write for catalogue. Suncrest Poultry 
Farm, R. 1. Box F. Grand Rapids, Mich. 

3-9-12 



S. C. WHITE LEGHORN EGGS FOR 
hatching after Feb. 1, from heavy laying 
standard bred stock, at $1 per 15. $4 per 100. 
l-'ertility and satisfaction guaranteed. C. H 
/.urburg. R. 1.. Topeka, 111. \2-i 



HilM' COCHINS FOR SALE, HENS, I'UL- 
lets or trios. My stock Is first class. Won 
27 prizes in 1909. Send in your order now 
r.)r eggs. Will ship when you want them. 
.1. c. T'.nughman, Topek.T, JCaii. •■>-:• 



P.LAKES S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS WIN 
at Springfield, 1st cock, 1st hen and 3d 
cockerel, 5 entries. At Madison Square, New 
York., I made 3 entries, winning 1st pullet. 



Eggs .$2 per 
side, Conn. 



setting. \V. .1 Blake 



Burn- 
-10-13 



SINGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORNS FOR 
sale from leading prize winning strains. 
Good shape and color cocks, $1.50; hens 
and pullets. $1 each. 1 am selling out 
my entire stock of I.,eghorns, therefore will 
make these low prices. E. H. Olson, R. 1, 
Tlior. Iowa. 1-2 



BARlLAINS 

cockerels .^1 
Order now 
.ind $2 ))er I 
mated pen 01 
guaranteed. 
Tbor, Iowa. 



L\ S. C. WHITE LEGH()R.\ 

.mil ^2 eaeli for dandy l)irds. 

;iiul get your pick. Eggs $1 

". according to iiuality. Eithei- 

range llock. Reasonable hatch 

.lames Keegan, i!. I. Box 72. 

2-4 



SLXGLE COMB WHI'l'l-: LEGHoRXS. 

<"'hoice stock for sale. We make a spec- 
ialt\ of sui)iilyin.g breeders with foundation 
stock, I'riees from $2 to $10 for imllets 
and eockeiels, according ti» merit. I'^ggs 
fi'i- lialehing. S2 i)er 1 ." : %'< \>o\- .",(i. Reaver 
l>aiu riiiillr.v I'-arin, Mi pii t i;i>iMei\ . .V. Y. 2-3 

R. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 

I OFFER YOU THE HIGHEST QUALITY 
in R. C. White Leghorns, both in stock and 
e.ggs and my i>iices are reasonable. Some 
ehoice trios for sale. lO.ugs from my Chi- 
• ago first ))rize i>on shipped ])romptl.v. My 

winners at Chieago in 
best in the west. Mrs, 
■^riie Mai)les, Mavwood. 

2-4 



birds are first nrize 
competition with the 
W. .loncs William; 
111. 



R<>si-: c»).Mi; wiin-i-: i.i'.chor.ns. -i-hi-: 

worlds record for best la.vers. Have bred 
Leghorns for nineteen years. Get the best — • 
•■i'hilli{)s Strain." l-^ggs %?> i»er 15; stock 
for sale. Write for calaU>g. Rockv Vallev 
Poultry Co.. No. CG "The (^aks," Decrfield, 
111. 2-3 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 



S. C. brown LEGHORNS. BRED FOR 
shape, color and laying qualities. Pullet 
bred cockerels, the finest show and laying 
breeders in existence, clieap. H. M. Moyer. 
R. 2, Beehtelsville, Pa. 11-9-12 



20 CHOICE S. i\ BROWN LEGHORN 
<'Ockerels at special prices to close out. De- 
.scribe just what you want. I know I can 
please you. Egg oiders booked now, either 
P.rown or Buff Leghorns. Prices right. O. 
R. Rice, Delavan, Wis. 12-:! 

PRAY'S POULTRY FARM. RRAY'S S. C. 
I^rown I.,eghorns have been bred for show 
purjjoscs and heavy e^^ production. Have 
free range and are line. Show birds, $5 
each; breeding cockerels, $2; eggs, $1.50 to 



$3 for 15, $6 
St.. So. Elsie. 



per 100. 
Mich. 



Geo, L. I'ray, 



Ovid 

12-3 



IXNIXCIBLI-: 

v.on I'liiir lirsis 



C. iiRoWN LEGHOliNS 

-Mhens, l;tlt>. « 'ock scoring 

»:;•■',. ItUllets !t|. pen ist'.-'s. Eggs. $2 tn %z. 

Hariy T. Trainer, 
u-t»-12 



.Mating list r»ady soo!i, 
<.'arp<'nter, Ohio. 



R. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 



R. C. BliOWN LEGHORN (242-EGG 
strain), feiualt! line, eggs and stock for sale 
reasonable, ac<-ording to quality. I won the 
liighost honors on all that I entered at 
last Schenei'tady show. < 'orresr>ondence 
licited. Wm. Gaffev, South Worcester 
V. 



the 

so- 

N 

2-4 



BUFF LEGHORNS. 



S. C. BUFF LEGHORNS— SOME FINE 
cockerels for sale. They are beauties at $2, 
$3 and 5 each, sired by a son of first cock. 
Madison Square Garden, 1908. Eggs, $2 per 
15. F. D. Kemp. Sparta. Wis. 12-4 



Ko.m.; COMB JiUFF LEGHOKXS. oLK 
birds are good layers, large and healthy 
with good combs and good buff cobtr, .Just 
till- kind you want. Eggs. $1 for 15. $5 for 
100, No stock for sale. Sunnyside Poultry 
l-'aiin. C. C. Glasgo. Loudonville, O 1-3 



P.LFF Li:<aiOKXS, S1X<H.E COMl^. BRED 

fi-om Chicago winners. Two 

Produce show specimens 

spread tails guaranteed. 

even buff. Eggs, ,$3 per 

mens equaling the best. 

I'dgerton. O. 



l)ens mated. 

only. Low, well 

Elegatit, golden, 

15, produce specl- 

Dr. C. E. Hoover, 

1-3 



BLACK MINORCAS. 



liOSE COMB BLACK MINORCAS. EXHT- 
bition and breeding cockerels, $2 up. Pure 
Northup strain. Grand large birds. Every 
one a bargain. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Circulars. Eggs, $2 for 15. Book vour or- 
ders now. .Tames F. Gleason, Michigan City, 
Ind, 1 2 - ,3 



PURE ROSE COMB BLACK MINORCAS. 
A few choice cockerels for sale, bred from 
winning stock at the leading shows in this 
state. Book your egg orders earlv from 
three choice pens. Dr. E. H. Drews", Madi- 
son, Wis. 12-3 



I 



# 



t 



I 



,. 



• • 



MUST SELL AT ONCE. FEW VERY FINE 
K. C. Black cockerels from my noted "Oul- 
Minorca. Booking egg orders. Blacks 
whites. Pullet record, 2 7 eggs in 
1909. Six ribbons on 7 entries 1909 
F. Sampson, Franklin, N. Y. 1-3 



cout" 
and 
Jan., 
Oscai 



I BREED FOR QUALITY AND SIZE. S 
C. Black Minorca eggs, $2 per 13. Cockerels 
for sale. I. Allison, Florence, Neb 1-4 



SINGLE COMB BLACK MINORCAS, Ex- 
clusive winners of 5 firsts at ShelbyviUe. 
Lebanon and Sheridan poultry shows 
Scores. 93 to 94 1^, by Judges McCraeken. 
Rummer and Greer. Eggs, $1.50 and $2 
per la. Fertility guaranteed. H. A. Brat- 
lin, Brazil, Ind. 1 3 



ROSE 
White 



COMB 
Minorcas 




New York, Chicago, St. 
shows. Breeding stock 
ing guaranteed. Large 
Catalog mailed free, 
mour Ind. 



BLACK AND ROSE COMB 
First prize winners at 



Louis and all large 
and eggs for hatch- 
stock. Great layers. 

G. A. Clark, Sey- 
1-3 



BLACK MINORCAS, ROSE AND SINGLE 
^*^ ,; ^^'•■'^at size and shape. Pens headed 
by Madison Square and Rochester 
Stock and eggs. Circular. M 
Ovid, N. Y, 



winners. 

V. Allen. 

2-1 



GLEN OAK MINORCA YARDS. ROSE 
Comb Black Minorcas exclusively. Clean 
sweep at Peoria with one single exception 
which resulted in a tie. Stock and eggs 
guaranteed. $2.50 per 15; $6 per 50- $10 
per 100. Charles White, Route 36. Peoria. 
■^'^- 2-4 



ROSE COMB BLACK MINORCAS. WIN- 
ners of 7 first and 3 cups at AUantown, 
A\illiamsport and Scranton this season. 
Judge T. F. McGrew, in reporting Scranton's 
Quality show, says: '.Mr. Tobey has on 
exhibition an number of specimens of such 
remarkable quality as to call for the high- 
est praise; anyone who can rear Black Min- 
orcas and show them in such beautiful con- 
dition, has the right to claim the honor of 
being an expert with poultry." C E Tobev 
Scranton. Pa, ' o « 
- "~'^ 

SILVER SPA NGLED HAMBURGS. 

SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURGS, STAN- 

dard bred. Lot of fine cockerels, some few 

choice pullets, for sale. Great layers. Egg 

orders booked now for 

Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Lineboro. Md. 11-4 

FOR SALE— LINE BRED SILVER SPANG- 
led Hamburgs. Winners 17 ribbons one 
show. Also highest scoring eight birds. 
Will dispose of cocks, hens, cockerels, pul- 
lets. Eggs in season. None better for 
breeding and eggs. Write Wauconda Poul- 
try Farm. Benton Harbor, Mich. 12-3 

FAVEROLLES. 



spring delivery. 
Denton Warehelm. 



BREED SALMON FAVEROLLES. CAN 
send you some fine ones, all bred from 
first prize winners at leading shows. This 
popular breed of French fowls is unexcelled 
for utility and fancy. Egg orders booked 
for spring delivery. C. P. McAndrew, Ells- 
worth. Wis. 11-3 

CORNISH 



CORNISH FOWL. MADISON SQUARE, 
Jamestown Exposition. Allentown, Trenton, 
Hagerstown, Philadelphia winners. Old and 
young stock for sale. Egg orders booked 
now. Circular free. R. D. Reider, Middle- 
town. Pa. 12-3 




POLISH. 



WHITE CRESTED BLACK POLISH, LINE 
bred for 26 years. Winners at World's Fair, 
New York and Boston. Remember that See- 
ly is the veteran Polish breeder of America. 
Stock for sale; egga In season. Chas. L. Seely, 
Pres. Am. Po lish Club, Afton, N. Y. 5-9-12 

W. C. B. POLISH. A FEW CHOICE 
cockerels for sale. Bred from winners at 
Herkimer, Utica, Rochester and Buffalo. 
Birds are sure to please. Eggs after Feb. 
15. Don't fail to get my prices. Warren 
\X. Dickens, Box 93. MIddleville, N Y. 1-3 



BANTAMS. 



RARE BARGAINS. GOLDEN AND SILVER 
Sebright, Buff and Black Cochin, Rose Comb 
Black and Black Red Game Bantams. High- 
est honors New York. 800 birds. Proper & 
Co., Sc hoharie. N. Y. 8-9-12 

GOLDEN SEABRIGHT BANTAMS FOR 
sale. Birds scoring 93 to 96%. Won at 
Newton, 111,, in lively competition, first cock, 
first and second cockerel, first, second and 
third pullet. Eggs after March 1, $3 per 
setting. Dale Arnold, Newton, 111. 1-4 



GOLDEN & SILVER SEABRIGHTS' EGGS 
for sale from pens scoring from 93 V^ to 96. 
The best in the west. $2 per 15. Middle 
West Bantamry, Lock Box 23, Rolfe, Iowa. 

-'-1 



HOUDANS. 



HOUDANS. WINNERS WHEREVER 

shown. 1st at Phlla., Allentown. Norrls- 
town, Pa., 1908. Phlla., 1909, fifteen rib- 
bons with ten entries. Stock and eggs for 
sale. J. Bmlen Smith, Chestnut Hill, Phila- 
delphia, Pa, 3-9-12 

CHOICE HOUDANS. Cocks, cockerels, hens 
and pullets to close out at reasonable prices. 
Write, stating just what you want. Supply 
limited. Order at once if you want a bar- 
gain. Birds are good in all points and will 
give satisfaction. J. B. Belknap, R. 3, 
Council Bluffs. Iowa. 12-3 

HOUDAN EGGS FROM McAVOY'S AND 
Dr. Taylor's strain. Have raised them 3 
years. Have 50 pullets and hens, from 
which will ship eggs for hatching at $1.50 
for 15. or $7 per 100. J. D. Payne, Water- 
loo, Ind. 1.3 



IT IS A RECOGNIZED FACT THAT "Q. & 
B." Houdans are "the best." If you start 
with "the best" you will save time, money 
and annoyance. If you want a flock of prize 
winners and record layers, demand "Q & 
B." Houdans. Write for our beautiful de- 
scriptive catalog; it is free. Eggs, $2.50, 
$5 and $10 per 15; ten chicks guaranteed to 
hatch. Quimby & Brown, 109-U High St.. 
Ijiswich, Mass. 2-4 

HOUDANS — MY BREEDERS ARE TRAP- 
hested and bred for eggs; also have some 
fine show birds. Won all first.« and 2 
seconds on 6 entries. Eggs pen 1 $2 per 11, 
pen 2 $1.50 per 15; guarantee 10 fertile or 
replace setting free. John C. Meyer, R. 9 
Oconto Falls, Wis. 9.4 



LARGE CRESTED, HEAVY LAYING HOU- 
dans. Eggs from four grand pens. Ten 
.tears a breeder. Guarantee good hatch. My 
first year with Orpingtons, Whites and 
Blacks. Hattie P, Franks. Worth, 111. 5-9-12 

LAKENVELDERS. 



LAKENVELDER'S. FOUND AT LAST 

what this paper is dedicated to: "The 
most beautiful in fowls." Exhibition stock. 
Eggs in season. Anson van Voorhees, Mar- 
shall. Mich. ' 0.4 



DORKINGS 



SILVER GRAY DORKINGS. BEST TABLE 
fowls. Splendid layers year around; New 
York and Boston winners. Finest yards in 
America. See Campine advertisement. 

Cherry Grove Farm, M. R. Jacobus, Prop., 
Ridgefield. N. J. 2-6 



SILVER CAMPINES. 



SILVER CAMPINES. ORIGINAL INTRO- 
ducer improved strain Belgiums. Great egg 
producers. Largest white eggs. First prize 
whitest dozen eggs in show. Boston, 191o! 
^^■'7^Z Giove Farm, M. R. Jacobus. Prop.. 
Ridgefield. N. J, o.g 



GAJiCES. 



GAMES — INDIAN GAMES, WINNERS 
wherever shown. If you want a show bird 
or breeder write me. I have the goods. 
Grand lot cockerels; also 30 pit game cocks 
and stags. 18 years a breeder and exhibitor 
Eggs in season. J. Boyce. SummltvlUei 
^- ^ 12-3 

DOMINIQUES. 



DAVENPORT'S AMERICAN DOMINIQUES 
won at New York 1908 every first prize of- 
fered; 1909 six of the ten firsts and seconds. 
Write for circulars and prices. W. H. Dav- 
enport. Coleraine, Mass. 5-9-12 



BABY CHICKS. 



E. AND D. HATCHERY. YARDLEY. PA., 
shippers of day-old chicks and eggs from 
high grade stock of the leading varieties 
Express paid and safe arrival guaranteed 
east of the Mississippi river. Write for 
list of varieties and prices. 1.3 



PHEASANTS. 



PHEASANT BREEDING PAYS 800 PHR 
cent better than chicken raising. A pair of 
pheasants ar« worth from |26.00 to $150.00 
to a breeder yearly. Read the Reliable 
I'heasant Standard, the recognized authority 
on pheasant breeding, and learn all about 
this rich Industry. 75 cents a copy by mall 
from A. V. Me«rsch, Poughkeepsie. New 
York. 9-08-tf 



ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANTS. $5 A 
pair, China Ringneck Pheasants, |7.50 a 
pair. Write Jennie Milner. Bloomlngton, 
}}}^ f-f 

TURKEYS. 



BRONZE TURKEYS. First cockerel, sec- 
ond, third, fourth pullet, first pen at Illi- 
nois state show 1909; first cockerel, first 
pullet at Peoria. 1908. William Ringhouse, 
R. 2. Box Y. Hav ana. 111. 3-9-12 

FOR SALE MAMMOTH BRONZE TUR- 
keys. A fine strain of good layers, large 
bone and frame, and nicely marked; bred 
from prize winning stock from Madison 
Square Garden. Order early. Prices rea- 
sonable considering quality. Mrs. Mary 
Schoonmaker, R, 1, Meshoppen, Pa. 1-4 

BRONZE TURKEY EGGS, $2 PER 10, AND 
genuine Wild Mallard Duck eggs, $1.50 
per 10. Order early. Will ship when 
wanted. H. W. Fairall, Iowa City, Iowa. 

1-4 



DUCKS AND GEESE. 



THOROUGHBRED TOULOUSE GEESE'. 
$10 and $12 per pair. My geese are prize 
winners. Fancy White Rocks and Rouen 
Ducks. Eggs in season from each variety. 
Mrs. L. L. Swinford. Oakland. 111. 12-3 

BLACK CAYUGA DUCKS AND WHITE 
Holland Turkeys for sale. Also a few Afri- 
can Geese (females only). Let me book 
your orders now for eggs from the above 
varieties. Satisfactory hatches guaranteed. 
Correspondence solicited. Floyd S. Beau- 
mont. R. 15. Kansasville. Wis. 12-3 

PIGEONS. 

I OFFER GUARANTEED MATED HOMERS 
in any quantity, at $1.00 a pair, and chal- 
lenge squab compaaies or dealers to produce 
better stock at twice this price. Beautiful 
White Homers, $1.50 a pair. Get my prices 
on Runts. Carneaux and Maltese Hens, and 
save dollars. Charles K. Gilbert, 1563 East 
Montgomery Ave.. Philadelphia, Pa. 8-9-12 

WANTED— 5,000 COMMON OR HOMER 
Pigeons. Pay at least 25c pair. Highest 
prices paid for Guinea Fowls, Live Rabbits 
and Guinea Pigs. S. Gilbert, 1128 Palmer 
St.. Philadelphia. Pa. 12-5 

MISCELLANEOUS, 

"WANTED"— PIGEON DUNG. WRITE 

Pfister & Vogel Leather Co., Milwaukee, 
Wis., for prices, etc. 10-3 

A FINE 160-ACRE FARM IN THE WHEAT 
belt of Kansas, 19 miles from Abilene, 
county seat Dickinson county. Four miles 
from R. R. Now being used for pasture, 
good wire fence, good water the year round. 
Will sell below the market on reasonable 
terms. Non-resident widow owns it and 
has no use for it. Some improvements. 
Address K. F., care Poultry Fancier, 357 
Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

"WANTED" — PIGEON DUNG. WRITE 
Pfister & Vogel Leather Co., Milwaukee, 
Wis., for prices, etc. 1-3 

POULTRY SUPPI1IE8. 

POULTRY FEED— PRICE PER 100 LBS. 
Beef scraps $2.75, meat and bone $2.25, 
ground bone $2.25, hen scratching grains 
$1.85, chick scratching grains $2, poultry 
mash $1.80, pigeon grain $2.25, alfalfa 
clover meal $1.50, crushed oyster shells 
65c, crushed clam shells 60c, mica crystal 
grit 65c, pearl grit 60c, medicated charcoal 
$1.50. The meat and bone, shells, grit 
and charcoal in both hen and chick size. 
Give us a trial order. J. G. Hermann & 
Co.. Indianapolis. Ind. 11-6 

PRINTING. 

PRINTING — POULTRY, GENERAL. NOTE- 
heads, envelopes, postcards, labels, cards, 
tags. 100 either, 40c; 250, 75c; 500, $1.25, 
postpaid. Circulars, everything. Finest en- 
gravings. Beautiful samples for stamp. 
Model Printing Co., Manchester, la. 10-9 




TRAP NEST 

made in a few minutes 
verv simple and reliable 
complete plans 10 cents. 
(*»o. Stlrdlvant. Box 8, 
Sheboygan Falls, Wis. 




rtsf 



"V 



V 



DtlNCL 'IHAT SIBLEY'S 



R E 



i^^**- 







are in the lead 
and will hold 
it. At th. B.H 

Indiana Slate Fair this season, our Rose Comb Reds won the most coveted prize, I oi pea. ALso 
1st and 3rd cocks, 2nd cockerel and many of the othcj unuj. rs .vrr. iti mlti from our flock. 
They have an unbroken chain of victories to their credit for many years at leading shows. At 

Detroit January 1909 they won 23 prizes including 12 firsts and 11 others. At 
Chicago, December 1908, 17 prizes including 10 firsts. At Indianapolis, September 
1908, 11 prizes including 5 firsts. 

Our winnings at Detroit, January, 1909, in one of the strongest classes of Reds ever 
gotten together were: first, second, third and fourth on cocks, first, second, third 
and fourth on hens; first, second, third and fourth on cockerels; first and fifth on 
pullets; first and second on pens. The four club specials for color and shape. 
The silver loving cup (valued at #25.00) offered by the Mayor of Detroit for the 
best display of either Rose or vSingle Comb Rhode Island Reds. The silver loving 
cup (valued at $20.00) offered by the Hotel Normandie for the best display of rose 
comb Rhode Island Reds and other valuable specials. 



THE SIBLEY REDS 



r -U WAYS W(JN I- AS I ANr» WEST 



2000 BIRDS RAISED DURING THE PAST SEASON FROM WINNERS 



wem aa mm iM i mmjii 



MIN-NE-HA-HA Ul prize winner, Chicago, 
Dec. 16-19, 1908. Detroit. Jan. 9-14, 1909. 



for catalogue describing our matings and telling all about the Sibley Reds. 



iSome ot the cream of this year's production is still in 
our yards and if you are looking for a choice bird or two 
we can more than please you at right prices. 

We will have ten grand pens mated for the egg trade. Rook your orders 
early. Prices f3 00, |5.0(3, ^10.00, |15.00, ^0.00 and |25 00 per setting. Send 









I 



rviiui ^^, aiic 



1 

»>.■■*. -S. Ji &, 



Chu 






.bley 



South Bend, Ind 



m 












I I 










1^ 




lULERSXR ASS ** 

ite Orpingtoris 

ARE THE BIGGEST PAYERS 
THE BIGGEST WINTER LAYERS 

"CRYSTAL" 



KELLERSTRASS 

S T RAIN 



White Orpingtons 



Are the GRAM>i:ST UTl 



t I'Muh 



rm rtHoiii t(Ki.!v. and as to 



UiL I AMiiUS HI ?'(, ■ ■■ r-f ii€ Y," 

VALUE $10,000. l'ir«t {»il/e wluuer at Jamestown 
Exposition, Madison Square Ctarden, New York, and every- 
where else she has been shown. The rea-son we value the 
above hen at Ten Thousand Dollars Is because we refused 
•2.5(X) for her after we sold five of her chicks for |7,5»X>; nnd 
we will Klve 910,000 for a "Crystal'* White 
Orplnsrtoii H: n that will cnnnl hor in fV«ry iv.iv. 

Hi liA i'lSl H.^^S I i%Km., HAHSAS ill 1 Y . mti 



their FANCY QUALITY they u on inst .u MaJi>on Square Garden 
New York 1905. 1906,1907. IMO.S; also .,t c rvst.,1 Palace London' 
England, Chicago and Boston If vu ,,^1 x.nu liirds to niPKOVF 
VOIR ^Vrrn-K M fnrtlu snow KOOM unt. us. \Vc have th^, 
.x'.vA the \\\\\) lf!\r W l\>. .ts nur it.ist treuul s!)(.ws. STOCK 
and EGGS for ,s.uc al ail iinus. I^cnuiuiu!, we .lu the ORIGINA- 
TORS of "CRYSTAL" While Orpiu^tous. .uu! iiueU only the »Iin0 
kind. We devote our who'e time to this one breed. 

SEND FOR OUR CATAI^OGUE 



Ufc Members American White Orpington Club and the American PoultryAM"*^ 



,P 1' 



ELLERSTRASS FARM 

ERNKST KKTJ.ERSTi, \S !V(,prift,., 
Onjjfiiatoib ut Cii'hta! W !u!e Oipuijitous 

^* ^'<^> i KANSAS CITY, MO. 



•ms mmmmmi'mmmm- »!«!^:w».)«wi»isi»f* i -,. 



■f»*'««*'***tw««m«aw" 



• 



# 



# 



1 





i 



Barred Plymouth Rocks Exclusively 

Eggs from 5 grand pens, $2 per 15. Have many prize 
wmners m my yards. : : : Satisfaction guaranteed. 
ERNEST WAGNER, - KEND ALLVILLE, IND. 

Winners at Dearborn, Mich., 
_ _ December, 1909. 1st and 4ih 

t%\T'V'' \'''?'>S class of birds. Have 4 pens lieadeTby'c:c'keJ:i?:corin";' 92"' 
Thf^'ri ^T^'^' '" "T^ P^"= ^'■^ '''Sh class birds scoring 91 to 93 under Tuck r' 
A « Si'i^ ^°^^ "^^"^ '° ^''°^- "^^"'^ ^""^ P"<=es on eggs 
A. J. MATTHEWS WAYNS. MICHIGAN 

Barred Rocks 



Crown Bone Cutter 



Hens fed cut green l)oue lay I 
r more epjts. (Jet 11 Crown Boue 
^rutter. Send to-<lay for CHtlllo^'ue. 
WiUon Bros., Box >S22» KsHton, I'a. 



BEST MADE 

Lowest 
in Price 



BUFF ROCK5 



1 



Save Time, Effort & Money 

Buy S. C. White I^eghorn Day Old Chicks 
from me and you get a good strong healthy 
chick in each specimen. I guarantee this 
aud also safe delivery and the price is only f 
^«„fc= «o^>. Cheaper than you can afford to 

C. E. KYLE, 

Rocky River. Ohio 



cents each, 
hatch them. 

R. F. D. No. 1 



EXCLUSIVELY. Regal Blue is the name. Bred in line for 
Li years and originally from the best blood lines in the world 
cv,^,„ T^ ♦ •. .11 ^ "^^^ ""^quailt^d record of five Srst-uremiums at Mich Sini*» 

^il^^^r o^H°'^- •'^?' *-eraam.s tor .some one to duplicate. No room to tell you Sfiidre'^^^^^^^ other 
nt^Hc f ^""^ ''Pf'''^^ prize.s they have won at other leading show.s. I now have imvvlrds show 
liul^lj^T^ ^yP^ ^"'? ^?^°'' ^;^'^ '.'^^'■°^- ^^^P ^"d distinct bar;i„g Ilso breedii^e stocV n?a^ 
will merit the approval of any fancier. When ordering remember I do not remdre v?u to oav foJ 
n, ?m ^f P^"^'''^^'^''^''-^*''"^^- but .ship you as good a.s can be found at reaso^ab?e^^^^^^ 
quality of my stock and increasing demand warrants me in advancing the DriceSeLf [for ii«toh 
nig) to $i per 1.5. Address A. L. EMERSON INKSTER j^^j^'^ij"' "'^ ^^^ P"*^^ ^^ ^ggs (for hatch- 



MAKE YOUR HENS LAY 

PRICE PER 100 LBS. 

Heef Scraps - - ,«!'.•. 7 

Meat and Hone - - •_».■_» 5 

(".round Kone - . '2.'lo 

Alfalfa Clover Meal - 1.50 

Medicated Charcoal . l.JiO 

Hroken Oyster Shells - .05 

Mica Crystal Grit - - .(',5 

Pearl Grit - - - .Ol) 
J. G. HERMANN & CO.. Indianapolis, Ind. 




"HA 





Ma«fe*ywiwffi«watiw 



mmmnm^mm,««,m,mm,,m,:.^^ "^-^-k^-^s^-m-*-...-.^^ 




*flMii5tea ■«ij»tife«-«fei»iiii6^** 



Established a BIG RECORD by winninjr 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO JANUARY, 1907 

R^cJ Sl^^f-^^ ^"T CHICAGO DECEMBER. 1908 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO DECEMBER. 1909 

me o^hatZdlrom F^^^^'° mT' "'"' '" "''f "f" *° ^'""'"^ ^^^^ '"^'^^ y^^'' bi^ds purchased from 
Xr «h!,„ i u^^ I '°''^ ^^""'^ "'°° ^' t'^- '^''^«^' «'^°^^'« in "le country. I could mention show 

fh^J u' "^^ c ™y b-'-ds have won the BEST PRIZES but I honestly believe this hmior bdon^sto 

Is m'^ne For- tlfe°sel ^ 7" '"^ ^''^' ''""'V ^^^ "^^'^ '^°' ''^ ^^-'^ that I will p.blish your wimdngs 
d^oic^ofbreed^^ ,f,t?,^,^ .Z^l^'^'^^^S^^^^XiTwl^^^^ 



A C I 

LAPHA 



t"% 






»w/ WW Kid i i Jf'"^ 

BUFF PLYMOUTH 



" ""■ ■■'' ■^ ^■"-"■TTI WWIIWIIili ll l ll 




Wm all First Prizes at the Michigan State Fair, Detroit, Mich., September 2 to 10 1909 
Wmnmg ist and 2d cock, ist and 2d hen, ist, 2d and 3rd cockerel, ,st. 2d and 3d pullet' 
ist pen. At the Dearborn, Michigan Show, December, 1909, in a class of 87 birds one of 
the strongest ever gotten together in the West, I won ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th cocks, 'ist and 
3rd pullets, 2nd and 3rd cockerels, ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th hens, with birds scoring to 04 
by Tucker. ^^ 



ONE THOUSAND BIRDS FOR SALE 



including some of the cream of my old stock and the cockerels and pullets of last spring's 
production. I can mate up pairs, trios and pens that will win and produce winners Also 
single birds both sexes in lots to suit. Write for prices on eggs from my choicest matings 
They will put you in the lead. 

DONT DELAY, WRITE TO-DAY 

20 young Toulouse Geese from Chicago and Detroit winners (never beaten.) Write for 
prices. Catalogue free. Please mention this paper when writing. 

DEARBORN POULTRY YARDS, S. D. LAPHAM, prop., Box P. Dearborn, Mich. 



^P ll W 




.1 t 
ii ' 

It 

If 





Vol. XIV 



CHICAGO, ILL, MARCH, 1910 



No. 3 




an 




) 11 < >■ 



^%3S»««^ 



Kinds of Nests 




■^* 



<^ 



Many Poor Hatches are the Result of Improperly 
Setting the Hen. An Experiment to Show at 
What Period Exposure of Eggs Results in Great- 
est Loss. 

By C. E. PETERSEN. 

Ale III.\(i with hens is the one .sure 
niclhod oni])l(.yc(l by hnn(h-c(ls and 
thousands of pouhrvnicn all o\er the 
world, and there is really little t(» he 
said re.i^ardiuM ilu' matter of hatchin-- 
in- as the hen will attend to thaU 
hut there is soinethino- that needs i(. he said re- 
i-ardin- the niakin«^- of the nest and the plaein- <.f 
n and the carin- h .r the lien <o that even under 
natural eondiiioiis results, perfect as far as p( .s- 
sihle. may he secured. 

All hirds like secrecy in ilieir nests, and even the 
coiinnon lien will not ])roceed with her construction 
when watched, so that it is neces.sary to use a little 
strata.i^em to i^ei near enough to see her at work. 
Mie seats herself < m the i;round, and, loosening;- the 
earth with her strong- claws, she keeps tuniin- 
around as she i)lace< sticks, weeds, or straws, in a 
circle around her. In turning;- around her hreast- 
I'one moves the loosened eartli from the center, and 
leaves ii in a rid^e around the nest, under the \ e,ne- 
lahle coxerin-. at exactly the ri-ht distance t(» kec'p 
'he eLj,i;s in and the cold riir out. 

The diameter of the ne^t is thus measured hv 
the leui^th of her hreasthone, and the bottom of the 
nest is Hat like the bottom of a ])late, not cur\ ini; 
like the bott(.ni «.f a saucer; S(i tha.l whil.si e\ ery 
c,--.-- is ke])t in the nest by the outside rim, the out'- 
side e,L;i^-s do iK.i press nn the center ones. .\(.w it 
may be asked why is this of so much consecpience ? 
Is iK.l a iKsi a nest, and why will not aiiv S(piare 
l)o.\ answer.-' h. answer this (|uestion it is a^ain 
necessary to watch the iieii while settin- outlier 
e.i^.ns t<. kiK.w what she does when not watched, 
lake the e^.i;s from under a (piiet hen that has been 



sittin.i^- tor a lew days, and number them, not with 
•<ne fio-ure only, but with .six nr seven fi-ures on 
each e-- so that the fi-ures will reach around the 
whole e-o-, and show you its number in anv ix.sition 
I'nt the e--s back a-ain. with the numbers ,me 
and two in the middle, and the other e--s in numer- 
ical order on the outside. Lonk at them a-ain in 
three hours time, and vou will find that tlie two 
vou placed in the middle, have been moved to the 
ontside, and two ..f the out.sule numjjers have taken 
ilieir place. 

Make a plan of the e-i^s as thev are then arran-ed 
by pultiii- down the numbers in a circle on a juece 
<•! paper, and Inok a-ain in another three hours, and 
you will hnd the center e.i^-s a-ain chan-ed. ' Re- 
peat the inspection as ol'ten as you i)lease, and y..u 
\yill lind that the e--s are not nierelv turned but 
that they are constantly travelin- about the ne^l 
and especially that the ..ame e-i^s are not allowed 
to remain very l..n.- in the center of the nest. 

Xow make a nest, as most persons .i^enerallv do 
make it for a hen, with a saucer-shaped bot'tom, 
and each outside e-- pressin- hard on the center 
ones, and then see how difficult and dancrerous it is 
to make an e-- travel alxait in such a nest ; and yoit 
will .see at once frecpient cause of e.i^-.i^s bcin- broken 
and the hatch spoiled, but the hen -cts the blame, 
and not the person wh.» made a ne.st which was sci 
laulty m construction thai either the hen could not 
move the e--s or in makin- an attempt to do it, 
breaks some ot them. 

riie hen's way of makn- a nest is onlv possible 
betore any e--s are in it. She cannot (jo it after 
the e.--s are there, and she rarelv attempts to do 
>o. b<.r tjiis reason it is wise io place the hen on 
the nest tor se\ eral days bet'ore the e.i;-,i;s are put 
nnder her, for durin- tin's time she win'^shape the 
nest to suit the si/e and shai)e of her bodv. I^nos 
lor incubation should be well selected, whatever 
ben they come from, no c\--s are lit for settin- 
unless the shells are slron-. smooth and re-iilar and 
"I the usual si/e laid hv the hen. \'erv old hens 



1 

I' 



Barred Plymouth Rocks Exclusively 

Eggs from 5 grand pens, $2 per 15. Have many prize 

wmners m my yards. : : : Satisfaction guaranteed. 

ERNEST WAGNER, - KENDALLVILLE, IND. 




BUFF ROCK* 



Winners at Dearborn, Mich., 
December, 1909. Istand4ih 

to 93j^ Females m these pens are high class birds scoring 91 to 93 under T"'-kr' 
The ^rdsand scorecar^to show. Write for prices on eg|s ^'^ """" ^"•^''=^- 

/* *. MATTHEWS - - WAYNE. MICHIGAN 



J 



Save Time, Effort & Money 

Buy S. C. While l^eghoni Day Old Chicks 
from me and you get a good strong healthy 
chick in each specimen. 1 guarantee this 
and also safe delivery and the price is only 12 
cents each. Cheaper than you can afford to 
hatch them. c. E. KYLE. 

R. F. D. No. 1 Rocky River. Ohio 



Barred Rocks 



EXCLUSIVELY. Regal Blue is the name. Bred in line for 
JUj year.s and originally from the best blood lines in the world 

iihr^»r ri^f^^if .-11 r ^"^''^ ""^^*^ali*?d record of five first-uremiuuis at Mich Stat*^ 

Show, Detroit, stil 1 remains for some one to duplicate. No room to tell vou of h ndreH^ of ot w 

quality of my stock and increasing: demand warrants me in advancing the orice of eLf r fnr h^t^v, 
mg) to $4 per 15. Address A. L. EMERSON INKSTER. ^^''ij^j^"'^"'^: the price of eggs (for hatch- 



MAKK YOUR HENS LAY 

PRICE PER 100 LBS. 

Keef Scraps - - $'2.7 5 

Meat and Hone - - 2. "Jo 

ijround Hone - - 2.2 5 

Alfalfa Clover Meal . 1.50 

Medicated Charcoal - l.SO 

Broken Oyster Shells - .fio 

Mica Crystal Grit - - -05 

Pearl Grit - - - .60 
J.G.HERMANN & CO.. Indianapoli., Ind. 




HALBACH'S WHITE ROCKS" 



Established a BIG RECORD by winning 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO JANUARY, 1907 
off I DISPLAY AT CHICAGO DECEMBER, 1908 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO DECEMBER. 1909 

me o^hatredtom FTr?/° hT' '^^' '" f'}''T '" ^'""'"^ ^^^^ ^^'^' y^^'' "rds purchased from 
me or natched trom LGGS I sold have won at the largest shows in the country I could mpntinr, sln^,., 

hfpuJcZWT'^rite* 'T T^,^^" PRIZES bat I hcealyTE. ■h.Ttar'b donjs .^ 
Is .ri™ S.; f h. ™™ ? ? t'"'' 'r"" »« ym need not be afr.ld that I will p.blish yonr winSinm 

^n°'a"i i°,;ta,"rr°.°L,'?iVASlR"ty ;iF^^^^^^^ 



A CLEAN SWEEP 

LAPHAM'S BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS 

Win all First Prizes at the Michigan State Fair, Detroit, Mich., September 2 to 10 1909 

Wmnmg ist and 2d cock, ist and 2d hen, ist, 2d and 3rd cockerel, ist, 2d and 3d pullet 

ist pen. At the Dearborn, Michigan Show, December, 1909, in a class of 87 birds one of 

the strongest ever gotten together in the West. I won ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th cocks, ist and 

3rd pullets, 2nd and 3rd cockerels, ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th hens, with birds scoring to 94 

by Tucker. 6 y^ 

ONE THOUSAND BIRDS FOR SALE 

including some of the cream of my old stock and the cockerels and pullets of last spring's 
production. I can mate up pairs, trios and pens that will win and produce winners Also 
single birds both sexes in lots to suit. Write for prices on eggs from my choicest matings 
They will put you in the lead. 

DONT DELAY, WRITE TO-DAY 

20 young Toulonse Geese from Chicago and Detroit winners (never beaten.) Write for 
prices. Catalogue free. Please mention this paper when writing 

DEARBORN POULTRY YARDS. S. D. LAPHAM. prop.. Box P, Dearborn, Mich. 



S* 



4. 



i 




# 



# 




• 



• f • 



f! 




Vol. XIV 



CHICAGO, ILL., MARCH. 1910 



No. 3 




an 



d "^ 



T 



I o n 




of 





Many Poor Hatches are the Result of Improperly 
Setting the Hen. An Experiment to Show at 
What Period Exposure of Eggs Results in Great- 
est Loss. 

By C. E. PETERSEN. 

AlXHINCi >vith hens is the one sure 
method employed l)y hundreds and 
thousands of poultrymen all over the 
world, and there is 'really little to be 
said re.t^rardiiiiT the matter of hatchin^r 
ino- as the hen will attend to that, 
]>ut there is somethin<r that needs to be said re- 
pirdint;- the makin^- of the nest and the placing- of 
it and the carini^- for the hen so that even under 
natural conditions results, perfect as far as pos- 
sible, may l)e secured. 

All birds like secrecy in their nests, and even the 
common hen will not i)roceed with her construction 
when watched, so that it is necessary to use a little 
strataj^em to get near enouo^h to see her at work. 
She seats herself on the "ground, and, loosening; the 
earth with her strong claws, she keeps turning 
around as she places sticks, weeds, or straws, in a 
circle around her. In turning around her breast- 
bone moves the loosened earth from the center, and 
leaves it in a ridge around the nest, under the vege- 
table covering, at exactly the right distance to keep 
the eggs in and the cold air out. 

11ie diameter of the nest is thus measured by 
the length of her breastbone, and the bottom of the 
nest is flat like the bottom of a i)late, not curving 
hke the l)ottom of a saucer; so that whilst every 
egg is kept in the nest by the outside rim, the out- 
side eggs do not press on the center ones. Now it 
may l)e asked why is this of so much consequence? 
Is not a nest a nest, and why will n(n any scpiare 



])ox answer? To answer this (|uestit)n it is again 
necessary to watch the lien while setting on her 
eggs to know what she does Vv^hen not watched. 
Take the eggs from under a quiet hen that has been 



sitting for a few days, and number them, not with 
one figure only, but with six or seven figures on 
each egg, so that the figures will reach around the 
whole egg, and show you its number in any position. 
Put the eggs back again, with the numbers one 
and two in the middle, and the other eggs in numer- 
ical order on the outside. Look at them again in 
three hours' time, and you will find that the two 
you placed in the middle, have been moved to the 
outside, and two of the outside numbers have taken 
their place. 

Make a plan of the eggs as they are then arranged, 
by putting down the numbers in a circle on a piece 
of paper, and look again in another three hours, and 
you will find the center eggs again changed. ' Re- 
peat the inspection as often as you please, and you 
v/ill find that the eggs are not merely turned, but 
that they are constantly traveling about the nest 
and especially that the same eggs are not allowed 
to remain very long in the center of the nest. 

Now make a nest, as most persons generally do 
make it for a hen, with a saucer-shaped bot'tom, 
and each outside egg pressing hard on the center 
ones, and then see how difficult and dangerous it is 
to make an egg travel about in such a nest ; and yoil 
wdl see at once frequent cause of eggs being broken 
and the hatch spoiled, but the hen gets the Wame, 
and not the person who made a nest which was so 
laulty in construction that either the hen could not 
move the eggs or in making an attempt to do it, 
breaks some of them. 

The hen's way of makng a nest is only possible 
before any eggs are in it. She cannot do it after 
the eggs are there, and she rarely attempts to do 
so. For this reason it is wise to "place the hen on 
the nest for several days before the eggs are put 
under her, for during this time she will shape the 
nest to suit the size and shape of her body. Eggs 
for incubation should be well selected, whatever 
hen they come from, no eggs are fit for setting 
unless the shells are strong, .smooth and regular, and 
of the usual size laid by the hen. Very old hens 



INTENTIONAL 2ND EXPOSURE 




Page 58 




PO Ij i 1' P:Y FAM €I EK: 





often lay roiig-h and ill-shaped cfygs: fat hens g-ener- 
ally lay thin shelled and often double yolked eggs. 
The badly shaped eggs seldom hatch ; the thin 
shells will endanger the whole brood, and perhaps 
teach the setting hen to eat eggs; the double yolk 
has two chickens it it, whch are generally too en- 
tangled to get out of the shell, and if they do get out 




WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCK COCK. 

the4^re^^ormm^'''^hiI'H'^f?"^^ °^ ^^^^ P"^^ ^^ two shows and 

are neither fine nor strong, nor the result of a con- 
stitutional habit that it is desirable to perpetuate 
Kggs laid by yearling and two-year-old hens hatch 
larger chickens which w^ill grow into much finer 
fowls than those laid by immature pullets. They 
are strong growers, more vigorous and much easier 
to raise to the age of maturity. 

The moment that cockerels and pullets are mated 
and their eggs used for breeding purposes, that 
moment degeneration of the stock begins; so for 
this reason always, select your best hens for breed- 
ers. When an egg has been broken, and its con- 
tents discharged in the nest, it will be fatal to all 
the rest unless at once attended to. It varnishes the 
shells and prevents the necessary passage of air 
through them; it makes them adhere to the feath- 
ers of the hen and causes a repetition of the acci- 
dent; it makes the eggs adhere to each other and to 
the nest, so that the hen cannot properly turn and 
move them around, and it soon does that which is 
still worse, poisons the air contained in the nest so 
necessary to the development of the embryo chick. 
When such an accident happens the eggs must 
be removed from the nest, washed in clean water 
of a hundred degrees and wiped dry. The hen 
should be cleaned as well as the eggs, and a new 
nest made for her, and it is possible that the damage 
done may have been repaired or at least materially 
lessened. Sometimes a hen will leave her nest- 
eggs are found cold and hopes are not very bright 
for a successful hatch. If the eggs are valuable it 
makes matters worse, but it is always wise to con- 
tinue the hatch to the end, for eggs at some periods 



March, *10 

of incubation will stand a good deal more abuse than 
we realize. The first thing to do is to immediately 
cover the eggs with a heavy shawl or quilt that has 
been heated over the stove and as soon as possible, 
get another hen and put her on the eggs, warm 
water of the proper degree is an efficient means of 
restoring the lost heat to the embryo. 

I have had eggs that the hen left during the last 
week of incubation, for many hours, hatch a fair 
percentage of chickens, and if it is during the sum- 
mer season, a whole day's absence from the nest 
might not injure the eggs if in the last stages of de- 
velopment. Some very interesting experiments 
made in this direction will perhaps be a help to 
very many poultrymen and will conclude this article 
in a fititng manner. In order to make it perfectly 
plain we will relate in detail the methods of the ex- 
perimenter. 

''W^e set ten hens on ten eggs each, in the fc^llow- 
ing manner. On the first morning at six, we put 
four eggs under number one hen all marked No. 20. 
On the next morning we put four more under her 
marking them 19. On the third morning we put 
two more under her, marking them with a circle; 
and at the same time we put four under number two 
lien marked 18. W^e repeated this with all the hens 
until number ten had been set on four number two 
on the nineteenth, and four number one on the 
twentieth morning. On the evening of the twentieth 
day, at six, we took eight eggs away from each hen 
and put them them on a carpenter's bench standing- 
in the open air, and left them there until six the 
next morning, when we put them back under their 



!•«;" .^4a.^^tlX3g^£s.l 



^;ar;«s?.-i, 




LIGHT BRAHMA COCKEREL. 
Winner of first prize at Deoafnr in kma 
and owned by U H.^Jollef Tb^^ir R k D.^a/SectturNll '''"' 

respective hens. On the night uf the exposure there 

-:Z:ifT "'"f '"""■"^'' '^"t ^'^« "--"i-nun tc'n per! 
ature o the night was not below 411 degrees 

hen eJnotVT- "'".*, ^' ^^^' *^° ^^^^^^ ^"^<^' each 
I en exposed being tiie two niari<ed with a circle 

Ihese we left as proof-eggs to show if anythin' 1 ui 
gone wrong with the setting "^ " 

The eggs used were all under a week old, from 




• 



^^r 




«!!# 




young vigorous cross bred fowls, running on a 
arge free range, with a large proportion of cocks ; 
the hens being a cross between Dorkings and Lan^- 
shans, and the cocks Houdans. Indeed, every e4 
was as certainly fertilized as those of wild birds, 
llie result of this experiment was as follow^ • 
Hours of Incubation Number of Chicks 

I^revious to Exposure. From Four Eggs. 

1^ 4 

36 4 

60 4 

84 "2 

108 ;;:::;:::::: 2 

132 3 

156 :::;:;:;:; 2 

180 1 

204 ^) 

^^« '/.'.'.'/.['. 









v..--io 111 

A Dissertation on Rhode Island Red Breeding in 
General and White in Plumage in Particular. 

By M. E. SERVOSS. 

IX years ago when 1 had only been 
breeding Rose Comb R. 1. Reds for 
two years, after mating up my breed- 
ing pens. I found that 1 had some 
very good utility stock on hand; too 
good for market eggs and not quite 
good enough to sell chicks or setting eggs from, so I 
mated them up and thought I would give some of 
the neighbors a start and help myself a bit at the 
same time. They were to take several settings of 
eggs each in time to get the chicks out before \m ay 
1st and in September were to bring me the best 
three pullets from each setting of eggs from which 
I was to make a further selection of one for each 
setting. In this way, I would get a farm raised 
early hatched utilitv bird for winter layino; for 
each setting of eggs, with a possibility of a few 
good breeders. 

Among those brought in from one farm was a 
beautiful pullet, large and good in quality but on 
one hip about two inches forward and a little to 
the right of the tail there were three pure white 
feathers; otherwise she was so good that I kei)t 
her, pulled out the white feathers, supposing them 
to have come from a slight injury and put' her in 
with my breeders. I thought no further of the 
matter until that fall after the old hens had ccmi- 
pleted their molt, when 1 noticed that T had three 
hens with just those three white feathers in exactly 
the same place. Examining them closer, 1 found by 
the band, that one was the hen I had pulled the 
three white feathers from a year before and the 
other two were early pullets that looked so exactly 
like her that there was no cpiestion but they were her 
offspring. Well, they all went into the market egg 
pen, white feathers and all, that I might not think 
some of my good birds had jumped the high fence, 
and this ended the matter as far as they were con- 
cerned. 

Remembering that the White Leghorn is among 



1 E R:^^-^ !^ P agTsa 

252 (J 

276 .'.'*.' I 

300 2 

324 4 

348 * * 4 

372 * * 3 

396 4 

420 3 

444 3 

468 ;.'.*;;.'.*.'; 

This experiment goes to show what we have al- 
ready maintained, that the first few days of incu- 
bation is the critical period, and that later on when 
the chicken is formed, absence from the nest is 
less fatal to successful results, and results would of 
course have been entirely different if the night tem- 
perature had been lower and the eggs with less 
vigorous vitality in them. 






the varied ancestry of the Reds, I am confident that 
there is entirely too much indifference to this mat- 
ter. In all probability, white in the plumage of 
young growing chicks, sometimes comes from im- 
proper feeding and perhaps occasionally from an ac- 
cident, but are not breeders all too readv to ''jump 
at conclusions" and claim that such was the, case 
with theirs because it was proved to have been so 
with others? Proved to be by trap-nesting and care- 
Uil records. In other words, is it not too' much like 
the cockerel who cut the spike off the end of his 
comb by getting it fast in a wire fence? One 
breeder listed a cockerel of this kind and then it 
was decidedly amusing to see how many other 
breeders had, according to their sales list, each had 
a cockerel get his head fast in a wire fence and pull 
the spike off his comb. 

When conclusions are jumped at it does more 
more harm than one at first thinks, because it makes 
the breeder careless and in the end seriouslv dam- 
ages his entire flock. Now it is niv private opin- 
ion, publicly expressed that in most cases the show- 
mg of white feathers in R. I. Reds, like white in ear 
lobes is simply a reversion to the Leghorn ancestry 
and that, consequently, great care should be used 
in keeping such specimens for breeders. It should 
always be remembered that three generations fixes a 
characteristic, and it is a fact that white feathers 
in the young of high bred Reds is becoming alarfn- 
ingly common. One well known breeder told me 
recently that his winning cockerel at a big show 
had as a cock developed white in both sickle and 
wing feathers. The discussion came up because 
of a cockerel I had purchased of him who had de- 
veloped white in wing and tail, and while he still 
looked alright, siring birds that were worthless be- 
cause of the white in plumage. 

] also purchased some years ago a claimed Kan- 
sas State winner who also sired birds worthless 
because of v/hite in plumage. These things 
were laid in each case to some injury the male 
had received and in each case T could not resist the 
temptation to iiKpiire if they had sired birds with 
white in plumage because oi" some injury, they were 
going to receive some months later? It is needless 
to state that my inquiry received no reply. So I 




,Plg^4£Z>POULTRY FANCIE 




had to clear out the whole batch and be^in over 
again, as far as those two males and their "get" 
were concerned. 

If some little runt of a chicken shows white feath- 
ers, it is not to be wondered at but when a fine, 
large, vigorous male throws white feathers, as he 
reaches his second year, I believe it is due to revert- 




Tt.-BJ9t'> ''^WA^^$-0^-t^'<^K 1909 . 

iA. 3U 1— IS O-K^ JSI , Im: X C2, i-r. 




SILVER WYANDOTTE COCK. 

First prize bird at Chicago and the kind bred by Clare E. 
Hoffman, Allegan, Mich. 

ing and is all the more dangerous l)ccause all of his 
"get" of the ])receding spring have been more or 
less affected. I also believe lie showed white as a 
chick. I also note that these birds all showed white 
in ear lobe. A\'hat is the remedy ? Greater care and 
less parrot like excuses. When an occasional chick 
shows a white feather or two in its winiis, if it is 
not a strong, vigorous bird, eat it: if it is otherwise 
a promising specimen, i)ull out the feathers, care 
for the stock properly and if they grow in white 
again, never use it for a breeder, even if in the full 
bloom of its first perfect molt it should show no 
white, for it is too risky, and never on any account 
use a male that has at any time shown white in 
l)lumage, if his sire also had the same defect. Stamp 
it out first as we did the feathered legs, which was 
a reverting to the Cochin. 

It is not many years since ten ])er cent of the 
Reds hatched had a trace of leg featherimr, while 
now I doubt if there are two or three to a thous- 
and. There is no di faculty in stamping out any 
fault of this kind, so that we do stamp it out and 
not begin to cover it up with excuses. Any breed 
made up of so many different breeds will occas- 
ionally revert to one or another- It is not a result of 
improper mating or of one out-cross but simplv of 
reverting that is to be occasionally expected in a 
made-up breed, i)ut when they do come and the 
])ird is half grown and an otherwise good specimen, 



pull them out and if they come in white again, use 
the old hatchet cure. It is the safest, the surest and 
the most honest, both to ourselves and to our cus- 
tomers. Even if causing some loss now, it will 
pay best in the end and I believe do much toward 
eliminating the white in ear lobes. And don't, I 
beg of you, let each and every one of us have our 
best stub combed cockerel to have lost his spike by 
wav of a wire fence, or ruin the future of the beau- 
tiful and wonderful Rhode Island Red by making 
too many excuses for white in plumage just to have 
a few dollars now. Again I sound the breeders 
warning: Three generations fixes a characteristic. 
Edison Park, 111. 



Some people are just ''chicken raisers"; others are 
poultry breeders. The one takes w^hat he can get for 
Iiis ])roduct, the other sets his price. Which class do 
you belong to? 



Xo one would think of condemning the grocery or 
dry goods or any other mercantile Inisiness, because 
])eople are failing every day in them, but with ])oultrv 
raising it seems to be different. When you find a fail- 
ure in the poultry business, people are quick to con- 




'^0:^^M'^; 



90f^ 



FIRST PR^ZE Ch^R'L AT BUFFALO SHOW \^Q9 
Bred Owned And Ei^hvb»fed Bv 

t)r Q.J. ftNDHU SS C|\NPiW)M(xUA MV- 



u.- <^. typical specimen of the Columbian W^yandotte as bred 
i)> J)r. L. J, Andiuss. 

demn the business instead of the man, and the man, 
of course, is looking for an excuse for his failure and 
the business gets the hot end of things both coming 
and going. 





c '• 




i< ^ah?y.TV^ >f;.w ; y ' JS T .3 7 



March, '10 




POULTRY FANCIER 




• c 



om 



b 



Page 61 Ji;« 



^•■*f 





Watt 



\^0 ¥tl* Vw^lCoL dil 






A Breeder and Admirer of Crested Fowls Defends 
His Favorites Against the Prejudice Which is so 
Commonly Held in Connection with Crested Va- 
rieties. 

By FRANK WICKIZER. 

HERE is an old fable which tells of a 
stag contemplating his reflection in a 
forest pool. ''How majestic are my 
antlers !" he cried, "but my legs— how 
poor and scrawny and altogether un- 
lovely r Just then a wolf (or it may 
have been a panther; 1 do not profess to quote 
literally) broke cover, and the stag ran. It was an 
uneven race. The stag easily distanced his pur- 
suer, but alas! In plunging through a chaparral, 
his antlers became entangled in the branches; he 
was a prisoner, and, as he awaited the attack of the 
beast, he had a brief interval in which to lament 
his folly "My legs," he moaned, '^which but now 
I scorned, would have carried me to safety but for 
niy antlers, of which I was over-proud." 

In the world of the poultry fancier we have two 
schools one (infinitely the larger) wedded to comb 
and wattles, the other to crest and beard. And the 
greater school says to the lesser: "We admire you' 
Jn many respects you are superb; but alas, your 
crest and beard ! Can't you see how much superior 
are comb and wattles? But for this one unpardon- 
able sin, we would take you to our bosom as a long 
lost brother!" ^ 

But let us see if the greater school is not in the 
class with the foolish stag, that scorned the mem- 
bers which, in the crucial test, did him such heroic 
service. 

The vermiform appendix in the human anatomy 
IS without a known function, unless it be to corral 
the truant grape-seed, and pave the way to appen- 
dicitis. So with comb and wattles of the domestic 
lowl. Their only office is to lure the frost-bite 
and serve as a mark for the militant spur This 
much will be admitted even by the most uncom- 
promising of the g. s. A popular dictionary thus 
-defines the comb: "The naked, fleshy caruncle on 
the upper part of the bill or hood of a cock or 
other bird ; it is usually red. (b) One of a pair of 
organs on the base of the abdomen of scorpions " 
i hats about all that can be said of it, save that 
vyhen serving as anchorage of side-sprigs, it tempts 
the fancier to dark and secret ways. 

As to the crest, it performs much the same service 
lor the bird as does a head of hair for the man so 
fortunate as to have one. If a comb grew there in 
lieu of hair, a man might glory in the depth of its 
yarmine ot the regularity of its spikes, but he would 
hardly count on it to ward oft* pneumonia, neuralgia 
toothache or grip. He would have 10 provide an 
artificial scalp protector. Rut the crested bird is 
bald only through accident. Crest and beard to- 
gether form a rational protection to the organs of 
head throat, reduce the terrors of roup to a tra- 



dition, and go far toward disclosing the secret of 
vvhy certain of the crested breeds are winter layers. 
\ bird with a frozen comb will not lay. The man 
^vho knows that much of the game should be 
able to give the answer to the winter-laying prob- 
lem in something less than three guesses. 

So much for utility. Beauty remains to be con- 
sidered. It may be contended that this is not a 
proper field for argument, since whether the 
head of a fowl looks better with crest or with comb 
is a matter of individual taste. But I am going 
to refer the question to the arbitrament of Mother 
Nature. When she sets her hand to accomplishing 
something really fine in the way of birds, does she 
cap the head ot her masterpiece with a comb or 
with a crest? We mav find our answer in 'the 
graceful aigret of the heron, in the orange-and- 
black plume of the golden pheasant, in the peacock 
headdress of the king lady, in the pompadour of the 
European jay, in the fan-shaped crest of the hoopoe 
111 the thistle-down tuft of the quetzal, and in the 
chaste coiflfure of the lyre bird. Dame Nature has 
excellent judgment in these matters. In the decora- 
tion of her feathered creatures of jungle and bush 
she IS no more prone to blunder than in the tinting 
of the rose or the painting of a sunset. 

Yet the stubborn fact remains that there is quite 
a general prejudice in this country (not in France 
and England) against crested fowls— or perhaps it 
IS not so much prejudice as scepticism, doubt It 
may have its origin far back in the pioneer days, 
when hawks, owls, weasels and other enemies of the 
domestic fowl infested the poultry yards, and when 
the ability to see in all directions at once was es- 
sential to protection. It is conceivable that in such 
a contingency the crest might prove a handicap 
While the "normal" crest— that is, one conforming 
to Standard, and not too large— in no wise hampers 
the fowl in feeding, or in quest of grasshoppers 
bugs and worms, the crested bird cannot look 
straight up or backward without turning its head 
even as you or I. To such satisfaction as the 
greater school can derive from that admission it is 
welcome. But the day when it was necessary for 
the domestic fowl to have eyes in the back of its 
head has long since passed into history. Times 
have changed for the hen, as for the cow, which 
once needed horns for self-protection, but now is 
bred without them. 

Or the prejudice may be due to a lack of dis- 
crimination— to a popular impression that all 
crested birds are shaken out of the same sack, and 
because some are weak layers and deficient in meat- 
producing qualities, all share in these defects— in 
short, that nothing good can come out of Israel. 
Or again, it may be due to the fallacy that Nature 
is niggardly of her virtues, and seldom entrusts 
more than one or two to the same individual. 

In throwing out these few humble suggestions I 
trust I haven't started something I can't stop. And 
if we should have more to the same (or rather op- 
posite) purpose, from another source, I trust' the 
discussion may prove instructive and amiable. 
St. Joseph, Mo. 




POULTRY 








E 




1 




I 





Poultry Fancier 

Published under the name Fancy Fowls for 1 years. 



Entered •■Second Class Matter, Sept. 28, 1907, at the 

Post Office at Chicago, lu., under 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



Published the 1 5th of each month by 

POULTRY FANCIER PUBLISHING CO. 

FRANK HECK. President 
357 Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 



FRANK HECK, 



Editor 



Subscription price in United States and pos- 
sessions 25 cents per year. 

Subscription price in Chicago, Canada and 
foreign countries, 50 cents per year. 

All subscriptions are immediately discontinued 
when the time expires for which they have been 
paid. 

Requests for advertising rates will be given 
prompt attention. 

Changes of ads must be received by the 1st of 
the month. New ads must be received not later 
Ihan the 10th of the month. 

The circulation of Poultry Fancier is national 
m character. It is the only poultry journal pub- 
lished solely in the interests of fanciers, the people 
who constitute practically the entire fraternity. 

The mission of Poultry Fancier is to teach 
fr*o" *»o^ to produce the beautiful and valu- 
able Standard bred birds which are the founda- 
tion of all profit and pleasure in poultry raising. 



March, 1910 



The Penalty of Wilful Igno- 
rance. 

IVIany breeders who have meagre 
success with their fowls do not de- 
serve any more than they get. We 
might also add that they will never 
get any more than they deserve, 
which in few words means that they 
will never succeed. Some folks in 
this world are too tirea mentally to 
think of ambition much less to ac- 
tually possess it. The people who 
move things in business affairs or in 
any other direction in this life are 
the ones who are dead in earnest, 
who have some special aims and who 
use all their talents to accomplish 
their purpose. And, after all. why 
should any of us spend our time and 
efforts doing things in a half-hearted 
manner. No one should be censured 
for inability to reach certain heights. 
We cannot all possess wealth or 
fame or social position or manv other 
things that most of us covet, but we 
can, all of us. make the most of our 
opportunities and put forth the best 
efforts of which we are capable so 
that the things we do undertake to 
do will be done in such manner as 
to represent the fullest measure of 
our ability. Anything short of this 
i.s not justifiable no matter from what 
viewpoint it be considered. It mat- 
ters not how menial the work or how 
lowly the position, the world is ready 



uith unstinted praise and due reward 
if the work is done well or the posi- 
tion creditably tilled. 

The breeding of Standard-bred 
fowls is an occupation possessing 
many features peculiar to itself. The 
people interested in it represent all 
classes and conditions of men and 
women in -AX walks of life. Many 
peojik- who use excellent judgment 
in other affairs seem to lay all of it 
aside in their work with their towls. 
We feel somthing of a personal in- 
terest in every one of the thousands 
of people who have paid twenty-five 
cents for a year's subscription to 
Poultry Fancier. They must have 
expected to learn something from it 
or they would not have spent their 
money for it. We want the paper to 
be a genuine help to them and we 
want to aid them in raising better 
birds. Those who are in the work 
merely for pleasure and recreation 
are usually deeply interested in pro- 
ducing bids as near to the require- 
ments of the Standad of Perfection 
as possible and those who are mak- 
ing a business of the work most as- 
suredly need to produce such birds. 
Success comes in just such measure 
as one's knowledge of the work war- 
rants. If we make little effort we re- 
ceive little reward and some of us 
seem to be content with both. The 
penalty of ignorance in poultry rais- 
ing, is failure. Failure is never ex- 
cusable. Tt can always be avoided if 
sufficient effort is made to accjuire 
the necessary knowledge and anyone 
who can read can learn. Some people 
do not learn because they do not ap- 
preciate the importance and the nec- 
essity of learning. Others do not 
learn because they think they know it 
all and, therefore, make no' effort to 
learn. 

The writer has these conditions 
brought to his attention in two force- 
ful ways. One is through editorial 
correspondence and the other through 
judging in the show room. We al- 
ways feel like congratulating and re- 
joicing with the exhibitors whose 
birds carry away the honors. We like 
to see anyone succeed and get the re- 
ward to which he is entitled. On the 
other hand our feeling of sympathy 
IS just as keen for the fellow who 
loses. Our experience as an exhib- 
itor has been such that we can real- 
ize the pleasure of winning and know 
the disappointment of losing. We 
can, therefore, appreciate conditions 
on both sides. Tt is always a source 
of special regret to us when we get 
in touch with cases where an ambi- 
tious breeder loses the honors be- 
cause of inexcusable ignorance. These 
cases are numerous at most every 
show and this little preachment is 
presented to readers at this time in 
the hoi)e that many who need it will 
read it and profit by it. 

Our object is to help a lot of people 
who aro not making the proper ef- 
fort to help themselves. This may be 
a thankless task and a seemingly pre- 
sumptuous one, but it is pardonable 
in view of the fact that these same 
people are strivinjr in a crude way 



March, '10 



PA 






to accomplish certain results and that 
they take defeat greatly to heart. Our 
advice to them briefly is — start right 
now to learn all about the variety 
of fowls you are breeding. Do this 
by reading all you can find relative 
to it. Don't be afraid to spend a 
dollar or two for poultry literature 
including a copy of the Standard of 
Perfection and then make use of it 
after you get it. At every poultry 
show many dollars are thrown away 
in paying entry fees on birds that the 
breeder ought to know cannot win 
and upon disqualified specimens. 
This waste of money and the some- 
times keen sting of defeat could be 
avoided if breeders would learn be- 
forehand what is required in their 
fowls. ^ Failure is bad enough when 
unavoidable, but is worse and all the 
more humiliating when caused by 
wilful ignorance. 

Be Sure of Proper Type in Your 

Breeding Birds. 

Right now is the time for the 
breeder to consider well the type of 
birds which he places in his breed- 
ing pens. This most vital point is 
too often overlooked in the wild de- 
sire for color characteristics. The 
majority of breeders do not p-ive to 
Standard shape the consideration 
which it deserves. The old expres- 
sion "shape makes the breed, and 
color the variety" is just as true to- 
day as it ever was. In no two breeds 
is there so much confusion of type 
as in Plymouth Rocks and Wyandottes 
and it is particularly noticeable in 
the White varieties of these breeds. 
Many White Wyandottes possess no 
characteristics to stamp them as 
Wyandottes except the rose comb. 
'1 he Wyandotte should 1)e shorter on 
the legs than the Plymouth Rock and 
should have a nluinp well-rounded 
body with shorter thicker neck, 
shorter back and lower tail. Many 
hieeders seem to think that most any 
kind of a white bird with a rose 
comb ought to win over one that is 
excellent in shape but defective in 
color. Judges in the show room can- 
not help discounting severely such 
specimens of White Wyandottes as 
resemble White Rocks in type, and 
many disappointed exhibitors cannot 
or will not understand just why their 
birds although clear white have not 
been placed over other specimens not 
nearly so good in color. The fancier, 
no matter what his variety, who 
wishes to gain the greatest success, 
needs to study carefully the Standard 
shape description of his breed and 
let it be the first i)oint of excellence 
which he demands in his breeding 
birds. There is no nleasure or profit 
in exhibiting one's stock and repeat- 
edly failing to win any of the most 
coveted honors. Likewise there is no 
good excuse for repeated failure if we 
put the right sort of determination 
into our efforts. Now at the beginning 
of the breeding season is a good time 
to turn over a new leaf and lav the 
foundation for future success, ff the 
stock is not properly mated, nothing 



• 



o 





€-• 




r.')Tr"ifr^'i^My s5 a££;Ss g^g; 




on earth can make high grade birds 
out of the chicks hatched from the 
eggs. Don't handle this branch of 
the business by guess work. Tt is like 
building your house on the sands 
Perhaps half the birds in your breed- 
ing pens ought to be thrown out. 

We are speaking now, with refer- 
ence to breeders who are trying to 



„,JMi^vi9,.. J ^POU LT R Y F14KCIERi 




produce exhibition excellence in their 
stock and who wish to reach the posi- 
tion occupied by the foremost fan- 
ciers whose sales of stock and eggs 
for hatching reach into the thousands 
of dollars each year. The fr)undation 
of success is to have the right sort of 
stock. The way to get this is to 
mate only the best birds regardless 



of quantity. If you have only two, 
three or a half dozen good ones, then 
mate only that manv. And in select- 
ing the best let type be the'first test 
that the birds must pass. If they are 
greatly deficient in shape of any sec- 
tion do not place them in the breed- 
nig pen, regardless of what their 
color may be. 



Pertinent Paragraphs 

By EASTERNER 

"There is monev in chickens." Yes, 
if you reckon up your grain bills. 

At the present high price of poultry 
the rooster makes a sound like 
money. 

As an evidence of wealth the 
chicken-coop lords it over the garage. 

■3f ^ 

The Mayflower descendants, of the 
female gender, are advertising their 
descent by wearing "Chanticler" hats 
of the Plymouth Rock variety But 
ought they not be barred? 

To beat the cold storage fellows 
restaurant keepers are boiling their 
eggs and saving the broth for chicken 
soup. 

Chicken stew really requires chick- 
ens, too, or at least some veal and 
chopped feathers. 

•3f ^ 

We are now told that panes of blue 
glass in brooders and brooder houses 
will prevent disease and promote 
growth. Tn blue glass days, it was 



said that cucumbers grew so fast, 
that a man who planted the seed and 
subjected it to the rays of light that 
came through the blue panes, had to 
hustle to keep from getting hope- 
lessly entangled in the swiftly-grow- 
ing vines. One experimenter testified 
that he tried the experiment and be- 
fore he could get away he had to use 
his knife freely and then found that 
he had a ripe cucumber in his pocket. 

Foreign fashions may be all right, 
but when it comes to eggs wearing 
paraffin coats it is time to draw the 
line. 

"Live and let live" used to be con- 
sidered a seasonable motto, but now- 
adays one can give thought only to 
the first part of it and its pretty dif- 
ficult to realize even that. 

S. Swaysgood says: "Come to the 
and of sunshine; of comets; of 
brains." It seems to be a good place 
to go to for brains, for they appear 
not to have got out of the state, as 
yet. None seems to have escaped 
through the "system." 

Two hundred egg strains, eh? Who 

has th«m? Tt is like the old game, 

Hutton. button, who has the button," 



POLISH "S;™' '" '"""■■s.'effi.Trt.rgsiT.va* 
BREEDERS ?sSEH^-Si i'S^S 

A T T E N T 1 N F^tS=.»rSa^S 

Chicago or New York. Our White Qr^st^i m^v%^uX^^^\^^^ '^°" ^ ^"^ P"^^ "^ ^^^her 
nersfrom the greate.st shows of the countrvfho„ ^^^^ ^/^^ ?^°' contains more prize win- 
our first pens Ire $5.00 «"d highe? qSaYuy ?annS?be foundT^^ ^^^^V /^^« ^^°"^ 

by a Chicago or St. I^ouis first prize winne? only J2%0 Wri?^ ?nr f?.^"fi' ^T^ of them headed 
fowl ever published. D 1 r> I* I n i xr ^^^^%^^^ the finest cstalogr on Polish 

Roya' Pol's'i Poultry Yards, Station A, Ashland, Wis. 



Don't Mistake the Hearse for 
the Bandwagon 



jPopular taste NO COMB TO FREEZE 

i n poultry 



i.1 ^ 1 . •-^ changes, like 

the styles in women's hats. In selecting your breed 

choose one that's ' 'coming in. " not one that's ' 'going out. ' ' 

Hardy Hoiidans 1?;^^'" ^ p^^^^^ ^^ ^j^J^^e 

, r, with. Houdans are Winter 

Layers of large, white eggs, and lots of them; they are 
non-«itter«; their flesh is unrivaled for table use; they are 
tame contented, rugged, handsome and profitable. Most 
popular fowl in France and England. The ideal "Town 
v^hicken. Winners wherever shown; silver cup and blue 

THE HILLCREST ROOKERIES 




FRANK WICKIZER, Prop., 



ST. JOSEPH, MO. 



but with this exception, in the game 
some one really had the button. 

To count one abnormally prolific 
hen a.s a strain is straining the 
definition of "strain" pretty hard. 
It is like reckoning that one swallow 
makes a summer. 

There are other Peggies than Kel- 
lerstrass' that are worth $10,000 or 
more, but it would be considered un- 
complimentary to call them "old 
hens." Some are young. 

An auto isn't necessarily a sign of 
wealth. Some poultrymen own a 
buzz wagon." 

Down in Boston thev are claiming 
that a certain poultry editor, despite 
his heat, has not lessened tlie coal 
bills of the past winter. 

"Drev" ought to be more careful 
about his utterances on faking or he 
will give his chief considerable work 
ni explaining. Witticisms and edi- 
torials don't jibe well. 

An utterance which needs explana- 
tion would better be not uttered It 
should die just before it is born. 

•X- -X- 

The beginner, "in wandering mazes 
lost, ' doesn't know whether he needs 
fifty acres or fifty square feet of land 
whether houses in winter shall be 
closed or open, whether— and here he 
throws up his hands. 

It has been suggested that a spring 
chicken is so named because it is 
springy, like India rubber. We cer- 
tainly have tried some of that char- 
acter and consistency. 

And still the modern poultry breed- 
er thinks he is going some if he gets 
a hen to lay 200 eggs in twelve 
months; and he is. 

"Constant Reader" is informed 
that to the best of our knowledge S 
Swaysgood is not financially inter- 
ested in a blue glass factory. 

■X- ^ 
"Pro Bono Publico" we think is 
l?r ^"Tfr .^" s^^^ting that Hon. Nelson 
W. Aldnch and S. Swaysgood have 
formed an illegal combination to ad- 
vance the price of food stuffs. It is 
a mere coincidence that their plans 
tend to this common end. 

■3f ^ 
For some months to come, the 
Hotels and boarding houses will have 
to depend upon old hens for their 
spring chickens. So will the poultry- 
man who doesn't use an incubator. . 

1 hat was a solar plexus blow Uncle 
Isaac dealt to the trap-nesters. when 




he told of a Lieht Brahma hen 
which laid 313 eggs in a year, long 
before the trap nest was invented. 
Query. Would a trap nest have ver- 
ified such a record? 

In Rostand's ne\y play, "Chanti- 
cler," the cock imagines that he con- 
trols the sun, which can rise only 
because he has crowed. It is to be 
feared that there are not a few chan- 
ticlers among the members of the 
human race, and that they are not en- 
tirely wanting among the poultry 
crowd. 

Freak legislature is supposed to be 
the prerogative of the several states 
in the Union. For example, notice 
the following acts which have been 
introduced by learned legislators, ac- 
cording to a prominent newspaper: 

IN NEBRASKA. 
To compel all hotels to have bed 
sheets nine feet long, clean towels 
and disinfect all linen once a sea- 
son. 

IN COLORADO. 

To make it a misdemeanor to give 
or take a tip., excepting only the 
sleeping car porter. 

IN OREGON. 

To prohibit the wearing of a hat- 
pin more than nine inches in 
length, anything else to be declared 
a deadly weapon. 

IN DELAWARE. 
To tax bachelors and gypsies, both 
of whom are classed as undesirable 
citizens. 

IN UTAH. 

To make it a misdemeanor not to 

bathe at least once a week. 
IN TEXAS. 

To make it a criminal offense to 

swear over the telephone. 

But it begins to look as if the con- 
gress of the United States had been 
assuming some of the carefully 
guarded prerogatives of the states, 
for under the tariff list, paragraph 560 
provides that "Eggs of birds, fish and 
insects (except fishi roe, pressed for 
food purposes) may be admitted 
free." while paragraph 256 provides, 
"Eggs not specifically provided for in 
this section, five cents per dozen." 
These provisions have led to the 
question, "Is a hen a bird?" 

If a hen is a bird, hen's eggs would 
not have to pay a duty when im- 
ported into this country. If she isn't 
a bird, her egg would be dutiable at 
five cents a dozen. Hence importers, 
in New York City and in Providence. 
R. T.. have raised the question. **Is a 
hen a bird?" 

The custom house officers declare 
that, in the tariff provisions, hens 
eggs arc not birds c'^^t^s. and they 
rely, in part, upon the decision in Sun 
Kwong On vs. United States, where 
duck eggs, nickled and packed in salt 
and mud. after the Chinese fashion, 
were held to be not birds' eggs, and 
therefore, of course, that ducks were 
I'ot birds. If ducks are not birds, it 
is reasonable to suppose, reasoning 
by analogv. that hens are not birds. 
So when a fancier grows enthusiastic 
over his birds, one needs but to say: 
*'Sh! There's a custom house officer 
at hand and he may overhear your 
remarks," in order to stop his flow of 
eloquence. It would seem that there 



POULTRY FANCIER^ 



are birds and birds, and whether any 
living creature is a bird or not de- 
pends upon when and by whom the 
definition is made. In the theatre, for 
example, if one should say, as a wide 
hat trimmed with long plumes, comes 
down an aisle, to the accompaniment 



sz^ 




2ESS3Z3E2: 




March, '10 

of the rustle of a silk gown, "She's 
a bird," he might be as correct in his 
definition, as would be a custom 
house officer when he declares that a 
hen is not a bird. In the woods a 
bird is one thing, in the tariff another, 
and in the theatre still another. 




L 



COLUMBIA 

First WhiteBearde:dPol!ShHenBoston'o9 

FlRSTWhlTEBEARDFDPOLiSHHEN-CHICAGO'OS 
• 0\A/NED BY "THE 

Royal PoLisn PouLiii^ \^rds 

A5HLAND,\A/iS, 



DE 



A NOTED WINNER. 




<!Bmfmmmmmmmmmmmmmmsm»msve»immm-mimmmmmmim>ammm,: 



The above cut is a good picture of un- 
doubtedly the most noted Polish fowl in 
America, a white bearded Polish hen, 
owned by the Royal Polish Poultry Yards, 
Ashland, Wis., where the highest qual- 
ity is bred. This little hen has travelod 
more extensively and won more prizes 
than any other Polish fowl in existence. 
During 1908 she won first prizes at points 
widely separated, among such places be- 
ing poultry shows at Hartford, Conn., 
Boston, Chicago. Janesville, Wis., and 
Duluth, Minn. She is pronounced by 
John R. Gough, superintendent of crested 
breeds at the great Boston show, to be 
the most perfect specimen of Polish fowl 
he has ever seen. At several shows 
where she has been exhibited she won 
silver cups or gold prizes for being the 



highest scoring bird in the show. At 
Janesville she was scored 97 by Judge 
Heimlich, being cut only % a point on 
shape. At Duluth. Minn., she was again 
the highest scoring bird on exhibition, be- 
ing scored 96 by Judge Tucker, with a 
cut of only V^ a point for shape of body. 
•Judges who have passed upon her have 
declared that her crest and beard are 
practically ideal in shape, and all of them 
have agreed that her body very nearly 
conforms to the standard requirements. 
She is one of a pen of remarkable prize 
winning birds. The cock bird heading 
the pen has won first prize at Chicago. 
Memphis and Minneapolis, and among 
the other female birds are the first pul- 
let at St. Ivouis, '09, first and second hen 
at Chicago, '08, first and second hen at 
Memphis, '09, and first and second hen at 
Minneapolis. '10. 



IQOO 



EDELWFl^i STRAIN 



I^!0 



S. C. WHITE LEGHORHS ";^^«tationed. I.ow-tailed^ Chalk- 

, , ,, ,, r -fc-r «.^ '»«««.«. li-* A^jk*-^ white stock, aconne to 96^. 100 

cockerels, pullets and hens for sale. <; grand pens mated for the egp trade 

WHITAKER ca McCUNE, ASHTABULA, OMIO 



Lt. BRAHMA, 
LEGHORNS 






Strictly high class stock in every particular. Winners 
for years. Record this season at Illinois State Show 
, ^. , . , . , ^. ^"^ ^* Decatur, 7 firsts, 10 seconds, 4 thirds and 6 

fourths, also specials, including best shaped male and female Brahmas. 

Light Brahma Egg» from Winners, $5 and $3 per 15 

Single Comb Brown Leghorns, $3 and $2 per 15 

Eggs from utility Barred Rocks $6 per 100. Mammoth Bronze Turkeys 
highest quality. Eggs $4 per 1 1. Catalog free. 

I absolutely guarantee satisfaction and can more than please vou. 



L. H. JOSTES & SON, 



Rte. 2, MACON, ILL. 




• 



e 



• 







V 





FANCIER- 





lo !u ru ?*" " ^^^ •'"'■•'**''* "^ «^'^^«^ publicity to the view, of our reader, who 
would hke to expre,. themselve. briefly upon topic, that are of interest. A hearty 
mvitation is extended to all our reader, to use the department freely. 



Editor Poultry Fancier: 

Dr H. F. Ballard in the February 
number of the Fancier states that two 
letters in the preceding number sug- 
gests his article. As he proceeds to 
pay his respects to my reply to Mr 
Wright's article in the December 
number, I suppose I must plead guilty 
to being one of the offenders He 
says: As to Mr. John E. Davis's tirade 
against the Asiatics it needs no an- 
^^''^'t- , T;''^^^? Really my dear doc- 
tor i had no wish or intention to in- 
dulge in a tirade against any breed 
or breeder. I have nothing but good 
will for any man who is keeping 
poultry for profit or pleasure. I have 
found both pleasure and profit in 
them since I was a boy when, in my 
spare moments, I kept a little flock 
ot mongrels, but I always tried to 
make them pay and as I grew older I 
looked around always for the variety 
that would pay me best. My circum- 
stances were such that I could not af- 
ford to keep any one variety because 
i liked their particular color or 
shape. They must give me something 
more substantial. I tried the Brah- 
mas but they consumed too much 
food and gave me comparatively 
nothing in return. I next tried the 
Leghorns but did not like their cani- 
bahstic propensities, so they gave 



way to the Plymouth Rocks which I 
kept for 26 years or more until the 
Reds caught my fancy some thirteen 
years ago which I still have and ex- 
pect to have until something better 
turns up. 

In regard to this "tirade": I had 
been reading a bitter and sarcastic 
complaint from a breeder of Buck- 
eyes who accused the Red breeders of 
trying to keep the Reds out of the 
Standard and sundry other wicked 
things and when I read Mr. Wright's 
article in the Fancier it just seemed 
as though every disgruntled breeder 
whose favorites were not paying him 
thought it was his duty to have a 
crack at the Reds or some other of 
the popular varieties. And it would 
seem as though some of the genial 
doctor's remarks assumed something 
of the nature of a "tirade." Let him 
breed Rhode Island Reds or Geor- 
gia Shawl Necks or Massachusetts 
Browns or anything that any other 
state in the union can make, but some 
of us who know how to succeed 
where somebody else has failed do 
not propose to give up our good 
things to try some one else's new 
patent. Doesn't this verge a little 
on the "tirade" doctor? And again, 
you say making windy assertions 
without proof may stuflF some people 

H A K E B U F F WYANDOTTE S 

bpecialty sale this month breeding pens and trios, i have T number of 

S. C. BUFF LEGHORNS 7:v' tvi:^ -^ 

IQin D L JJL Kii • -w^-mA^i^ Baraboo Valley Show, Jan., 

IVIU. h'en headed by Madi5on Square winner. Some fine scored cockerels for sale, reasonable. Egg 
^3 per 15. $5 per 30. Satisfaction guaranteed. F. W. CATLIN, BARABOO, WIS. 

ROSE COMR RHODF ,A^^o»«Io» of youngsters for sa^breds 
*^^^'^*-' V.V-^IVIO I\JnV^L7IL from the best winning and laying strain 

in America. They are red to the quill and possess the fCf A MFV Dl7r\C 
length of body and symmetry of form so desirable in a typi- lO JLi/tL i 1 JL/ t\.tHJ$^ 

cal Red. We solicit your orders and guarantee satisfaction. 

LUMBERTON POULTRY CO . JAY B. DEUTSCH, M,r.. ANT IGO. WIS 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES 

TRUE IN TYPE AND COLOR .?" "?" " '-" ''* 

I c . r . . , ,. V^^*-»^*^ shows this season my birds 

have won fourteen first prizes including first prize hen at Madison Square 
Uarden in the hottest of competition. I shall breed ten matmgs of high class birds 
this year from which I offer eggs for hatching, same as I use for myself. Mating list 
cheerfully mailed for the asking. Dr. C. J. Andniss. Canandaigua, N. Y. 



but when they learn by experience 
they will know better. Vm afraid this 
kind of argument won't afford much 
mformation to Mr. Wright in regard 
to the origin of his favorites. 

Another M. D., Dr. Lott, also rises 
for information. It would seem as 
though the whole medical fraternity 
was aroused by my little defense of 
the popular varieties. My question 
as to whether the Dark Brahma was 
the result of a cross or a series of 
crosses he replies to in the negative. 
Now I have no wish to dig up the 
origin of this variety because I have 
no interest in it and, further, I am not 
looking for an argument, but I think 
if he will pursue his investigations a 
little further he will learn more about 
his favorites. Read "Poultry Culture," 
edited by Dr. D. W. Judd in 1886, doc- 
tor, and you can add a little more in- 
formation in regard to the Dark 
Brahmas to that which you possess. 

John E. Davis. 
Marblehead, Mass. 

DIFFERENT KINDS OF FAKERS. 




.WHITE PLYMOUTH 
ROCKS 



Allen Tucker's 

WHITE ROCKS 

^. . , again made good 

this season by winning every Bine competed for; 

also silver cup winners. Three grand pens com- 

posed ofthese prize winners mated for this season's 
egg trade. A limited number of choice cockerels and pullets for sale 
at reasonable prices. 

ALLEN TUCKER - . MINERAL POINT. WIS. 



Editor Poultry Fancier: 

Faking and what constitutes it and 
what does not seems to be an all- 
absorbing topic just now. Some say 
do it to match your unscrupulous (?) 
competitor, a few say don't do it, oth- 
ers define or try to define a line be- 
tween it and legitimate conditioning, 
one or two say do as the ancient 
Spartans did — teach it to the youth, 
practice it as skillfully as possible, 
but don't get caught at it, as therein 
lies the disgrace. 

How would it do if we were to ex- 
tend or direct the discussion to the 
fakers who illustrate their winnings 
in the poultry journals by taking ad- 
vantage of their advertising privileges 
and having cuts of their winners pub- 
lished broadcast and some even go- 
ing far enough to have scores printed. 
Is not this a species of faking.'' tak- 
ing the beginner who looks at the pic- 
tures and thinks if the score is there 
and the bird right over it, it must be 
so. Even worse sometimes the name 
of the judge will be added. Such 
owners must surely be in ignorance 
as to what they are doing or they 
would never do it, for what older 
breeder who knows what a bird 
should be would think of recom- 
mending a man who did not know 
how much harm he was doing to him- 
self as well as others by a fake of 
this kind, an improper cut. showing 
a bird said to score 94 or better. Few 
birds will stand in a natural position, 
but most of them will assume a scared 
look, while others are badly repro- 
duced by the photographer who is 
generally a man who knows nothing 
of poultry but does know when they 
are in focus and snaps them just aft- 
er they leave a good pose. This, of 




Page 66 



course, does not refer to all cuts, nor 
any in particular, but the writer has 
seen many cuts in many journals that 
come as near fakint? as anything that 
is done to the birds themselves in 
order to gain an unfair advantage. 

There is one other method of prac- 
tice which might be called faking 
and that is the advertising of some 
people wdio belong to specialty clubs. 
These, whether their birds are placed 
or not, win color specials, shape spe- 
cials, etc., and so advertise. One case 
in particular 1 call to mind was that 
of a hen in a well-tilled class. She 
was not placed by the judge, but her 
owner was the only club member in 
the class and, of course, got the shape 
and color specials and she w^as hardly 
worth the entry fee and express 




■•^(ff;^.,A^.WJ>A'' 



March 







charges. This is forbidden ground, 
of course, but such winnings might 
be used to catch the uninformed, but 
more disgusting than all other fakers 
is the kicker at a show who always 
has the best birds, but is always 
beaten by a crooked (?) judge whose 
friends are there, etc. He draws at- 
tention to himself when he is un- 
worthy of any, disgusts the public 
and the show management by his ig- 
norance and injures the fancy all he 
can. Ts he not the worst fake or 
faker in the business? Like a mug- 
wump who belongs to one party and 
votes with the other and would it not 
be better if he could be disqualified 
and cast out like the bird with stubs 
and kept out? W. N. Watson. 

Sun bury. Pa. 



Awards at Indianapolis, Ind. 



EXHIBITOKS AT INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 

Ackelery. U E Frankfort. Ind 

Ackley. A. F Woodstock, 111. 

AUee, Thaddeus Chicago, 111. 

Anderson, Geo. O Rushvllle, III. 

Bantam. Eli Portland, Ind. 

Barkdoll, Geo West lenity. C) 

Barkei-. Fred W Westfield. ' Ind 

Barks. S. M Thorntown. Ind. 

Barnett, H. W Springfield. O 

Baugh, C. B Indianapolis Ind 

Beck. E. E Hammond, Ind 

Bender. E. B Zionsville, Ind. 

Benifleld, T. M Shelby viile. Ind 

Settles, Ralph E La Porte, Ind 

Biermann. E. H Bloomington. Ind' 

Blue Ribbon Poul. Farm Columbus, Ind. 

Bowers. W. R Baltimore. Md. 

Bowker Poul. Farm Dublin. Ind 

Bradshaw, Herman Lebanon. Ind! 

Bradshaw. Mrs. H Lebanon. Ind. 

Broner. Hariy L Rochester, Ind. 

Brown. C. P Colborn. Ont., (^an. 

Browne, W. F Delphi. Ind. 

Bryant. Cliff Hamilton. O. 

Bushmann, C. L Indianapolis. Ind 

Byers. C S Haz(>lwood. Uul. 

',"' ter. h.. t, Knoxville, Tenn. 

(hapman. Dr. W. A Indianapolis. Ind 

Chambers. Edw Aurora. Ill 

( hristian W. H Indianapolis. Ind 

Church, .1. A Xt-wm-in in 

Clark. Cliff H.. ■.:.■.■. lb. rnia' Mo 

W^v\ ^-^' o Seymour. Ind 

Cobb. \\. S Jackson. Mich. 

Coen. J E Wingate. Ind! 

^""^'t' Pfeston B Indianapolis. Ind. 

cook, \A . J Indianapolis. Ind 

Corn we 1 Mrs. .1. W Newman. 111'. 

Cornwa 1. Miss L. S Newman. III. 

Cottingham. H. O Noblcsviile. Ind. 

Coulter. C. c Frankfort Ind 

Cox & .Son, E. M Kingman. In.l. 

Cresswell Lew Fairland, Ind. 

Crookc Albert E („,on, Ind. 

Crumbly, c. C Veedersburg. In.l. 

Daab Bros (^Humbia. Ill 

Danner. H. A Frankf<.rt. Ind. 

^ •^'' : 'I, -^""'^ ' Filmore. Ind. 

Devoir Mr. and Mrs. C. T. .. .Franklin. Ind. 

R n^' "..'"^^ M ^^' Crawfordsville. Ind. 

R J] *^\F^' Maderia. (). 

Dunkle M. J Mrdwav. ( ). 

Edwards Oliver C Mace." Ind 

Ehman. Mi.-^s Lou Indianapolis, ind 

Eisenman J. C Greensburg. Ind! 

Erf with. Wm 

— .9235 Commercial Ave.. .So.' (Miicago, 111 

Ewbank E E Kingman Ind 

Faulbush. H. H Lawr.nceburg. Ind 

Fosfnaught Bros Van Wert o' 

Fountain Farm Lebanon Ind" 

Frash At Son. John Huntington". Ind' 

Gamber, Robt Wakcman. o 

Gaylord Farm Walingford. Conn 

Gl!b<-rt «t Son. .\. K Clavton Ind 

r.illogly. Dr. R. (" Newman. III. 

A^'^y^^' "•• ^' Logansport. Ind. 

>?.£"• ,9'^'? Indianapolis. Ind. 

Griffin. Major Glenwood. Ind 

Grimes. A. E Decatur, ()' 

Hackney. Oliver A Indianapolis Ind" 

Hadley & Hammock Danville, hid 

Haines Bros Dayton. ( >'. 

i'*'*"- •'■ 1> Tndianapfdis. hid 

Hallam. Dr. C. L . . . Mooresville Ind 

Hawkins. Robt Bridgepc.rt Ind 

Henderson. W. W Bridgeton. Mo 

Herron. C. (^ Hope. Ind' 

TTershman. Wm Medarvsville. Ind. 

"»". B F Indianapolis. Ind 

Hoover. G. Earl Mathews. Ind 

Hornaday. E. M Zlonsvllle. Ind. 

Houghland. R. G Booneville. Ind. 

Huffman, A. D Wanamaker. Ind 

Huffman Poul. Yds Roanoke. Ind 

Hunter. D. F Franklin. Ind. 

Hurl. Peter .S Thorntown. Ind. 

Jacobs. Mrs. L. M Georgetown. O. 



James, Rev. Henry. 
Johnson. Clair F. . . 

Frank P.. 

S. B 

F 

E 



.lohnson. 

Johnson, 

Jones. S. 

Jones. T 

Kline, Geo 

Krone, O. C 

Krome, W. P 

Lambert, T. N 

I^ane. S. B 

Lieber. Albert 

Lindenburg, W. F. . . . 

List. Robt. G 

Longfield Poul. Farm 

Lovell. F. J 

Ludlow. Mi-s. 
Fail 

r>undstrom, C. 

Lundstrum. A 

Lytle, H. S. . . 
McGuire. Wm. 
McKinney. R. 
McKinster. E. 
McMillen. R. H. . . 
McQuinston, J. A. 

Mack. Jas 

Mahan, Mrs. F. .1. 
Mahan, W. W. . . . 



R. S. 
view 
H.. . 



M. 
\. . 
L. 



Kent. O. 

Rushville, Ind. 

. . .Indianapolis, Ind. 
Fairland, Ind. 

Fiankfort. Ind. 

Catlin, 111. 

, Downeis Grove, 111. 
Richmond, Ind. 

El wood, Ind. 

Rose Hill, 111. 

Spiceland. Ind. 

..Indianapolis, Ind. 
. . . .Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Southport. Ind. 

Bluff ton, Ind. 

Danville, 111. 



Park, Indianapolis. Ind. 

Indianapolis. Ind. 

Omaha, Neb. 

Mattoon. 111. 

Broad Ripple, Ind. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Corydon. Ind. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Gieenwood, Ind. 

Indianaijolis. Ind. 

Piqua, O. 

Lizton, hid. 



Marsh, Dr. John L Brownsburg, Ind. 

Martin Poul. Farm Nashville. Tenn. 

Mathena, E. A CrothersvUle, Ind. 

Mathews, L. I* Thorntown, Ind. 

Matthews, Thos. B Newman, 111. 

Meeks, Pearl Parker, Ind. 

Mehler, Wm Louisville, Ky. 

Miles, A. S Plainfield, Ind. 

Moore, J. W Cambridge Cit.v, Ind. 

Murphy, Ed. B Carmel, Ind. 

Murphy. E. W^ , Carmel, Ind. 

Nash, M. J W. Toledo, O. 

Neal, Tavner Brownsburg, Ind. 

Newby, C. J Carmel, Ind. 

Newby, S. M Rochester, Ind. 

Noftsger. S. A No. Manchester. Ind. 

Norton, W. D No. Girard, Pa. 

Norwood. Mrs. A Southport, Ind. 

Oliver, C. F Macy, Ind. 

O'Neall, J. H Indianapolis, Ind. 

Ornbeck. Ben Edwardsville, 111. 

Overman, T. P 

...E. Meridian Heights, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Palmer, W. H Zionsville. Ind. 

Pangborn, Geo. W Indianapolis, Ind. 

Phillips, Chas Irvington, Ind. 

Picket, H. A Greentown, Ind. 

Porter, A. W Bridgeport, Ind. 

Powel, Geo Carmel, Ind. 

Prospect Poul. Farm. . Orleans, Ind. 

Ratcliff, S. M Kingman, Ind. 

Reed, Martin Hope, Ind. 

Reiber. Frank Greenville, Ind. 

Robinson. J. M Indianapolis, Ind. 

Rodenbeck. F Arcadia, Ind. 

Root, Dan E 

c-o Joske Bros., San Antonio. Tex. 

Rubush, Wm Irvington. Ind. 

Ryan. John Toledo, O. 

Sanders, W. M Odon, Ind. 

Sanford, W. J Lebanon, Ind. 

Sawyer, D. M Hazelwood, Ind. 

Schmedel, Roy Indianapolis. Ind. 

Schmidt. Geo. F Martinsville, Ind. 

Scranton, B. H Rising Sun, Ind. 

Shriver, A. W Bradford, 111. 

Shutts. Harry I Rose Lawn. Danville, 111. 

Smiley, T. S Matthews. Ind. 

Smith, F. S Hamilton. O. 

Smith, Wm Indianapolis, Ind, 

Soper, M. A. & T. B Danville. Ind. 

Spaugh. C. E Rugby, Ind. 

Stephenson. B. N Salem. Ind. 

Stewart. O. E Bridgeport, Ind. 

Stuckmyer. E. A Indianapolis. Ind. 

Sturtevant. R. W Beloit. Wis. 

Swain. B, O Zionsville. Ind. 

Thomas. Claud B Moores Hill, Ind. 

Thurman. J. C Richmond. Ind. 

Trobaugh, J. H Delphi. Ind. 

Trueblood. Mi-s. E. A Salem, Ind. 

Tuttle. Morton Huntington. Ind. 

ri)Ian.l Poul. Farm Decatur, 111. 

Walker. 1). H Orleans. Ind. 



Over 300 
prizes won at 
large shows in 



SINGLE COMB BROWN LEGHORNS 

CHAMPIONS of the West '^^ y**""*- Record unequalled. Right color and size 

15, both matings. Circular free."'" """'" ''^'- ^^ '""" *^-^« '" «3«« P" 
C. F. LANG - 1812 FRONT STREET . LA CROSSE, WIS. 



Silver Laced Wyandottes and Salmon 



Winninjafs for HUO 
at Minneapolis and 

He^or^tiH.. V tui^A • »u , , DulutH. 1,3 first.s, 6 

rPC we?t ilin Jn»;.\".^^^ largest and best cla.sses ever shown in the 
t: 5 Z^- ^ ^'" guarantee satisfaction on anything 
$2 00 peris. Stock for sale. Send for catalogue 

C. p. McANDREW 



Eggs 



ELLSV^ORTH, WIS. 



LONG'S ORPINGTONS T' ^^ -" Tl". 

^— . -v../-* -.v^ Have made a wonderful 
record in the past winter shows. Egg at LIVING PRICES from ten gran.l pens 

E. M. LONG, . BOX P. F, OSCEOLA, IND. 



COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES 
AND LIGHT BRAHMAS 

"THE BEST IN THE NORTHWEST" 

5 firsts. 6 seconds and 3 thirds at the ,8ro Minneapolis show 

GEO. A. KERSTEN 

_n9Wesl52nd Street (Washburn Park , Mmneapol.8, Minn. 




• 



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Wf 



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« • 




March, '10 




Q. 



Wallmer, Dan. . 
War ton, Mrs. L. 
Weckler, A. L. . . 

Wesner, T. .1 

West View Farm... 
Wheeler, W^m. H. . . 
White Feather Poul 
Whitman, Joe C. 

Wildiff, John 

Wilhite, Ben W. . . . 
Wilkins & Co., Geo 
Williams, Clyde . . . , 
Wilson, Clarence B. , 

Wil.son, E. E 

Winierate, J. J 

Winnans, Geo. C. . . 
\Vise & Son. A. K. . 
Wooley, Frank 
"Wright. Mrs. 1 
Wyant Bros. . . 
Wyson, Ross . . 
Young-, Dr. M, 



Fa 



W. 



.O 



B. 
J. 



A, 



. . .Huntington, 
. . -Indianapolis, 
. . .Bunker Hill, 

Smedley, 

Columbia City, 
Indianapolis, 
rm. .Southport, 

Advance, 

Irvington, 

Crawfordsville, 

Atlanta, 

Parker, 

Aurora, 

...Indianapolis, 
Craw lords ville, 
klahoma City, Okla 

Westfield, Ind 

I-.ebanon, 

. . Bainbridge, 

Colfax, 

Lebanon, 

. . Indianapolis, 



Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 



Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 
Ind. 



AWARDS AT INDIANAPOLIS IND 
BARRED PLVAIOITH ROCKS 

Henderson: 1. ck; 1, .5, hen- 4 5 nul • 1 

& Son. 2 ck. Day: ;5. ck; 4. 5. ckl. Cot- 
tingham: 2, hen; ;?, pen. Burnett: 3 4 
hen; 1. 2. pul. Neil: 2. ckl; 5. pen. jdhn^ 



peii. 



son: 1, ckl. Bowker Poul.' Far'm 
Hoover: 4, pen. 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS 

Trobaugh: 5. ck; :i. pul; 4, ckl; 5. pen. 
Cond.t: 1. 2 .3 4, ck; 2, S, hen; 1. 2 ; ckl ; 

I' V, ^'xxP"'\ ^- -• •^' ^' P*^"- Gilloghly: 

3, ckl. Wright: ."), ckl 

BUFF PLYMOUTH ROC KS. 

CTiurch: 1, ck; 4, pen; 2, ckl. Browner: 
o. hen; 2, pen. Dunkul : 2. .{, hen; .5, pul. 
Weckler: 1. hen; 1, .3. 4. ckl; 1. 4. pul; 1, 
pen. Jacobs: 2. .-,. ckl; 2. 'A pul 

COLUMBIAN PLYMOUTH ROCKS 
Reed: 1, ck; 1. hen; 1. ckl; 1. pul; 1 * pen 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. ^ 

Pangborn: 2. ck; 4, hen; 3. pen. Bronwe- 

5, ck. Cobb: 1, ck ; 3, hen; 2, ckl; 1 r>' 
pul Lytle: 4, ck; 1. ckl; 3, pul; 4. pen! 
McKmster: 3. ck; 1, hen; 3, ckl; 2. pul. 

§^ Vi"^U •\^*'": 4. 5. ckl; 4, pul; 1. 2, pen. 
Shults; 5, hen, 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. 

Jones: 5, ck; 3, 4, hen; :5. pen. Wesner 

6. ck; 3, ckl; 1, 2, pul; 2, pen. Johnsop- 

4, ck; 2, hen. Ackley: 1, ck. Grace, Jr.: 2. 
ck. Ratcliffe: 1. hen; 1, 4; ckl; 1, pen. Eh- 
man: 2. ckl. McGuire: 5, ckl; 4, pen. Lane: 

5, pen. 



lULTRY FANCIERr 



GOLDEN WYANDOTTES. 

Meeks: 2, ck; ■. pul. Dillon & Bell: 3, 5. 

5,Hkl; TpuV. '• ''^'= '' ^"'' '' P^"- ^'^^^'^ 
SILVER LAC ED WYANDOTTES. 

ck; 1, 2. 3. hen; 2, ckl. Grimes: 4 hen- i 
ckl; 3, pul. Williams: 2 4. pul 

PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES. 
Erf with: 1, ck; 1. ckl; 1, 2, hen; 1. pul. 
Phillips: 3, 4, ckl. Rodenbeck: 2 ckl- '^ nul 
COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES " 
Martin Poul. Farm: 1, hen. West View 

1 . "; o' r^^' }' P"'- Stephenson: 2 prize 
ckl; 2, 3, 5, pul. Hall: 4, pul. 

BUFF ORPINGTONS. 

,, Cli ambers: 2 ck, 4, hen; 5, ckl; 5, pul 
Griffin: 1 ck; 3 hen; 3. ck. Wyant Bros.. 

1, hen; 4, ckl; 1, pul. Walmer: 2, 5. hen 

2, ckl; 3, 4, pul. List: 1. ckl; 2 pul; "' 
pen. Byers: 1, pen. Smith: 3, pen. 

WHITE ORPINGTONS. 

Young: 1, hen. Wilson: 1, ckl; 1. 2, pul. 
Edwards: 1, pen. ... i^"'. 

BLACK ORPINGTONS. 

Blue Ribbon Poul. Farm: 1 2 ck- 2 4 

^''"= h \ ''^^'' -' 5' P"': 2, pen. ' Tuttle: Z, 
ck. Nash: 4. ck. Swain: 1. hen; 1. ckl; 

3, 4 pul. Murphy: 3, hen; 4, ckl. Crane: 
■o, ckl; 1. pul. Byers: 1, pen. 

S. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS 

Scranton: 3, 4, ck ; 2, 3, 5, hen; 2, 3, 5, 
ckl; 1, 2. 3, 4, pul; 1. 2, pen. Wooly: 2 
ck; 4, ckl. Hill: 1, ck; 3, pen. Rubu.sh ! 
^, ck; 5, pul; 4, pen. Longfield Poul. Yds • 
5, pen, 

R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Beck: 4. ck; 2, ckl. Bushman: 1 2 ck- 

1, 2, hen; 1, 4, ckT; 1. 4, pul; 1. pen. ' Dil- 
lon & Bell: 3. ck; 4, hen. Coulter: 3, hen : 
o' ^' ,^"1, Barker: 3, ckl; 3, pen. Bender: 

2, ckl. Robinson: 3, pul. Barnard Bros.- 2 
pen. Christian: 5. pen. 

LIGHT BRAH3IAS. 
Cornwell: 1, 3. ck ; 4, hen; 2, 3, ckl; 1 •' 
pul; 1 pen. Winnans: 4, ck; 5, hen; 5, ckT. 
Byers: 2 ck. Johnson: 5, ck; 1, 2, 3. hen; 

1, 4, ckl; 3, 4, 5, pul; 2, 3, pen. Coen: 

2, 3, pul: 4, pen. Church: 1, ck ; 1. hen; 

1. pul. Wise & Son: 2, ck ; 3, hen. Cress- 
well: 2, hen; 4, pul. 

BUFF COCHINS. 

Church: 1, ck; 1, hen; 1. pul. Wise & Son: 

2, ck; 3. hen. Creswell: 2, hen; 1, ckl- 
4, pul. Coen: 2, 3. pul. 

BLACK LANGSH.ANS. 

Gilbert & Son: 1. ck ; 1, ckl. Wilkins & 



White Wyandottes, ?• C- Buff. R. C. Brown and R. C. White!' 

c!"b MrfafS:^ ZTw Wvln^di^f^r "^"r «'y»"do..e,sa„d R"*a'Brow'n'l"eghVrns"' /ncfud „1 
V- ID .vieaai on he.st W Wyandotte hen. My winners are in mv breedine pens mated to nrodiir>f 
winners I v ou order eggs you will get the be.st without reserve at ^00 peri 5 S^mechS^^^ 
for -sale SatistHction guaranteed. Highland Poultry Yard.. C. Capener^Pr^op .R.F.D Sarab^.^^^^ 



WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS 



Winners at Milwaukee, January 
1910, Ist pullet, 3rd cock, 4th cock- 
won all firsts and Gold Special lor best display in American cUss^" Two grand^Jens ma*^ed7oi^ 
the egg trade headed by and including these winners with other females of equal aualiWEJSs 
s;^sfac?ro^^gTrfn?ee^' "^ P" '' "^^'""^ '''''^'- ^ '^^ ^^^^ cockereTs al"d pu'lell'^or ^sf 1? 
QUALITY WHITE ROCK POULTRY YARDS. W. R. ABBOTT. Prop.. Ft. Atkinson. Wi.. 



"DONAGHETS REPy^ 



have won for the second season in succes- 
sion the R. I. Red Club Cup and the Araeri- 

M ,. ci. A , .1 ^ i^ T^ — I ] —; *^*" Class Cup. at the Baraboo Valley Poul- 

t, > Show Also their share of first and specials at other leading shows. Eggs for hatching as 
follows: first pen |3 00 per l.V .second and third pens f2 00 per 15. utility stock having exilfent 
farm range IL.'^O per l.V When ordered in lots of 30 eggs w/ll allow adi.scount of 15 per ceSt and 
lulots of50 or larger 10 per cent dKscount will be allowed. Both single and rose con?b 



J. T. DONAGHEY 



BOX 117, NORTH FREEDOM, WIS. 



S. C. R. L REDS £««* ^f^o a ay 



OLD CHICKS 



i i \ w U 

want 



egg.s or chicks from birds that lay eggs the year round, I have them. They ar< #?l O too Write 
tor free mating list. 

— Busiftrss BIRDS Of auAijrr==^ 
Tim Natah Pauiiiry fartfi, R. P„ Ggigjtill, P,€*§3., Eh-Jto, W/s. 



Pag e 67 





't** 



RFXrFlFT?'Q COLUMBIAN 

iJl^i^l^lLlV O WYANDOTTES 

BRED TO WIN AND LAY. STOCK AND 
EGGS FOR SALE. YOUR MONEY'S WORTH 

Address A. M. BENDER, 1231 WALTON AVE., FT, WAYNE, IND. 



Co.: -' .i. ck; 2, 5, hen; 2. 4, ckl; 4, pul; 3 
pen. Barker: 4, ck ; 1. hen; 1, ckl; 4 pen 
Moore: 3. hen; 3. ckl; 2, pen. Hershman.' 
4. hen; o, ckl; L'. 3, pul. Mahan: 1, pen. 
WHITE LANGSHANS. 
Stewart: 1, ck ; 2, pul. Hawkins: 2. ck; 

i'^P."'- J^^\%^- ^'^ '*• ^^": -• 5. ckl; 1, 4. pul 
Porter & Co.: 1. 2. hen; 1, ckl; 3, pul. 
Us.selman: 5, hen. ' ^ 

8. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 

. ^f'^^r/- ,^'^^' "^^^'^ ^' P"»; -. pen- Up- 
land Poul. Farm: 5, ck ; 4. hen; 2, pul. 
Muehler: 4. ck ; 2. ckl. Bowers: 3. henT 5. 
ckl Stuckmeyer: 2. 3. ck; 5, hen; 3, ckl; 

1. 3 4, pul; 1, pen. Lovell: 2, hen. Gay- 
lord Poul. Farm: 2, pul. 

8. C, WHITE LEGHORNS. 

Lundstriim: 1. 5, ck; 3, ckl. Bradshaw: 

2, ck; 1. 2, hen; 1, 2. 4, ckl; 1, 4. pul; 1. 
pen. Wildig: 4. ck. Sanders: 3. ck; 4. hen. 
Wysong: a, hen; 5, ckl; 2, pen. Crook: 3 
pul. Beirman: 3, pen. 

R. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 

Norton: 2, ck; 2. hen. Powell: 1. ck; 1, 
hen; 1, 2, ckl; 1, 2, pul; 1, pen. 

8. C. BIFF LEGHORNS. 

c."*"v!'^-.-' !^^'' ^' ^*'"' ^' P'^l: 1. 2, pen. 
Smith: 4, ck; 2, ckl; 2, pul. Eiseman: 1, 
ck; 4, hen; 3. ckl; 3, pen. Schmedel: 5. ck. 
rhurman: 3, ck; 3, hen; 3, pul. Krome: 2. 
hen; 1, ckl. 

ANCONA8. 

All to Palmer. 

8. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 

Wilson: 2, ck; 1, 2, hen; 2, 4, ckl; 2, 3, 
pul; 2, pen. McQuinston: 1, ck; 3, 5, hen; 
3, ckl; 4, pul. Wilhite: 4, hen; 5, ckl; 5 
pul. Lindenburger: 1, ckl; 1. pul; 1, pen. ' 
R. C. BLACK .MINORCAS. 
Clark: 1, 2, 3, ck; 1. 2, hen; 1, 2, 4, ckl; 
1. 2, pul; 1, 2, 3, pen. Houghland: 3, 5. 
ckl; 3, 4, pul. 

SILVER BEARDED POLISH. 
Young: 1, ck; 1, 2, hen. 

GOLDEN POLISH. 
Miles: 1, ckl; 1, pul. 

WHITE CRESTED BLACK POLISH. 
Miles: 1, ck; 1, hen. Young: 2, ck. 

WHITE FACED BLACK SPANISH. 
All to Young. 

SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURGS. 
All to Young. 

HOLDANS. 
Smiley: 1, ck; 2, hen; 1, 2, 3, ckl; 2, 3, 4, 
pul. Prospect Poul. Farm: 3, ck; 1, 3, hen; 
4. 5, ckl: a, pul. Trueblood: 2, 4, 5, ck; 
1, pul. 

PIT GAMES. 

ENGLISH BLACK RED GAMES. 

Mack: 1, ck. 

CLAVBORN GAMES. 

Mack: 1. pul. 

WHITE DOMINIC GAMES. 

Grittin: 1. ck ; 1. pen. 

BL.4CK BREASTED RED <i.\MES. 

Young: 1, pen. 

SHAWLNECK GAMES. 

Hackney: 1. ck ; 1, hen. 

YOKAHOMA GAMES. 
Young: 1, ck; 1. hen. 

BLACK COCHIN B.\NTAMS. 

Bovvers: 2 ck; 1, hen; 1. ckl; 1. pul. De- 
Volr: 3. ck; 4, hen; 1. pen. McKiney: 1, 
ck; 2, 3. hen; 3. ckl. 

BUFF COCHIN B.4NT.4.MS. 
Newby: 3, hen; 2, 3. ckl; 1. 3, pul. Mc- 
Quinston: 2, ck; 5, hen; 1, ckl; 2, .">, pul. 
Cook: 1. ck : 1. 2. 4. hen; 1, pen. 

WHITE COCHIN BANTA.MS. 
Thomas: 2. ck; 1, hen; 1, ckl; 1. pul. 
Marsh: 1. ck. 

WHITK POLISH B.\NTAMS. 
Young: 1. hen. 

IMRTRIIMiE (OCHIN BANTAMS. 
Cornwell: 1 hen: 1, ckl: 1. 2. 3. 4, pul. 

R. C. WHITE B.\NT.4MS. 
All to Faehbush. 
BLACK BREASTED RED GAME BAN- 

T.AMS. 
Christian: 1. ck ; 2, pul. Bowers: 1. ckl; 
1, pul. 

LICiHT BR.\H.>L\ BANT.AMS. 
All tu K.van. 

(JOLDEN SEBRKiHT BANTAMS. 
Brown: 1, 2. ck ; 1. 2. 3. hen; 1, 2. 3, 4, 
ckl; 1, 2, 3, pul; 1, pen. Young; 2, pen. 
BRONZE TIRKEYS. 
I.,ambert: 1, old cock; 1, hen. Krome: 1, 
young cock. .Anderson: 2, hen; 3. 4, ckl; 2, 
pul. Mahan: 2. ckl; 3. pul. Picket: 1. ckt; 
1, pul. 

WliriE HOLLAND TURKEYS. 
All to Creswell. 

WHITE BR.4ZILIAN DUCKS. 
.Ml to Young. 

Bl FF ORPINCiTON DUCKS. 
.Ml to Swain. 

PEKIN DUCKS. 
Herron: 2, 3, old drake; 1, 2, old duck: 
3, 4, young drake; 1, 2. young duck. Picket: 
1. old drake; 3, 4. old duck; 1, 2, young 
drake. 

INDI.AN Rl'NNKK Dl'CKS. 
Hurt: 3. ck; 3. hen: 2. pul. Bradshaw: 

1, drake; 2. duck. Bender: 2, drake; 1, 
hen; 1. young drake; 1, young duck. Wlng- 
ert : 1, pen. 

WILD MALLARD DUCKS. 
Hunter: 1. 2, 3, 4. drake; I. 2. 3, 4. duck; 

2, 3. 4. .^1. young drake; 1. 2. 3, 4. youngs 
duck. IJndstrom: 1. young drake; 5. young 
duck. 




LTRY FA NCI E 




'^J^ 



*.-^.f 




Awards at Waterford, Wis. 



EXHIBITORS AT WATERFORD, VVIS. 

Albrecht, F. J Waterford, Wis. 

Anderson, Oscar Burlington, Wis. 

Barnes, Symour Waterford, Wis. 

Beaumont, Floyd Kansasville, Wis, 

Berger, Harry C Waterford, Wis, 

Berger, Julius Waterford, Wis. 

De Grave, Jos Waterford, Wis. 

Grueter, John Burlington, Wis. 

Halbach & Bros., Ludwig. .Waterford, Wis. 

Hatelstad, Miss H Waterford, Wis. 

Hatelstad, Peter Waterford, Wis. 

Heningfeld, W. F Waterford, Wis, 

Hulbert, Arthur Waterford, Wis. 

Kordentick, Edwin Waterford, Wis. 

Munson, Nels Burlington, Wis. 

Noble, Bert Burlington, Wis. 

Noll, Alfred Waterford, Wis. 

Noll, Frank Waterford, Wis, 

Pierce, C L Waterford, Wis. 

Plucker, Floyd Waterford, Wis. 

Tindall, F. B Waterford, Wis. 

Topp, Albert Waterford, Wis. 

Vogt, L. C Lyons, Wis. 

Wangeline, Elmer Waterford, Wis. 

Wiemer, Lawrence Rochester, Wis. 

Wilberwyn Poul. Yds Berwyn, 111. 

AWARDS AT WATERFORD, WIS. 

BARRED PI.YMOUTH ROCKS. 

Kortendick: 1, ck, P. Hatelstad: 1, 2, 
hen; 1, 3, ckl; 1, 2, pul; 1, pen. Tindall: 
2. ckl; 3, pul; 1. pen. De Grave; 3, pen 
Hulbert: 3, hen. 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Hennlngfeld: 1, ckl; 2, 3, hen; 1, 2, pul; 
1, pen. Munson: 1, hen; 3, ckl. Noll: 2, ckl. 



BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Vogt: 1, ck; 1, 2, 3, ckl; 1, hen; 1, pul. 

\^TIITE WYANDOTTES. 
H. Berger: 1, ck; 1, ckl; 2, hen; 3, pul; 
1, pen. Noll: 2, ckl; 3, hen; 1, pul; 2, pen. 
Barnes: 2, ck; 1, hen; 3, pen. J. Berger: 
3, ckl; 2, pul. 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. 
All to Vogt. 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. 
Wilberwyn Poul. Yds.: 1, ckl; 1, 2, 3, 
hen; 1, pul. 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES. 
Noble: 1, 2, ckl; 1, 2, 3, pul. Wange- 
line: 3, ckl. 

R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 
Plucker: 1, 2, hen; 1, pul. 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 
All to Anderson. 

BUFF LEGHORNS. 
Greuter: 1. ck; 1. 2, ckl; 1, 2, hen; 1, 2, 
3, pul; 1, pen. 

WHITE FACED BLACK SPANISH. 
All to Topp, 

PIT GAMES. 
All to Wiemer. 

BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 
H. Tatelstad: 1, ck; 1, ckl; 1, 2, hen; 
1, 2, 3, pul; 1, pen. Holbach : 2, ckl; 2, pen; 
3, hen. 

BLACK COCHIN BANTAMS. 
H. Berger: 1, ck; 3, hen; 1, pul. H. 
Hatelstad: 2, ck; 1, ckl; 1, 2, hen; 2, pul; 
1, pen. 

TOULOUSE GEESE. 
Hulbert: 1, gander, 

AFRICAN GEESE. 
Beaumont: 1, ck; 1, ckl; 1, 2, goose. 



Awards at Great Falls, Mont. 



EXHIBITORS AT GREAT FALLS. MONT. 

Allen, J. W Great Falls, Mont. 

Babcock, V. J Great Falls, Mont. 

Bauer, Daniel Great Falls, Mont. 

Bennett, Robt Great Falls, Mont. 

Broadle, John Truly, Mont. 

Bole, Mrs. Jas. P Bozeman, Mont. 

Canfleld, Roy Great Falls, Mont. 

Clark, H. O Great Falls, Mont. 

(Mingan, Eugene Great Falls, Mont. 

Coppens, Louis Great Falls, Mont. 

Dlbb, Richard Great Falls, Mont. 

Edmunson, Harry Great Falls, Mont. 

Ferguson, Mrs. Gordon Cascade, Mont. 

Flaherty, Edward Great Falls, Mont. 

Ford, Lee M Great Falls, Mont. 

Hawkins, S. S Great Falls, Mont. 

Hazen, Hal Great Falls, Mont. 

Jones, Mrs. J. S Cascade, Mont. 

Kluge, Chas Great Falls, Mont. 

Kneeland, Chas. Great Falls, Mont. 

Le Grand, Noel Great Falls, Mont, 

Leuchars, George Great Falls, Mont. 

Longeway, Dr. G. E.... Great Falls, Mont. 

Longeway, H. H Great Falls, Mont. 

Longeway. Miss M Great Falls, Mont. 

Moore, W. M Ulm, Mont. 

Muhllg, Cha.<? Great Falls, Mont. 

Murphy. Raymond Great Falls, Mont. 

Newcomb, Guy F Great Falls, Mont. 

O'Mahony, J. J Great Falls, Mont. 

Pullen. C. E Great Falls, Mont. 

Remington. W. A Sun River, Mont. 

Schmit, Mrs. F. J Great Falls, Mont. 

Schmit. F. J Great Falls. Mont. 

Thisted, Andrew Great Falls, Mont. 

Turner, Wm Belt, Mont. 

Van Tighen. Gust Great Falls, Mont. 

Watkins, Lloyd Great Falls, Mont. 

Wendling, W. A Great Falls, Mont. 

Wocasek, Mrs. F Great Falls, Mont. 

Zimmerman, A. J Great Falls, Mont. 

AWARDS AT GREAT FALTvS. MONT. 
BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Newcombe: 1, ck; 1, 2, ckl; 1, 2. pul; 2, 
pen. Thisted: 2, ck; 1, 2, 3, hen; 3, pul; 
1, pen. 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

All to Newcombe. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. 

Babcock: 1, ck; 2, 3, ckl; 1, 2, 3, hen; 
1, 2, 3, pul; 1, 2, 3. pen; sweepstake on 
ck, hen and pen. Edmunson: 1, ckl. Wo- 
C£LS6l{ ' 2 ck 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. 

Ford: 1, ck; 1, ckl; 1, pen. .«^chmif : 2, 
ck; 2, ckl; 1, 2, 3, hen; 1, 2. pul; 2, pen 
Coppens: 3, ckl; 3, pul; 3, pen. 

GOLDEN LACED WYANDOTTES. 
All to Hawkins. 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES. 
Bennett: ], ck; 1, 3, hen. Kneeland: 2. 
hen; 1. pul. 

PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES. 
Mrs. Jones: 1, ck. ; 1, 2, 3, hen; 1. pen. 
Wocasek: 1, ckl; 2, pen. 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. 
All to Clark 

8. C. BUFF ORPINGTONS. 
Flaherty: 2, ckl; 3, hen; 2, pen. O'Ma- 
hony: 1, ckl; 1, 2, hen; 1, pen. Kneeland: 
8, ckl; 2, 3, pul; 3, pen. Moore: 1. ck; 1, 
pul. 

8. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. 

All to Kneeland. 



8. C. WHITE ORPINGTONS. 

All to Remington. 

R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Pullen: 3, ckl; 1, hen; 1, 2, 3, pul; 1, 
pen. Clinga: 2, ckl. Turner: 2, hen. Dibb: 
1, ckl. 

S. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Pullen: 1, ck; 2, 3, ckl; 1. hen; 1, 3, pul; 

1. pen. Clingan: 1, ckl. Turner; 3, hen. 
Kneeland: 2, hen. Bauer: 3, pen. Wend- 
ling: 2, pul; 2, pen. 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 
Schmit: 1, ck; 1, ckl; 1, 2, hen; 2, 3, 
pul; 1, pen. Kneeland: 3, hen; 1, pul; 
sweepstake, pul. Zimmerman: 2, 3, ckl. 
R. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 
Edmunson: 1, ckl. 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 
All to Mrs. Ferguson. 

R. C. HROWN LEGHORNS. 
Boadle: 1, 2, ckl, 1. 2, hen; 1, pul; 1. pen. 
Remington: 3, ckl. 

8. C. BUFF LEGHORNS. 
Longeway: 1, ck; 1, ckl; 1, hen; 1, 2, pul. 
Murphy: 2. ck. 

S. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 
Kluge: 3. ckl; 1, 3. hen; 2, 3, pul; 1. 2. 
pen. Watkins: 1, ckl. Leuchars: 2, ckl; 

2, hen; 1, pul. 



^v^ErWt■.-v^.j!J-.^^VJ>V;..J 



HOUDANS. 

All to Allen. 

SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURGS. 

Longeway: 1, ck; 3, ckl; 3, hen; 3, pen. 
Mrs. Bole: 1, 2, ckl; 1, 2, hen; 1, 2. 3, 
pul; 1, 2, pen. 

WHITE COCHIN BANTA»IS. 

Schmidt: 1, ck; 1, 2, hen. 

BLACK COCHIN BANTAMS. 

All to Longeway. 

INDIAN RUNNER DUCKS. 

Boadle: 1, drake; 1, duck. 
PEKIN DUCKS. 

Wocasek: 1, 2, drake; 1, 2. 3, 4, duck. 
TOULOUSE GEESE. 

Wocasek: 1, gander; 1, 2, goose. 
SPECIAL PRIZES. 

Chas. Kneeland, awarded silver medal by 
American Poultry Association for best ckl 
in the American, English, Asiatic and Med- 



1?!^ 




Srf 




Marc h, *10 




POULT RT FANCIER 




ONE OF THE GOOD KIND. 

A winning Barred Rock pullet, typical 
of the strain of E. M. Buechley, Box 10, 
Greenville, O., whose birds have been bred 
in line for 20 years. 

iterranean classes. V. J. Babcock, awarded 
the Frank Powell gold medal for sweep- 
stake pen. V. J. Babcock, awarded .$25 
in gold by the Northwestern Stockman and 
Farmer of Helena, Mont., for best Sisplay. 
V. J. Babcock, sweepstake cock, hen and 
pen. Chas. Kneeland, sweepstake cockerel 
and pullet. 



JOSEPH DAGLE, Manager OAK HILL POU! TRY FARM 

EXPERT JUDGE AND BREEDER Member American Poultry Association. Member Buff Rock 
eggs.- WCHLAND^IOWr^ ^""^ ^°" ''""'" ""^""^ "^ '"" ^^^ ^'«^ ^^"^« st4 anS 



R. C RHODE ISLAND REDS. ^^ ^^^^ '^*^ *K»^n *t the Wg Missouri 
!I"!T'"^"""'"'"""''^™^^~^^""'"""'''""^""^"™ii"""i"^^^™i™ State Show, St. Louis. Dec 190Q l<5t 9A 

IT o'r TZ'iZT^'- 't^'V^^l ""• ''" '"-^ ■■ ^ "'" '" " ='«- »' '«^ ^- •"■<^' J^nd «^? 



VIRGIL BLAKEMORE. Fayette. Mo. 



BOGARDUS' ORPINGTONS 

S. C. BUFF AND S. C. BLACK 



First prize winners 
a t Chicago, 111., 
Hager.stown, M d . 
Cincinnati, Ohio; 

^^rcU'^'c^aL^i w^ilT^^^^^^ P"^^^^« ' '^'^ ^•-^- «^°- ^-^« that^:'Iir\l?&7Sit m^ 

O. A. BOGARDUS, 



BOX A, WARSAW, KY. 



WHtTE ROCKS stock for sale that wm win in the show 
WW mmm m m^ r^%^%^a^m9 room and fill the egg basket. Our birds 

mmammm'w^w^ mmmmZ ^ --1L^^'^' ^^^*^' beauties, strong in good 

WHITE WY ANDOTTES ffis.'^-|[^S"aJ 

liven j:^ r>'' 



BERWYN POULTRY YARDS, 



BOX P,, BLRWYN, ill, 





% 



m 



t 



I 

c 1} 




Awards at Kankakee, 111. 




111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

III. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 

111. 



EXHIBITORS AT KANKAKEE, IIX 

Andrews & Sons. C. H Champaign, 

Baker, Howard Kankakee 

Bergner. H. P so. Chicago, 

Blackstone. Mrs. J. w Bourbonnais 

Danforth. E. S Kankakee, 

Davjs & Dynes Zionsville, 

Day. O. L. Kankakee. 

Dewey, C H. Morris, 

S?k"'"S' ?• '^ Kankakee, 

^"by H. a. St. Anne 

Gowdran. Fred Kankakee, 

Graham, Ben j Custer Park, 

Gras.son W. . Wlchert 

Grmnell Guy L Kankakee 

Hay ward, E. G Cooksville 

Hicks, F. J Onarca 

Hobble, W. R kankakfe," 

McConnell, Wm Rantoul 

McKinstry, B. F Kankakee, 

Mann, Ansel Manteno, 

Mann, ^ames Bourbonnais, 

i^.^T^'.^ r^ H Manteno, 

ONeil, C. J Manteno 

Osburn, Wm Morris 

Patchett. Frank W Reddick' 

Peterman Geo Kankakee.' 

Rantz. Edwin Kankakee, 

Ruessler. Theo Kankakee, 

St. John, Chas Kankakee, 

St. John, P. A Onarga, 

®^',, o ,r.' ■ Monee, 

Small & Vining Kankakee. 

Stellwagen, P Monee 

Stokes, Mrs. J. M Kankakee', 

Styke, Henry st. Anne! 

Swope. A. H Buckingham, 

Townsend, Geo Onarga 

Tracy, C L Kankakee'. 

^in'ng. \Valter R. 2, Kankakee. 

Williams, Robert Rantoul 

Wilson, Mrs. H Bonfield! 

Yeates. A. A Bradley, 

Yeates, L. E Kankakee, 

AWARDS AT KANKAKEE. ULI.. 
BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Small & Vining: 1, ck; 1, 2, 3, ckl; 1, 2 

R. C. R. I. REDS & BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS 

A tew grand red cockerels for sale at reasonable 
prices. My birds have won manv prizes at the 
leading northern Indiana shows. ' 4ggs now for 
12.00 peris f r«m pens mated to produce high class 
exhibition stock. Harry Sower. Ro me City, Ind. 

Prouty's Partridge Plymouth Rocks 

Good trio for $8 if taken at once, are worth more 
but I must have the room. Eggs $S per setting, 
express prepaid. O. I^. PROUTY, 

Box 115, New lyOthrop, Mich. 

S C RROWN Choice cockerels 
uf. V^. OlXV^/VVi'l for sale. Bred in line 

1 FnHORN^s ^or several years. Cock- 
l-l^VJtlV^rVi'^O erel bred females to spare 
Excellent layers Prices reasonable. 

H. E. MARQUARDT. WAUSAU. WIS . 

WHITE WYANDOTTE EGGS 

for hatching. After March 1st, from hens and 
pullets rconng from 92 to 94'^, price $2.00 per 15. 
Hggs guaranteed. Elizabeth Dupons, 
Kenosha, Wis. 

BIG BROWN BEAUriES 

Eggs from pen scorine im% by Shellaberger. 
Onlv limited number of orders taken. $S to $5 
per 15. Pullet or cockerel mating. Brown Leghorn 
Poultry Farm. J. H. Ryan. Prop.. Kenosha. Wis . 

W. THEO. WITTMAN 

ALLENTOWN, PA. 

General Judge all varieties Poultry. Careful 
and straightforwardly honest work in the show 
r»om. 30 years a poultry man. 



fireider's Fine Catalogue 

of pure bred poultry for 1910 is bigger 
and better than ever, 200 pages, hand- 
somely Illustrated, 150 engravings, 
photos, .•» fine colored plates, de- 
scribes 65 leading varieties of land 
and water fowls. Gives low prices of 
stoclt and eggs, also Incubators, poultry _ 

supplies, etc. Calendar for each month. Tells 
how to care for poultry, giving full details. 
The price of this book is only 10 cents. 
Write for it to-day. 

B. H. CREIDER. Box 101. Rhnams, Pa. 




PILImlNG^ iNSTIiUMENTS 



i'lilli.jt Milk 1 »i»t U.iil.i fi.t ».! i;i;:i;^ t ron mmeiirtecl 

. hy U. iS. A(frlo>iltur»l P»p<., price Vi.W. SiW«r Milk 
, Tiihei .V)c; Teat HUtoury »1.50; Teat Opener 75c: CmMIe 
Trocar for l)l.*t t\ M; Capon Tfiole. Poultry In»tr\nnenU, 
" Horee and Cattle Syrinirei. All Pilling Ingtrti- 

Ti<>nt« are of fine quality— none better. Full 
dlreotiong. Write fc<lay for free book, 
•'CowTr..»l»iUi.." 

Q. P. PILLING * SON CO., 

?73<1 «.(.h St . Philarfplphii. Pt 



hen; 1, 2, pul; 1, pen. Day: 2, ck; 3. hen: 
3. pul. Ruessler: 3, ck; 2, pen. 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Hay ward: 1, ck; 2, ckl; 1, 2, pul; 2, pen. 
Downing: 1, ckl; 3, pen. Rautz: 2, ck; 
3. ckl; 1, 2, 3, hen; 3, pul; 1, pen. 

BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

A. Yeates: 1, ck; 3, ckl. St. John: 1, 2, 
ckl; 1, 2, 3, pul; 1, 2. 3, pen. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. 

J. Mann: 1, ck ; i, 2, 3, ckl; 1, 3, pul; 1, 
pen. Grinnell: 2, ck; 1, 2. hen. Small & 
fining: 2, pul. 

SILVER WYANDOTTES. 

Bergner: 1, ckl; 1, pul. McKinstry: 2, 3, 
pul. 

PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES. 

Townsend: 1, ck; 1, 2, ckl; 1, 2, 3, hen; 
1, 2, pul; 1, pen. 

BUFF ORPINGTONS. 

Ij. Yeates: 1, ck. Rantz: 2, ckl. A. 
Yeates: 1, ckl. McConnell: 3, ckl. 

WHITE ORPINGTONS. 

All to Mrs. Stoke.s, 

BLACK ORPINGTONS. 

Rantz: 1, ckl; 1. pul. L. Yeates: 2, pul. 

S. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Patchett: 2, ckl; 1, 3, pul; 3, pen. A. 
Mann: 1, ckl; 2, pul. 

LIGHT BRAHMAS. 

All to Day. 

DARK BRAHMAS. 

All to Wilson. 

BLACK COCHINS. 

All to Andrews & Sons. 

WHITE COCHINS. 

All to Andrews & Sons. 

BUFF COCHINS. 

All to Andrews & Sons. 

PARTRIDGE COCHINS. 

All to Dowring. 

WHITE LANGSHAN8. 

All to Williams. 



S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 

Peterman: 1, ck ; 3, hen. Wilson: 1, 2, 
hen. Small & Vining: 3. hen. 

WHITE LEGHORNS. 
Small & Vining: 1, 2, ck; 1, ckl; 1, 2, hen;. 
1, 2, pul. Day: 2, 3. ckl; 3, pul. 
BUFF LEGHORNS. 
All to A. Yeates. 

SALMON FAVEROLLES. 
All to Davis & Dynes. 

GOLDEN SEBRIGHT BANTAMS. 
Townsend: 1, ck; 1, ckl; 1, 2. hen; 1, pul.. 
Small & Vining: 3, hen. 

BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 
Day: 1, 2, ckl; 1, 2, pul. Baker: 3. ck;. 
1, hen. 

WHITE COCHIN BANTAMS. 
All to Hobbie. 

PEKIN DUCKS. 
Small & Vining: 1, ck; 1, 2, 3, ckl; 1. 2, 3,. 
hen; 1, 2, 3, pul. Ruessler: 2, ck. 
ROUEN DUCKS. 
All to Small & Vining. 

CAYUGA DUCKS. 
All to Small & Vining. 

GRAY CALL DUCKS. 
All to Small & Vining. 

WHITE CALL DUCKS. 
All to Small & Vining. 

COLORED MUSCOVEY DUCKS. 
All to Small & Vining. 

WHITE MUSCOVEY DUCKS. 
All to Small & Vining. 

INDIAN RUNNER DUCKS. 
Small & Vining: 1, ck; 1, hen. Davis & 
Dynes: 2, ck; 2, 3, hen, 

WILD MALLARD DUCKS. 
Small & Vining: 1. ck; 1, ckl; 1, hen; 1, 
pul. Ruesler: 2, ck; 2, hen. 

EMBDEN GEESE. 
All to Small & Vining. 

BROWN CHINA GEESE. 
All to Small & Vining. 

WHITE CHINA GEESE. 
All to Small & Vining. 

WILD GEESE 
All to Small & Vining. 

BITF GEESE. 
All to Mann. 

WHITE HOLLAND TURKEYS. 
All to Small & Vining. 



Awards at Mendota, 111. 



EXHIBITORS AT MENDOTA, ILL. 

-\drian, John Paw Paw, 111. 

Anthony, A. W Berwyn, 111. 

Asche, A. H Princeton, 111. 

Auringer, Paul Mendota, 111. 

Balcom, C. A Ohio, 111. 

Ballon, Jas. W Dixon, 111. 

Bander, Dr. C Mendota, 111. 

Beatty, Geo. L Farmers City, 111. 

Barret, Wm Mendota, 111. 

Brown, Edward Mendota, 111. 

Chase, M Mendota, 111. 

Childs, Ralph O Princeton, 111. 

Cork, S. L Peru, 111. 

Davis, Fred T Mendota, 111. 

Denen, Wm Aledo, 111. 

Dewhart, Ed. C Mendota, 111. 

Diller, C. W Steward, 111. 

Dunovan. H. I^. . .6520 Laflin St., Chicago, 111. 

Farley, E. H Leland, 111. 

Fleisher, H. A Ohio, 111. 

Fox, E. M Walnut, 111. 

Genther, Gabriel Mendota. 111. 

Gonigan, L. E Walnut, 111. 

Good. R. O Polo, 111. 

Hoover, Wm. H Polo, 111. 

Huber, C. E Dixon, 111. 

Hunter, G. M Paw Paw, 111. 

Johns, Geo. H Oglesby, 111. 

Jones, Mrs. Chas Paw Paw, 111. 

Katzwinkel, August Mendota, 111. 

Keller, V Naperville, 111. 

Klein, J. A Mendota, 111. 

Kutter, Herman Mendota, 111. 

Leffelman, Louis Mendota, 111. 

McClennahan. V. D Dixon, 111. 

Meihsner & Son, C. C Walnut, 111. 

Meyer.s, Truman I Naperville. 111. 

Moore. L. H Mendota, 111. 

Nisley, Geo Mendota, 111. 

Ott, Calvin Prophetstown, 111. 

Pohl. Chas Mendota, 111. 

Prescott. G. F Dixon, 111. 

Rawson, J. H Princeton, 111. 

Head, Everett R Galena, 111. 

Relg.'l. Chas. J Mendota, 111. 

Rosebaugh, J. A Dixon, 111. 

Schaller. Gilbert Mendota, 111. 

Scheidcnhelm, Geo. J Mendota, 111. 

Scheidenhelm, John Mendota, 111. 

Schildberg. Otto Mendota, 111. 

Skinner, Frank E Sandwich, 111. 

Snader, G. W Walnut, 111. 

Stacy, Wm I.a Moille. 111. 

Stafford. C. P La Moille, 111. 

Strong. W. V Leland, 111. 

Walker. Q. A Polo, HI. 

Wallia, Bert Walnut. 111. 

Wallis, Harold Walnut. 111. 

White, Elmer Mendota, 111. 

Wilklns. Chas Troy Grove, 111. 

Wills, E. B Mendota, 111. 

Wilson, Robert Woosung, 111. 

Winter. A. J Mendota. 111. 

Winter, John Mendota. 111. 

Wise Bros Earlville. 111. 



Wormley, H. J 

Youngman & Son. S. W. . . 



.Mendota, 111. 
.... Dixon, 111. 



AWARDS AT MENDOTA, ILL. 

BARKED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Beatty: 3, ckl; 2. 4, pul; 4, pen. Walker: 

2, hen; 1, pul. Brown: 1, 2, ck; 1, hen. 
Hoover: 2, ckl; 3 hen; 5, ck; 1. pen. Fleish- 
er: 3, ck; 5, pen. Stafford: 4, ckl; 4 hen*, 
5, pul; 2, pen. Cork: 4, ck ; 5, ckl; 5, hen; 

3, pul; 3. pen. Gonigam: 1. ckl. 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Wilson: 1, ck; 3. ckl. Winter: 1, 4, ckl; 

5. hen; 1. pen. Kutler: 2. ckl; 3. 4. 5. pul. 

Prescott: 5, ckl; 1. 3. hen; 1. 2, pul; 2, pen. 

BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

All to T. Meyers. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. 
Read: 5, pul. Skinner: 2, ck; 1, 2, ckl; 
1, 2, hen; 1. 2, pul; 1, pen. Fox: 1, ck; 3, 
ckl. McClannahan: 3. 4, pul. 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. 
Snader: 2, ck ; .t. ckl; 5, pul; 3, pen. Bat- 
corn: 1, 2, 3, 4. ckl; 2. hen; 1. 2. 3. 4, pul; 
1, pen. Rawson: 1, ck ; 1, 3. 4, hen; 2, pen. 
<JOLDEN WYANDOTTES. 
Auringer: 3, ckl; 3, pul. 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES. 
Dewhart: 3, ck ; 1. 2, hen. Katzwinkel: 
1. ckl; 1. pul. 

COLUMBL4N WYANDOTTES. 
Ott: 2. ck; 1. 2, 3. ckl; 2. hen; 1, 2, 3, 
pul; 1, pen. Anthony: 1, ck; 3, 4, hen; 4, 
pul. 

S. C. BUFF ORPINGTONS. 
Mlsley: 1. 4, ckl; 2. pul; 2, pen. Duno- 
van: 4, 5, hen; 1, .5, pul; 4. pen. Wendell 
& Son: 2. ckl. Scheidenhelm: 3. ckl; 4, pul; 
3, pen. Rosebaugh: 1. ck ; 1. 2, 3, hen; 
3, pul; 1. pen. 

8. C. WHITE ORPINGTONS. 
Moore: 3. ckl; 3, pul. 

K. C. WHITE ORPINGTONS. 
Keller: 1. ckl; 1, 2, 3. 4. hen. 

S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. 
Wise Bros.: 1. 2, ck; 1, 2, ckl; 1, hen; 
1, 2, 3. 4, pul: 1, pen. 

8. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 
Adrian: 1. 2. ckl; 2, pul. Katzwinkel: 

3, ckl; .'). pul. Stacy: 4. ckl; 1, hen; 1. 3, 

4, pul; 1, pen. 

R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Ballon: 2. ck; 3, ckl; 2. hen; 3. pul: 2, 

pen. Hunter: 2. ckl. Klein: 4, .t. pul. 

Katzwinkel: 5. ckl. Good: 1. ck; 1. ckl: 

1, 3, hen; 1, 2, pul; 1, pen. Relgel: 4. ckl. 

BUFF COCHINS. 

All to Wendell & Sons. 

PARTRIDGE COCHINS. 
All to Wilklns. 

BLACK LANG8HANS. 
Aache: 1, ck : 2. ckl; 1, 2, hen; 1. 2, pul: 
1, pen. Meihsner & Son: 2, ck ; 1. ckl; 3. 
hen; 3. 4, 5, pul; 2, pen. 

WHITE LANGSH.\NS. 
.411 to Farley. 





--^■-^-•^^ ■■ - v^...^^il.....> POl^I^RY FA'NCIER^I March, 

Ml to V;.. "";''' "" I K(mOKNS. WendenT'^;''''V'^.«^^^^^'^^ » ^ «' ^ » LEGHORNS. 

K. C". BKOWN LF<iHORNs t ^f,? i S-/V,*"''- ^' ^"^^ ^' ''^^' ^- •^- h^" = R'^«": 3, 4. pul. Dunbar: 1, ck; 1, 2, 4. 

Wormley: 2 ck" Fleisf^^^Pp^ul Gon- !' cff i ''•>^ 4'^'rf,;., =^- ^'^^ = -'• '!<'■ '^^^^'Ji^: h^n; 1. 2, 4. ckl; 1. 2. pul; 1. pen.' Church 

5. pul: \V-^-^^^^^ , All to "allis *"'^ BANTAMS. r e. BIFF I.KGHOKNS. 

S. t. UHITK I.K(iHOI{NS. BKON7F TITRKi,v« ^11 to Sweet. 

mil Hu,u«'.r\.Kr4 "^eOlannahan: :l, 4. ^^^ _BorKBOX KEI) TIKKEVS, All (o Williamson. 

V..u„„„':-a,r-/!s;^,r«,;";^-<!«';-\-- „ , , ^,„ »VHn||;„„L,.AND TIRKKVS. Plseher: :,. 4. ^K^''^ ?,%, pul. r.. Dun- 

hon.,,. ., ::. 4. pul: i pen. ' Sc.alW: J-EKIN ,.,rCK« „ . ''"-^ '-XiiilliliAA' iW,V,QV,ir^ '' ■■"'• 

SII.VFK SI»AN<iLKI) H\MB1 K(iS i ., V - ' , ', ' -' ^^^^ 2- 3- ''• ^en. All to C. Dunbar. 

All to Barret. *^*"^*^" HAMBl KOS. 1 -'' 4. .> pul; 1 pen. Wendell & Sons: ^^j, ^^ME^ 

Ai, f w, •. '" (iAMES. Bander: 3, ck; 4,' ckl. ' ^ ' " ^ Poindexter: 2. ck. Flynn: 3. ck ; 1. 2. 

rOKMSH IXni4X« .,. ^ KOrEN DFCKS. ^^"^ ^- ^^- Brabazon: 1. ckl; 4, CR. 

All to Denen IM>IANh. All to W intei; BIFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 

BLACK BKEASTED CiAME BANTAMS. All to Wiitei «^'^'^*^« HtCKS. All to J edlan & Bartuska 

All to Childs. '° ToVlors*^ f^^^^^ BLACK COCHIN BANTAMS. 

<iOLI>EN SEBRKiHT BANTAMS. All to Kutler f«EESE. All to Welker 

Walli.v.: 1. 1'. :], 4. ckl; 2. hen; 1 pul \VHITF AFRirAx: /^r-fv^^^^c ^' ^- BI-^^'K BANTAMS. 

John.s: 1. .^k: i. hen. ' ' ^ au to Winter <.IINEAS. Ernest: 1, ck; 1, hen; 3, pul. Gormley: 

" "bronze Tl'RKEVS. 

^ All to L. Dunbar. 

Awards at Delavan, Wis. . ^i?'h ' ; ' ^'^'hen?^^*^4';' cki church: 

*' TT lo. .i, ekl; 4, pul. Besecker: 1, 2, ck; 1, 3, ckl; 

EXHIBITORS AT HELAVAN, WIS. BUFF WYANDOTTES AYLESBURG DUCKS. 

Anderson. .1. O Delavan, Wis. , Miller: 3. ckl; 3, hen; 3. pf^n. l^nderwood ^Church: 1. ckl; 2, pul. (\ Besecker: 1, 

Austin. E. S Delavan, Wis. j. ck- Davis: 1, ckl; 2, hen; 2 3 4 pul- 1 ^^^'' ^' P"'- 

Bassler. J. S Darien Wi.s ^' P^"- Dunbar: 1. 4, hen- 1 bul- '> ck- 4 ROUEN DUCKS. 

Be.secker. ('has Delavan. Wis] ^"kl; 2. pen. Gormley: 3, ck Lar'sen-' ">' Watson: 3. ck ; 3, ckl; 3. hen; 4, pul. 

Besecker, Walter Delavan Wis ^kl. ' " ' -• Sweet: 2. ck. Church: 2, pul; 2, hen; i. 

Bowers. Mrs. H Delavan.' Wis. ^ ''ARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES *^*^'- ^- Besecker: 1. ck; 1, hen; 2, ckl; 

Brabazon. Jesse C Delavan Wis. Rodman & Son: 2, 3, 4 ck- 1 '•> ^ 4 •^' P"^- Bri^KS: 1, ckl; 1, pul. 

Brabazon. John Delavan. Wis. ^^1: -'. 4. hen; 1. 3. 4, pul;' l' "•>' pen CAYUCJA DUCKS. 

BrisRs. W. W Delavan, Wis O'Connor: 1. ck; 1. 3. hen: 2 pul "' ' Watson: 1. ckl. Sweet: 1, ck. Church; 1, 

Bri.stoi. Sadette S Delavan, Wis.' COLUMBIAN WYAXHOTTK* P"^' "' ^^'- ^'- Besecker: 1. hen. 

Bunker. W. W Avalon Wis Sweet- ' 4 nul 4 elf ^ n i , CiRAY CALL DUCKS. 

Chri.vlian. B. W Delavan Wis' " hen 3 ckl' Merrell : 1. pul; All to Church. 

(Mark (ieo Delavan,' Wis. ' ' 's. C " BUFF ORI»IXT-roTV« BLUE SWEDISH DUCKS. 

Church. Roy Elkhorn. Wis. All toAhe'rxvell **'*"^^^' 1<>^S. All to C. Besecker. 

Cowles. Percy Elkhorn. Wis. S. C. WHITE ORI»IN(;TONS . .. VVHITE CRESTED DUCKS. 

Davis, Truman Delavan Wis Trenfield • ■? 4 r^n t5 , , ' ' . ^11 to C. Besecker. 

Dun;>ar. C. S Elkhorn,' wSs! ckl; 1 L'^'V. 4' pul •''f o"f,::"'^- ^' "• ^' ^' INDIAN RUNNER DUCKS. 

Dunbar. Harry Elkhorn. Wis. R. C WHITE 'o"rpIN<;tox« Church: 1. ckl; 1. hen; 2. 3, pul. C. 

Dunbar. Lula Elkhorn. Wis Austin: 1 pul"* ckl Bristol f' ekl Besecker: 1. ck; 2. ckl; 2. hen; 1. pul. 

Earnest. Frank Delavan Wis S. C BiAc'k ORPIvi'TOxi' COLORED MUSCOVEY DUCKS. 

Fischer. Gre^or Elkhorn W s" Anderson: 3 ck. short j'^^^^'o o , , W Besecker: 1. 2, ck ; 1. 2. 3. hen; 1. 3. 

gSTn'^^;^ ''\ .•.•::Se!S;4';: w!l F.%tu'rt^;rant-'4^"c'kl.-'ll' S^^^tlva^t"' 1 ^k^: ^„ ^ WHITE MUSCOYEY DUCKS. 

Gulicks.,n Mrs. A Delavan. Wis. 1. 2. 4. pul; 1. pen. ^lui^tvani. l, ckl, All to Church. 

S^win ^^''• i ^ ^^*^»" ^'*t^-- Bl. DIAMOND JUBILEE ORPINGTONS nu ^^ I.*^", >«ALLARi) DUCKS. 

Ha.Nden^ Frank A Beloit. Wis. Christian: 2 3. pul "««»>»'lONS. Church: 1, ckl; 1, hen; 1. pul; 2. ck. C. 

Heck Bros. Lyons. Wis S. C. RHODE ' ISLAND RFOS Besecker: 1, ck ; 2, ckl; 2, hen; 2, pul. 

g^>'^»-- H- -r Darien Wl.s Clark: 3. ck; 4 ckl pTudame^^^^ 9 Brig^s: 3. ckl; 3. hen; 3, pul. 

Hoover. Wm. H po o Hi' 3. ckl; 2 3 4 pul 1 Ven rVm..i'«-^ ' ?' TOULOUSE GEESE. 

Hunsbusher. B. J Darien Wis ck ; 1,'ck'l; i 2, pul ^ Gulickson: 1, Sweet: 1. hen; ], ckl. Williamson: 1, 2. 

Jedlan ^: Bartusko Chicago, HI. R. C. RHODE ISLAND KFUS 'i"'' T ^**'- Church: 3. ckl; 3. pul. C. 

i-"J3'T"'ii ;^- V T.yons 'Wis. Ha.vden : 2. ck , 1 2 .r 4 >ul ' ckl • 1 Besecker: 4, ckl; 4, pul. BrisKs: 1. ck; 

Keef & Babcock Delavan. Wis P^'H. Shulz: 1 ck • 1 'ekl " ' " "■ ^'^"- 

Lambert Fred C Beloit. Wis' LKiHT BR VIM \S c KMBDEN CiEESE. 

]:tJ7ni T- /: Delavan. Wis. All lo Williamson '•^^- n^Z^^'\'- 'V'. '''^^'y^' ■>■ -K': -• Pul. 

Mn T rV \- '^"lo»i ^^'"Is. Ill- I'ARTRID(;K COCHINS T i^.T'i ''•.-' /"^ ^ .-• ^''"- Briggs: 1. ck; 

Miller, <'eo A Beloit. Wis. All to Williamson. '''''"= ^' ""iv^.^^A. , 

Monear. Earl Solon Mills HI BLACK LANCJ.SH \NS ,.. ^. AFRICAN (JEESE. 

Morton. IWe Darien. Wis." All t-, Hunsbusher ' ,."?'"'"^i V ^''^' ' "• »^''"- ^'- Besecker: 1, 

O ( onnor, M. J Darien Wis S C BROU'N 1 K^iKki^x-u ^'^'' ^' ^^'^ 1- 1^^": 1- P"l- 

O-Connor. P. D i,^]^: ^l^T^ Welko.?:' 1." pu"^ *^) \kl;^'3"*hen Rice- 1 rn »«f>^\^' CHINESE (iKESE. 

?in-VJ^'^V Delavan. Wl.s. -'. 4. hen; 2.'^3. pt^l; 3 ckl. Monear • ' 1 etV'"'T ^ T' *'%•'• '!"'• *^ ^^^^^cker: 1. ck. 

Peffer. \\. F Delavan, Wis ckl; 4. pul. . '• ivioneai . 1. 1, ekl; ], hen: 1. pul. 

Po.nde.xter. Ed Delavan. Wis! K. C. BROWN LEGHORNS r^u ^^^"'P^ CHINESE GEESE. 

Prudames. AH.s. c Delavan. Wis All to Ba.s.sb.,-. r.i.in,uA». (^hurch. 3. ck ; 3, hen: 3, pul; 4. ckl. 

Reed. Melbourne o Darien, Wis! S. C. WHITE LE<iHORNS Sweet: 1, pul; 2, ck. (\ Besecker: 1, ck; 

Rice. n. R Delavan, Wis. Jedlan <SL' Bartuska: ] ckl M.s* Harnlv '''''"• «.., , 

R. .belts Br<.s Lvons Wis L ■!. ck ; 2 4 ckl- 1 •'" 34 hl^'-^ Pa WILD GEESE. 

Rf.dman & Son, A Darien, Wis. Pul; L l»f'n'. 'simo'ns:' I' ck - '• nul'- •'• eui' , ^^"'■'.;'' \ •'• ''^'' ■'• '^^''^ ' '• Beseck.-r: 1, 2, 

Rodman. D. B Darien Wis R. C. WHITE LFGH<»KV^ ' " ''^' • ^' "• ''^"^ ^' -• ''^^- 1- -• Pul. 

Sherwell. Edwin Delavan'. Wi.s' A II to .Ang^ns"" "^^ '^^^*'"""^-^- ^„ ^^, BUFF GEESE. 

Short. J. H Rock ford. Hi _^__^ ■^" ^'' f^l'urch. 

Shulz. H. F.. Lyons. Wis! ~" " ■ ■ ■ . 

EEa^^w>;■K.■■b:;;;;:;;S!;■ 11? Columbian Wyandottes -dLS;^;;??^ 

Stuitevant. 11. w Delavan' viTia /Tlfc'*- _:■ «>* •xujc,-., ity. large blockv 

Sweet. Jr.. Ed ■■.'.■.■. Darien" Wis' ( KiCfiarClSOIl Str Silll) I'k'^-^'i'-"^ ^^'''"^ '" ^"^'^^^^*"^ Wyandotte .shape. 

?re^,;a'' -V"^" ^ Lake GenevS; ^Is! females- H..s this .season 5P..0 and ?2 00 per 4.' Vf^o^'i^^^^^^^^^^^ 

?^n;i^;^oS^''Ro?'-.-.'.-.'.--.v -'^^^ Cr^st^l White Orpingtons "^-i^^^JiS^f^TRAiN 

VoRt. u r. ...-. V... Hvons. Wis: ^ M. JACOBS. BARABOO. WIS. 

Watson. FU)\vland Elkhorn Wis ~ — " — _»_ 

we^'ko!": H'vVnR'o:::::::;^^.^;^^^^^^^^^^^ HIGH CI ASS S f R I RFFIQ ?'r,"*""i,"^i^°'- ^^^-^^>o -^as 

William.son. A ! . . . ! ! feela^an' Wis ***^** V^UnOO U. K^. S\. 1. IVLUlJ 5°"°;;:f: P«^kw°°^^^ ^°^''^' ^ov. 17- 
lst, .3rd pullet, l.st pen. Richland, Iowa, Dec 14-17 icxK) Da^le TnL;^.t9T'-!"'^^f=i^'^°^^^^^ 

^^rVTciC- ^"SVn.';. -/•,;;;?' ^ '■ P^"- "•^"" Z^ CHALUPA. ; R. 2. PLEASANT PLAIN. IOWA 

.^^€r^KPn:jPr^A^Psirtridge Plymouth Rocks 

hen; 4. ckl; 3. pul ; 2, pen. Redman: 4, pui ^ur xxrr^, wr^«..,r^ * ^ W. *^ O 

OieKory: 1. pul: 3. 4. hen; .1. pen THE WOLVERINE BRED TO LAY STRAIN 

BUFF PLYMOUTH ROC KS. J A HAflFIVIAN an. . ^ m.. 1„,^ 

Vogt: 1. ckl. Toplin.ski: 1. .S. 4. pul: 4, ''* ^' "AUt^MAIN, . . CHARLOTTE MIPH 

hen; 4. ckl. Morton: 1 2 3 hen- '' nul- P..-.:j » d » -j »• . ^ ^* *^-^*x»-.v-r 1 1 il,, lVll\^ri. 

2, 3, ckl: 1. pen. " ' ' ™__ President Partridge Plym outh Rock Club 

^"^]thr l^^'pul^^Kee^TRlhc^ock: 1. c* ; PETERSON^S HOlJDAN^ ^^^ Undefeated Champion 
•J, ckl. Cowles: 1. hen; 1. 4, ckl; 3. ck; 3. VT *-■'» ^•^ V-r A ^ v^ * A V-T V^ JLy/-Vi lO Strain of Am^rio- 

pul. Christian: 3. ckl. I'effer: 2. hen; 2 Send for 80-page book on The Houdan 30 full nao-pH niot*.c «f ^ • «" "^ America. 

ok Bowers: 3. hen; 4, pul Parrish : 4. ck; Mating for Exhibition. Management and many iThertmnor^^^ wintiers. Houdan Standard, 

^- hen. ^ Rev. C.E.Peler.en.Presidenr American Houdan Cl^^^^^^^ Postage g) cents 

Bridgton, Maine 




• 



^IF 



> 



t 



# 



^Ki ^Kr 




March, '10 




POULTRY FANCiE 




Page 




Awards at Three Rivers, Mich. 



EXHIBITORS AT THREE RIVERS, MICH 

Abbott. D. D Three Rivers, 

Fred Constantine, 

Rivers, 
Rivers, 



Astling. 
Avery, Clyde 
Barnes. Mrs. 
Barnum, J. 
Belote, Carl 
Bennett, Ed. 
Bowie, R. A 
Carl, Frank 
Cox, C. G. . . 
Cheisman & 



Flora. 



• Three 
Three 

..Union City, 
. . . .Sherwood, 
Three Rivers, 
Three Rivers, 
Three Rivers, 
Three Rivers, 
Son Sherwood, 



Craft. L. E Three Rivers, 

Crandall. M. I Three Rivers, 

Dent, Joe Three Rivers, 

Donovan. Oliver J Three Rivers. 

Eagleton. Geo Three River.s, 

Elvving, W. L Vicksburg, 

Farrand Bros Colon 

Faust. C. H Vicksburg-,' 

Fitting, Samuel Three Rivers. 

Foster, C. C 



Gebhart. E. E Three 

Gosskunze, M Three 

Hagenback, Chas Three 

Hart, E. P Three 

Havens. F. H Three 

Hecox, Frank Three 



Herndon. H. A. . . 
Herndon, J. W. . . 

Hill. C. O 

Hudson. C. J 

Hunter. Mrs. F. . . 
Huss. Edward . . . 
Huss, Mis. Marion 

Huss Bros 

Kaiser. E 

Karchner. J. 
Klocke. Carl 



Three 
Three 
Three 



Quincy, 

Rivers, 

Rivers, 

Rivers. 

Rivers, 

Rivers, 

Rivers, 

Rivers, 

Rivers, 

Rivers, 



Vicksburg. 

. .Thre§ Rivers, 



Three Rivers. 

Three Rivers, 

Three Rivers, 

Three Rivers, 

A Colon. 

Three Rivers, 



Knapp. Frank Three Rivers. 



Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich, 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mich. 

Mien. 



Exclusively S"^' ""* 



S. C. Black Minorcas VenZt 

show one of 
— best shows ever held 
in northern Indiana. Jan. 4-8. 1910, won silver 
cup for best display in Mediterranean class, 
points to count. Eggs from birds scoring 
92 to 95 $3 00 per 16. 
G. A. GAGE LA GRANGE, IND. 



S. C White Leghorns 

The right type and color. Line bred 
for years. Winners at Yonngstown 
and Warren, O. Stock eggs for sale. 

RrPTrmr 336 wirt street. 

DClV 1 VlllX, YOUNGSTOWN, O. 



'^'i^iotlt'h '" S. C. Brown Leghorns 

Kendallville. Ind., Jan. 4-8, Tucker. Judge; 2 
3 cock. 2 cockerel. 1, 2. 4 hen. 1, 2 pullet, 1. 2 
pen. 20 females average 92 1-6. Richmond, 
Ind., Jan. 12-15, Zike, Judge; I won eight prizes 
with five birds entered; 1 cockerel, 1, 2 hen. 1. 
2 pullet, 1 pen. two specials. I breed my own 
winners. Write for mating list 
IRA FORD - LA GRANGE, IND. 



S. C. Rhode Island Reds 

Some fine cockerels $3 each. Eggs 
from birds scoring 90 to 93, $1.50 per 
J 5. One cock and 6 hens. Partridge 
Wyandottes for sale cheap. 

D. E. MILLER, ROME CITY, IND. 



Barred Plymouth 

FLOr^K^ Mulloy's Ringlets nre 
*^ ^^-'^^^ *• '-^ good Rocks. Won 1st 
cockerel 1st pen chicks at Nebra.ska State Fair 
I901> Write me for stock and eggs. Eee.-^ 
$1.50 and $2 50 for 15, 

CHAS ^^. MlTI.f.OY 

B07L lo, fri';moist, nebr. 



. 



BROODER 



CLOUGH'S 

CHICKEN 

Tele.scopic. Always one story. The best 
free literature. Address 

Clough's Lampless Brooders 

AURORA, ILL. 



O 
W 



H. 



Kown, R 
Krull, J. 
Little, H, 
Lyon. r. 
Morri.son. 
Naylor, Wm. . . 
Palmateer Bros. 

Prior, B. Li 

Rohrer, F. A. . . 
Sibley. Irving A. 
Strickland, W^m. 
Tackabery, 
Thorns. F. 



D Schoolcraft, 

C Three Rivers, 

A Kalamazoo, 



Three Rivers, 

Three Rivers, 

Three Rivers, 

Quincy, 

Tekonsha. 

Three Rivers, 

& F. C So. Bend 

Three Rivers, 

Hayes Three Rivers, 

H Colon, 



Trickey, Geo Three Rivers. 

Warner. Earl Tekonsha. 

WilnuKhby. A. S Three River.s. 

Wright. H. I Three Rivers. 



Mich. 
Mich. 
Mich. 
Mich. 
Mich. 
Mich. 
Mich. 
Mich. 
Mich. 
, Ind. 
Mich. 
Mich. 
Mich. 
Mich. 
Mich. 
Mich. 
Mich. 



AWARDS AT THREE RIVERS. MICH. 
BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

Havens: 2. pen 3, ckl; 2, 3, hen; 4, ck; 
4, pul. Herndon: 3. pen; 4, hen. Crandall: 

2, pul; 3, ck. Barnum: 1, pen; 1, 3, pul; 
1, 2. ckl. 

WHITE PLYMOITH ROCKS. 
Hudson: 1, pen; 2, 3, ckl; 2. 3, pul. Palma- 
teer Bros.: 1, 2, 4, hen. Bower: 4, pul 
Barnes: 3, pen. Cox: 1, 4, ckl; 1, pul; 1, ck; 

3, hen. 

BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 
Karchner: 1. 4. ckl. Goosbunge : 2, ckl; 

4, pul; 3, pen. Belote: 1, pen; 2, hen; 1, ck ; 
3, ckl; 1. 2. 3. 4, hen; 1, 2. 3. pul. 

WHITE WYAXDOTTES. 
Gebhart: 1. pen; 1, 2, 3, 4. ckl; 



Ewing: 



pen; 



2, 3, 4, 
1, ck; 



3. ckl. 



hen; 1, 2. 3. pul 
1, hen; 1, pul. 

HI FF WYANDOTTES. 
Astlins: 1. 2. pul; 1. ck ; 2. 3, hen 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES. 
Kaiser: 4. hen. 

PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES. 
Ewing: 1, pen; 1, ck; 1, 3, ckl; 1, 2, hen; 
4, pul. Pryor: 2, pen; 2, 3, ck; 2, 4, 



1, 



ckl; 3, 4, hen. Huss: 3, pen; 2. 3, ck; 3, 
4, hen. 

BLACK ORPINGTONS. 

Mrs. Hunter: 4, ckl. 

WHITE ORPINGTONS. 

All to Knapp. 

BUFF ORPINGTONS. 

All to Lyon. 

S. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Tackabery: 1, pen; 3, 4, hen; 1, 4, pul; 

1, ckl. Eagleton: 2, 3, pul. Huss Bros.. 

2, ckl. Farrand j Bros.: 3. ckl. 

R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 

Sibley: 1, 2, pen; 1, 2, 3, 4. ck; 1, 2. 3, 4, 
ckl; 1, 2, 4, hen; 1. 2, 3, pul. Thoms: 3, 
hen; 4, pul. 

LIGHT BRAH3IAS. 
All to Abbott, 

BLACK LANGSHANS. 
Cheisman & Son: 1, 2, pen; 1. ck; 1, 2, 3, 
ckl; 1, 2, 3, 4. hen; 1, 2, 3, 4. pul. 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 
Herndon: 3, ck ; 1, 2, hen; 1, pen; 1, 2, 3, 
pul; 3, ckl. Tackabery: 2. 4, ck. 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 

Foster: 1, pen; 1, 2, 4, pul; 1, 2, 3, ckl; 
1, 2, 3, hen; 1, 2, ck. Craft: 3, ck; 3, 4, 
ckl; 4, hen; 2, pen; 3. pul. 

BUFF LEGHORNS. 

Warner: 1, pen; 1, ckl; 3. 4. hen; 1, 2, 3, 
4, pul. Little: 2, pen; 1, ck; 1, 2, hen. Hill: 

3, pul; 2, ckl. 

S. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 
Krull: 1, pen; 3, 4, ckl; 3, 4, hen; 3, 4, 
pul. Naylor: 1. hen. 

BLUE ANDALU8IAN8. 
All to Willoughby. 

SILVER SPANGLED HAMBURGS. 
All to Wright. 

PIT GAMES. 
All to Abbott. 

BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 
All to Ewing. 

JAPANESE BANTAMS. 
All to Cox. 

INDIAN RUNNER DUCKS. 
All to Fitting. 



Awards at Baraboo, Wis. 



EXHIBITORS AT BARABOO, WIS. 

Ahrensmeyer, G. F. ... North Freedom, Wis. 

Alwin. Wm Baraboo, Wis. 

Benedick, G. W Baraboo, Wis. 

Blachly. J. M North Freedom, Wis. 

Black, H. C Baraboo, Wis. 

Cahoon, Wilbur Baraboo, Wis. 

Cahoon Bros Baraboo, Wis. 

Capener. Clifford liaraboo. Wis. 

Catlin, F. W Baraboo, Wis. 

riaik, C. A Reedsburg. Wis. 

Conway, D. F Elroy. Wis, 

Crosley. Alex Elroy. Wis. 

Da vies. G. W. . . North Freedom. Wis. 

Donaghe.v, J. T North Freedom, Wis. 

Gahagan, .1. M La Valle, Wis. 

Gibbins. Chas Baraboo, Wis. 

Gibbins. P. H Baraboo. Wis. 

Hackett, G. W North P'reedom, Wi.s. 

Hake. W. S Elroy, Wis. 

Harkins. Mrs. Mary... North Freedom, Wis. 

Helm, L Baraboo. Wi.s. 

Jacobs. I.., M Baraboo. Wis. 

Kelley. H. D Reedsburg, Wis, 

Koppke, Henry Baraboo. Wis. 

Lange. Wm North Freedom. Wis. 

McGuan. .las Baraboo, Wis. 

Mader, H. F l.,a Crosse, Wis. 

Maxham. H. L Reedsburg. W'is. 

Newell. F. H Baraboo. Wis. 

I'addock. B. E La Valle. Wis, 

Powell, Mrs. Anna. ... North Freedom. Wis. 

I'owell. E. L North Freedom, W'is. 

Ringling, Mrs. Al Baraboo. Wis. 

Kingling. Mrs. C Baraboo, Wis. 

Ruggles, Miss Mary Baraboo. Wis. 

Sanderson. Ernest Baraboo. Wis. 

Schacht. P'red Baraboo. Wis. 

Schellenberer. Gus North Freedom. Wis, 

Seails. W. M Elroy. Wis. 

Shalt. Wm Baraboo. Wis. 

Snydei-, ,7(>hn Madison. Wis. 

Sladler. Roy Baraboo. Wis, 

Stoinbrink. Ed North Freedom. Wis. 

Teni))lin. Albert Baraboo. Wis. 

Tempi in. Fred Baraboo. Wis, 

Vilas. C. N Baraboo. Wis. 

Voeck. .Tohn North Freedom. Wis. 

Wells. Louis Baraboo. Wis. 

Wickern. Wm Baraboo. Wis. 

.\W.VRDS .\r BARABOO. WIS. 
BARRED I'LVMOI TH ROCKS. 

Mader: 1. 2. hen; 1. 4, pul: 3. pen. Hack- 
ett: 1. ck; 1. 3, ckl; 3. 4. hen; 1. pen. 
Black: 2. 4, ckl; 2, 3. pul; 4. pen. Pad- 
dock: 2. ck. 

WHITE PLY.MOl TH RO( KS. 

Catlin: 1. ckl; 1, 2. 3, hen; 2, pul; 1. pen. 
Newell: 3. ckl; 3, pul. 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. 

Capener: 1. ck ; 1, 2. 3, 4. hen; 1. 3. ckl; 

1. 2. 3. pul; 1. pen. Cahoon: 3, ck. Shale: 

2, ckl; 4. pul; 2. pen. 

BUFF" WYANDOTTES. 

Hake; 1. ck; 2, hen; 1, 2, 3, 4, pul; 2, ckl; 

1. pen. Crosby & Alexander: 1. hen; 1, 3, 
4, ckl; 2. pen. 

SILVER LACEI> WYANDOTTES. 

A. Templln: 1. 3, ck ; 3, 4. hen; 2, 4, 



4, 
4. 



ckl; 1. pul; 2. pen. F. Templin: 2. 4. ck; 

1, 2, hen; 3. ckl; 2. 3, 4, pul: 3, pen. 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. 
Jacobs: 2, ck; 2, 4, hen; 2, ckl; 2, pul; 

2, pen. Hackett: 1, 3, 4. pul; 1, 3, hen; 

3, 4, ckl; 1, pen. 

S. C. BUFF ORPINGTONS. 
Hackett: 1. 2. ck; 1. 2, 3, 4. hen; 1. ckl; 

1. pen. McGuann: 2, 4. ckl; 1, 2, 3, 4. pul; 

2. pen. Gahagan: 3. ckl; S. pen. 

S. C. WIirrE ORPINCiTONS. 
Wichern: 3. ck; 3, hen; 4, ckl; 1, 2, 3, f, 
pul; 1. pen. Jacobs: 3, ckl. 

S. C. RUFF ORPINGTONS. 
Kelley: 1, ck ; 1, ckl; 3, pul; 3, pen. San- 
derson: 2, ck; 3. 4, hen; 4, pen. Ringling: 

3. ck; 1, 2. hen; 2, 3, 4. ckl; 1, 2, 4. pul; 
1. 2. pen. Vilas: 4. ck. 

S. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 
Donaghy: 3, ck ; 1. 2. 3. hen: 1. 3. 4. ckl; 
1. 2, 3. pul; L pen. Blachlv: 2, ckl; 4. pul, 
R. C. RHODE ISLANI> REDS. 
Hackett: 2, ck ; 2, ckl; 3 pul. Clark: 
ck; 3. hen. Wichern: 3, hen; 3, 4, ckl; 2, 
pul; 2, pen. 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 
All to Gibbons. 

R. c. BROWN le<;horns. 

Capener: 1. J. 4. ckl; 1, 2, 3, 4, pul; 1, 
pen. Maxham: 3, ckl; 2. pen. 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 
Ringling: 1. ck, T.,ange: 2, ck; 3, hen; 

1, 2. ckl; 1. 2. 3. pul; 1. pen. Voeck: 1. 2, 
hen; 3. 4. ckl; 4, pul; 2. pen. Conway: 4, 
hen; 4, pen. Steinbrink: 3. pen. 

R. C. WHITE LE(iHORNS. 
Ahrensmeyer: 1. ck; 1. 2, 3, 4. hen; 4. ckl; 

2, pul; 1. pen. Maxham: 3, ckl; 1. 4. pul; 
2. pen. 

S. C. BUF'F LE<iHORNS. 
Catlin: 1. ck; 1, 2, hen: 1, 2. ckl; 1, pul; 

1. pen. Capener: 3. 4, hen; 4, ckl; 3. pul; 

2. pen. Davles: 3. ckl; 2, pul. Schellen- 
berger: 4. pul, 

S. C. BLACK LEGHORNS. 
All to Schacht. 

ANCONAS. 
All to Hackett. 

S. C. BLACK MINORCAS. 
Davles: 1. ck; 1. 2. 3, hen; 1, 2, 3. ckl; 

1, 2. 3, 4, pul: 1. 2. pen. 

WHITE CRESTED BLACK POLISH. 
Burdick: 1. ck ; 1. hen; 1. ckl. Cahoon: 

2. ckl; 1, 2, 3, 4. pul; 1. pen. 

HOUDANS. 
Newell: 3. hen; 3. ckl; 2. i)ul. 

SILVER SPANGLED HA.MBURGS. 
Ail to Kellev. 

BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS. 
All to Snvder. 

WHITE COCHIN BANTAMS. 
All to Kelley, 

BLACK BREASTED GAME BANTAMS. 
All to Cahoon Bros. 

BRONZE TURKEYS. 
All to Wichern, 

WHITE HOLLAND TURKEYS. 
All to W, Cahoon, 

TOULOUSE (;eese. 

All to AlwIn. 




wAl M CI £.• |?r 




March, '10 





S2I2SESEaaS3SS2:SS 

Marc h, '10 




ULTRY" 




Mir-ws OF 



POULTRY SHOWS (©, 

Notices sent to us by secretaries will be pub- 
lished in this department without charge 




KANKAKEE, ILL. 

E. P. Vining, Secretary of the Kanka- 
kee Association, reports that the next 
show will be held January 9 to 14, 1911. 
Chas. McClave has been secured as judge, 
ihis IS one of the best shows in northern 
Illinois. 

MOUND VALLEY, KAS. 

A7o^?® next annual show of the Mound 
Valley Poultry Association, will be held 

wnr^n^^Ji.^^ -^S, ^^' 1^11- ^- A. Stone? 
S r-^^m^^® judging. The secretary is 
M. C. Taylor, of Mound Valley. 

■3f "St 

WOONSOCKET, R. |. 

The sixth annual exhibition of the 

J^?d in^'^^f -^^i^'^r/ Association will be 
held in Harris Hal . which is one of thP 
best lighted halls in New EnglLd the 
same week as usual. Dec. 15, 16, 17, 'l910 
Single cooping, good judges, large regu- 
lar premiums, and a big list of cish 

^enl^'lL^^'S^'^^r ^^^^ thf good manSle 
ment that has characterized the show in 
the past, we expect will make it more 
successful than ever next December 

C. O. Smith, Sec'y. 

RICHLAND, IOWA. 

PmiUrl?®!;^!"""^' meeting of the Richland 
Poultry Fanciers' Association, the follow- 

qfo.^'^'^^^'L^f"? elected for the yelr 
dent T w ^^"iV ^^T'"^^ ^'^^^^ vice-presi- 
T w A,T^- Hallowell; secretary-treasurer, 
J. W Allen; superintendent, W. C Jones' 
assistant superintendent. F O D^ke 
Dates for next show Dec 1^ 14 A i?' 

was- nati'Th.^"' ""'ftf.Sjin^ Iniebtel'niss 
was paid, the association still had a nice 
ittle balance left in the treasury. ThI 
last show was a success in evefy way 
Judge Dagh. gave such good satisfacS' 
placing the awards at the last show that 

season" Th." ^"^^^^.^ ^^^^'^ ^^r next 
season. The association will offer ten 
silver cups to be awarded at the nex" 

Pi^M.^^i^v.^^'^^^^,' ^f t*^^ business men of 
Richland have also offered to donate sil- 
ver cups. We shall follow the same rue 
everv'^^exhfhif^r^ /'-^^ '^^'' ^"^^ ^uarantel 

d« v of thi'^f.^P''^"'*^'?' "^^"^y "" the last 
fhi^g^thL'^eason.- ^' ""' ^^ ^^« ^^^^ 

Richland. la. ^^ ^- ^"^"' ^^'y- 

^ -H- 
CRESTED FOWL BREEDERS' ASSO- 
CIATION. 



To Breeders of Crested Fowls of every 
variety, we oflfer a most cordia invitation 

nnnifrt K^'''' ^^^ producing varieties of 
fimi^^S.^r'^'V^''^^^ -^s at the present 
hiVro f ^^'^^ '^?1^^ ''^"^ gentlemen who 
have formed this organization are only 
too well aware of the unduaiified right of 

Hon^So?"!? ^"^^*^.l ^^^^^^« *« the diltinS- 
tlon placed upon them by the poultrymen 

?Lul^'^ f"*"^ ^'y ^^"^ '"^"^^1 them the ever- 
lasting layer. 

With the object in viou- of domcwi- 

fi^JilT-^ ^"^ ^!L® T>M^c in general the 
splendid qualiflcation.s of the Crested 
Breed in every variety this organization 
is dedicated. Note the following remarks 
of the editor in a recent i.ssue of Amer- 
ican Stock-keeper: 

"The splendid display of Polands at the 
Boston show emphasizes the vast amount 
of work the Crested Fowl Breeders' As- 
sociation of America is doing to advance 
the Interests of the crested breeds 

Every exhibitor of Polish was a* mem- 
ber of this organization and competed for 
Its premiums. The quicker the breeders 



of Houdans. Silkies, Sultans, Creve Couer, 
and La Fleche realize this fact it is our 
hrm belief the better it will be for them 
as It stands to reason that what it does 
tor one breed it can undoubtedly do for 
them all, 

}}^\,^^^^^rshxp lists are open to all 
reliable breeders of these various varie- 
ties, including Crested Ducks and Ban- 
tams although so far the Poland breed- 
ers seem to be about the only ones 
to appreciate this fact and their large 
entry at Boston simply emphasized the 
amount of faith they have in it 

The first annual meeting was held in 
rf^^c^-i}"^' Mechanic's building. January 
IS, 1910, and the first election was held 
resulting as follows: 

President, Wm. McNeil; vice-president, 
A* A Reynolds; secretary,treasurer, John 
A. Gough; associate secretary, James 
Cutting. 

Directors— Charles L. Seely W B 
Atherton, Miss I. E. Ives. Eliot Hub- 
bard, Rev. C. C. Petersen. F. L. Andrews, 
Robert Horte, Edgar A. Weimer, James 
Abernethy, Richard Oke, Wm. Minnich, 
George E. Winters." 

John A. Gough, 

Secretary. 

NATIONAL COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTE 

CLUB. 



The annual meeting of the National 
Columbian Wyandotte Club was held 
.January 13, in room 14, Mechanics build- 
mg, Boston. In the absence of the 
president the meeting was called to or- 
der by Vice-President Campbell, Secre- 
I^^^' mv,^^® American Poultry Associa- 
tion, ihe members present were enthusi- 
astic over the fact that Columbian Wyan- 
dottes were the largest class in the show. 
The year has been a good one for the 
club, both to increase of membership and 
hnancially, about eighty new members 
having joined during the year and a 
balance of $122.00 Is in the treasury The 
club has issued a catalogue of 48 pages 

?""io^n^^®r^^^'®^^^^"^ ^s to issue another 
for 1910. The officers elected for 1910 are 
president, Horace Porter, Ridgefleld, 
?*^"";.', vice-president, Walter G. Fenton, 
Mt. Clemens. Mich.; secretary- treasurer 
Geo. F. Eastman, Granbv, Mass. Execu- 
tive committee, the president and secre- 
r^^^iT^c^- Campbell, Mansfield, Ohio; 
r\ ^- ^''k\' ^}' Thomas, Ont.. Can. 
( harles D. Cleveland, West Orange N J • 
T. Reid Parrish, Nashville, Tenn.;' Milan 
A. Brayton, Fall River. Mass. With a set 
of officers who are enthusiastic Columbian 
Wyandotte breeders, with the fact that 
at three of the largest New England 
shows. Boston. Mass., Providence R I 
and Portland, Me., the Columbian 'wyan'- 
dottes were the largest class in the show 
is It any wonder that the club looks 
toward the future with renewed con- 
fidence. 

A donation to the club of a $25.00 
silver cup from Mr. H. W. Buckland 
Lower Wick, Worcester, England, to be 
given at the ghow where the annual meet- 
mg IS held, to the best shaped Columbian 
Wyandotte, was acknowledged and the 
donor thanked. 

Notice of the death of former Secretary 
E. E. Mcintosh last July, was brought be- 
fore the club and resolutions of symnathv 
for his family adopted. 

George F. Eastman, Secretary. 

COLUMBIAN PLYMOUTH ROCK 
CLUB. 



At the annual meeting of the American 
Columbian I'lymouth Rock (^lub held at 
Buffalo during the week of tlie Inter- 
national Show, the officers and executive 
committee for 1910 were elected. 

In addition to this two committees were 



appointed, one to draft a club standard,, 
and one to dratf a constitution and by- 
laws, both to be published in the cliib 
catalogue. 

Committee to draft a standard consists 
of D. M. Green, Syracuse, N. Y., Geo. H. 
Sweet, East Aurora, N. Y., and H. W. 
Partlo, Ingersoll, Ont., Canada. 

Committee on drafting a constitution,. 
Dr. E. B. Kaple, Elbridge, N. Y.. F. M. 
C emens. Mechanicsburg, O., and S. M. 
Clemo, Welland. Ont., Canada. 

The club is in a flourishing condition 
at the present time, but a vigorous cam- 
paign to double the present membership 
will be waged during the year. The club- 
catalogue will be a model of its kind, 
and will contain not only Information 
indispensable to the breeder of Columbian 
Rocks, but interesting and valuable to- 
any breeder of poultry. Persons inter- 
ested and desiring a copy should address 
the secretary to that effect ,and their 
request will be filled and a copy mailed 
them as soon as issued. 

^,^ ., ^ E. B. Kaple, 

Elbridge, N. Y. Secretary. 

AMERICAN LEGHORN CLUB MEETING. 

At the annual meeting of the Amer- 
ican Leghorn Club held in Baltimore, 
Md., Jan. 4 to 8, 1910, the following offi- 
cers were elected: President. W. F 
Brace. Victor, N. Y. : first vice-president, 
W. R. Bowers, Baltimore, Md.; second 
vice-president, G. L. Wheeler. Penn Yan, 
^; 7.\} third vice-president, W. E. Bright, 
Waltham, Mass.; fourth vice-president. 
Frank McGrann, I>ancaster, Pa.; secre- 
tary and treasurer, Norman L. Kisling, 
Bel-Air. Md. The club will have a state 
Vice-president in each state and will of- 
fer handsome ribbons at all shows. an(J 
asks show secretaries to get in touch with 
Secretary Kisling at once, so arrange- 
ments can be made to supply all This 
is one of the strongest clubs in the U. S. 
and embraces breeders of all varieties of 
the Leghorn family. Addres all corre- 
spondence to 

Norman L. Kisling, 
■r. o« ^ , Secretary and Treasurer. 
Box 22, Bel-Air. Maryland. 




F. L. POULTRY FARM 

Rhode Island REDS .^^i^^^ 

in red hot competition at Hagerstown. Chi- 
cago. McKeesport. Butler and Pittsburg Pa 
Stock, egg.s and baby chicks. Write for cir- 
cular and mating list. 
F. L. OBER. R. F D. NO. 1, VERONA. PA. 



=^ 



LEGHORNS-HOUDANS-ROCKS 

Houdans to February 28th, 18. Total for 
year 947. Send for my 1909-10 show record. 

H E ROHFR^ 929 MISS. ST. 

"• *^* '^^^litV^ LA CROSSE. WIS. 



Silver Laced Wyandottes t^rbox 

iiri . ««r « irtain direct 

White Wyandottes ^^uston strain 

■ ■ » . Pure 

Houdans Mc AVOYTA YLOR strain 
h!f 1, , . ^^ff'^ ^2 00 per 15. Poor 

hatches replaced at half price 

B. H. BACON. R. F. D.. Elroy. Wi«. 



WATCHEMOKET 
POULTRY YARDS 

SEASON OF 1909. 
EGGS FOR HATCHING 

Argonauts : : : $.5.00 per dozen 

Phoenix Fowls : : 3 00 per dozen 

Only a strictly limited number of eggs will 

be sold The Argonaut is a pea coml^d bird 

^)!lf° "r^'^^r^^^JPJ^ shanked, general pur: 
pose fowl. The Phoenix is the unique long- 
tailed breed produced by the "Yankees of 
the Orient", the wonderful little Japanese 
Cash in advance with all orders. 

fTH . o "• S- BABCOCK 

77 Summit St.. . Ea«t Providence. R. I. 



<l • 



t 







€ 





Some White Orpington Facts 



Written for Poultry Fancier by Ernest Kellerstr 



ass. 



I have before me a copy of the lUus- 
$^r^^^5 Poultry Record, the Feathered 
World, Poultry. Feathered Life, the Aus- 
tralian Hen, South African Poultry Jour- 
nal the first four named being- published 
m London and the others in the countries 
suggested by their titles. Each journal 
has been scanned through and then gone 
over agam. I have tried to unearth all 
the matter pertaining to the most popular 
breed and variety in the text. What I 
was trying to get at was the foreign at- 
titude toward the Orpingtons, because 
they have been bred and shown in Eng- 
land many years, something over ten in 
fact, before they were introduced here in 
America. 

Have they worn well there, you ask'> 
Well^ let me point to a few things that 
I have noticed in my perusal of the for- 
eign poultry press as it affects this great- 
est of all fowls. The fancy in England 
was all going over to, or I might say had 
gone over to, the Wyandottes when the 
Orpingtons came upon the scene. These 
good birds, the Wyandottes, had for years 
held the place of popular esteem with the 
utility poultry keepers in the United King- 
dom, and of course the fanciers followed. 
As I look at the fancier's task of breed- 
ing better birds it seems to roe that he 
follows the procession of utility poultry 
people. I do not state this for a fact. 
But it looks to me that way. A bird that 
has as much prejudice against it as the 
Orpington had when it first made its bow 
to the public must win its honors with 
those people who make up the foundation 
of the fancy first and last: those people 
who keep pure bred poultry because it Is 
better than stock of mixed breeding for 
practical purposes. 

This class of poultry keepers will make 
a fowl show its true value in the meat 
and eggs class before it can find a way 
into the permanent scheme of their poul- 
try keeping. Then come the fanciers and 
they take it up because it is popular with 
those who are buyers and general breed- 
ers. Let me say that the first Orpingtons 
that were shown were given the guffaws 
that were received by most every made 
breed when it first came out into the light. 
The Orpingtons were popular in England 
before they came to America. The Eng- 
lish fancier had to be shown that they were 
a meritorious fowl before he would adopt 
them. They made good with him and then 
were seized upon by the fanciers of that 
country and now oyer a third of the ad- 
vertising done in the English papers is 
done by breeders of this great bird. 

America is not going crazy over a 
chicken. It has taken the Orpington up 
because there was room for it. It had a 
mission to fill and is filling it in every 
corner of the land. No idle breed or va- 
riety boom is behind the tremendous 
popularity of the breed. The reason they 
have abroad supplanted varieties which 
have had a great amount of popularitv is 
that they have made good in the utility 
way before being taken up by the fan- 
ciers. We learn recently that about one- 
half of the advertising "done in the Ger- 
man poultry papers is with the Orpingtons 
as a basis. This fowl was known in that 
country before it was here in America. 
The work of poultry keeping there is 
mostly of a practical nature. The birds 
that win their way to the hearts of this 
great empire of poultry growers must 
first prove themselves in the e^-g laving 
pens and on the tables of the best homes 
in the country. Then they begin to be 
taken up by the fanciers. 

I am often asked the reason why the 
White Orpingtons are such ^reat layers 
and why their meat is of such high qual- 
ity for the taVjle. In the making of this 
great fowl constitutional vigor was the 
first thing demanded. Th«,'y must be a 
bird that would do well in anv climate 
and thrive wherever located. To this 
end great strength of body and actual 
breed characteristics were secured by the 
most careful breeding and selection. Now 
it is well known to all breeders and stu- 
dents of breeding problems that vigor and 
bodily stoutness will produce a large sup- 
ply of eggs for the simple reason that 
the ]>ird has the digestive apparatus to 
assimilate feed enough to keep up its own 
supply of body building tissue, and sup- 
plying enough over to generate the multl- 
farous cells of the ovaries which sooner 
or later are developed into eggs. This 
breed faculty must be In the foundation 



of the variety in order that it be a domi- 
nant trait of the fowl. Remember that. 
There must be an inherent ability to pro- 
duce eggs and lots of them or else the 
breed will not do what is claimed for it in 
the egg pens. 

It is well known that good fowls, those 
bred with the egg habit in view and then 
neglected in the hands of incompetent 
poultrymen, will after being supplied the 
right food and management, so surprise 
one in egg laying as to be almost beyond 
belief. Fowls that are bred well do not need 
the continued pampering that some seem 
to imagine to keep them doing their func- 
tions well. They need the material to 
work with and have the vigor to transform 
it into poultry products. If there is a 
breed that has more vitality to put into its 
work in the laying pens, breeding yards 
or general purpose work on the farm I do 
not know what it is. The Orpingtons ex- 
cel in these characteristics. 

In cold climates it is necessary that a 
certain amount of heat produced by the 
combustion of the food go into keeping the 
fowl comfortable. The remainder goes 
into the egg basket. The excellent suit 
of heat retaining plumage that covers 
the Orpington is sufficient for it in any 
climate. If the cold not severe enough in 
the houses where they are quartered to 
freeze their combs they will lay as well 
as in the springtime. It may be said in 
passing that such ill treatment as is ac- 
corded all fowls when they are given too 
cold quarters will for the time being 
stop the good work of any fowl. 

Another place in the scheme of keeping 
fowls where the exceptional vigor of the 
White Orpingtons comes in well is in the 
growing of early chicks. If the parent 
stock is not well equipped in the matter 
of strong constitutions the rearing of 
early hatched chicks will be very hazard- 
ous. I have proven after years of ship- 
ping eggs in all climates from Alaska to 
Mexico that the White Orpington has this 
one great quality. Every shipper of eggs 
for hatching knows what treatment they 
get at the hands of some of the express 
porters. But the uniformly good results 
which have attended our shipping of eggs 
for hatching is proof enough that thev 
are from birds that have the greatest 
of vigor and bodily strength. Early 
hatched pullets that go to laying earlv 
in life and keep it up during the fall and 
winter are the money-makers for the 
farmer's wife and for the utility poultry- 
man. 

Now as to the White Orpington's value 
as a table fowl: Firstly, a fowl for the 
table must be one of good breast develop- 
ment. It must have in addition to a deep 
meated and long breast, a well rounded 
pair of thighs and some well placed tender 
meat upon the back. There must not be 
a great amount of waste in the oflfal. 
The percentage waste should be small and 
the smaller the better, in. sav. a nine- 
pound fowl. It is easily proven that a 
nine or ten-pound Orpington has less 
waste in the oflfal than most any other 
fowl. This is accounted for when we 
show that the shape and characteristics 
of the White Orpington all make for even 
and well-rounded growth of chicks which 
make the most out of their feed. The 
modern, low-down Orpington, with his 
ability to turn the forage of the free 
range into meat and quick growth and 
his adaptability to Intensive poultry cul- 
ture, is the best showing of the work of 
the poultry breeder and fancier. 

Is it any wonder that the Orpington is 
doing thinsrs in the way of crowding the 
crest of popularity? It had so long been 
needed that it was snapped up bv those 
who wanted such a tvpe of fowl very 
quickly after its introduction to America. 
We were in need of a barefoot large bird. 
Do you not remember the attempts to 
give the public the l^arcfooted Asiatics, 
and the arguments which were advanced 
for them? Do you not remember the 
White Americans? This breed was not 
one of those that was not worth a chance, 
but no one could tell why thev did not 
catch on. The name Orpington is euphon- 
ious and easily remembered, having a 
dignity all its own, yet it was not the 
name that caught the first admirers of 
the breed. It was the fowl itself. 

White Orpingtons are as primarilv a 
fancier's fowl as aoY other breed. There 
is room for still greater combinations of 
type, color and size. They present to the 



^i..*, 



man or woman who has a taste for the 
esthetic a problem in breeding and rear- 
ing and exhibiting such as no other fowl 
affords. They will not lose one iota of 
their popularity. On the contrary this 
will increase in proportion to the chances 
they have that will make them win public 

We have often heard that white fowls 
are easily bred. This is the general ^ 
pression of the unacquainted amateur and 
the novice. But are they? Have not the 
men who are today producing the oret- 

•V^.L^' l^? ^^^Vi^« h^^ J"«t Ss muc'^^of 
a task before them as the breeders of 
parti-colored fowls, They have. While it 
M essential that the breeding birds hive 

Mn.. "^tV^^^^f ^ ^^ .^^°«d' ^« it were, be- 
^r,2 tjejn. there is enough in the rear- 

o^^brl«i5^®.^'"^ """1 general care to make 
or break the good qualities which the 
breeding stock mav have in it In one 
fu^^^^ V^e careless breeder can waste 

the carefu fancier can attain a degree of 
breeding skill and heighth that will make 
now fr^^P^.^ous beyond his dreanis Ri|ht 
now there is room for more careful White 
Orpington breeders. There will continue 
WM?/*'^'^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^««d breeders^' thi 
^ sea^son.'^''"'^ ^"^^ ^''^^'^ ^^^"^ «^^son 

thl" Whitr^^'^''^ plants of the country 
Iri^,, -^^^ Orpingtons have made good 
impressions wherever tried. Thev will 
continue to grow in demand for plants 
i^fnn.n .1^'^^ ^^^^^ ^hick is wLted t? 
has bnH ^^f. "market. The broiler business 
the vifalifTnft?.'' K^^^ i« contend with in 
taken nn^,?^ 1}"% ^""^^^.^ ^^^^h have been 
taKcn up by it from time to time hut 

from what we hear about the suc?lss at- 
tained with the White Orpingtons wlmav 

o?the^nofmr'^V^^^-°^ ^^^« Irani Tra^?K 
or the poultry business. The White Or- 
pington is ready for the table from the 

s?ale ^?'i^" P^"f^ ^^ the^oft roaste? 
stage. It does not run to lees anri bono 

carries itself along, deve oping the frame- 
work to carry the muscle and mlat I? It 
fll.E^^^^"^- f^° ^'ther chick can pu? on 
flesh so evenly as the White Orpington 

I want to say a word now to the breed- 
ers who are working to make thi White 
?JP^"&,ton even better than it is and who 
have the best for the breed at helrt 
Keep good size and shape in view alwavV 

?^tn °h' "i'l" '^^^'^" the cSfor hobby and ?me 
It to death. Color is well and good in Us 

t^e'breadth'1,n^'^i'%^.''P^"^^«"^"«t'Lve 
true n? fh^ and depth and conformation 
tiue of the breed. Do not overlook the 
matter of good colored legs and skin 
Have the le^rs on the male breeding birds 
especially well placed on the body and 
hZl^ u\^ "l^^fy thigh. Work for heivy 
bone, but not clumsy frame-work. Full- 

2n ^i P.^i*""^^^ *^ o"ly to be sought to 
fill out the beautiful lines of the body 
Keep special note of the best egg layers 
in the flock and choose from them thi 
breeding stock where it is possibl^ S^ 
not breed from too large combed males 

In working for broad birds do not get 
theni short in body and think that is 

h«nH ■f^H^i'®"' h""?^^- ^^®P the scales at 

land and know what you are doing. Avoid 

too high-tailed females and the kind that 

drop down behind so far that they may 

?nr. ^h^^K ^-"^^y^^ Stick to the Standard 
for the breed. Keep down to date In all 
things and when there is an opening speak 
the word for the White Orpingtons Too 
much eood cannot be said of them. Thev 
deser\'e all the kind words and have not 
been disappointing to the old heads of the 
business who have taken them up. Go to 
the shows with your birds and strive to 
make clean, honest, strong competition, 
there is room for us all at the work of 
breeding them and the more good White 
Orpingtons we can produce and show to 
the public the faster will the breed carry 
Its standard to the front. Let your shib- 
boleth be, "I Will." 
Kansas City. Mo. 

STANDARD ALUMIlSflM 
LEG BANDS 




iii'g[|P''"'::|y :!jiiiiiiiiiiiiii''''';.iiii'!iiiiiii»!jiipi'';!;.ii!iiiiii;) 



Price 12 bands 15c, 25-20c, 50- 
35c, 100 60c. Send for catalog 
of trap nest, egg shipping boxes 
drinking fountains, feed hop- 
pers and other supplies. 

GEO. STIRDIVANT 

SHEBOYGAN FALLS. WIS. 





Page 74 



■'•'••"■•• -^ 




POULTRY HOUSES AND FIXTURES. 



The Reliable Poultry Journal Pub. Co. 
lias just issued the seventh edition of 
then- popular buok^ "Poultrv Houses and 
Fixtures." This book has just been re- 
vised and* brous:ht lipht un to dnte. 

The most valuable points covered are 
as follows: Building poultry houses of all 
kinds, i. e., closed -front houses, scratch- 
mg-shed iious^s, oren-front or fiesh-jiir 
houses, giving- details of botli the popular 
"Woods" and "Tolinan" open-front 
houses; portable houses, also all kinds of 
interior and exterior fixtures. 

The plans for each st\ie liouse. to- 
gether with the approximate cost of each 
house, are so explicit that anv amateur 
who can handle a hammer and saw will 
understand just how much lumber to or- 
der for each house and liow to build or 
superintend its construction. 

This book contains over 150 illustra- 
tions and is unquestionably the most in- 
structive and comprehensive wcirk on the 
construction of poultry houses and fix- 
tures that has been compiled to date. 
Every house and fixture described in this 
book is in use on the plant of a success- 
ful poultryman. The price of Poultry 
Houses and Fixtures is 50 cents per copy, 
Or the book and Poultry Fancier for one 
year for 65 cents. 

DUCKS AND GEESE. 



The Reliable Poultry .Journal Pub Co. 
has recently completed the third edition 
of their book, "Ducks and Geese," which 
has been revised to conform to the 1910- 
1915 American Standard of Perfection It 
contains articles by the foremost duck 
and goose breeders, giving complete in- 
structions regarding the breeding rear- 
ing, feeding, housing, marketing and ex- 
hibiting of these profitable fowls It is a 
complete guide to profitable duck and 
goose raising, and is illustrated by the 
world's leading poultry artists. Frank- 
lane L.. Sewell and Arthur O. Schilling 
The price of Ducks and Geese is 75 cents 
per copy or the book and a year's sub- 
scription to Poultry Fancier 90 cents. 

ECONOMY IN POULTRY RAISING. 



A bone cutter is as much a part of a 
poultry tarm as the chickens themselves, 
(xreen cut bone is the best cut food tb" 
can be given them. It is better than tlie 
commercial products and cheaper With 
a bone cutter of his own the "poultry 
farmer IS not paying the jobbers' profit.4 
nor IS he spending money in freight and 
expense bills for prepared foods that are 
not at hand. 

Cut bone is easily prepared if the poul- 
tryman has a Crown Bone Cutter He 
can secure his cut bone fresh every day 
^o poultry farm should b<> without 'a 
Clown Bone Cutter, for, besides the fact 
of Its being a necessity, it is amply low 
in price. Write to Wilson Bros.. Box 822 
of pHc'e^ ^"^ ^'*''*'" ''^^'^^^Sue and .scale 

"EASY TO USE'" CATTLE 

MENTS. 



INSTRU 



Our readers are doubtles.s familiar with 
the advertisements of the Pilling cattle 
instruments and remedies 

We believe that this firm sells in(,re 
hor.se and cattle instruments direct to 

line '^1'^ Vi'''". ^?"-^' °^^^'' '^•^"''^^^ >" tl'^^Jl* 
line. The oldest house in the business in 

this country. They have through a course 

of probity and fair dealing extc^nding over 

foTVlL^.^^^^^fy ^"^If "P a «oli,l bu^^i es.s 
for the 'easy to use" Pilling instruments 
and remedies. It is well fo? all oHs to 
remember that accidents and emergen- 
cies will arise on the farm which rcduire 
prompt action In order to save the 1 fe 
and u.sefulness of an animal and on 
case of milk fever saved by the prompt 

b?^fh2''«".^^ '''^.'''r ^roatr^ent enTiTd 
i?^ M®^^w"^^:\H ''^ Animal Industry and 

fov^^U^tu^^^ H^'', '^^"^^ ^'"' P«y ^'ie bill 
for all the veterinary instruments that a 

farmer can use in a lifetime. Treating 

a case of garget successfully so as to save 

a useful udder, tapping a hoven cSw to 

prevent death from bloat, removing ob- 

eowfl?,"^ ^°"', ^^^ ^^^^« ^^ hard milking 
iT/\f'^ ""^ ^" ^"''"r^ Pretting all the milk 
that the cow can give without the annoy- 
ance to cow and operator which is inci- 

^r/,f' i^.i'^^'^'J "^^^^^^S, represent a few 
of the fields of usefulness of these reme- 
dies and instruments. 

This firm is absolutely reliable and we 
urge all our readers to get into corre- 



POULTRY FANCI 



spondence with them and see how cheaply 
they can be supplied with cattle cases, 
hard milking outhts, garget outfits, arti- 
ficial im|)regnation outhts, as well as a 
full hue of good remedies. 

Send a postal to George P. Pilling- & 
Son Compan.N. 22:]9 Arch St.. Phila.h-Iphia. 
Pa., and get a free book. Send today, 
loti may need help tomorrow. 

REAL GALVANIZING. 

Tndouljtedly the farmers of this coun- 
try have wasted a great many thousand 
dollars in recent years on pr.or wire fence 
Many of them have been unable to un- 
derstand why what seems like a good 
fence will become utterlv useless in such 
a short time. Their eyes have lecently 
been opened < n tiiis (piestion dv a little 
booklet written by an expert on "this sub- 
ject, who knows how in' the rush to get 
rich quick many manufacturers have 
neglected the fundamentals of good fence 
building. They have built fences with 
light uprights, and have used wire that 
was hardly galvanized at all. Mr. Brown 
tlie author of the book, points out that 
in true galvanizing, the galvanizing com- 
pound IS not merely washed on the wire 
like cheaply plated jewelrv. but tliat a 
chemical action takes place whereby the 
spelter used for galvanizing becomes a 
very part of the wire. It is not a simple 
covering for the wire, but a part of the 
wire Itself. He attributes the long life 
and durability of the Brown Fence to its 
superior galvanizing and its extra heavy 
uprights. We know every one of our 
readers will be interested in Mr Brown's 
l!^^'^..boo^. Write to the Brown Fence 
^ Wire Co., Dept. 94, Cleveland, Ohio, 
and ask for it. 




March, '10 

l|lj >7VJ. . 1 . , -I - I I I . ■.■■ t ..I I — ■. , .,.., 
....■.•^ .... ,■...■« ■ . ... .. ....--.,■... ^--^^ 




NOMINATIONS FOR AMERICAN 

POULTRY ASSOCIATION 

OFFICES. 



Following is a list of the parties 
who have been successful in getting 
their names on the nominating bal- 
lots for A. P. A. officers: 

For President. 
C. M. Bryant received ;{:30 votes. 
H. V. Crawford received 15 votes. 
Grant AT. Curtis received 5 votes. 
James E. Rice received .2.5 votes. 
Henry Steinmesch received 5 votes. 

For First Vice President. 
L. H. Baldwin received 250 votes. 
IT. H. Collier received 6 votes. 
H. B. Donovan received 8 votes. 
C. K. Graham received 24 votes. 
Henry Steinmesch received 7 votes. 

For Second Vice President. 
L. H. Baldwin received 8 votes. 
Chas. D. Cleveland received 9 votes. 



C. K. Graham received 227 votes. 
O. L. Ale Cord received 15 votes. 
Miller Purvis received 11 votes. 

For Secretary-Treasurer. 

J. Y. Bicknell received 1 vote. 
Geo. O. Bown received 2 votes. 
S. T. Campbell received 346 votes. 
Chas. H. Ring received 5 votes. 
W. S. Russell received 5 votes. 

For Executive Board. 

L. B. Audigier received !i votes. 
Henry Berrar received 25 votes. 
Chas. D. Cleveland received 10 
votes. 

Harry H. Collier received 41 votes. 
H. V. Crawford received 205 votes. 
Grant M. Curtis received 2:!4 votes. 
U. R. Fishel received 120 votes. 
W. R. Graham received 22 votes. 
Theodore Hewes received 111 votes 
Wm. Barry Owen received S votes. 
Charles G. Pape received 10 votes. 
Irving A. Sibley received 41 votes. 
W. P. Smalley received 14 votes. 
P. H. Sprague received 26 votes. 
T. E. Quisenberry received <):i votes. 

Place for Next Annual Meeting. 
St. Louis received 196 votes. 
Niagara Falls received 14 votes. 
Buffalo received S2 votes. 
Toledo received 14 votes. 
Purt Huron received 6 votes. 

The regular election ballots are now 
being mailed to members and are re- 
turnable in thirty days. Each mem- 
ber IS entitled to vote for one nom- 
inee for each office except for mem- 
bership on the executive board, where 
there are three vacancies to be filled. 

™ilMm||ffl|||iiMt|i|||M|||i||iiiiiiMiiiiii./nimfM.|i.,||,|,,, ||Hi„MHm,|| ,||. , , ||n,, ,,|„^ 



POULTRY FENCF 

STOCK STRONG -RUST PROOF 

Madeofextraheavydoublegralvanized wires 
nu- u?-^°Ji "^r ^""'^ ^^^^^ required 
Chick tigrht-bottom wires only l in apart 

^ COSTS NO MORE THAN NETTING 

yet will last five times as lonr. 

bend tor catalog— we have 

lao st>^les and 

can save you 



money. 
Write today 



m^ 



BROWN FENCE &WI BECO. DEPT. a4, a »/FiJi)jn^ 



60 Years '' Z^r' I. K. FeichTs^ 

Eviv PATRort '" r''" ''"? ?''" ," '^' ""'°» ^i'hout a protest. 

fey SmULD fHF'Y"NOT^^ •''^ 1'°"^ '°' the money paid. 

. OA . V , V . . '' ^^^' when none but specimens to scorp Qfl 
to 96 pomts find place in their breeding pen ? Which '^ '™^"' '° "°'^ ^" 

WIN AND BRKFD ON 

m the hands of their patrons, for they do not exhibit, nor do they aooroorinl. 
their patrons winmngs to their advantage. appropriate 

From Sept I to May 15, Brahmas $3.50 to $ 1 for females- $5 .« *7n 

t files. St$ rl f^'"i '''^^^ '"1 '^''^ wya^dtrusV o1? 

f:;45"t/$l5lVmreS"FrS«^t°75^ '«• ''t''^'"' 

pTrttl-itlf - «-^ »' -& ^icl^'??o; -faC a«- 

jJC^FELCH & SON. Box 176 . NATICK. MASS. 



« # 




• 



« 




• 





BROWN LEGHORNS WITH A 

ORD. 



REG 



C F. Lang. La Cio.sse. Wis., i.s one 
of the western Leghoin bieed^^rs who 
can justly lay claim to the title of 
eader. For over 20 years he has been 
breeding the best in S. C. Brown Leg- 
horns and he lias won more than 300 
prizes in competition witli the best west- 
ern breeders and .some of the best stock 
from east-rn yards. His circular and 
mating list this season give full infor- 
mation regarding hi.s birds and he will 
gadly send a copy of it fiee to all ap- 
plicants. It you want to raise some top 
notchers there is no surer way of doing 
it than through stock or eggs from Mi- 
Lang's yards. 

LONG'S ORPINGTONS. 



POULIRY FANCIER 



won on Singh' Comb Reds. 1st cockerel 
1st, 2nd, :iid. 4tli pullets and 1st pen! 
He had no old birds entered. He ahso 
won the Silver Cup for best display of 
Rose Comb Birds and the shape and 
color specials of the two Rhode Island 
Red c-lubs. At Pittsburg he won on 
Rose Combs, 1st. 3rd cocks. 1st, 4th hens 
and 5th pen. On the Single Combs he 
won 1st, 5th cocks. 3rd, 4th. 5th cocker- 
els, 3rd, i3th pullets, and 3rd pen, with 





If you are looking for Orpington stock 
or eggs don't fail to write for the mating 
list of E. M. Long. Box P. F.. Osceola, 
Ind. Mr. Long has made a remarkable 
record on his birds in the show room 
and his customers have also been verv 
successful. He breeds Single Comb Buff 
Black and White Orpingtons and his 
breeding pens this season contain the 
best birds he ever owned. Tliis means 
much, because in the past he has de- 
feated competition from some of the best 
flocks in America. His prices are very 
reasonable and our readers can send him 
their orders, feeling assured that thev 
are getting the biggest value that their 
money can buy anywhere. 

H. S. Wentz, Quakerstown Pa. is In 
position to supply Poultry Fancier read- 
ers with Buff Rocks or eggs for hatch- 
ing, and he guarantees satisfaction. 
His birds have been prominent winners 
at some of the best eastern shows He 
has a record at the Big North Penn 
Show of 1st cock, 1st and 3rd hens, 2nci 
cockerel, 1st pullet, also Silver Cup for 
best display and six other special prizes 
He also has a record at the East Gran- 
ville Show of 1st, 3rd. 4th hens, 3rd, 4th 
cocks, 1st pullet, 2d. 3rd cockerels. His 
show record is ample evidence of the 
high ciuality of his stock. 

F. L. Ober. Route 1, Verona, Pa., re- 
ports the following winnings this season: 
At Butler. Pa., on Rose Comb Reds, he 
won 1st and 2d on cock, hen, cockerel and 
pullet, also 3rd pullet and 1st hen. He 




FIRST MILWAUKEE PULLET. 

First prize White Plymouth Rock pul- 
let at Milwtiukee, 1910. Bred and owned 
by W. R. Abbott, Ft. Atkinson, W^is. 

no hens entered. He also won the color 
specials at Pittsburg offered by the two 
clubs in the Single Comb class. Mr. 
Ober has a few good breeding cockerels 
and yearling hens for sale which will 
breed winners for his customers. This 
is an excellent opportunity for some of 
Poultry Fancier readers to get some *^x- 
tia good birds at reasonable prices. 

Among the breeders of the best Rhode 
Island Reds in the middle west is H E 
Donaghey, Box 117, North Freedom, Wis 



Page 75 



Mr. Donaghey spared no expense in get- 
ting the foundation stock of his flock 
and he obtained the best that could be 
procured from the leading eastern flocks 
He has by careful mating improved his 
birds until at the present time there is 
not a better flock anywhere. Owing to 
the pressure of his duties as a public 
official of his town, he did not exhibit 
his birds much during the past season, 
but he won nearly everything wherever 
he did show. He is president of the 
Baraboo Valley Poultry Association and 
has held that office foi- the past three 
years. We cheerfully recomend him to 
all buyers who ar« looking for stock or 
eggs for hatching. 

Our readers who are interested in Hou- 
dans should write to Quimbv and Brown 
109 U. High St.. Ipswich. Mass., asking 
for a copy of their catalogue and list of 
matings. It will prove of special inter- 
est to buyers. This firm is an unques- 
tioned leader in the Houdan fraternity 
and their birds have been prominent 
winners at many of the best shows in 
the east. Their birds have also won in 
all sections of the country in the hands 
of customers. 

We wish to call attention to tlie ad of 
Ira Ford, La Grange, Ind., which appears 
on another page of this issue. Mr. Ford 
is a regular advertiser in Poultry Fancier 
and is an old experienced breeder. He 
breeds S. C. Brown Leghorns exclusively, 
and has won many prominent prizes at 
good shows in strong competition. His 
birds have scored as high as 94 1^ by 
well-known .judges and he has a number 
of times won sw^eepstake prizes with ten 
birds with scores averaging from 93 to 
94 points. He will be glad to send a 
copy of his 1910 circular to all who write 
for some. His prices on stock and eggs 
are very reasonable 



AMATITE ROOFING 

MINERAL SURFACED NEEDS NO PAINTING 
_ . _ .SenH for free sample. 

BARRETT M'F'G CO., ^f,Tc a'g'o 




iDEAL ALUMINUM LEG BiNQ 

To Mark Chickens 
CHEAPEST AND BEST 

lgforl,5c; 2.5—2.^; 50— 40c ; 1 00— Too, 
Sample Rjuid Mailed for 2c .Stamp, 
frink Myers Mfr. Bii68. Freeoort.lJI, 



REDS 



JL\.* \t^' 




. C. Rhode Island Reds 



Hundreds of birds for sale at reasonable prices. Exhibition and breeding birds of highest 
quality. Birds on approval. Satisfaction or your money back, Mated pairs, trios and nens 

EDWIN R. CORNISH, 1426 Pontiac Street, ANN ARBOR, MICH. 




BARRED ROCKS, 

RHODE ISLAND REDS, Both Combs 

We have a fine lot of cockerels and pullets to offer our customers at prices ranging 
from $1.50 to $25.00 each. Before placing your order write us describing what you 
want and receive our catalog, which will be sent without charge. We guarantee every- 
thing as represented and all orders are shipped subject to approval. Our pens will 
be mated up early in December. Our new incubator house with twenty large 
machines will be ready for use in a few weeks. When you get ready for eggs or 
day-old chicks from first class stock, write us. Address, 



WILLIAM OSBURN, GOOSE LAKE FARM, 



BOX P, MORRIS, ILLINOIS 




l-ff^g'/.-'igy/xyK-^a^gii^ftCTSi 




POULTRY FANCIER^ 




SPECIAL DISPLAY ADS 



«/!-■ 'i^'CHElfrTFARMRAlSED' 

the kM,?'?^*'* *"** '^ C. White Leghorn. 

the kind the new standard calls for. Of 16 
entries won 6 firsts and 4 seconds. Pens 
headed by these grand cocks and cockerels 
eggs from these pens by the setting or hun- 
dred. Satisfaction guaranteed. Write your 
wants E..H. Reichert. Virdin. III. 



Rose Comb Brown Leghorn Eggs 

from special mated pens, Madison 
Square, Chicago and Boston winners 
circulars. JAMES CRAWFORD. 

Cameron Mills, N. Y. 



Dr. Holmes' Trap-Ne.ted, Standard-bred, 

g'-it Rhode Island REDS 

Bred for vigor, size, shape, color. Stock and 
eggs in season. Free catalog. 

RED ROBE POULTRY PENS 
West Mam Street. EVANSTON. ILL. 



Buff Cochins That Win 

On ten birds at Cedar Rapids, I won all firsts and 
special for best 10. I can help you win too, If 
you send me your order for stock or egffs. Grand 
birds for sale and eggs that will produce winners. 

I ^^Ih'B.lfl^^- ^ ^"^ "OJ"® t^an please you. 
J. C. MITCHEM. Marshalltown. Iowa 



COLUMBIAN WYAN- 



DOTTES ^'■^^ ^'^^^ *^e best stock 

~7 . * * ^-"^ money can buy 

Strain. Satisfaction ga'uranteed. 

and 13 00 per setting. 

LOUIS WESTFALL. R. 3 WAVERLY. NY 



money can buy (Keating's 
Eggs $2.00 



R. C. & S. C. Rhode Island 

Redil ^°°* better. 40 first and second 
oa fen P'"'"'!.^ ^^ *^ Sedalia and Kansas 
Cit^ 150 grand birds at special prices to 
quick buyers Place egg orders now 

D. J. Bri8S. Carthajre, Mo. 



AnCOna^ exclusively, l^eaders for I2' 
rmucuuas years. Hundreds of prizes in 
hot competition won bv us and our customers 
Young and old stock $1.50 and up. Prices low 
for quality. Our stock and eggs will put you 

6?A%??-'^V.^'^"".. W H. Branthoover. 
61 15 Station St.. East End. Pittsburg. Pa 

.President Ancona Club of America 



Houdans and Buff ^Sr^^in.lrl 

WvAnffnff-»« °^ highest honors on Hou- 
TTjrauuuilC5 dans at Rochester and Can- 
andaigua. making nearly clean sweeps. Hou- 
dan eggs $3^ Wyandotte eggs $2 Circulars. ' 
Mrs. R Y. Bowden. CliFton Sprinifs, N. Y. 



EZ£ 



5 LINE BRED FOR 20 YEARS 

( Some very fine cockerels for sale. Eggs at 
r right prices. Illustrated circular free. \ 

J^M. BUECHLY. Box 10, Greenville. Ohio 5 



Kellerstrass and Cook Strain of 

White Orpingtons 

Barred Ply- 



S. C, 

Kggs $2.00 per 



mouth Rock eggs $1.^ per 15. SatisfacMon 
guaranteed A. J. WALDSCHMIDT. 
'^^ Washington. Iowa 



BARRED ROCKS f°^kerel mating of 
D It * 1- . ,.^ the very best strain. 
Pullet line is direct descendants of '%ouis- 

f^'^'TT^^f-.^^^^^^f ^^'' '^^°- Kggs ^ to $5 for 
*i r:A y ,^y "°^^ headed by prize winners 
$1 50 for 15 eggs. Catalogue free. 
S. R. Patterson. Dept. P. F..Centerville,Iowa 



Red Cockerels rS^<^ 



Few choice 

Single Comb ^,,„, ^„^ 

Special cockerel of Decatur, 111. in a class 75. 
Also Rose Comb Reds. Beck strain direct. 
Score cards furnished after November 27th 
Prices $2 00 up. 

FERD. W. OERTEL. BRIGHTON. ILL 



«^« »«,^'5K1'*^ COMB » 

BUFF ORPINGTONS 

Eggs from exhibition and utility stock Send 
for Mating Ust. A few breeding cockerels 
for sale. H BREVOOR7 ZABRISKIE, 

17 Elm St., Woburn, Mass. 



Cornish Indians. Superb Matings. 

Best imported and domestic blood. Kegs for 
hatching. Have bred Cornish 18 years 
Cockerels for sale. Can help you. 

T. D. Moore, Box 92. Hopkinsville. Ky. 



LEGHORNS ^i^j,\ r.riz\^^' 

erels for .sale from the 1st Boston cock. Eees 
for hatching. -^kk^ 

C. H. CLARK. BOX F. COBALT. CONN. 



^hite Plump FarmP^^i^^^^'^^^s^^ 
uuc I luiiie rarm y^^ n^^d to buiid 

up your flock. All prize winners. White 

wXu^w^i^^'.^^r' 7^^'^^ ^f"^^" Guineas. 
White Holland Turkeys. White Pekin Ducks 

Z^l c^*'?'?'^^." ^^**^- Write for prices on 
eggs. Satisfaction guaranteed 

J. a _BAKER. Proi>.. Rt. l^lainville. III. 



WATSONS CELEBRATED STRAIN OF 
Rose Conib Rhode Island Reds. Golden 
Princess, laid 291 eggs in a year; .50 hens 
averaged 240 in a year; eggs and cockerels 
from this great strain for sale; a recipe for 
sure cure for lice, 10c 
IRA WATSON. . FREDONIA, N. Y. 



EGGS FOR HATCHING 

Ur^^.^-,^.- ^^own Leghorns. S. C. Black and 
White Minorcas. White Wyandottes, Barred 
Rocks and R. C. Rhode Island Reds. 

C. Jackson. Buchtel. Ohio, L. Box M- 



Silver J,ace<l U yaiidot««M. W hUv Crested 

I, '*. J,"**'*^ ""<* Barred IMytnouth 
J(«>(;kH. Direct desceudants from Madison Square 
aud Cblcago winners. Won twenty eight reeular 
?'^'^*'.^°? ^"^^ diplomas at Oelwein, lows, Jan. 
4-9. JH09, In strong competlon. Choice stock for 
sale. Circular free. Cascade Poultry Yards. 
Wm. Neiers. Prop., I., II. 4r,, CaKca<le, la. 



REED'S ? ^^ BROWN Lt:GHORNS and 
IVCEiU O R c. RHODE ISLAND RF;ds 

Winners of first at Chicago.Kewanee. Prince- 
ton and Illinois vState Shows. Get my de.scrip- 
tive circular of six grand matings for the eeir 
season. DR. F. M. REED. 

Wyanet. Ill, 




Light Brahmas. Felch Strain Direct 

Kg^s from high-scoring prize winning stock 
$2 00 per 15. On 11 entries at New Castle. Pa. 
'09. won 11 prizes and $10 gold special for best 
display in Asiatics Pens headed bv 93 and 94 
pt. males. ./Females score from 92K to 95. 
3d prize ck. score 92^ and ckls. for sale. 
MrsJRd. Bartlettlfigi/J Oak St New Ca«!t1e Pa 



CRYSTAL WHITE ORPINGTONS 

We head the Kellerstrass strain and hav^ 
defeated the strongest competition at leading 
shows. You don't take chances when you 
send us an order for stock or eggs. Both for 
sale now. Write us. D, A- WEDGE, 
215 Galena Street Aurora, 111. 



S. C. R. I. REDS 

Eggs for hatching from some grand pens 

$5.00 and $3.00 per 15 

J. E. SCHUTTE. Lebanon. So. Dak. 



PRIZE WINNING 

WHITE PLYMOUTH Ji"" ^|| -fi! 

ROCKS ^^^ ^^^^ ^"^^^ *^'® y^"^- ^"ces 
OSCAR E. WOOD UNION, IOWA 



S.C. and R.C. RHODE ISLAND REDS 

Single combs direct descendants from New 

J,*^'''^^^.^*'?,P*^'^' **'* ^'''6 "<^>ld Glory" and "Red 
Cloud. Rose comb descendants of O. E. Miles 

J!f ^P®^', ^"P^'''^^ *^®'o''' fl°e combs. Best stock 
obtainable. For stock and eggs write 
Dr. E. B. CRAMBLIT, AMES, IOWA 



Choice Collie Puppies SJ^S^omtbul 

as I make a specialty of Whites. I do not place 
as high a value on the colored ones that come 
along with them and so offer them at low 
Sov^o^ SERVOSS COLLIE KENNELS 
BOX 220, - EDISON PARK. ILL. 



Walker's White Rocks ^!r?^*Nt^ 

Ca.stle's big show they won all firsts, 3 .sec- 
ond, 2 thirds, 1 fourth and all specials. What 
do you want better than this? Eggs $S and 

BOB WALKER. Porter St.. New Castle, Pa- 



COCHINS HOMK. Headquarters for Amer- 
ica B greatest Coehlus and Brahmas First Drlz-^ 
and silver cup winners ailWlnnepeg. Can., Seattle 

6T-^»,?*'°°- ^"•' *"^ ^- I^*'^- State Fairs. Man- 
kato, Minneapolis and Madison Square Garden. 
JN.y Get my prlcee before you buy birds of 
qusllty. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
C. M. Atwood, Box Z, 3.'>, Dundee, Minn. 



BUFF ROCKS Young 

sired by a 95 point male. Also yearlings. 

bpeciai prices for short time. 

A. L. Fawcett. Box 8, New Albany. Pa. 



At Indian«poli., Ind. State Show my 

Barred P. Rocks ^°" l""^ p"'"^'- ^^^ 

1 * io^ ,r hen; 1909 again they 
won 1st and 2d pullet. 3d and 4th hfn in 1910 
Springfield. O., 1st and 2nd hen. 1st pen 2nd 
cockerel. 3rd pullet. 1910 also Silvef Cuo 
H^^^s $3 00 for 15. H. W. BARNETT ^' 
^24J?uihnelLBld»_.. . Springfi^^ld 



St'^alnT^H'lil.tr.lrVV""* '^"^^^^ (Sweet's 
Strain.) Black-tailed .lapanese and Buff Cochin 
HantauiH, Barred liocks. A few choice cockereg 
of each variety for sale. Let me book vo„r 
order early for eggs from my choicest mat^S^s 
at «3.00 per 15. »5.(X) j.er 30. Bantam eeKs^ii2^.^ 
per 1.5, t4.(M) per 80. "umui eggs ai ^..W 

E. B. ROBERTS CANASJTOTA, N. Y. 



Single Comb Reds exclusively 

has the Nicest Keds here In BrlKhtin wh?.%"' 
cause nay Strain comes from Bennett'^ famm« 
pr ze-wlnners scoring from 9() to !M RecSjid r^ 
prizes lately. | Write forr-rlces of eWs Mat/i;: 

J P'raijifer?' ''^ «'^^'«^«-^'-" R«u?fn"ieed*V"^ 
• ■'*'"P«'-*- BrlKhton, III. 



m I fP 



• 



• • 






ji^( March, '10 



Columbian Wyandottes 



Heck's 

Strain are prize winners. They win fo? me 
they win for my customers. They will win 
for you. Old and young stock for sale, prices 
reasonable, write your wants. Jacob Heck 
Leeseville. Mich. Station 23. Detroit, Mich* 



S. C. Rhode Island Reds and ^^" 



win. 



Barred Plymouth Rocks f,^^ i^i^i^" 



and breed- 
Write us for description 



ing stock for sale. 

and prices. 

E. H. DOWNS. RTE. 20, IDAVILLE, IND. 



America's Foremost Strains Jjfiu y 

Hirprf *°^ lowest prices on S. C. Reds, S. 
A^iicvi. c. White Leghorns. Duckwing and 
Pit Games. Buff Cochin Bantams. Write for 
show record and prices. Egg orders booked 
before February 15th. ,5 eggs free. 
Chas H.,Ziegenfu«j._ Box Z. Betlilehem. Pa. 



PHILLIPS' S. C. BLACK MINORCAS 

Noted for shape, size and color, bred from 
the best blood obtainable and winners at the 
leading shows. Write for prices and full 
particulars. 

THOS. H. PHILUPS State Vice President, 
S. C. B. Minorcas Club, Dover, N. J. 



WHITE WYANDOTTES ril 



irst pen 
_-id Silver 

Cups at Mo. and Kas. State shows. '08. First 
pen Mo. State Fair Oct. 09. First pen 6 
straight years at Sedalia .shows. Sweepstake 
pen Dec. '09. over all breeds. Males 95%. 
females to 9(5. Be^t eggs $2 50 per 15. 
S. G. WHJPRECHT, Box H, Sedalia, Mo. 




LIGHT BRAHMA5 



vSize. fine markings, good leg and toe feather- 
ing, etc. Eggs $2 00 per 15. Please send orders 
early. 

JNO. F. WOODS, UTILITY FARM, R. 19, 

Ow^ensville, Ind. 




TOULOUSE GEESE ^'hSr^i 



Also 
Chinese 

(Jeese and Fawn Headed Indian Runner 
Drakes for sale. Breeder and shipper of fancy 
land and water fowls. Write for prices. 
W. M. SAWYER. Box F, Lancaster. Mo. 



FILE'S CATALOtiL'E gives 

prices of all the leading varieties of 
land and water fowls. Farm raised 
stock for sale and e^RS In season. 
Send 2 cents for my Poultry Book. 

HENRY PFILE 
Freport, III, Dept. A 




Quality Strain 1$ARRKI> ROCKS have 
been line bred for lo yeurs from foremost win- 
ners In America. Winners at leading shows. 
Cocks, hens, cockerels and pullets both matings 
for sale, from these winners or bred In line. 

C. C. r>RAKE & SON, 
Lock l$ox ^:J2, La Harpe. III. 




At INDIANAPOLIS February 190f;, my 
RarrprI RnrL-c won 1st cockerel, 2d cock. 
UctnCU I\UCKS Silver Cup; Feb. 1908. l.st 
cock, 1st cockerel; .Sept. 1909. 1st and 3d cocks, 
1st pen. I breed Rose Comb Reds- Indiana- 
polis winners too. Stock with quality for 
sale W. W. ZIKE. MORRISTOWN. IND 




Buff Rocks, Btiff and Silver 
L, A c e d W y s% rkdotton, ai\<1 
AVKite Holland XurKeys, choice 
Cockerels for sale from prize winning stock. 
Egg orders booked now, prices reasonable. 

I^. C. VOGT, LYONS, "WIS. 



POULTRY rANCIER«*C!^ 





B. P. ROCKS & S. C. W. LEGHORNS 

Egg orders booked now from my 200-egg 
strains. Trap nests used. 1 know Just what I am 
doing. Birds scoring 91 to 95 with a famous egg 
record behind them. Have the shape, color and 
size. Write me for a square deal, 

H. O. SWIFT.— F. Castlewood, So. Dak. 



Gilden Wyandottes ?S?cJo"D^e'c"'7" 

12, 1909, 66 in class, won 5th cock, 4th cockerel 
3rd pullet, with 4 birds. Mo. State Show, St! 
Louis, Dec. 6-1 « , 1809. 64 in class, won 2d cock 
3'1 cockerel. 4th pullet, with 5 birds. 
J. S. Pennington. Box F, Plainfield. lU. 



Langshan - Hills Poultry Farm, 
Home of Barnas' Black Lang- 
shans, winners whenever shown. Write 
your wants; Cockerels and Pullets $2.50 each. 
Hens $1.50. Napoleon J. Barnes 
R. D. 7, Box 15. Winchester, Ky. 



White 



real 
strain 



uti: 
known. 



Sing! 
^^^^ 

eyes, great vigor and' greatest" possible egg 
producers. Eggs $1.50 per 15; $6.00 per 100. 
Honesty ffuaranteed. 
~ ' MOSELEY, 



leComb 

nrn« ^°^^^ ^°^ size U]4 to 7 Ib. hens) 
^**** color, typical shape, deep bay 



LAKE SHORE POULTRY FARM 

Breeders of 

llijcli ClasH Silver Laced Wyandottes 
Exclusively. Stock for sale at all times. Egg 
odrers booked now. 

H. F. BERGNEK. Pros. HENRY MAU, Mgr. 
South Chicago. Ills. li.F.D. No 34. Kenosha, Wis. 



BXJFF IVYANDOTTB:^ Cxclu- 

sively. Ideal shape, solid buflf color. 
Guaranteed to please you. Eggs and Baby 
chicks. Write me today. 

GLENN H. BURGOTT. 
EDEN CENTER. - . N. Y 



•< raultless" Hot&dans, 287 
C|(^ Straii^. Five carefully mated pens 
of large, crested, dark colored birds, de- 
scended from the greatest prize winners in 
America. Book your orders now for Spring. 
A few males at low prices. Circular free. 
Wm. C. Snider. Box 105. Kansas. Ills. 



R.in^let Barred PlymoutH 
RocKs won all firsts at Oshkosh. 1909. two 
silver cups, clean sweep. Cockerels $1 .50 up. 
Eggs, best matings $3.50 per 15. $5 per 30. gen- 
eral stock $1.50. Lake View Poultry Farm. 

T. W. Crltchette. Markeaan. Wis. 



Baby 



rkirlra Eggs for hatching. White 
VlllClkS Orpi 



-pington. Barred Rock, 
White Wyandotte, Mammoth Bronze Turkey. 
All prize winning stock and grand birds. 
Shipped with safety anywhere. Book your 
orders now. MISS CLARA L. SMITH 
Landon Poultry Yards. Croxton, Va. 




S. C. BlacK and -WHite Minor. 

cas bred for size aud egg production. 
Stock and eggs for .sale in season. All cor- 
respondence answered promptly. 

G. B. SmitH Oh Son 

Box 454 North Itaitimore, O. 



Rose Comb Rhode Island Redi 



Light 



Brahma Bantams '^"'"'" » ' 



Madison 
Square. N. Y., Baltimore, Hagerstown, Md., 
Philadelphia, Nazareth. Allentown and Read- 
ing. Pa._ S^ockand eggs. Hillside Poultry 
Yardi ' " 



J.S 



Prop., Dept R, Nazareth. Pa. 



R. C. WHITE LEGHORNS :*;-; l". 

Great Milwaukee Show, 1910. Kggs and 

birds tor sale. Send for circular. Eggs from 

prize winning S. C. WHITE and BROWN 

LEGHORNS. 

Dist. Atty. Philip Lehner. Princeton. Wis, 



Buff Rocks, S. C. Black Minorcas 
and R. C. R. I. Reds f^.TfrZ^'l'^l^'e 

Incubator eggs 



winners at $1.50 
$5.00 per 100. 
H. S. WENTZ. 



per 



QUAKERTOWN, PA. 



Columbian RockH, Columbian Wyan- 
dottes, R. C. Bufl'LefirhornH, bred from New 
York, Buffalo and Rochester winners, .5 firsts 2 
seconds on 7 entries at Rochester show Dec 1909 
Cockerels $S to tlO pullets n2 to «6, Trios #7 to #1.'5 
Eggs «3 per 1.5, t5 per 30. Free setting from best 
pen with each f lo order. Stock ciiaranteeed 
F, A CAMPBELL HONEOVE, N. Y. 



O. C dLACJv at Columbus show 

nRPINHTONS 1909also several at Ocon- 
Vri\XJnUIV^lli3 omowoc and silver cup 
for best pen. Several choice cockerels for sale 
Eggs from pen No. 1 $5 per 15 : pen No. 2 $2 
per 15. Dora James Pick Fall Rirer, Wis. 



CLASS Single Comb Rhode Island 



Eggs from 1st pen, 



Rl^fl* Prizewinners. „^ , , 

i\iu» setting 15 eggs $2.50. Eggs from 2nd 
pen. setting 15 eggs $2.00. Special prices on 
orders of 100 or more. Guaranteed satis- 
faction. William Kenney, Sparland, III. 



S. L. AND W. WYANDOTTES, R. C. 
RHODE ISLAND REDS Winners at the 
big Centervllle. Iowa, and St.Louls shows. Write 
for catalogue describing the largest pure bred 
Poultry Farm In North Mo. Fancy and utility 
matings a specialty. Egg orders booked. Guar- 
antee 9 chicks to the setting or will replace. 
JOHN KEARSE, R. 1, Coatsvllle. Mo. 



WHITE PLYMOUTH 
ROCK „. 

Eggs 



Cockerels and 

p u 1 lets for 

sale. Birds score from 945^ to % 

and will improve your flock. 

Prices rearonable. Eggs for sale from this 

quality of stock. 

W. R. GEIER REMINGTON, IND. 



BARRED ROCK EGGS folV'Sc^. 

bator eggs $4 per 100. M. B. Turkey eggs $6 

per 10. Won leading prizes at Shelbyville 

and Indianapolis shows. Geo. O. Anderson 

R. 5. Box 0022, RushvUle, Ind. 



FOR SALE. M. BRONZE 

Tl IRK'FVQ *^^^^ ^y ™y g^^a* prize 

lWAVrvi:«I»J winner and d i p 1 o ma 

Tom. Finest stock to be found. Also S . L. 

Wyandottes. C. J. KAPPHAHN 

R. 8 ALEXANDRIA, MINN, 



WYANDOTTES AND LANGSHANS. 

Winners at St. Louis Show. 1909. also two $i5.u0 
sllvercupsat big Ferry county 1909 show In hot- 
test class of Wyandottes ever shown. Partridge 
and Buff Wyandottes $2 per 15. 3 setting for $5. 
Black Langshans 1.50 per 15. Buffs Bred by R- B. 
Schlndler. Partridge and Langshans bred by ,Iohn 
Allen. Allen & Schlndler Perryvllle, Mo- 



I fr;i-IT^'^CLUSIVELYl2years«b 
*^*^^* * * er. My stock is excellent 

BRAHMAS 



breed- 
high 
scoring, great layers, 
will please the most 
particular. Flock of 200 to select from. Prices 
right. Eggs, .single settings or incubator lots. 
HAROLD DAVIS SLEEPY EYE. MINN 



Wv;)nf1oHl»S SILVER and WHITE Blue 
ff JdUUOUeS Ribbon Winnersat Defiance 
and Toledo. Ohio, 1910. Eggs from grand 
mating that will produce winners $2.W per 
15. Illustrated circular free. 
Four Sisters Poultry Farm, Will P. Yetter, 
Prop.. R. No 3. Box A. New BaTaria. Ohio 



EGGS f BARRED^ J>LYMOUTH. £QQS 

FOR HATCHING 

both pullet and cockerel lines. Catalogue 
giving winning, mating and prices free. 

Chas. F. SCHLUETER. Box K. Reynold.. 111. 




Page 78 




POULTRY FANC 






.-^ 



LASSIHED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Numbers and initials count the same as words. 

30 words or less one month, $1. For more than 30 words 
add two cents for each additional word. 

30 words or less, three months, $2. For more than 30 words 
add 3 cents per word. 

For any time longer than three months the rate is two cents 
per word per month, but no ad will be accepted for less than 50 
cents per month and the ad must appear each successive month. 

A discount of 10 per cent given on ads running for 12 months. 



«.*«P"" 



BBEEDEBS' SEVEBAL VABIETIE8. 

WHITE FACED BLACK SPANISH WHITE 
Plymouth Rocks, Houdans and Java cock- 
erels and trios for sale. The very best 
strains. Eggs in season. Theodore A. 
Moritz, 569 St. Georges Avenue, Rahway, N. 
£; 12-4 

S. S. HAMBURG AND BARRED ROCK 
cockerels for sale. Birds fine in all points. 
If you could see them I know I would get 
your order. Be sure and get my prices. 
Correspondence answered promptly. Egg 
orders booked. Mrs. C. R. Thompson, Box 
23. Randall. Iowa. 1-3 

ST. LOUIS AND STATE FAIR SHOW 
birds. Won. 1st cockerel, 2nd pullet, 1st 
pen. Black Leghorns and Black Javas. 
Birds. $2 to $5. Eggs, $2 per 15. Also 
choice White Wyandottes. Try a specialist. 
H. C. Hunt. Delavan, 1 11. 1-3 

FRENCH SALMON FAVEROLLES, SICIL- 
ian Buttercups and Indian Runner Ducks. 
Non-setting hens. Booking orders now for 
spring delivery. E'ggs per setting, hens $1 
per 13 eggs. Ducks. .$1 to $2 per setting 
12 eggs. Send order now. Davis & Dynes 
R. 30, Zionsville, Ind., Sunnyside Poultry 
Farm. ^.3 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES, McINTOSH 
strain. Eggs. $1.50 per 15. White. Golden 
and Buff Wyandottes. Rose and Single Comb 
Brown Leghorns. Kulp's strain. From prize 
winning stock. Eggs, $1 per 15. Circular 
free. M. L. Musselman. Bet hlehem, Pa. 1-3 

EGGS AND STOCK FOR SALE. BUFF 
and White Leghorns, Rocks. Silver Ham- 
burgs,, Partridge Cochins, Pearl Guineas, 
Toulouse Geese, Pekin Ducks, English Phea- 
sants, Belgian Hares, White Rabbits, Canarv 
Birds. O. W. Zeigler, Harmony, Pa. 1-3 

FOR SALE. I OFFER STOCK AND EGGS 
for hatching from the following: S. C. 
White Leghorns, Brown Leghorns, Black 
MInorcas, Buff Orpjngtons, Light Brahmas, 
White Rocks, White and Columbian Wyan- 
dottes. Also day old chicks. Get my prices 
Jos. M. Fay, 808 Howard Ave., Altoona, Pa! 
. ^ 1-3 

QUALITY R. C. BROWN LEGHORNS, 
Kulp & Gale strain. Greens Curgh and 
Unlontown winners. 1st pens, 1st cock, 2nd 
ckl., 1st, 2d pullet. 1st, 3rd hens. Eggs 
both matings. Closing out R. C. W. Leg- 
horns. Show birds, first prize winners at 
bargain prices. Write me. W. Hipklss, 
Scottdale. Pa. 1.3 

SENECA LAKE FARM, HIMROD. N. Y.. 
breeds beauty, utility. White Wyandottes, 
R. C. W. Leghorns and Lakenvelders, the 
beautiful and prolific new breed. Eggs $2 
setting; $8 per 100. Orders given prompt 
and careful attention. 3.3 

kf:llerstrass strain s. c. snow 

White Orpingtons; also beautiful Golden 
Wyandottes. Eggs 10 cents each. Schuyl- 
kill Poultry Yards, Pine Grove. Pa. 3-3 

TWO 2-YEAR-OLD COLUMBIAN WYAN- 
dotte cocks for sale at $5 each. Columbian 
Wyandotte and Barred Rock eggs $2 per 
13 from Al stock. Frederick PfafP, Box 
638, Anadarko, Okla. 7-9-12 

YOUNG STOCK OF QUALITY FOR SALE 
4 firsts on 7 entries at Greenfield, 111., Nov. 
15-20, 1909; 8 firsts, 5 seconds and 2 thirds 
on 16 entries at Pittsfield, 111., Dec. 15-18. 
1909. S. C. W. Leghorns, B. P. Rocks and 
White Holland Turkeys. Write your wants 
to Thos. M. Stubblefleld, R. 6, Jacksonville, 
J"' 6-9-12 

BOURBON RED TURKEYS AND R. C. 
Brown I..eghorn8 our specialty. We aLso 
raise White Wyandottes, Indian Runner 
Ducks and Pearl Guineas. Eggs for hatch- 
ing at right prices. Mr. and Mr.s. G. W. 
Price, Belmont, O. 2-3 



All cla.ssified advertising is payable in advance. Positively no 
exceptions to this rule. The rales are so low that we cannot 
afford to take the time and trouble and incur the expense neces- 
sary to keep book accounts with these ads. 

Send money order, currency, draft or registered letter. Stamps 
accepted for amounts less than one dollar. 

Poultry Fancier is published the 15th of each month. All 
ads must reach us not later than the 5th. Advertisers receive 
the paper free each month that their ad appears. 





BEFORE PLACING YOUR ORDER GET 
my prices on eggs and stock. S. C. BufT 
Orpingtons. Barred Rocks, Mammoth Bronze 
Turkeys and Indian Runner Ducks. Birds 
have farm range and are strong and healthy. 
Mr.s. Higgs, R. 1. Henry, 111. 2-4 

PENS. TRIOS AND COCKERET^S OF 32 
varieties poultry, including Wyandottes 
Brahmas, Cochins, Rocks, Polish, Reds, Ham- 
burgs, Leghorn. Andalusians, Houdans and 
Minorcas. Booking egg orders now for spring 
delivery. Stamp for catalogue. Simon C. 
Kulp, Box S'. S.. Hatfield. Pa. I-3 

EGGS $2 PER 13, 3 SETTINGS $5 FROM 
Kellerstrass Yhite Orpingtons and Brown 
& Coleman's Black Orpingtons. Black 
Minorca eggs 10 cents each, any quantity. 
Alson Indian Runner Ducks of finest quality. 
Berry & Sawyer strain. J. A. Dickson 42 
Division St., Ashtabula, O. 2-4 



CLAY HILL POULTRY FARM. FULTON 
Iowa., Jay Breeden, Prop. Breeder of Black 
Langshan.s, White and Silver Laced Wyan- 
dottes. Eggs from pens scoring ninety-five, 
$3 per 15; pens scoring ninety, $2. Cock- 
erels for sale cheap. My birds are prize 
winners. o 4 



FINE BOURBON RED TURKEY EGGS $3 
per ten. Rhode Island Red eggs. $1 'per 
in; $5 per hundred. Orders given prompt 
attention. Send me yours. Mrs. A. G Friesz 
Keytesville, Mo. ' £-4 

BABBED PLYMOUTH BOCKS. 



GET MY CIRCULAR ON BARRED ROCKS'. 
Have some fine ones for sale at prices that 
will surprise you, considering the quality 
Let's get In touch with each other. I know 
I can please you. Egg orders booked. J. 
W. Bell. Box H.. Che tek, Wis. 1-3 

BARRED ROCKS, HIGHEST QUALITY 
Eggs from special prize matings, $1 and $2 
per 15; $5 per 100; utility fiocks, $1 per 26- 
$3.50 per 100. Choice cockerels, $2 and $3 
each. Circular free. Chas. Spangler Kent- 
land, Ind. ' 2_3 

BARRED ROCKS, O. C. K. STRAIN. 
.Something grand In either cockerel or pullet 
matings. A few good exhibition cockerels 
and pullets. Prices reasonable for quality 
Eggs. $3 per 15; $5 per 30. Write for mat- 
ing list. Mrs. Minnie McConaughy, Martelle 
Iowa. 1 n 
1.-0 

THE FAMOUS ORCHARD STRAIN BAR- 
red Plymouth Rocks, bred for vitality and 
productivenes.s. Eggs, $2 per 15. Send for 
booklet, "Starting with Poultry." Orchard 
Poultry Farms. Doylestown. Pa. (Hatching 
Department.) 2.4 

RINGLET BARRED ROCKS. E. B. THOMP- 
SON strain. Nicely barred, good yellow 
legs, fine layers. 13 eggs $1, 26 for $1.50 
Honorable dealing. Orders promptly filled 
E. H. Barden. North East, P a. 2-3 

BARRED ROCKS OF HIGHEST QUALITY 
i he Beauty strain; fine Barred and stand- 
ard-bred; from oxhihitlon winners. Remem- 
ber we are originators of the Beaut v strain 
lon'^'Ky -^^ for 1.1. Otis K. HoSSsf KIrby- 

^ o~l 

SPECIAL BARRED ROCK SALE. ON Ac- 
count of lack of time I will dispose of 2 
very good dark cocks, one pullet breeding 
cock, 25 cockerel bred hens and pullets and 
15 cockerels. Get prices now. Dr F A 
ShufTelton. Saint Marys, O. ■ . ^. 



BARRED ROCKS. KNOXDALE STUATN. 
Well barred and very strong In vltalltv 
good .size and splendid layers. Stock pro- 
duced from careful mating with the double 
mating system. Egg.9, $2 por setting- $1 
Mnn ''n'^^^r^n ^''^ers given prompt at'ton- 
tlon. C. W. Coleman, 200 Joffras Ave., Find- 
.ay, O. 2-4 



"PEERLESS" BARRED ROCKS. BREED- 
mg Barred Rocks our exclusive business. 
Our manager a poultry expert. Breed only 
line bred stock. Announcement 1910 sent 
free. Fifty-cent booklet, "Incubation and 
Brooding," sent for 20 cents during Febru- 

fH' ¥^/?}^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^o all who mention 
this ad. ' Our show record almost clean 
sweep in hot competition. We can please 
you. Peerless Poultry Plant. Inc., Clinton, 
Wis. 9_^ 



WHITE PLYMOUTH BOCKS. 



WHITE ROCKS— STOCK FOR SALE THAT 
will win in the show room and fill the egg 
basket. Our birds are big, white beauties, 
strong in all good points. Eggs from our 
choicest matings at living prices. Berwyn 
Poultry Yard s, Box P. Berwyn, 111. 12-4 

WHITE ROCKS. HEAVY WINTER LAY- 
ers. Pullets from this stock laying at 514 
months this season without forcing. Not 
one dissatisfied customer last season. ' Book- 
l^^.o?? orders, $2 per 15. S. P. Evans, 3838 
E. 78th Street, Cleveland, O. 

FISHEL STRAIN WHITE ROCKS EXCLU- 
sively. Eggs from first pen, $2 for 15; sec- 
ond pen. $1.50 per 15. 10 cockerels for sale, 
$2 to $5 each; pullets, $1.50 to $5 each 
Order early. A. L. McLaughlin, St^arland! 
^"- ^^_^ '^ 

WHITE ROCKS EXCLUSIVELY, "FISHEL 
Strain." Eggs from large, snow white, farm 
raised birds. 15 $1.50, 30 $2.50, 100 $6 
Special pen of high scoring exhibition birds" 
rRussell, Judge,) $2.50 per 15. Jesse C. 
Brabazon, Route 4, Box E, Delavan, Wis. 2-4 

WHITE ROCKS, FISHEL STRAIN, CHALK 
White, grand shape. My birds are as good 
as the best. Eggs only $2 per 15. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. W. R. Greer. Auburn 
^"d- 2-4 



WALKER'S WHITE ROCKS AT NEW 
Castle won In a class of 63, 1st cock l^t 
cockerel; 1st, 2d, 3d hen; 1st, 2d, 4th pullet; 
1st 2d hen. Eggs $3 and $5 per 15. Bob 
Walker, 233 Porter St.. New C astle, Pa. 2-2 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS, WINNERS 
at Peoria, Ottawa, Galesburg. etc. Three 
yards, headed by exhibition and prize wln- 
n ng males Eggs, $2 per 15. From good 
utility stock on range. $1 per 15. $3 per 60 
Wm. C. Goodwin. Chlllico the, 111 2-4 

WHITE ROCKS— EGGS FROM PEN HEAD- 

BUFF PLYMOUTH BOCKS. 



BUFF COCKS. ORDER EGGS FROM 
quality birds. Eggs from pen headed bv 
New York and St. Louis winierg. $5 plr U- 

V-^^""^' J^' l^ and $3. John D WiTklnV 
Pocahontas, 111. vvuKin.s. 

_ 2-4 

BUFF ROCKS. THE FARMER'S FRIEND 
Prize winners. 1st cockerel, 2d pullet at 
Jeffersonvllle, Ohio, Poultry Show r»n^ 
1909 Eggs. $2.50 the ?" The Buff Roci^ 
Poultry Farm, JefFersonvIlle. O i^^ 

GOLDEN BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS 
Large, golden, glittering buffs. Heav?Yay^rs 
of big, brown eggs. First prize winners It 
Chicago and other big shows. Eggs from 
prize winners. $3 per setting. Catalog freT 
P. C. Jungels, Box 1, Lomont, n^ ^'^^ ^^gl^z 

s;/,^i;..'iis; /^°^;^v^'' i^riisis 

Moorhead, la. iiiillott, 

0-3 



• # 



• 



• 




« <• 



March, '10 




•TRY FANC 



COLUMBIAN PLYMOUTH BOCKS. 



COLUMBIAN ROCKS — THE UTILITY 
Beauty breed. My own strain. Correct in 
shape, with grand color markings Eggs 
irom my Chicago winners $10 per 15- other 
pens $5 per 15. Mrs. R. a. Judy. D^catu?, 



PABTBIDGE PLYMOUTH BOCKS. 



WHY TAKE CHANCES? SEND ME YOUR 
order for Partridge Plymouth Rocks and 

^^r-^^7 ^Vr ?^ \^^ ^^^*- 1^0"'^ take my 
word for it. Look at my show record at 
Chicago, Detroit and other strong shows, 
consider the competition and you will see 
who has the quality. Some choice breeders 
at reduced prices and young stock that will 
please. Paul LaFrombolse, Mt. Pleasant. 
^^^^- ^^ 4-9-12 

WHITE WYANDOTTES. 



BUSINESS WHITE WYANDOTTES. OURS 
are great layers, have farm privileges, essen- 
tial to success. We aim above all to please 
customers. Write your wants. Stock. $3 
to $5 each. Egg.s, $1.50 per setting C 
N'- Hostetter, Manheim, Pa. ' 1-3 

SUTTON'S WHITE WYANDOTTES WIN 
again. On an entry of sixteen birds I won 
1st cock, 3rd cockerel, 2nd hen, 1st. 3rd 
pens, 1st, 2nd pullets, silver cup. best dis- 
play, best cock hen, cockerel, pullet and 
pen. More prizes, than all competitors. 
Eggs $10 and $5 per 15. F. D. Sutton. 68 
St. Louis Ave.. Youn gstown, Ohio. 2-4 

WHITE WYANDOTTES— EGGS FOR SALE 
from choice matings. Strong, vigorous stock, 
pure white and good shape. Write for circu- 
lar containing prices and description Men- 
tion this paper. Richard Bloom, "Fulton, 
Mo. 2-4 

EGGS FROM MORROW'S PRIZE WINNING 
White Wyandotes. At Montezuma. la., I 
won 1st pen, first, second sweepstakes. Eggs 
from exhibition matings. $3 per 15; other 
grand matings. $2 per 15. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. Address Frank Morrow. Barnes 
City, Iowa. 2-4 



BUFF WYANDOTTES. 



BUFF WYANDOTTES. HAVE BRED THEM 
since 1895. making me the oldest breeder 
of this variety in Ohio. Young stock from 
my Chicago and Cleveland winners. Eggs 
from the best matings I ever had, $3 per 15 
V. Crabtree, Tiffin, Ohio. 2-4 

THIMSEN. BUFF WYANDOTTE SPECIAL- 
1st. Eggs from Buff Wyandottes that win In 
the strongest competition. Eggs from pen, 
1. $3 per 15; pen 2 and 3, $2 per 15. If 
you are in the market for stock or eggs I 
can please you. F. P. Thimsen. Blooming 
Prairie. Mi nn. 5-9-12 

SILVEE LACED WYANDOTTES. 



REEPMEYER'S SILVER LACED WYAN- 
dottes in good competition won 6 firsts 6 
seconds. 3 thirds. $10 special and Presi- 
dent's Silver Cup. Best display, all varieties 
competing at Schenectady, N. Y., big show. 
Breeders or show birds for sale. J. Reep- 
meyer. Crai- Schdy. Co., N. Y. 1-3 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES, A SPEC- 
lalty. My pens are line-bred and prize wln- 
ner.s, scoring 91 to 93%. They are bred to 
lay. weigh and win. Eggs for hatching, $2 
per 15. or $3 per 30. Try a setting. I 
guarantee satisfaction. Peter J. Becker, 
Geneseo. 111. 2-4 

NELLIS' SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES. 
Prize winners wherever shown. Score at the 
big show of The Western Connecticut Poul- 
,!r^^^^^°^'*^tIon held at WInsted, Conn., 1907- 
1909: 91%, 92, 92. 92%, 94%; pen, 184%. 
First and third pullet, third cock. Eggs 
for setting. $3 for 13. Orders booked now. 
E. A. Nellls, Winste d. Conn. 2-3 

SILVER LACED WYANDOTTE EGGS 
from first cock, third cockerel, fourth pul- 
let, Chicago and Detroit and Grand Rapids 
winners; females that score to 95; $3 per 
15. Claro Hoffman, All egan. Mich. 3-3 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. 




COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. EGGS FROM 
choice matings, the same that I use to pro- 
duce my prize winners. $3 per setting. Fine 
trios. $7 to $10. O. R. Eddy, Box F. Ocono- 
mowoc. Wis. 5-9-12 

OEPINGTONS. 



COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. LOOKING 
for good blocky shaped ones, nicely laced 
tails, clean hackles? Farm raised from New 
York and Boston winners. Great vigor. Eggs 
very fertile. You must be satisfied or its 
no sale. Address Ralph Woodward. Box 82. 
Grafton. Mass. 1-3 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES, EXCLU- 
sivoly. You need our free circular giving 
winnings and description of matings. Eggs 
and stock reasonable. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed. Highland Poultry Yards, Box B. 
Highland Park, Mich. 3-3 



BOOK ON ORPINGTONS! SEND 10c TO- 
day for club book! Tells why Blacks are 
best of Orpingtons. The favorite of all who 
breed the three varieties together. Tells of 
Australian Government proof of laying su- 
premacy; most rapidly maturing fowl; 
largest per cent of white meat; largest and 
most beautlfin of Orpingtons. Milton 
Brown, Secretary, Cheviot Poultry Farms, 
Cincinnati, O. 12-10 

S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. EVERY ONE 
a show bird, winners in the leading shows 
of Northern New York. Cockerels, $5 and 
up. Orders booked for eggs at $2 and $3 
per 15. Day old chicks, 25 cts. each. 
Brook View Stock Farms. Rte. 3, Pulaski, 
N. Y. _____^^ 12^ 

FOR THE BEST ORPINGTONS', ANY OF 
the varieties, you must send to their origi- 
nators, who. naturally, have the best. Send 
six cents for catalog, history of Orpingtons 
and hints on Poultry keeping. William Cook 
& Sons. Box C, Scotch Plains. N. J. 
^ 1-10-12 

12 FINE S. C. WHITE ORPINGTON COCK- 
erels, $2.50 to $6. according to score. These 
birds will put new vigor In your flocks. 
Have mated some extra fine pens, eggs, $3 
per 15; 30 for $5. You will be sure to be 
pleased if you send me your order. Jas. 
C. Olson , Harlan, Iowa. 1-3 

SINGLE COMB BUFF AND KELLER- 
strass White Orpingtons. Eggs from 3 pens 
Buffs correctly mated, $2. $3 and $5 per 15. 
Limited number eggs from 2 pens extra 
fine Whites $5 and $10 per 15. Circular 
free. Alice J. Morrlss. Big Rock, 111. 1-3 

S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. OWEN BROS, 
strain. Fine stock for sale from prize win- 
ners. Eggs from choice mated pens. Prices 
within reach of all. Mrs. H. Wedderspoon, 
Cooperstown, N. Y., Perthmoose Farms. 

1-3 

BLACK ORPINGTON CARRY THE 

world's record for best winter layers. Eggs 
for hatching In season. Scored cockerels for 
sale. Write me for prices. W. J. Schmitt, 
Donnellson, Iowa. I-3 

CLEAN SWEEP ON S. C. BUFF ORPING- 
tons at Omaha and Lincoln. Neb., winning 
1st cockerel. 1st pullet and 1st pen at each 
show, besides other prizes and specials, plac- 
ing our Buffs unquestionably In advance of 
competition in the middle west. Ask for 
free 1910 mating list. Prewltt. Box W. 
Onawa. Iowa. 2-8 

S, C. WHITE, BLACK, BUFF AND DIA- 
mond Jubilee Orpington eggs, $2 for 15; 
chicks three weeks old, 40c each; all guar- 
anteed, Hamilton & Kaufman, Two Rivers. 
Wis. 2-5 

S. C. BUFF ORPINGTONS FROM CHICA- 
go. New York and Canadian winners. Will 
have but one very choice pen of rich, even 
colored birds. Sound In hackle and saddle. 
Eggs $5 per 15. Few cockerels to spare. 
V. Crabtree, Tiflln, O. 2-4 

S. C. BUFF ORPINGTON EGGS FOR 
sale. Fine farm range hens and pullets 
mated to extra fine big boned cockerels. 
Eggs ri-25 per 15; $5 per 100. Herman 
Hunt, Clarksville, la. 3-3 

BHODE ISLAND BEDS. 

HIGH CLASS S. C. R. I. REDS FOR SALE. 
Original birds direct from Lester Tompkins. 
Scoring 91 to 93. Eggs from pens 1, 2, 3. 
$1, $2, and $3 per 15. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed. Isaac H. Painter. Chrisney. Ind. 
1-3 

SINGLE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS 
Exclusively. I showed 6 pullets and 4 cock- 
erels at Peoria. 111.. Dec. 1909, and won 8 
prize.s. I showed no old birds. Will sell 
the four cockerels. Also eggs In season. 
Write for prices and matings. Davis Crows, 
Ilanna City, 111. 

S. C. R, I, RED COCKERELS FOR SALE. 
Fine birds at reasonable prices. Eggs from 
best matings at $2 per 15. Free range 
stock, $1 per 15; $5 per 100. Mrs. H. L. 
Alsop, Sylvia. I owa. 1-3 

ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS. WON 
first at Peoria. Dec, 14 to 18, 1909; first 
at Lincoln, Dec, 14 to 17, 1909. Eggs, $3, 
$2 and $1 per 15, Utility, $5 per 100. J. 
B. Garber. Hopedale, 111. l-j 

CHOICE SINGLE COMB RHODE ISLAND 
Red cockerels for sale. Eggs In season, all 
from excellent stock. Maple Grove Cottage 
I'oultry Yards, Mi.ss LInnle Alston, R. 3, 
Coulterville, 111. 3.1 



LIBERAL POULTRY YARD. SINGLE 
Comb Rhode Island Reds. Eggs: First 
pen, $2.50 per 15; second pen, $2 per 15; 
third pen, $1,50 per 15. Incubator eggs 
from other pens, $4 per 100; farm range 
$2.50 per 100. C. L W. Adkisson. Galatla. 
i|^ 1-4 

SINGLE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS 
Eggs in season from excellent laying strain 

^w" j^*°- }• *2 per 15; pen No. 2, $1.50 per 
J8d 91 10 SI jad x$ 'Moou Aj^na -gx 
hundred. Mrs. Harvey Trultt. R. 1. Farm- 
ington. 111. J. 3 

MY ROSE AND SINGLE COMB RHODE 
Island Reds are first prize winners wherever 
^^^^^x , ^°" *^® "°'^'s '^hare at Springfield 
and Holyoke. Can send you birds that will 
improve your flock. Egg.s. $3 per setting 
Valley Farm. 94 East Main St.. Amherst, 
Mass. ,_« 

HAVE YOU DECIDED WHERE YOU ARE 
going to place your order for S. C R I 
Red stock of eggs. If not. write a postal 
It , .^ Poultry Yards, Antwerp. O.. for 

their catalog. Six years exclusive breeding. 

- -—____ ?ii 

ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS 
Persistent layers. The right shape and 

wl?f; ^^^^^ ^■''''^ ^^ *^ *5 per sitting. 
Write for particulars and mention Poultry 
l^ancier. Septimus Mawer. Grand Rapids, 
^- ^ 3-3 

TO BREEDERS OF S. C. R. I. REDS. 1 
have a limited number of eggs to sell from 
my prize winning pen. None better. F C 
Eidridge & Son, Bourne, Mass 9-9-12 



ROSE COMB REDS. AFTER FIVE YEARS' 
caretul mating fur eggs, shape and color, 
our Reds lay like Leghorns, and grow like 
1 lymouth Rocks, with female plumage, that 
pure deep red. First time to offer eggs 
from these grand Reds. Prize winners in 

nTrLffn"- ^^^J *- P^^ 15; $3 per 30. Sari" 
pie feathers. Ernest E. Lienard, Route 8. 
Box 21, Lanca ster, O. 3.3 

LANGSHANS. 



THE 

shans 

don't 

order. 

your 

now 

show 

Write 

Mo, 



quality: of MY BLACK LANG- 

is proved by their show record. You 

take chances when you send me your 

I can start you right or Improve 

flock with some of the grand birds I 

have for sale. Scores to 95% In 

room. Prices right. Eggs In season. 

me. Mrs Frank Camerer. Gazette. 

1-6 

21 YEARS A BREEDER OF TH» BEST 
Black Langshans, Have a show record un- 
der leading judges unequaled by any other 
breeder. Male birds each season score to 
95%. females 96%. Buy where you know 
that you will get the highest quality at 
reasonable prices. Have some grand cocks 

f Qr:f/°^^®,^^^^ *° ^P^*"®' scoring from 94 
to 95%; also some extra choice hens. Made 

\ ^^^H. ^^^^P ^^ '^e Eastern Wisconsin 
show this season and won silver cup for 
best pen in the show three years, all breeds 
competing score 191%. A. Stransky. Pres. 
Eastern Wis. Poultry & P. s. Assn.. Chilton 
^^^- __^_ 11-9-12 

fan^<S.n^^^^^^?o BLACK AND WHITE 
hfrj ii^^K ^If,^^' *2 per setting from pens 
headed by blue ribbon winning male birds. 
W.H. Hefner. R3. Columbia Cit y. Ind. 2-4 

f?i.^^«'^^^ WHITE LANGSHAN MAN. 
f™ u ^^ J'^^- ^«S« 'o'- setting. 3 

from each of five pens at $2 per setting. 
First premium winners at the largest show 
fSrd IlT^"'- ^' ^- ^^««"«^. C. No. 18. Rock 

WHITE LANGSHANS. FIRST PEN HEAD- 
ed with cockerel which won first prize and 
first and second hen. Eggs $1.50 for 15 
Second pen $1.50 for 30. Anconas bred 
from imported stock. Eggs $1.50 for 15 
Londinf O^^^""^ "°'^- °^°- ^cCague. New 



A HE lOU LOOKING FOR SOME FINE 
iilack and White Langshan eggs at $1,50 
per setting? if so. send to us We will 
guarantee them to hatch. Second pen $1 
per setting. Stock at reasonable prices. 
John & Gust Shonk, Lancaster. O. 2-3 

WHITE LANQSHAMS WHITE DIAMOND 
Strain. Eggs $1 per 15 and up. T, J. Us- 
selmann, St. L ibory, 111. 3.2 

S. C. WHITE LEQHOBNS. 



BUFF COCHINS FOR SALE. HENS. PUL- 
lets or trios. My stock is first class. Won 
27 prizes in 1909. Send In your order now 

V^^'r,^??^- ,^'*'' ^^'P ^^6" you want them. 
J, C, Baughman. T opeka. Kan. 2-3 

BLAKES S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS WIN 
at Springfield. 1st cock, Ist hen. 1st and 
3rd cockerel, 5 entries. At Madison Square 
New York, I made 3 entries, winning 1st 
pullet. Eggs $2 per setting. W. J. Blake, 
Burnside, Conn. 2-10-13 




Page 80 




POULTRY 



BARGAINS IN S. C. WHITE LEGHORN 
cockerels $1 and $2 each for dandy birds. 
Order now and get your pick. Eggs $1 
and $L per 15, according to quality. Either 
mated pen or range flock. Reasonable hatch 
guaranteed. James Keegan. R. 1. Box 72. 
J hor. Iowa. 2-4 







^ NGLE COMB WHITE LEGHORNS 
Choice stock for sale. We make a spec- 
ialty of supplying breeders with foundation 
stock. Prices from ?2 to ?10 for pullets 
and cockerels, according to merit. Eggs 

Dam Poultry Farm, M ontgomery, N. Y. 2-3 

B. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 



L^l^^n^r^^^.'^^^ HIGHEST QUALITY 
io.„^ <-• White Leghorns, both in stock and 
eggs and my prices are reasonable. Some 
choice trios for sale. Eggs from my Chi- 
cago first prize pen shipped promptly. My 
Diras are first prize winners at Chicago in 
competition with the best in the west. Mrs 
\\ Jones Williams, The Maples, Maywood.' 
ill: 2-4 

ROSE COMB WHITE LEGHORNS, THE 
world's record for best layers. Have bred 
''^V^^V^^ o^'' nineteen years. Get the best— 

fnr^l?^ w'^"". ^^^« *=^ Pe'- 15; stock 
for sale. Write for catalog. Rocky Valley 
Poultry Co., No. 66 "The Oaks." Deerfleld. 

^ ** 

R. C WHITE LEGHORNS, ELEPHANT 
fi.i"fi"'o ^*^^"le. 1st cockerel; Iowa state, 2 
hists, 2 seconds, 2 thirds and state cup 

u^n\?'l^\'^ ^ ^^^"^^ «^^h. Range, 10 cemsj 
pen, lb 2-3 cents each. Catalogue. Rogers 
Ranch, Box 11, Pleasanton. la? 3-3 

S. C. BROWN LEOHOBNS. 



INVINCIBLE S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS 
l^i" ^^^''W ^'■'^i^; Athens, I'jio. Cock scoring 
Jo%. pu ets 94, pen 186%. Eggs. $2 to $3 

S^ggtJif ohTo"^ ^^^"- ^--^ ^' ''z'h 

S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS BRED FOR 
.shape, color and laying qualities. Baby 
chicks $10 per 100. Eggs by the setting 

V m^"'t.^. ^^^*'- "• ^- ^""y^^- ^- 2. Bechtell- 
__'_5!___^' • • 11-y-i'' 

B. C. BROWN LEOHOBNS. 



R. C. BROWN LEGHORN (242-EGG 
strain), female line, eggs and stock for sale 
reasonable, according to quality. I won the 
highest honors on all that I entered at the 
last Schenectady show. Correspondence so- 
licited. Wm. Gaffey, South Worcester, N. 
2-4 



BUrr LEOHOBNS. 



fc. C. BUFF LEGHORNS— SOME FINE 
cockerels for sale. They are beauties at $2 
f; and 5 each, sired by a son of first cock.' 
Madison Square Garden, 1908. Eggs. $2 per 
lo. F. D. Kemp, Sparta. Wis. 12-4 

ROSE COMB BUFP^ LEGHORNS. OUR 
birds are good layers, large and healthy 
with good combs and good buff color. Just 
the kind you want. Eggs. $1 for 15, $5 for 
100. No stock for sale. Sunnyside Poultry 
Farm. C. C. Glasgo, Loudon vllle, O. 1-3 

BUFF LEGHORNS. SINGLE COMB. BRED 
from Chicago winners. Two pens mated 
Produce show specimens only. Low. well 
spread tails guaranteed. Elegant, golden 
even buff. Eggs, $3 per 15, produce speci- 
mens equaling the best. Dr. C. E Hoover 
Edgerton, O. ' i_3 



SINGLE COMB BUFF LEGHORNS. EGGS 
Irom premium birds, line bred, as fine as 
ever wore feathers, n per 15. Eggs from 
choice selected birds on the farm, |4 per 
100. S. M. Keltner, Ande rson. Ind. 3-3 

BLACK MINOBCA8. 



MUST SELL AT ONCE. FEW VERY FINE 
^.', ^J.^^^ cockerels from my noted "Oul- 
o«"i Minorca. Booking egg orders. Blacks 
T Yi'n^^^' I'uHet record. 27 eggs in 

Jan., 1909. Six ribbons on 7 entries 1909. 
Oscar F. Sampson. Franklin. N. Y. 1-3 



S. C. BLACK MINORCAS. WON TEN 
firsts at the two leading shows in Michigan 
1910. (Five at state t-how, Detroit.) Large 
size, beautiful color, typical shape. Cir- 
cular free. W. B. Osborn, 430 Williams St.. 
Jackson, Mich. 3.3 



I BREED FOR QUALITY AND SIZE S 
C. Black Minorca eggs, $2 per 13. Cockerels 
for sale. 1. Allis on, Florence. Neb. 1-4 

ROSE COMB BLACK MINORCAS. WIN- 
ners of 7 first and 3 cups at Allantown, 
WiUIamsport and Scranton this season 
Judge T. F. McGrew, In reporting Scranton's 
Quality show, says: '.Mr. Tobey has on 
exhibition an number of specimens of such 
remarkable quality as to call for the high- 
est praise; anyone who can rear Black Min- 
orcas and show them In such beautiful con- 
dition, has the right to claim the honor of 
being an expert with poultry." C E. Tobey 
Scranton, Pa. ' 2-3 



SINGLE COMB BLACK MINORCAS, Ex- 
clusive winners of 5 firsts at Shelbyville. 
Lebanon and Sheridan poultry shows. 
Scores, 93 to 94^, by Judges IVcCracken, 
Kummer and Greer. Eggs, $l.o0 and S2 
per 15. Fertility guaranteed. H. A. Brat- 
li^n, Braz il, Ind. 1.3 

w^^P ^P^^ BLACK AND ROSE COMB 
White Minorcas. First prize winners at 
New lork, Chicago. St. Louis and all large 
shows. Breeding stock and eggs for hatch- 
ing guaranteed. Large stock. Great layers. 
Catalog mailed free. G. A. Clark, Sey- 
mour Ind. ^_3 



GLEN OAK MINORCA YARDS. ROSE 
Comb Black Minorcas exclusively. Clean 
sweep at Peoria with one si igle exception 
which resulted in a tie. Stock and eggs 
guaranteed $2.50 per 15; $6 per 50; $10 
per 100. Charles White. Route 36. Peoria. 
^"- 2-4 



CORNISH 



CORNISH FOWL. MADISON SQUARE 
Jamestown Exposition. AUentown. Trenton' 
Hagerstown. Philadelphia winners. Old and 
young stock for sale. Egg orders given 
prompt attention. Circular free. R. D 
Reider, Middletown. Pa. 3.3 



POLISH. 



WHITE CRESTED BLACK POLISH, LINE 
bred for 25 years. Winners at World's Fair 
New York and Boston. Remember that See- 
ly Is the veteran Polish breeder of America 
Stock for sale; eggs in season. Jhas. L. Seely 
Pres. Am. Polish Club, Afton, N. Y. 5-9-12 

W. C. B. POLISH. A FEW CHOICE 
coclierels for sale. Bred from winners at 
Herkimer, Utica. Rochester and Buffalo. 
Birds are sure to please. Eggs after Feb. 

w T^?"?^ ^\\^ ^° ^^^ ^y prices. Warren 
W. Dickens, Box 93. Mid dlevJlle, N. Y. 1-3 

NINETY-FIVE FIRST PRIZES, FORTY- 
four seconds, twenty-two thirds, and several 
fourths and fifths were won by as on Polish 
towl during the past show .season at Chi- 
cago, St. Louis, Memphis. Minneapolis and 
other great shows of the country. No 
bi-eeder of I'olish fowls has ever made any- 
where near such a record of winnings in 
two months. We breed White Crested Black 
lolish and Silver, White and Golden Beard- 
ed I olish, and in each variety our first pen 
IS headed by a male bird that has won a 
nr.st prize at either Chicago or New York 
Our White Crested Black Polish first pen 
contains more first prize winners from the 
greatest shows of the country than can be 
found anywhere else. Eggs from our first 
pen are $5, and higher quality cannot be 
lound. Other pens, some of them headed 
by a Chicago or St. Louis first prize winner 
only $2.50 Write for the finest catalogue 
on Polish fowl ever published. Royal Polish 
Poultry Yards, Station A, Ashland. Wis. 3-I 



BANTAMS. 



o'l^^*,^^^^^^^' GOLDEN AND SILVER 
Sebright. Buff and Black Cochin. Rose Comb 
Black and Black Red Game Bantams Hleh- 
est honors New York. 800 birds. Proper & 
Co.. Schoh arie. N. Y. 8-9-1^ 

GOLDEN SEABRIGHT BANTAMS FOR 
sale. Birds scoring 93 to 95%. Won at 
Newton, 111., in lively competition, first cock 
first and second cockerel, first, second and 
third pullet. Eggs after March 1, $3 per 
setting. Dale Arnold. Newton , ill. 1-4 

II AVE SHOWN BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS 
smce^ 1904 at all the leading shows in east- 
ern New England. During that time I have 
won 133 firsts, 103 seconds, 86 thirds, 110 
specials. 10 sliver cups, and a number of 
championships. Eggs from 2 pens that 
score from 931/2 to 9«>, $2.50 per 13 Harry 
E. Smith, Box 723, Middletown, Conn. Mem- 
ber of Conn. Poultry Assn., Middletown 
AsHn.. and National Bantam Assn. 3-3 

BLACK BRKASTED RED GAME BAN- 
tams. On ten entries, seven scored 95^^. 
two 96. one 96 1/2. Write for World's Egg 
Challenge. Eggs $2 per 15. J. F. Kale & 
Sons. Warien. O. 3.2 



HOUDANS. 



HOUDANS— MY BREEDERS ARE TRAP- 
nested and bred for eggs; also have some 
fine show birds. Won all firsts and 2 8^! 
onds at oshko.sh. Wis., on 6 entries Eggs 
pen 1 12 per 15; per 2 $1.50 per 15 kuI?- 
antee 10 fertile or replace setting free. John 
C. Meyer, R 9, Oconto Falls. Wis. 2-4 



HOLJDAN EGGS FROM McAVOY'S AND 
Dr. Taylor's strain. Have raLsed them 3 
years. Have 50 pullets and hens, from 
which will ship eggs for hatching at $1.50 
for 15. or $7 per 100. J. D. Payne. Water- 
loo. Ind. I 3 



IT IS A RECOGNIZED FACT THAT "Q & 
B." Houdans are "the best." If you start 
with "the best" you will save time, money 
and annoyance. If you want a flock of prize 
winners and record layers, d(!mand "Q & 
B." Houdan.s. Write for our beautiful de- 
scriptive catalog: it is free. Eggs. $2.50. 
$j and $10 per 15; ten chicks guaranteed to 
hatch. Quimby & Brown, lOy-U High St 
Ipswich, Ma.ss. 2-4 

LARGE CRESTED, HEAVY LAYING HOU- 
dans. Eggs from four grand pens. Ten 
years a breeder. Guarantee good hatch Mv 
first year with Orpington.s. Whites and 
Macks. Hattie P. Franks. Worth. 111. 5-9-12 



LAKENVELDERS. 



LAKENVELDER'S. FOUND AT LAST 

what this paper is dedicated to: "The 
most beautiful in fowLs." Exhibition stock 

vf^? ^,",.^5^^^"- Anson van Voorhees. Mar- 
shall, Mich. 2-4 



DORKINGS 



SILVER GRAY DORKINGS. BEST TABLE 
fowls. Splendid layers year around; New 
York and Boston winners. Finest yards in 
America See Campine advertisement. 

Ridg7fiePd:"N^. T"^' ^'- ^ ' ^-«^-' ^-,P-. 
SILVER CAMPINES. 



SILVER CAMPINES. ORIGINAL INTRO- 
ducer improved strain Belglums Great egg 

vvhitcst dozen eggs in shov, Boston 1910 
2-6 



DOMINIQUUS. 



DAVENPORT'S AMERICAN DOMINIOIIFC! 
won at New York 1908 every first prizlof^ 
fered; 1909 six of the ten firsts and seconds' 
Write for circulars and prices. W H Dav 
enport. Coleraine. Mass 5^9 ^2 



BABY CHICKS. 



f/, AND D. HATCHERY. YARDLEY PA " 
shippers of day-old chicks and eggs fr^ 

E#p^ref^ilid''rn^ °' /^^ leadlng^^vlwitTeT 
eas^ o? ^hl ^^ ■ ^^^^ arrival guaranteed 
east of the Missis.sippi river. Write for 
list of v ariet ies and prices . }?J 

PHEASANTS. 

PHEASANT BREEDING PAYS 800 PBR 
cent better than chicken raising A naU^ o^ 
Pheasants are worth from |25.!o tt ??50.?0 
to a breeder yearly. Read the Reliable 
Pheasant Standard, the recognized authoHtv 

^hla^lcnSH ^^««^'^/. and ^earn au' abo^^ 
this rich Industry. 75 cents a copy by maJl 
^rom A. V. Meersch. Poughke^p^^l^ N^^ 
I2I2: 9-Og-tf 

Da^r^^^r^i ^INGNECK PHEASANTS. $5 A 
Sa r WrJl^ Rln&neck Pheasants. $7.50 t 
pair. Write Jennie Milner. Bloomlngton. 

— '. ____^__ •-• 

TURKEYS. 



MAMMOTH BliUNZK TURKEYS SCOIt 
^^^^; G,aU„h „..„.. r.,.S.%%U. 'cV, 

0-0 

k?y^ SALE MAMMOTH BRONZE TUR- 
Kcys. A fine strain of good layers larc-e 

trom prize winning stock from Madison 
Square Garden. Order early Trices rea 
sonable considering quality Mrs Ma?y 
Schoonmakcr. R. 1, Meshoppen. Pa I-4 

BRONZE TURKEY EGGS. $2 PER 10 AND 
genuine Wild Mallard Duck eggs $1 50 
per 10. Order early. Will shfo ih'fn 
wanted. H. W. Fairall. Iowa city.^ ?owa 

_^^ 1-'* 

PIGEONS. 



I OFFER GUARANTEED MATED HOMERS 
n any quantity, at $1.00 a pair, and chaN 
lenge squab companies or dealers to nrndn^. 
better stock at twice thls'^'price' 'fi^Imiful 
White Homers. $1.50 a pair. Get my Drlces 
on Rupts. Carneaux and Maltese Heiia InH 
save dollars. Charles IC Gllbe?? itS!' K^^t 
Montgomery Ave.. Philadelphia. Pa 8-^^1 2 

WANTED— 5.000 COMMON OR HOMER 
Pigeons. Pay at least 25c pair. inKliTst 
P'l?«« paid for Guinea Fowls, L?ve R^hb?tl 
and Guinea Pigs. S Gilbert 1190 ^ ? .^ 
St., Phlladelphll Pa.* ^"^^^'' ^^28 Palmer 



MISCEULA.NEOUS. 



• • 



# 



# 



A FINE 160-ACRE FARM IN THE WHEAT 
belt of Kansas, 19 miles from Abilene, 
county seat Dickinson county. Four miles 
from R. R. Now being used for pasture, 
good wire fence, good water the vear round 
Will sell below the market on reasonable 
terms. Non-resident widow owns it and 
has no use for It. Some improvements. 
Address K F care Poultry Fancier, 357 
Dearborn St.. Chicago. Ill .00. 



S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS 



Winners of l.st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th pullets, 

2ud pen in a strong class at the big 

Baraboo Valley Show, January 1910, 

Asrook*>r^l last «^i.>.,.„ i,^ .. »x ^ . Pcn headed by 1st cock at above .show. 

T^hf f^lJi f .^^"^'^r" *statl,a Crosse and 1st at the Wi.scon.sin State A.ssociation Show 

The females in ray yards are full of quality, bred from the best blood lines in Amer ca I wm suppTv 
my customers with eggs from these without reserve at $3 per 15. |5 per 30 They will produce winners 



JAS. McGUAN, 



-WANTED-' -- PIGEON DUNG. WRITE 
Pfister & Vogel Leather Co.. Milwaukee. 
Wis., for prices, etc. 1.3 

POULTRY SUPPLIES. 




POULTRY FEED—PRICE PER 100 LBS. 
Beef scraps $2.75. meat and bone $2 25 

fr«""'^.H^^''r ^2.25 hen scratching grains 
?1.8o. chick scratching grains $2. poultry 
mash $1.80. pigeon grain $2.25 alfalfa 
clover meal $1.50, crushed oyster shells 
65c, crushed clam shells 60c. mica crystal 

ir^A ''•rn?^^'"^ ^""^^ ^^<^' medicated charcoal 
$1.50. The meat and bone, shells, grit 
and charcoal In both hen and chick size. 

rl""^ t"^^,"" *''^^! °^^^''- J- G- Hermann & 
Co., Indianapolis, Ind. ^.g 

PRINTING. 



BARABOO, WIS. 



have again made 
a record breaks 
ing Winning at 

the Baraboo 



Raven Rock Poultry Farm 

Valley Show January 1910. We won on BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKs' 1st 

cock 3d and 4th hens, 1st and 4ih cockerels, 1st pen, best display and B P R 
Club Cup on best cock, cockerel, hen and pullet-54 entries in the class. On 
:>. ^. Black Orpington* we won 1st, 2nd cocks, 1st, 2d, 3d and 4th hens 1st 
cockerel, 1st peti, English Class Cup and $10.00 Gold Sweepstake for best'dis- 
play, open to all classes. In Columbian Wyandottes we entered only seven 
birds winning 3 firsts and 5 other prizes, also cash special for best pen of Wyan- 
dottes all varieties competing. x- j 

i^olr^oTn var^d^'s' ^Th^ev''wai?!.?h ' winnings in former years andour winners were produced 
in our own yards. They, with other.s of equal merit compose our breeding oens for this sea- 
son from which we w 11 .supply our egg trade without re.serve. We havrusertran^nests for 
l^^nv ""r"^ '"^^f*" nothing for breeders, but those that make good records aMaylng ChoicI 
stock always for sale. Eggs f3 per 1^ l^per 30 from one or all pens. Satisfactio^i g^ra^iteed 
GEO W. HACKETT. Prop. BOX 111. NORTH FREEDOM. WIS. 



PRINTING— POULTRY, GENERAL, NOTE- 
heads, envelopes, postcards, labels, cards 
tags, 100 either. 40c; 250, 75c; 500, $1.2-^' 
postpaid. Circulars, everything. Finest en- 
gravings. Beautiful samples for stamo 
Model Printing Co.. Manr>hf^<3tpr Ta loTfi 



BROWN _LEGHORNS 

THE EMPIRE STRAIN 
ALWAYS WINS. 




"CATALOGUE FREE 



GEO. H. BURGOTT, 

UwTONs. Erie Co., 



EXHIBITED AT 

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN. 





"MAJESTIC I." 
5th Cockerel. Chicajjo Dec '08 



Rankin's Barred Rocks 

"BEST IN THE WEST" 

A N D 

ADVANCING IN QUALITY EACH SEASON 

Bred from Chicago winners. Pens headed by win- 
ning males and specially mated to classy females for 
type, surface color, under color, yellow beaks and 
legs and head points. Which point do you lack^ 
Winnings Chicago, Dec, 1908, 5th cockerel. Blue 
Island, 111., 1909, 2d and 4th hens, 3d cockerel; 1910 
1st and 3d cockerels, 1st hen. Eggs, both matings 
$2.00, $2.50, $3.00 and $3.50. ^ 

Ode L. Rankin. Maywood. 111. 





imam 

iUrc 

wuud 




READ WHAT THE BRIGGS SYSTEM WILL 00 FOR YOU 



EDGAR BRIGGS 

Poultry Expert 



SUCCESS WITH POULTRY ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED BY THE USE OF BRIGGS 

SYSTEM AND SECRETS 

Feed for crowinc cMck. .nd making cm .t 1 5o. per l...l.el .ipl.in.d b, th. Bri.g. Sr.t.n.. No m^hiu-ry uo cookln, 

95% OF ALL CHICKS HATCHED CAN BE RAISED 




• • 



2000 Inypra and 3000 chicks can be cared for without help 
by one person and still have tiiiio for <>tli«r work. 

$J5 (M) 8«TPd on every hundred chicks raised to maturity 
by this wonderful Kriggs system. 

EndorM'd by hundredd of IondtT<<r «iiic<>f>fi«*fn1 
poultryinen—llundredff of unuualiued teatiinuniuls 
in oar poRctenMiuii. 

"PROFITS IN POULTRY KEEPING 
SOLVED" 

This great book by Ldgur lirifrf^s tella how to increaae 
your preflcut profits or start a profitable and ensy occupa- 
tion Failures unknown when the I{rl|rir(i Syntcm is used. 
It meets every condition and covtrs every part of the busi- 
ness. Keeps hens in the pink of condition and produces 
more eR«8 than any other system; molts hens early, and 
fowls are rarely aick when this wonderful system is followed 

THE SECRET OF TURKEY RAISING IS 
ALSO BARED 

Thin book ham never been »ol4 for lean tben 
95.00 i»er copy, (iiid thousands covering; several fditions 
lite being followed by an equal numbei of successful poultry 
raisers. 

WB flAVE iDRCHASET) THE SOLE RIGHTS OP 



PUBLICATION FROM TITE VVUTrrOH. MR. BRI0G8. 
and have just reduced the price from f&.OO to (JiLSfr 

per copy, including one yenr s subscription to •i'orLTHT 
8iioci..ss," regular price 60 cents, so under the great offer you 
get the Briggs System book for only T.'i cents. V e hnve 
alsojust tnk. n off the press "BrSfffffi 8<Tre(« In Poultry 
<-ii!ture," contnining most valuable :::id never before pub- 
liHlied secrets that hnve produced wonderful and easily ob- 
tainable results. These secrets are alone worth the price 
of the book, hut under our great offer you get them FREE. 

3f»e:oial. of-f-efr 

While the present edition of the lirigget (Syatem 
and Neeret liooLii lantn. 

IF VOIJ WILL KK.MIT TS $1 ?5. WE WILL SEND 
IMMEDIATELY A COPY OF BKIOGS WONDERFUL 
SYSTEM BOOK, Viz.: PROFITS IN POULTRY CULl VRE 
SOLVED, also aset of BRIGGS "SECRETS IN POUI/IKY 
CULTURE' and include also POULTRY SUCCESS ojio 
year. Even if you already have a copy of 'Profits m iN.ultry 
Keeping Solved." you are losing money every dav bv not 
having the supplemental publication **Necre<a in Poultry 
Culture." POULTRY SUCCESS is admittedly the world's 
leading and be^t POULTRY JOURNAL. L(» yejjrs old 80 
to 1«4 pages, beautifully iihistrated end printed Most com- 
petent and experienced writers in the country, 60 cents • 

y'Vr,.'^*' .'" ^^^'' -^^^^ Centiiru Poultry Magjuiue. Sample* 
and Circulars Iree. AddresnT ' " f^ 



HOSTERMAN PUBLISHING CO.. BrJggs Desk 25 SPRINGFIELD. OHIO 




Page 80 I 



BARGAINS IN S. C. WHITK J.KGlloiiX 
cockerels $1 and $2 eaeli lur dandy hirds. 
Order now and yet your i.iek. Kg^s $1 
and ?, pur 1... aiioiding lo quality. Either 
mated i-en or range Hock, lieasonable hatch 
guaranteed. Janies Keegan, K. 1. Box T2 
I iii'r, Iowa. 0.4 

SINGLE COMB WIIlTi: I.J]( ; H( .KXS 
Choice stock for sale. We make a .spec- 
ialty of suj>plyiny: breeders with foundation 
stock. Prices from $- lo ?10 for pullets 
and cockerel.s. according to merit. Eggs 

V-In 'T.'"''l^'' ?r J^'-^'- l^J ^-> P^'f 30. Beaver 
Dam I'uultry Farm , Montgoni.ry, X. Y. !.*-:{ 

R. C. WHITE LEGHORNS. 




ANCIER 



Ml hi MOLL AT ONCE. FEW VEliY FINE 
S; ii.^^ cockerels from my noted "Oul- 
cout Minorca. Booking egg orders. Blacks 
and whites. Pullet record. -7 eggs In 
Jan., i;m)1». Six ribbons on 7 i-ntries litOy 
<'^^"tr F. Sampson. Franklin. N. V. 1-3 



SINGLE COMB BLACK MINOliCAS. Ex- 
clusive winners of 5 firsts at Shelby vi lie, 
Lebanon and Sheridan poultry shows. 
Scores. 1*3 to 941/2. by Judg-s J'-jCracken. 
Kummer and Greer. Egg.s, $l..,o and $i! 
per lu. I'ertility guaranteed. H A. Brat- 
Im. Brazil. Ind. 1.3 



L'-iPJ'^J^^ r'^^^ HIGHEST QUALITY 
m Ji. L. ^^hlte Leghorns, both in stock and 
my prices are rea.sonable. Some 

from my Chi- 

promptly. Mv 

winners at Chicago in 

best in the west. Mrs. 

The Maples, May wood," 

2-4 



cgg.s and 

choice tiios for sale. Eggs 

•ago lirst prize pen shipped 

birds are first prize 

(•ompetition with the 

\V. Jones William.s 

111. 



ii^^^ ^?-^^^^ JiLACK AND KUSE COMB 
NVhite Minorcas. First pri; - winners at 
New \ork, Chicago, St. Louis and all large 
shows. Breeding stock and eggs for hatch- 
ing guaranteed. Large stock. Great layers. 
Catalog mailed free. G. A. Clark, Sev- 
moui- Ind. j'_2 



L(JSL COMB WHITE LEGHORNS. THE 
vurds record for best layers. Have bred 
•n^-n'-'"^ i^^" ^?»nt'teen years. Get the best— 

for Jilf w'"' "•". ^^^•'^ ^^' '''-'• 15 i stock 
for sale. ^\ rite for catalog. Rocky Vallev 

oultry Co., No. 06 "The Oaks." Deerfield^ 



<iLEN OAK MINORCA YARDS. ROSE 
Comb Black Minorcas exchisivelv. Clean 
sweep at Peoria with one si igle exception, 
which resulteil in a tie. Stock and eggs 
guaranteed. $2.50 per 15; .^G per 50; $10 
per 100. Charles White. Route" 36. Peoria. 
' ''■ 2-4 



CORNISH 



in-,iV; ^yW"^ LEGHORNS, ELEPH.XNT 
H.lf. .. '^^■"^'^*^^.' l«t cockerel; Iowa state, 2 
!" ' -..«''^''"i*l«. -' thirds and state cut). 

HMf^'ir . '/^' ^ "^^'-'"^^ ^'^^''*- -l^^^'ia^'. 10 cents; 
I'..:.). ,". ^'*^"^« .t^.^^^li- c:atalogue. Rogers 
l^anch. Box 11 . Pleasanton, la. ;;-;; 

S. C. BROWN IiEaHORNS. 



< OliMSll FOWL. MADLSox ^i^[M{K 
.laniestown Exposition, .MIentown, Trcntiui' 
Hagerstown, I'hiladdphia winner.*^. Old and 
.voung stock for .sale. Egg orders given 
prompt attention. Circular free. R D 
Iteider, Middlttown, pa. •}_•> 



POLISH. 



IN\IN(IBLE S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS 
won four lusts, Athens, liHu. Cock scoring 
^oV4. pu ets 1)4. pen ISO-'s. Eggs. $2 to S3. 

C.iipcnter, Ohio. ^.j,.^2 



WHITE CRESTED BLACK POLISH, LINE 
bred for 25 years. Winners at World's Fair 
New York and Boston. Remember that See- 
ly Is the veteran Polish breeder of America. 
Stock for sale; eggs in season. Jhas. L. Seely 
Pres. Am. Polish Club, Afton, N. Y. 5-9-12 



S. C. BK(.)WN LEGHORNS BRED Full 
shape, color and laying qualities. Baby 
chiek.s .*1U per 1<JU. Eggs by the setting^ 
ucular tree. H. M. Moyer, R. 2. Bcehtels- 
""•■• ^"- 11-1>-12 

R. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 



U. C li. POLISH. A Fl;:w CHOICE 
cockerels lor sale. Bred from winners at 
Herkimer, Utica. Rochester and Buffalo. 
Birds are sure to please. Eggs after Feb 

aV'" tP ^" ^ '^V^ ^^ ^"^^ ^^y prices. Warren 
W. Dickens. Box ys, Middlev lie. N Y !-•{ 



H. C. BliOWN LEGHORN (242-EGG 
strain;, female line, eggs and stock for .sale 
reasonable, according to quality. I won the 
highest hoiiois on all that I entered at 
a.st Schenectady show. Correspondence 
hcited. Wm. Gaffey. South Worcester, 



the 

so- 

N. 

2-4 



BUrr LEQHORNS. 



S. C. BUFF LEGHORNS— SOME FINE 
cockerels for sale. They are beauties at $2 
U and 5 each, sired by a son of first cock! 
Madison Square Garden, 1908. Eggs $2 per 
lo. F. D. Kemp, Sparta , Wis. ' 12-4 

K(^SE COMI! BUFF LEGHORNS. uUR 
birds are good layers, large and healthy 
with good combs and good buff color. Just 
the kind you want. Eggs. $1 for 15, $5 for 
100. No stock for sale. Sunnyside Poultry 
Farm. r. C. fJIlasgo. Loudonville. O. I-3 




.\lXLTy-Fi\K FIRST PRIZES, FUiiTl-- 
our sec.nds, twenty-two thirds, and several 
ourths and fifths were won by us on I'olish 
l<»\vl during the i)ast show seas..n at Chi- 
cago, St. Louis, Memphis, Minneapolis and 
ulher great shows of the country. No 
hrccder of Polish fowls has ever made any- 
where near such a record of winnings in 
two months We bne.l White Crested Black 
I ohsh and Silver, White and Golden Beard- 
ed 1 olish and in each variety our first pen 
IS headed by a male bird that has won a 
first prize at either Chicago or New York 
our Whit,- Crested Black Polish first pen 
contains mor.- first i>rize winners from the 
greatest shows of the country than tan be 
h.und anywhere els«.. Eggs from our first 
pen are :$,,, and higher qualitv cannot be 
Ound. other pens, some of them headed 
I'y a Chicago or St. Louis first inize winner 
-.nly .n'.r.o. Write f..r the finest catalogue 
on Polish lowl ever publishcl. Roval Polish 
I '"u I try Vaiils. .^tMii.Mi A. .As hland". Wis. 3-1 

BANTAMS. 



SIXGLK COMB BIFF 1J:g IK )RX.S. Er.i'.a 
Irom piemium birds, line bred, as line as 
ever wore feathe.-.s. if:i per lo. Eggs from 
choice selected hiids uii the farm. 
KejiMer, .\H(lersoii, |nd 



loo. S. M. 



RARE BARGAINS. GOLDEN AND SILVER 
Sebright. Buff and Black Cochin. Rose Comb 
Black and Black Red Game Bantam.s. High- 
est honors New York. 800 birds. I'roner & 
Co.. Schoharie. N . Y. 8-9-12 

GCJLDE;n SEABRIGHT BANTAMS FOR 
sale. Birds scoring 93 to 95%. Won at 
Newton, 111.. In lively competition, first cock 
first and second cockerel, first, .second and 
I per i /!'^ pullet. Eggs after March 1, $3 per 
• 1»» setting. Dale Arnold. Newton 11 1-1 




HOIDAN I'Zr.iiS FROM AlcAVOV'S AND 
L>r. Taylor's strain. Have raL^fd tliem 3 
years. Have 50 pullets and hens, from 
which will ship eggs for hatching at $1.50 
for 15. or $7 per 100. J. D. Payne, Water- 
loo. Ind. 1.3 



11' IS A iM-:co(;.\izi:i) fact jmlvt ••<,). \. 

li." lloiidaiis are "the best." If you .s'tart 
with "the best" you will save time, money 
and annoyance. If you want a fiock of prizi' 
winners and lecord layers, demand "Q & 
li." lloudans. Write for our beautiful de- 
scriptive catalog; it is free. lOggs, $2.50. 
$5 and $10 per 15; ten chicks guaranteed' to 
hatch. guimhy iSj nr(.wn. 109-U High St 
Ipswich. Mass. .,_•' 

LAliGE ('RKSTi:i>. HFAVY LAYING HOU- 
nans. Eggs fmm four grand pens. Ten 
.vears a breeder. Guarantee good hatch My 
first year with Orpingtons, Whites and 



filacks. Ifaitie P. I.'ranks. Worth, 



111. 



-9-12 



LAKENVELDERS. 



i-AKi':x\ELi)i:i:\s. found at last 

what this pap«'r is d.'dicatcd to: "The 
most beautiful in fowl.s." Exhibition stock 
J'.gys in season. Anson van \ 
sli.'ili. Mich. 



oorhees, Mar- 
2-4 



DORKINGS 



SILVER GR.VV DuliKlXGS. B l-]ST TVP.LE 
lows. Splendid layers year around; New 
wirk and Boston winners. Finest yards in 
America. See Campine advertisement, 

herry (.rove Farm. M. R. Jacobus. Prop., 
KulKetield, N. J. or 



SILVER CAMPINES. 



SIIALR CAMPINFS. ORMINAL IXTRO- 
iucer improved strain Belgiums. Great egg 
umes7'Tl '^"■^^'••^' ^vi^te egg.s. First priz.s 
c le -v c,' ' ."'^''•' '" ^'''^•^' Boston, 1910 
<'>'M.> C.rove Farm, M. R. Jacobu.s, Prop., 
la, N. .1. 2-G 



Ridgelieh 



DOMINIQUIJS. 



DAVENPORT'S AMERICAN DOMINIOUFS 
won at New York 1908 every first pri^e^f 
fered; 1909 six of the ten firsts and seconds 
Write for circulars and prices, w H Dav 
enport. Coleraine. Mass. 5^ n 




PHEASANT BREEDING PAYS 800 PHR 
cent better than chicken raising A nah^ of 

PheJsant sfnn /^r'^»: ^^^^ ^^« Reliable 
I neasant Standard, the recognized authorltv 

?his^^ieh't"i breeding, and ^learn aU affl 

f?om A ' v"^M^' ^l ^^"^^ ^ ^oPy by mai 
YoiS • Meersch, Poughkeepsie. New 

i° , 9-Og-tf 

DaTi^'^^rn- ^^^^GNECK PHEASANTS. $5 A 
S?r" w'".^ Ringneck Pheasants. $7.50 a 
pair. Write Jennie Milner. Bloomington. 

- — 1 __^ »-6 



TURKEYS. 



BLACK MINORCAS. 



v\' < > \ T !•: .\ 



S. <'. BLACK MINORCAS , 

firsts at the two leading shows in .MichigiiiV 
lUlO. (Five at state .-how. Detroit.^ Large 
size, beaulilul color, typical shape, 
cular free. w. B. Osborii, 430 Willia 



.lacksnn, .Mich. 



Cir- 
ms St., 
3-3 



IIA\f. .SHOWN BIFF CCX'HIN B.VXTV.MS 
since^ 190 4 at all the leading shows in east- 
ern New Lngland. During that time 1 have 
won l.M firsts, lo:! .scm.imI.s. sG thirds, 110 
specials. 10 .silv(M- cup.s, and a number of 
eliampiuMship.s. Eggs fmni 2 p.. 11s that JNiuNZlO 



"iK 9 1>.4 up with blood from World's Fa r 
pel' . "^'1"!,^ AV'^;^ 'r^\ "-»«• I-^^tJ $2\?,'$J 

^ •* ~ o 

FOR SALE MAMMOTH BKoXZI.: TUR- 
Kc>b. A fine strain of good layers larue 
.one and frame, and nicely iiariLd- b ed 
Irom prize winning stock from Madison 
Square Garden. Order early. Prices e, 
tunable considering quilit/ Mrs. Miiy' 
S.hoonmaker. R. ]. Meshoppen, i>a. 1-4 



I HREEIJ FOR gi ALITV AND SIZE, S. 
C. Hla<k Minorca eggs, $2 per 13. Cockerels 
for sab'. I. Allison, Florence. Neb. 1-4 



score trom 93U to 9<i. $2.50 per 13. llarrv 
L. smith. Box 72;{. Middletown, Conn. Mem- 
l.cr of Conn. P..ultry Assn.. Mi. 1,11. town 
.\ssn.. ■•ind Xiili.iiial l'.;int;iMi \ssn ' • 



ROSE COMB BLACK MINORCAS. WIN- 
r.V/".'!. "^ '^ fl^«* ^"^ 3 cups at Ailantown, 
VVilllam.sjM.rt and Scran ton this season 
Judge T. F. McGrew. in reporting Scranton'.s 
Cjtiality show, says: '.Mr. Tobey has on 
exhibition an number of specimens of such 
remarkable quality as to call for the high- 
est praise; anyone who can rear Black Mln- 
f»rcas and show them in such beautiful con- 
dition, has the right to claim the honor of 
being an expert with poultry." C E Tobey 
Scranton, Pa. ' " 2-^ 



I'.I..\CK |{Ri:.\STi:i> liici) GAME B\N- 
tams On ten entries, seven scored :i.-,*i., 
two 9(.. ..ne 9tJlij. Write for World's Egg 
( hall.ng... Eggs $2 per 15. J. f. Kal 
Sons. Warren, ( ). 



1-4 



PIGEONS. 






HOUDANS. 



IIOL'DA.N'S- 
n.^sted and 



MY 



i{iH>:i':i)i-:i;s aim-: ti;ap 

l"'<'<i '■"»• egKs; als.» have 
lin.' show bir.l.s. W..n nil nists 
"11. is ill OHhUosh. Wis. on n 
pen 1 $2 \,i'V I.-,; per 2 $!.,-,0 

antee ](» f.rtib' ..r replac.; setting free 
(-. Meyer, li 9, (Je..nlo Falls, Wi 



som<i 

and 2 sec- 

.ntries. lOggs 

per 1 5 ; guar- 

John 

•s. 2-4 



I OFFER GUARANTEED MATED HOMERS 
n any quantity, at $1.00 a pair, and chaU 

lelfer'^t^o'ck 'T^r' 7. ^^^^^''^ to"pro'hfce 
oeiier stock at twice th s price R.-mt if.ii 

White Homers. $1.50 a pair Get my nrlcei 
«)n Runts. Carneaux and Maltese He^is anl 
save dollars. Charles K. Gilber? 15tn Vn^t 
Montgomery Ave.. Philadelphia Pa 8-^ 1 2 
WANTED--5.000 COMMON OR HOMER 



i 



< 




^^F 



i 










t • 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



A FINE 160- ACRE FARM IN THE WHEAT 
belt of Kansas, 19 miles from Abilene 
county seat Dickinson county. Four miles 
from R. R. Now being u.sed for pasture, 
good wire fence, good water the year round. 
Will sell below the market on reasonable 
terms. Non-resident widow owns it and 

^^A "° V..^^ T.^^*" ^^- Some improvements. 
Address K ^-^care Poultry Fancier. 357 
Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 



S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS ^ 



'/Vi^'Vj^'^iMilf^jU^b,^ 



Winners of 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th pullets, 
2nd pen in a strong class at the big 
Baraboo Valley Show, January 1910. 
A«;rr,r>t*»r«-i lacf c*.^^ ^^" headed by 1st cock at above show. 

AS cockerel last seasuu iic won ist at La Crosse and 1st at the Wisconsin State Association Show 
The females in my yards are full of quality, bred from the best blood lines in America I w°?l suppTv 
my customers with eggs from these without reserve at $3 per 15. |5 per 30. They will produce winders 



JAS. McGUAN, 



"WANTED" — PIGEON 
Pfister & Vogel Leather 
W^is., for prices, etc. 



DUNG. WRITE 

Co., Milwaukee. 

1-3 



POULTEY SUPPLIES. 




BARABOO, WIS. 



POULTRY FEED— PRICE PER 100 LBS. 
Beef scraps $2.75_. meat and bone $2.25, 
.S2.2o. hen scratching grains 
scratching grains $2, poultry 




ground bone 
$1.S5. chick 
mash $1.80. 
clover meal 
65c, crushed 
g-rit 65c, pearl grit 
$1.50. The meat 



$2.25, alfalfa 



and charcoal in both 
Give us a trial order 
Co., Indianapolis, In.l 



pigeon grain 

$1.50, crushed oyster shells 

clam shells 60c, mica crystal 

60c, medicated charcoal 

and bone, shells, grit 



hen and chick size. 
J. G. Hermann & 
11-6 



PRINTING. 



have again made 
a record break- 
ing Winning at 

the Baraboo 



Valley Show, January 1910. We won on BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS 1st 

cock, 3d and 4th hens, 1st and 4ih cockerels, 1st pen, best display and B PR 
Club Cup on best cock, cockerel, hen and pullet-54 entries in the class. On 
b. C. Black Orpingtons we won 1st, 2nd cocks, 1st, 2d, 3d and 4th hens 1st 
cockerel, 1st pen, English Class Cup and $10.00 Gold Sweepstake for b-st'dis- 
play, open to all classes. In Columbian Wyandottes we entered only seven 
birds winning 3 firsts and 5 other prizes, also cash special for best pen of Wyan- 
dottes all varieties competing. f j 

™ur*oTn vL^ds' ^Th^ev'^wUi^^.^H'' ^i"«i°gs /" fof^er years andour winners were produced 
in our own yard.s. They, with others of equal merit compose our breeding pens for this sea- 
son from which we will supply our egg trade without re.serve. We hav^us^d traS^nests for 
years and retain nothing for breeders, but those that make good records ariayi'ng Choi?e 
stock always for sale. Eggs f3 per 15 $5 per .30 from one or all pens. SatisfactioTi g^aranteS 
GEO. W. HACKETT, Prop.. BOX 111. NORTH FREEDOM. WIS. 



PRIjSTING— POULTRY, GENERAL. NOTE- 
heads, envelopes, postcards, labels, cards, 
tags. 100 either, 40c; 250. 75c; 500. |1.2S 
postpaid. Circulars, everything. Finest en- 
gravings. Beautiful samples for stamp 
Model Printing Co., MnnohPQtPr Ta 10 9 



BROWN lEGHORNS, 

THE EMPIRE STRAIN 
ALWAYS WINS. 






GEO. H. BURGOTT. 

'CATALOGUE FREE LAWTONS, ERIE CO., 



EXHIBITED AT 

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN. 



N. Y. 




"MAJESTIC I." 
."ith Cockerel. Chicago Dec '08 



Rankin's Barred Rocks 

"BEST IN THE WEST" 

AND 
ADVANCING IN QUALITY EACH SEASON 

Bred from Chicago winners. Pens headed by win- 
ning males and specially mated to classy females for 
type, surface color, under color, yellow beaks and 
legs and head points. Which point do you lack> 
Winnings Chicago, Dec, 1908, 5th cockerel. Blue 
Island, 111., 1909, 2d and 4th hens, 3d cockerel; 1910, 
1st and 3d cockerels, 1st hen. Eggs, both matings! 
$2.00, $2.50, $3.00 and $3.50. 

Ode L. Rankin. Maywood. 111. 








EDGAR BRIGGS 

Poultry Expert 



READ WHAT THE BRIGGS SYSTtM WILL OU fOR YOU 

SUCCESS Willi POULTRY ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED BY THE USE OF BRIGGS 

SYSItM AND SECRETS 

Feea for crovlnc chicks und maklnc <»• .t I5c. per buihel e.pWned b, the Bri,,. Syitem. No machinery no cookln, 

957c, OF ALL CHICKS HATCHED CAN BE RAISED 



2000 Inyrra and .?Onn chicks rnn be rnred for witbout help 
by one person and still linvt- tiiiir lor otln r work. 

$J5 00 snred on tvery liumlred chuks ruiacdi to maturity 
by tliis wonderful Uri^ns systt-m. 

Eiulornod l»y hundreds of 1c>ndln<; fnirpennfiil 
poultry men Iliindredtt of unuualiUeU ieatiinuiiiuls 
lu oar poascBBioii. 

"PROFITS m POULTRY KEEPING 
SOLVED" 

This prpat book by ];<lKur BripRs trlla how to increase 
your |)H's. lit profits or etart a prolitnhle and ensy occiipiv- 
tion Inihires unknown when the Uriggn Hyatem is used 
It meets every condition and covers every part of the busi- 
tu\sB. Keeps hens in the pnik of condition and produces 
more e^^s than any other eysteni; molts bens early, and 
fowls are rarely sick when this wonderful system is f.dlowed 

THE SECRET Of TiJRKEr eAISIWG IS 
ALSO eAREO 

ThU book ban ncvpr been aoM for loas tbcn 
9u>00 per copy. nu>\ thoiisnnds covering severiil editions 
are being followed bj un equul uuinbei ol Buccessful poultry 
raisers. 

Wfi flAVE iTiRCnARFT) rTIT. SOLE RiGnTS OP 



PUBLICATION FKOM THE AUTHOTl. MR. BRTOOS. 
and bnve jnet rodiiftMi tin- price from 115.00 to i)il.Si5 

per copy, including one yeiir s subscription to • roiLTRT 
8ien.s.s. " reRular price 50 cents, so umier the ^reat offer you 
pet the Bri^'gs SvKteni book for only 7r, cents. V e hava 
Bl.soin.>it tiikeii off the pre^.s "Jlriirirn ScereU In Poultry 
C'liUurc," contnininjf mo-st vuhmble end never bel.ire pub- 
lished secrets that have produced womlerful and easily ob- 
tainable results. These secrets are alone worth the price 
of the book, but under our great offer you get thenj FKEB. 

SF=»EOI i«*^ i- OF"F~EFR 

Willie the present edition uf the Itriffss System 
and .Secret UooUa luats. 

IF \ou \s ILL i;kmit rs $i 2r,. tve will send 

IMMKDIATELY A COl'Y OV lilClGGS VVt>Nl)El;FrL 
SYSTE.M Look. Viz.: I'lCOFITS IN I'OULTKY CCL 1 UKE 
SOLVED. aiNO a set of BKHJCS 'SECKETS IN I'OULTKY 
CULTURE' and include also FOULTUY SUCCESS one 
year. Even if you already have a copy of 'Pridits in I'oultry 
Keeonig S(dved." you are losing money every dnv by not 
havnig the supplemental publication •♦Secreta In Poultry 
Culture." I'OULTEY SUCCESS is admittedly the world's 
leading and best I'OULTKY JOURNAL. 'M years old 80 
to lti4 paxes, beautifully ilhistrated and printed Most com* 
petent and experienced writers in the country. 60 cunts • 
year It is the joih Centurji foultry Mugaiiue. Sauiplea 
and Circulars tree. Addre8# " " i"- 



Pfohts in " 

8c.*|ved 






HOST£RMAN PUBLISHING CO., Briggs Desk 25 SPRINGFIELD, OHiO 



INTENTIONAL 2ND EXPOSURE 



MORE EVIDENCE THAT SIBLEY'S :-.™i:^3 

R it. At the Big 

F T% Q Indiana State Fair this season, our Rose Comb Reds won the most coveted prize, Ist pen. Also 
Ej iJ^ |3 ^»* ^^^ 3rd cocks, 2nd cockerel and many of the other winners were decended from our flock. 

They have an unbroken chain of victories to their credit for many years at leading shows. At 

Detroit January 1909 they won 23 prizes including 12 firsts and 11 others. At 
Chicago, December 1908, 17 prizes including 10 firsts. At Indianapolis, September 
1908, 11 prizes including 5 firsts. 

Our winnings at Detroit, January, 1909, in one of the strongest classes of Reds ever 
gotten together were: first, second, third and fourth on cocks, first, second, third 
and fourth on hens; first, second, third and fourth on cockerels; first and fifth on 
pullets; first and second on pens. The four club specials for color and shape. 
The silver loving cup (valued at $25.00) offered by the Mayor of Detroit for the 
best display of either Rose or Single Comb Rhode Island Reds. The silver loving 
cup (valued at fiO.OO) offered by the Hotel Normandie for the best display of rose 
comb Rhode Island Reds and other valuable specials. 




MIN-NE-HA-HA Ist prize winner, Chicago, 
Dec. 16-19, 1908. Detroit, Jan. 9-14, 1909. 



THE SIBLEY REDS HAVE ALWAYS WON EAST AND WEST 

2000 BIRDS RAISED DURING THE PAST SEASON FROM WINNERS 

Some of the cream of this year's production is still in 
our yards and if you are looking for a choice bird or two 
we can more than please you at right prices. 

We will have ten grand pens mated for the egg trade. Book your orders 
early. Prices |3.00, $5.00, $10.00, $15.00, $20.00 and $25 00 per setting. Send 



for catalogue describing our matings and telling all about the Sibley Reds. 

Irving A. and Frank Churchill Sibley, South Bend, Ind. 




4 $ 



THE FAMOUS HEM, "PEGGY." 

VALUE $10,000. First prize winner at Jamestown 
Exposition, Madison Square Garden, New York, and every- 
where else she has been shown. The reason we value the 
above hen at Ten Thousand Dollars Is because we refused 
•2,500 for her after we sold five of her chicks for 17,500; and 
we will Kive $10,000 for a •♦ Crystal ♦» White 
Orpinfirton Hon that will equal her in every way. 

KELLER87RA8S FARM, KANSAS CITY, MO. 



KELLERSTRASS** 

White Orpingtons 

ARE THE BIGGEST PAYERS 

Because they have proven to be 

THE BIGGEST WINTER LAYERS 

straYS "CRYSTAL •• 

White Orpingtons 

Are the GRANDEST UTILITY birds on record today and as to 
their FANCY QUALITY they won first at Madison Square Ga^ 
New York 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908; also at Crystal Palace, London 
v1?Sto 1a£!?1^?/^ ^^*^ Boston. If you need some birds to IMPROVE 
YOUR STOCK or for tlie SHOW ROOM write us. We have then 
^"^ \^^^J^.^ ^^^^ ^^NS. as our past record shows. STOCK 
TOPQ ^-/ovci^A'^^^'Lri'^^^V. I^emember, we are the ORIGINA- 
JP^^^l ^^^^"^M.- White Orpingtons, and breed only the«Iin» 
kind. We devote our who'e time to this one breed. 

SEND KOR OUR CATAI^OGUE 



Ufe Members American White Orpinsrton Club and the American PoultryA 

HELLERSTRASS FARM 

KRNEST KEI.I,ERSTRASS. Proprietor 

Originators of Crystal White Orpingtons 
R. r. D. No. 1 KANSAS CITY. MO, 



\ wMm i v i mi/' mrmn i mmmu 



tKtmftmmmmtimtstmmwm 




« 





u 



REGAL BLUE HARRED ROCKS 



I" eggs I am giving quality 

that few can equal and 

none surpass Try a set- 

• ., ., . ting ai|4 00, compare them 

with those costing vou $5 (X) up to $16.00 per setting, and be convinced 

A^L. KMERSON. ... INKSTEIR. MICHICAN 



BUFF 




CKvS 



Winners ai D arhorn, Mich., 
Dc-cember. 1909. 1st and 4 li 

3rd puUets i,. a s.ron, class of birds Have 4 pens head^'bv ™cl^eJ;>?:corh;g ^^l 
^- ■»•_>« ATTH EWS - - WA.YNE. MICHIGAN 

Barred Plymouth Rocks Exclusively 

Eggs from 5 grand pens, $2 per 15. Have many prize 

wmners in my yards. : : : Satisfaction guaranteed. 

ERNEST WAGNER, - KENDALLVILLE, IND. 



i 



Save Time, Effort & Moeey 

Buy S. C. White l^eghorn Day Old Chicks 
from me and you get a good strong health v 
chick in each .specimen. I guarantee this 
ai.d also .safe delivery and the price is only 12 
cents each. Cheaper than you can afford to 
hatch them. ^ ^ j^y^E, 

R. F. D. No. 1 Rocky River, Ohio 



Big Brown Beauties 

Kggs from pen .scoring 18(5}^ by Shellaberger. 
Only limited number ot orders taken. $2.00 
and $3 00 per 15. Pullet or cockerel mating. 

BROWN LEGHORN POULTRY FARM 
J. H. RYAN, Prop., Kenosha, Wisconsin 



"HA 




WHITE ROCKS 



■H.^;^ S tJ.-.imm-f^XfXHiSf'^- 



ta^»wwtt«<^^£mn>suuattu<60H 



**B>UNB9CTMgM3e5ti»W1iWW(Wi 



Established a BIG RECORD by winning 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO JANUARY, 1907 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO DECEMBER, 1908 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO DECEMBER. 1909 

me o7hatreTfr'^!n' Frrl\'° ^^Tu^ '^^' *" ''^f '?" '° "''""'"« >'^^'' ^"^^ ^^^^^ ^irds purchased from 
me or hatched from EGCIS I sold have won at the largest shows in the country. I could mention show 

"henScTa^eT S^'"^ '■^'''T^k":^''".^^^^ PRIZES but I honestly bdieve this honor belongS to 
the purchaser. So, when you buy birds from me you need not be afraid that I will pmblish your winnings 
as mine For the season of 1910 I have mated 15 grand pens. Write for mating list whicli descHbes mv 
Er,^TK""/'='"''1 °f "LEADER" my ist1:HICAGO COCKEREL a",d other famot"^^^^^^^^^ 
chmcelot of breeding cockerels left at $3 to $10 each. H. W. Halbach, Box 7, Waterford; WiJ 



A C 





AN SWEEP 

BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS 



Win all First Prizes at the Michigan State Fair, Detroit, Mich., September 2 to ,0 1909 
Winning ist and 2d cock, ist and 2d hen, ist, 2d and 3rd cockerel, i.st, 2d and 3d pullet 
ist pen. At the Dearborn, Michigan Show, December, 1909, in a class of 87 birds one of 
the strongest ever gotten together in the West, I won ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th cocks, ist and 
3rd pullets, 2nd and 3rd cockerels, ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th hens, with birds scoring to q. 
by Tucker. ^'* 



ONE THOUSAND BIRDS FOR SALE 



including .some of the cream of my old stock and the cockerels and pullets of last spring's 
production. I can mate up pairs, trios and pens that will win and produce winners Also 
single birds both sexes in lots to suit. Write for prices on eggs from my choice.st matings. 
They will put you in the lead. 

DONT DELAY, WRITE TO-DAY 

20 young Toulonse Geese from Chicago and Detroit winners (never beaten.) Write for 
prices. Catalogue free. Please mention this paper when writing. 

DEARBORN POULTRY YARDS, S. D. LAPHAM, p^p., Bo, P, Dearborn, Mich. 



• 



• 



• 






1 




IP 



/I 



• 





Vol. XIV 



CHICAGO. ILL, APRIL. 1910 



No. 4 



Th 



e 







Some of the Most Beautiful, Useful and Profitable 
Specimens of the Feathered World Are Found in 
the Bantam Families, the Midgets of Poultrydom 

By M. K. MILLER 

( ) more intcrcsiing work can be found 
in tlie poultry yard either for pleasure 
or profit than the breeding of bantams. 
We arc oiicn asked the question, why 
do you breed bantams? W'c always 
answer, because we arc interested in 
them. Many people imagine bantams are only a small 
chicken and of no value except as pets for children. 
The child part of it is true; where is the child that 
does not love the small things in Nature? All house- 
keepers are more or less interested in chickens, but 
when someone speaks of bantams they do not con- 
sider them, either for eggs or meat. While the fact 
remains many families living in towns could, if thev 
desired, keep a few bantams and be supplied with 
fresh cgg.s at a very small cost. P.antams can be kept 
protUably in a very small place. They are very small 
eaters and in numl)er will lay more eggs than the aver- 
age large hen will. Of course, the eggs are not as 
large, but three bantam eggs will more than equal 
two of the average hen's eggs. They are very nutri- 
tious, the yolk being large in proportion to tbe Qi:^^^:;. 
We sometimes wonder where the material comes from 
that creates them, being such small eaters and at the 
same time such veritable little Q<r^ machines. They 
will, with reasonable care -md attention, such as any 
member of the family can bestow upon them at meal 
time, pay their way. Usually there is enough .scraps 
left from tbe family table to iced several bantams. 
This, together with a little grain in the evening, makes 
an ideal food for tbem. .\s a table fowl, while small, 
they are a very choice morsel, as all wlio have ever 
eaten them will testify. They not oidy pay their way 



in eggs for culinary use, but they are in good demand 
for breeding purposes. Anyone who will take the time 
to hatch and raise a few will find a very ready sale 
for them at prices that will make the average person 
'\sit up and take notice." Bird dealers will pay from 
$LUO to $2.00 per head, while choice breeding and 
exhibition birds bring from $3.00 to $10.00 each. We 
now have reference to the well bred, aristocratic kind, 
tliat everybody admires and are as cheaply kept as 
the mongrel that has no value exceeding twentv-five 
cents each. Now, dear housekeeper, who having'tried 
keeping chickens in your back yard and gave it up be- 
cause you could not keep then'i profitably in so small 
a place, try two or three times the number of bantams 
in the same space, and I am sure you will find it not 
only profitable, but interesting, especially to your bov 
or girl, if you are fortunate enough to have either. 
Send to some reliable breeder for a setting of eggs, or 
if you do not have the time and place to hatch and 
rear them, send for a pair or trio of the variety you 
fancy and give the child the care of them. You will 
find it not only an interesting pastime, but a profitable 
one for the child as well as yourself. We have been 
breeding several varieties of these little pets of the 
poultry yard and speak from experience. The longer 
we breed them the more fascinating and interesting 
they bc'-omc to us. The variety to^ keep will be the 
kind you admire most. If you are interested and can- 
not 'k^cide upon a variety,' go to some good poultry 
show, where you will find them in all their glory— the 
aristocratic little Seabright, the saucv Rose Comb, the 
proud Japanese, tbe beautiful Cochins, the stately 
Game, as well as a number of other varieties, each one 
baving tbeir admirers, and each variety vicing with 
the otliers for first place in the hearts "of tbe^vers 
of the midgets in poultrydom. The Seabright is with- 
out doubt the aristcKrat of them all, but each variety 
lias some fascinating characteristic to commend them 
to the lover of bantams. 
Pottstown, Pa. 



t. 



REGAL BLUE BARRED ROCKS -^Tei ?ari",Lr'ii;s 

^■— — — K ".o"«* surpHss Try a set- 

,„;»v, ,. tiiigai J4 00. cotiipaire them 

with thostr covtuiK v(.u $6 00 up to $16.00 per setting, and be convinced 

A.. I^. KMERSON. ... INKSTEIR. MICHIGAN 




UFF ROCKiS 



Winners ai D arhorn, Mioh., 
December, 1909. 1st and i h 

A. -y-MATTH EWS - - W^YNE. MICHIGA N 

Barred Plymouth Rocks Exclusively 

Eggs from 5 grand pens, $2 per 15. Have many prize 

winners in my yards. : : : Satisfaction guaranteed. 

ERNEST WAGNER, - KENDALLVILLE. IND. 






Save Time, Effort & Money 

Buy S. C. White I^eghorn Day Old Chicles 
from me and you get a good strong healthy 
chick in each .specimen. I guarantee this 
aiid also .safe delivery and the price is only 12 
cents each. Cheaper than you can afford to 
hatch them. c. E. KYLE. 

R. F. D. No. 1 Rocky River, Ohio 



Big Brown Beauties 

Kggs from pen scoring 18(5J^ by Shellaberger. 
Only limited number ot orders taken. ^.00 
and $3 00 per 15, Pullet or cockerel mating. 

BROWN LEGHORN POULTRY FARM 
J. H. RYAN. Prop., Kenosha. Wisconsin 




ALBACH'S WHITE ROCKS" 



Established a BIG RECORD by winning 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO JANUARY, 1907 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO DECEMBER, 1908 
BEST DISPLAY AT CHICAGO DECEMBER. 1909 

me oJSTd'tol.' Frr I'' T° ^^Tu' '^^' '" ^^f '?" *° ^''""'"«^ ^^^^ ^^'^^ ^^^^^ ^irds purchased from 
me or hatched from EGGS I sold have won at the larg;est shows in the country. I could mention show 

tie'^^rcTaseT 'so"",'"^' ""T "^ '^%^^^^ P^^'^ES but I honestly belie've this honor bdonSt" 

Is m^ne Pnr' th.^Z ^^ "? u'"^' ^'■'"^'"'' ^^^ "'^^'^ "°' ^^ ^f'"'*'^ "'^^ ^ ^^'" P-^li^h your winnings 
as mine For the season of iqio I have mated 15 grand pens. Write for mating list which describes niv 

chofce"lotTl'""d?'"'"''"t°' "LEADER" my ,st CHICAGO COCKEREL a„^. otheT alrWrd" A 
chMcelot of breeding cockerels left at $3 to $10 each. H. W. Halbach, Box 7, Waterford, Wis! 




I 



I 



CLEAN SWEEP 

LAPHAM^S BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS 

Win all First Prizes at the Michigan State Fair, Detroit, Mich., September 2 to 10, 1909 
Winning ist and 2d cock, ist and 2d hen, ist, 2d and 3rd cockerel, ist, 2d and 3d pullet, 
1st pen. At the Dearborn, Michigan Show, December, 1909, in a class of 87 birds, one of 
the .strongest ever gotten together in the West, I won ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th cocks, 'ist and 
Srd pullets, 2nd and 3rd cockerels, ist, 2nd, 3rd and 4th hens, with birds scoring to 94 
by Tucker. 

ONE THOUSAND BIRDS FOR SALE 

including some of the cream of my old stock and the cockerels and pullets of last spring's 
production. I can mate up pairs, trios and pens that will win and produce winners Also 
single birds both .sexes in lots to suit. Write for prices on eggs from my choicest matings. 
They will put you in the lead. 

DONT DELAY, WRITE TO-DAY 

20 young Tonlonse Geese from Chicago and Detroit winners (never beaten.) Write for 
prices. Catalogue free. Please mention this paper when writing. 

DEARBORN POULTRY YARDS, S. D. LAPHAM, prop., Bo, P, Dearborn, Mich. 



• 




• 



4 




• 






Vol. XIV 



CHICAGO. ILL.. APRIL. 1910 



No. 4 



Th 



^ 




Little 




antam 




Some of the Most Beautiful, Useful and Profitable 
Specimens of the Feathered World Are Found in 
the Bantam Families, the Midgets of Poultrydom 

By M. K. MILLER 

O more interesting work can be found 
in the poultry yard either for pleasure 
or profit than the breeding of bantams. 
We are often asked the question, why 
do you breed bantams? We always 
answer, because we are interested in 
them. Many people imagine bantams are only a small 
chicken and of no value except as pets for children. 
The child part of it is true; where is the child that 
does not love the small things in Nature? All house- 
keepers are more or less interested in chickens, but 
when someone speaks of bantams they do not con- 
sider them, either for eggs or meat. While the fact 
remains many families living in towns could, if they 
desired, keep a few bantams and be supplied with 
fresh eggs at a very small cost. Bantams can be kept 
profitably in a very small place. They are very small 
eaters and in number will lay more eggs than the aver- 
age large hen will. Of course, the eggs are not as 
large, but three bantam eggs will more than equal 
two of the average hen's eggs. They are very nutri- 
tious, the yolk being large in proportion to the egg. 
We sometimes wonder where the material comes from 
that creates them, being such small eaters and at the 
same time such veritable little egg machines. They 
will, with reasonable care and attention, such as any 
member of the family can bestow upon them at meal 
time, pay their way. Usually there is enough scraps 
left from the family table to feed several bantams. 
This, together with a little grain in the evening, makes 
an ideal food for them. As a table fowl, while small, 
they are a very choice morsel, as all who have ever 
eaten them will testify. They not only pay their way 



in eggs for culinary use, but they are in good demand 
for breeding purposes. Anyone who will take the time 
to hatch and raise a few will find a very ready sale 
for them at prices that will make the average person 
"sit up and take notice." Bird dealers will pay from 
$1.00 to $2.00 per head, while choice breeding and 
exhibition birds bring from $3.00 to $10.00 each. We 
now have reference to the well bred, aristocratic kind, 
that everybody admires and are as cheaply kept as 
the mongrel that has no value exceeding twenty-five 
cents each. Now, dear housekeeper, who having tried 
keeping chickens in your back yard and gave it up be- 
cause you could not keep them profitably in so small 
a place, try two or three times the number of bantams 
in the same space, and I am sure you will find it not 
only profitable, but interesting, especially to your boy 
or girl, if you are fortunate enough to have either. 
Send to some reliable breeder for a setting of eggs, or 
if you do not have the time and place to hatch and 
rear them, send for a pair or trio of the variety you 
fancy and give the child the care of them. You will 
find it not only an interesting pastime, but a profitable 
one for the child as well as yourself. We have been 
breeding several varieties of these little pets of the 
poultry yard and speak from experience. The longer 
we breed them the more fascinating and interesting 
they be'-ome to us. The variety to keep will be the 
kmd you admire most. If you are interested and can- 
not -kcide upon a variety, go to some good poultry 
show, where you will find them in all their glory— the 
aristocratic little Seabright, the saucy Rose Comb the 
proud Japanese, the beautiful Cochins, the stately 
Game, as well as a number of other varieties, each one 
having their admirers, and each variety vieing with 
the others for first place in the hearts 'of the lovers 
of the midgets in poultrydom. The Seabright is with- 
out doubt the aristocrat of them all, but each varietv 
has some fascinating characteristic to commend them 
to the lover of bantams. 
Pottstown, Pa. 



INTENTIONAL 2ND EXPOSURE 




Page 82 




POULTRY FANCIER-CTlsiii-^iOH' 




A 



^:% '■ 



I for Neglected Varieties 



Two of the Many That Are Specially Deserving and 
That Possess Points of Merit Which Make Them 
Worthy the Fullest Consideration 

By DR. GEO. B. EDWARDS 




BOUT twenty years ago, when the 
Minorca boom was so strong in this 
country, we imported a few Whites 
from England, anticipating not a little 
pleasure, as well as profit, from our in- 
vestment. But as we found the variety 
to be somewhat tender and unprolific, our experience 
with it quite naturally covered but a short chapter. 
However, we have always felt it a pity that the White 
Minorca has not reached the same stage of develop- 
ment as attained by the Black, which, as a variety, has 
become well and favorably known, with the odds of 
color against it. 

And popularity, it must be admitted, improves a 
variety in every w^ay, because of rivalry and the ex- 
tent to which it is bred. But someone must take the 
helm fearlessly and courageously, and pilot the weak, 
neglected varieties to a position of prominence and 
usefulness, and this, perhaps, is more profitable than 
the creation of so many new varieties. 

Who, then, will take up the White Minorca, and be 
to them what Northup has been to the Blacks? For 
they now appear to be in the hands of only a few, 
struggling breeders, who are just about able to keep 
them from going down and out. 

If, in the Leghorn family, the White variety has for 
so many years been gaining over the others, including 
the Blacks, why is it that the reverse condition has 
prevailed among the Minorcas, the Black variety hav- 
ing left the Whites so far in the rear. 

Let no one imagine that we are now seeking to act 
in the capacity of promoting the White Minorca to 
any personal advantage, for such is not the case. We 
only feel impelled, by a sense of what is really due a 
meritorious fowl, to deplore the unsteady and un- 
healthy growth they have hitherto enjoyed. It may be 
said that they are not as hardy as the Blacks, and that 
breeders, therefore, have not been able to increase 
their size to any extent above that of the Leghorn. 
Be this as it may, it still remains that there are great 
possibilities wrapt up in the White Minorca fowl, pro- 
vided their hardiness can be increased, which rnight, 
we doubt not, be gained l)y an infusion of blood from' 
the Blacks. No one may hope, however, that there will 
be any special demand for them, apart from such a 
transformation in size and general vigor, as suggested. 
A bit of costly experience mav here be introduced 
possibly for the good of those not long on the way! 
In those days of our novitiate, we had a brood of pret- 
ty White Minorca chicks, upon which we suspected 
lice were beginning to prey. We did the innocent 
thmg, then, when we administered to each little head 
a drop of pure peppermint oil— but, oh, the (lisap])oint- 
mg, the heart-rending results that appeared the fol- 
lowmg morning. Of course, all the chicks were dead 
And then, like a chastened child we said, '1 will never 
do it any more." But now we take three or four 
ounces of sweet, or olive oil, and one of sassafras, mix 
them, and we have an ideal unuent for anointincr the 



heads of chicks at all ages. An ordinary dropper may 
be used to administer it, or better, a little oil can such 
as go with sewing machines. Mention is made of this 
because the head lice are most to be feared, and, if 
one can cope with them, the chick w^ill ordinarily deal 
with the others, if a dust bath is accessible. Though 
some chicks, like some individuals, do not appear to be 
too scrupulous about the cleanliness of their bodies. 

And then the beautiful Silver Wyandotte, where 
have they been drifting all these years? They have 
been "putting on their beautiful garments," and have 
almost become one of the ornamentals. They have 
lost ground, while the Whites have been gaining, un- 
til to-day the White Wyandottes are to be seen every- 
where, the Silvers rarely. And yet these are, perhaps, 
the most attractive of the Wyandotte family, while 
their place, strictly speaking, has been usurped by 
their more fortunate rivals. The Silvers have grown 
up, not in popular esteem and demand, but like the 
shut-in, city urchin, narrow and flat chested, instead 
of a broad and compact development, bespeaking great 
sturdiness and vigor. 

During the 80s, when there was a greater demand 
for Silver Wyandottes than there were good birds to 
supply this demand, we were so fortunate as to se- 
cure a pen from a farmer, who, while he gave rea- 
sonable care to his birds, allowed them unlimited 
range, with an entire absence of inbreeding. But 
those were splendid birds, and to this day we recall 
them with great pleasure. They were darker in color 
than the finest bred stock of to-day, but they were 
vigorous and well developed, and, therefore, their eggs 
were plentiful, and their chicks were born to live. 
And they lived and developed on wholesome food with 
just ordinary care. Now I do not keep Silver Wyan- 
dottes, but I must confess that down in my heart there 
IS a corner which they have alwavs filled And I 
would like to see them putting on the Wvandotte shape 
again, and occupying the place they so richly deserve 
as the first Wyandottes. 

But the '' color scheme," which has never been al- 
together a success with this variety, must, if needs be 
be sacrificed, and more attention given to shape and 
strong, inherent constitution by out-breeding if neces- 
sary, if the variety is ever to get fairly in the race 
again. "^ 

But manifestly there is plenty of trouble ahead for 
other part.-colored varieties, if this color craze does 
not abate. And vvc shall see the solid colored varieties 
supersede those more and more, because more atten- 
tion has been given those in the matter of physical 

and'St"' " '■'' '"""" ""•"^^"' productiveness 
Laceyville. Pa. 



Tf the other fellow lias succeeded, why not yon? 

One of the most important points in poultrv raisinjr 
IS clcanhness. I.,ltl,y houses and runs are reallv re^ 
sponsible for more di.sease and loss than any other 

Haphazard matiiiff and breeding does not pav no 
•..alter what the quality of your stock. Even in ' fio cl 
of sen, fowls there are a few that are better Uian";'; 
HsI. I lace only the best you have in the breeding pen. 



• 





• 



• 



f^SZS2SSSI!P:iT;132n^ 



^h CSjIEJ -pqultry fancier^ 



a^U^VV.vVs' -V-v'T^,?-^:*^' 



Page 83 , 





liccess 






Some Thoughts for the Consideraton of Fanciers 
Who Wish to Attain Success and Prominence 
Quickly with Small Financial Outlay. 

By J. E. WILMARTH 



• 





N Ni^ARL.V every Poultry Paj^er we 
l)ick up we find some one asking the 
(|uesti()n, which breed shall I take up? 
the questioner generally naming over 
several varieties, and nearly every 
time the answer is to keep the most 
])()pular breeds. The reason given is that there is 
a greater demand for them. \Ve don't dispute that 
fact, but many ])e()ple do not stoj) to consider that 
there are also many more breeders of the more 
po])ular kinds of poultry, and therefore there is 
more competition with them, not only in the show 
room, but also in selling them, and when one goes 
to buy stock to commence with, if he wants good 
birds he will probably have to pay from three to 
five times as much for comparatively the same 
ciualitv in the very ])o])ular varieties as he would 
have to pay in the rare breeds. 

Take the Barred Rocks for instance, for a good 
breeding trio one would have to spend from fiftv 
to one hundred dollars, and for a bird that could 
win in any of the larLjer shows, a hundred would 
likelv be the price. This is all right for the man 
with plentv of money, but the ordinarv poultrv 
keeper finds this a little more than he can afford, 
and nian\^ paying these kind of prices get discour- 
aged when their birds fail to win or breed winners, 
as thev have paid all thev feel thev can afTord, and 
consequentlv thev ''get out of the liame." 

Put suppose we take un one of the rare varieties. 
\\q can get a good trio for ten to twenty dollars 
and a first class show bird for twenty-five dollars, 
that would probablv win first at most anv show, 
where one would be luckv to get a fifth with his 
more popular variety at four times the price. And 
when one wanted to sell stock, see the bunch of 
ads of the popular varieties in the poultrv papers, 
much of a chance has the little fellow o-ot 



TT 



ow 



with a small ad telling about his fifth prize win- 
^ ner fif he is luckv cnouoh to have one), and while 
there mav be a thousand looking for fwe will sav) 
A\^hite W'yandottes. there w^ould be a hundred ad- 
vertisers, with odds strono-lv in favor of the "Pig 
Guns" of Poultrydom, while with the Pyle \.q^- 
horn ffor instance) one would likelv be the onTy 
advertiser. There might be ten interested in this 
breed, and he would iyQ\ all the enquiries, with a 
strong possibility of making several sales. 

'T)Ut," vou say, ''in the show room T will have no 
competition." but this condition does not exist lonq- 
for others seeing them, will be impressed bv thoTr 
rarity, and you will probably have competition an- 
other year at your local shows, and with a little 
missionary work on your part, vou can get up cjuite 
a strong class in a few vears. You can also send a 
string to some of the large winter shows, with a 
good chance of winning out. With the resultant 
biisinoss that this kind of advertisino- (helped along 
ith a little poultry paper advertisino), will be 



w 



sure to bring to you, combined with the ])remium 
money won, you will be better off financially at the 
end of the year, than you would be by taking up 
one of the very popular varieties. 

This article is written for what we might term 
the "liack Yard Fancier," as the larger breeder 
would probably find the popular breeds more to his 
liking, but for one living in a village or on a small 
suburban place, the rare varieties of ])oultry often 
fill the bill just right. Here one wants to keep a 
few to supply his own wants, in eggs and an occas- 
ional chicken dinner, and at the same time have 
something that he will be proud to show to his 
friends. Pet us see what particular kinds are 
adapted to our ])articular wants. If eggs are the 
chief consideration, something in the line of the 
Mediterraneans will answer, provided one has a 
suf^ciently high fence to confine them, if they can- 
not be given their liberty. The Rose Comb Peer- 
horns are all good layers, and fair table fowl, if not 
allowed to get too old before being eaten, and one 
does not mind how many he kills. This can be said 
of all the smaller breeds, as they are all active, and 
when aged, their tal)le qualities are not improved. 
There are the Puffs, P>lacks, lirovvns, etc., none 
very poi)ular in Rose Combs. The Hamburgs are 
another good kind, great layers, of rather small 
eggs, the Golden and Silver ])enciled being the less 
popular ones. The Anconas are another good kind, 
closely resembling the Peghorns in utilitv points. 
Then there are the Alinorcas, cspeciallv the Rose 
Combs: but if one finds the flying abilities of any 
of the above to be too much for tiiem, why not try 
some of the Polish? These are fairly good layers, 
and a small active bird, but their crests preVent 
them from seeing to fly very much. Or in the 
American breeds we have, first of all, the Domi- 
ni(|ue, a grand old bird, when properly bred. Then 
there are the Silver and (lolden Wyandottes, the 
Silver Penciled, a very showy bird, "the I'.lacks, all 
good general ])ur])()se birds, closely resembling their 
more po])ular brothers of the Wyandotte family, 
both in table and Q^rir qualities and general dispo- 
sition. Tn Plymouth Rocks we have the Silver 
Penciled, the other Rocks giving promise of being 
loo popular for our consideration here. Then we 
have the Puckeves, a good breed, not generally 
fully appreciated, through the tendencv of the 
breeders of the more popular "Reds" to treat them 
as a joke. For one wishing nice quiet birds, the 
Asiatics will answer. There are the Dark P,rah- 
mas, one of our oldest breeds, also all varieties of 
Cochins. These may be kept in quite small runs, 
but re(|uire special judgment in feeding to see that' 
they get enough to eat to enable them to lav, and 
at the same time not get too fat. Thev also should 
have dififerently arranged houses from the smaller 
breeds, as they are better oflF without any roosts, 
and should be bedded down the same as a horse. 

Any of the abo\e breeds will give a fancier a 
nice looking flcx^k that will be an ornament to his 
place, will lay him plenty of eggs, give him an 
occasi()naI Sunday dinner," and he' can show them, 
and win with them, and sell his surplus to gocxi 
advantage, first among his neighbors being" at- 
tracted by something out of the (irdinarv, aiuMater 




Page 84 



POULTRY FANCIER 




A pril, '10 




throiio-h his winninos and advertising-. ]f one has 
only small runs, not covered with grass, I should 
advise him to keep clear of any breed having- many 
white feathers, as these present a dilapidated ap- 



pearance from sIiowin<:^ soil on their white plu- 
mag-e. The buff colors are the best for small runs, 
lollowed by the blacks, and black and red. 
Amityville, Pa. 



Coll 



uiiiLiaii Wyandotte BreedersTroubles 




One of Them Fears the Breed Will Be Ruined. 
Says the Brahma Standard Should Not Be Aped. 
Why Not Work in Harmony with Nature? 

By C. H. BATCHELDER 

T is in interest of the Columbian Wy- 
andottes, that I write these lines. It 
may well be asked "What of their fu- 
ture? What effect will the 1910- 
15 Standard have? Will they be bet- 
ter or worse for the changes?" If I 
could have my own way I should breed for clean 
white backs, breast, body and fluff, with only a tinge 
of blue m the undercolor of female, and nothing 
darker than light to medium slate in the undercolor 
Ox male. I should want a suspicion of blue in the 
surface white which carries with it better black 
sections and eliminates to a considerable de.o-ree 
the tendency to creaminess in females and brassiness 
in males. I should strive for intense black in neck 
and tail, with nice lacing, and let the wings take 
care of themselves. I am no crank on wing color 
although I am compelled to satisfy my patVons in 
this respect by furnishing- what they call for 

I am inclined to think this craze for black prim- 
aries, which the new Standard will call for wtll be 
the undoingr of a beautiful variety tnat was last 
approaching- the present Standard. If bred for the 
points I have named above the primaries of females 
would run "black to predominate," but to call for 
a solid black primary, except the edging of white is 
asking- too much. It is inviting' ruin. Already 
prominent breeders (and we small ivy have to tollovv 
their example) are sending out breeding males so 
dark that it is difficult to determine at a criance to 
what breed or variety they belong. Some of the 
brecdin.g females are so dark in slate undercolor that 
black would be a better description. These birds 
tnrow a large percentage of very dark chicks and 
when grown two-thirds of them go to the cull-pen. 
1 cppcr and black splashes .galore appear in the backs 
of females. The males have slate fluff, solid prim- 
aries without edging, splashed feathers back of 
thigiis, sides of breast and under throat. A few 
g:ood specimens result, and there is black enouHi 
in the female wing to satisfv the most enthusi- 
astic b ack-wing- crank. Time comes when the 
cockere s must go to market, and we may also in- 
clude the old hens. Feathers good for nothing; 
inky pin-feathers; turkey colored meat; inferior 
quality; inferior price- That's about it. All this 
and a lot more just to breed for a section that's 
out of sight— a section that is never seen except by 
force or when the bird stretches itself. No wonder 
certain breeders wanted to insert and did insert in 
color description of female these words, ''Occasional 
black in web of feathers shall not be a serious de- 



fect !" Why? r>ecause wing-cranks cannot breed 
solid black female primaries and keep the backs 
clean, and they want to make the breeding of their 
pet wings easily possible, even to the detriment of 
color sections in sieht. 

Conservative Columbian men have been breeding- 
for years to eliminate striping in saddles and sad- 
dle-hangers and now we must have some of it or 
take a back seat. For my part I would have a g-ood 
heavily striped saddle and hangers. It would make 
a better balanced bird. But w^hv didn't they let us 
know about this ten years ago? It would have 
helped us immensely over the brassiness and 
creaminess barrier that has loomed up ahead these 
many years. A moderate amount of striping- adds 
l)eauty and finish to the male's back, and'^good 




lieavy stripino- would he still better. What I am 
<lnvinff at is that the Brahma Standard is hein- 
aped in so far as it easily can be followed. Why not 
switch off and make a Colimibian Standard and 
dr.ne w,th ,t. The variety is able to stand on its 
own merits without any P.rahn.a props. It has color 
characteristics of its own and is entitled to its own 
color description. To change the male's saddle and 
han.crers will not entail a qreat amount of work for 
It comes naturally. A black female primary doe.s not 
come naturally with li,c,.ht undercolor and'will spoil 
the variety for reasons siven above. With striped 
saddles there will be less tendency to smutty hTk 
.IS rar^cved tail lacinn- and creaminess in females, ancf 

a, ''" '\''''^'^«' ^a'^tor in eliminating straw color 
and brassiness in males. 

T say set up a Slamlard of our own ami call for 
a i-erfcctinir of the sections in siijht with a -ood 
clean nndercolon one that does not .spell ruin"^to a 
now worthy utility variety. 

No. Haverhill, N. H. 



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April, '10 





■POULTRY 










Every Breeder of Poultry Who is Trying to Produce 
Standard Bred Fowls, Whether He Be a Beginner 
or Old Veteran, Should Read and Profit by This 
Poultry Sermon— The Truths Are Old Ones, But 
Are Too Often Overlooked. 

By J. F. DAVIS 




a long lane that 



HEY tell us it is 
has no turn." The proverb is capable 
of a double meaning. It may be 
taken to mean that our way may grow 
mountainous and wearisome because 
it lacks variety, in which case, the 
proverb is an exhortation to patience, or the pro- 
verb may mean that, sudden turns of fortune may 
be expected and, thus interpreted, suggests a word 
of caution. He is a very wise and self-sufficient 
poultryman who does not need continually the sav- 
ing voice of the proverb. 

The exhibition season is over, the breeding season 
is here. A few exhibitors have had a sort of royal 
procession through the show rooms and are now 
joyously flaunting a string of blue ribbons. Others 
have not been so fortunate: thev have won some 
prizes, perhaps none. 1^he mood in which victory 
or defeat is taken is apt to tell on all future ventures 
and is therefore a very important matter. It should 
be remembered that a show-room record taken by 
Itself is a small affair to the minds of observant 
people. I would not cast suspicion or scorn at such 
record ; my aim now is to point a way to make the 
record worth while. The essential thing in a show 
record is latent. It is not the record but wdiat we 
do with it and because of it that tells. Happy is 
the man who has made a clean sweep yet has 
enough ballast to keep him on even keel, and 
equally happy is the man who has suffered defeat 
and has grace enough to (piietly "take his medicine" 
and i)roht by it. In the poultrv business it is as 
''true as gospel" that, "the race 'is not to the swift 
nor the battle to the strong," but to the faithful 
plodder. Let the man with his string of winnings 
remind himself that the lane will turn the wrong 
way if he don't keep going right. Let the de"^ 
feated man assure himself that the lane turns pres- 
ently but he will never reach the turn if he does 
not keep going.. Yea, his defeat mav prove itself 
the turn it he has eyes to see it. Both winning 
and defeat call louclly for extra caution. Who 
hears and heeds and profits mostly by the experi- 
ence is surest of the future. 

l^Lxhibition stock in the breeding-pen is always a 
questionable quantity and qualitv. The exposure 
incident to transi)ortation to and from the show, 
the strange surroundings and unusual conditions 
tell greatly on the physical vigor of the fowls. The 
more shows a fowl has been exhibited at the greater 
the exposure and the less likelihood of its" value 
as a breeder. It does not alter the fact to say "the 
fowl looks all right." A month's extra cafe and 
feeding is necessary to get a breeding bird back 
into breeding form. This mav seem a strong and 
summary way of putting the matter but, vears of 



^•^ -J&. ^Si, .y jigs ^L. ^ _^^ 



ce 



hard knocks in the school of experience has tauoht 
one that; it is good sense. "^ 

It has been generally believed that the foremost 
breeders dispose of their show specimens, which I 
assume to be the case. But how have thev kept at 
the front ? By breeding inferior birds with superior 
skill.-' So we are told, and I do not believe it. No 
doubt they have the superior skill and inferior birds, 
but they^ are wise enough to breed only 'vigorous 
stock. The exhibition specimens sold as top- 
notchers, which they are, do not reproduce them- 
selves simply because they sometime lack vigor. 
We are apt to be very thoughtless about this 
matter. A first class record of a high class fowl is 
worth exploiting— it brings business and it is most 
natural to put the best side out. There is genuine 
satisfaction in blazing abroad a mating that is the- 
oretically hard to beat. But there is no ultimate 
gain above the practical value of a mating. This 
IS the thing we must consider. Animal nature has 
Its limits and when subjected to undue strain mav 
not break down but as we say "fizzles out " Such 
often is the result of high class matings. Ee-s 
are infertile. A superior male of impaired vigor 
by reason of exhibition exposure, is mated with 
vigorous females, the greater vigor of these inferior 
females outweights the depleted strength of the 
superior male. "The chicks from such a mating have 
small chances of life. They mav be successfullv 
reared but it is doubtful if a single one of them will 
equal the poorest female in the pen. 

Another thing. Show birds are mated and the 
show-record and matings are duly exploited This 
is more than advertising— it is the breder's miar- 
antee that these fowls are in prime breeding con- 
dition and, otherwise such as to warrant confidence 
that the progeny will make good. This is the in- 
terpretation the buying public is expected to give 
and does give to the breeder's advertisement Here 
however, is where many a breeder has struck a rock! 
1 he breeder has been honest ; his show records have 
been honorably gained, but, because of the afore- 
mentioned facts his matings have not made good. 
Now what is the remedy? How can we oive value 
to merit ? Well ! begin here. It is not by undue 
stimulation with drugs, compounds and confounds 
It IS not by replacing free infertile eggs, nor bv fair 
promises sweet words and over generous dealing. 
Ordinarily folks are satisfied with square dealincr 
rhe trouble with much of our square dealing hcis 
been that it was round, however, much of it we 
dispensed. ] here have been corners unfilled We 
have simply relied too much upon and conjured too 
nuch with exhibition stock. Merit has lost value 
because it lacked vigor. The thing needed is just 
h,s— give these fowls that have been exposed to 
the rigors ot the show a chance to fully recuperate 
T>reeders and buyers alike have lost their heads 
in the mad rush for the spectacular. There is i 
senseless craze for high-scores, big noise and 
emptiness. It is not that any one should let down 
in the passion for excellence. Let all strive for the 
best, the very best. But I am a firm believer in the 
idea that nature yields her best onlv to those who 
most closely and religiouslv observe nature's laws 




POULTRY FANCIER' 



April, '10 




AJatings should be made with consideration of these 
laws and discovered facts. Score cards and show 
records are very poor guides to mating. The 
breeder should know and must know the individual 
qualities of his fowls that not merely warrant but 
endorse his matinfjs. 

Moreover, high scores need generally to be taken 
with a grain of suspicion. It is not for me, nor in 
me, to reveal some mysteries of the score card. 
Just now I merely point a moral. Here is a pullet, 
scored 95 in the early show, given a pound in 
weight. To-day she is not an ounce heavier nor a 
bit larger than she was three months ago. There 
may now be other faults developed, also. Now it 
is manifestly a dishonorable and perilous thing for 
the breeder to ignore these facts. Such a fowl 
scores but 93 and has a two point cut for weight — 
a very serious cut. Here is another, scored 93 at 
the same show. She was given weight also, but 
to-day she is a well-developed and rugged specimen, 
big boned and strong, with an eye that sparkles 
with vitality. Surely there is enough contrast be- 
tween these two to save any one from confusing 
scoring qualities with breeding qualities. 



Again, the average of the flock and not the high- 
scorer is what the breeder realy has to sell. To 
raise this average year by year is the breeder's 
problem. To do it is rather more success than 
many gain. It is worth all one's effort and striv- 
ing to attain. I have tried to emphasize the truth 
that other merit fails in the absence of strong 
vitality. It is not too late to re-canvass every breed- 
ing pen and cut out every unworthy specimen. 
Those birds that have been on exhibition should be 
most thoroughly considered. A small pen of choice 
fowls is far more worthy than a large pen made u]) 
of exceptionally fine birds of weak vitality and 
others of indifferent quality. Let the money ques- 
tion drop out of mind and a little. Let the ''garrish 
glitter" of show-record and score card go and 
actually be a breeder for this season at least. I do 
not say that vigor is everything. I merely point 
out this fact — the individual fowl, however meri- 
torious, otherwise has every good quality vacated 
by the absence of vigor, and a vigorous gowl if 
rightly mated may be depended on to reproduce 
himself and more, if there is right breedino- behind 
nn. 



B 




reeamg 




ow 



Bird 




A Brown Leghorn Breeder Relates Some of His 
Experiences and Believes that He Is Undoubt- 
edly Right in His Views. 

By W. E. LUND 

ILL breeding for exhibition spoil Sin- 
gle Comb IJrown Leghorns for ^gg 
production? That is a question that 
has for some time been worrying 
breeders of the "little brown hen.'' 
Let me say I have found it not to be 
the case. What's that 1 hear? Prove vour case. 
Well, I'm not a writer, only a breeder' of Single 
Comb Brown Leghorns, but I'll do my best. ]'m 
sure my literary friends will excuse all my gram- 
matical errors in doing so. 

Two years ago I mated a cock to a brown hen 
that had a trap nest record of 145 eggs in one year. 
Of course this is not an exceptional record but she 
had the color, the carriage, length and breadth of 
back and symmetry that T wanted and I bred her* 
with others to this cock bird. From this mating I 
got six exhibition birds and thev have made an 
average egg record of 163 eggs in 365 davs. T 
cannot tell you how much these pullets scored as 
they were all entered in comparison shows, but for 
color and shape as well as Qgg production they 
certainly improved my flock. 

In breeding for exhibition, you would not choose 
a bird for your breeding pen that would be short 
backed, narrow at the rear of back, short legged 
and squatty. Now, look at your largest egg pro- 
ducers that you would choose in breeding for egg 
production. Has your largest e:gg producers short 
backs, pinched tails, squattv legs or any of the 
defects T have mentioned? Well, T guess not. Does 
your Standard call for short leiis, short backs, nar- 
row at the rear and i^inchcd tails for exhibition? T 
can assure you it does not. The chief characteris- 



s and Layers 



tics of tlie egg producing fowl, the exhibition fowl 
and the Standard are synonymous. It has always 
been my fortune to have my best egg producers 
prove to be my best exhibition birds. ' As to color 
It would do you no good to exhibit a bird that is 
fine in color and poor in shape, symmetry and car- 
nage. No sane judge in the country would place 
a prize on a demented looking, poor'shaped, unde- 
veloped bird that had fine color as its one redeemin.- 
leature. Competition is too keen these days tS 
allt)w us to consider placing such a bird in competi- 
tion. ' 

Did I hear some one say they had a hen whose 
egg production is fine (which also means fine in 
shape and carriage) but whose color, head and 
comb IS poor? Although I am a sticker for a fine 
comb, head and color, I would rather breed from 
such a bird than to breed from a bird with poor 
shape, carnage, short back, legs and narrow at the 
base. I would mate the above described hen to a 
cock bird extra fine in the color points that were 
weak on the female, and be sure that his head and 
comb are extra strong. T can assure you that vour 
fowls so mated will produce more exhibition sneci- 
mens than ,f mated with a fowl that is fine in color 
comb and head and weak body shape, carriage 
and symmetry mated to any cock bird vou care to 

tT-l- ^A •""'■■''^ y°" ^^ fi"^ a" occasional hen 
that IS ,q:ood in tfr^ production that has a pood car- 
nage and short legs but never a bird with a short 
back and narrow at the rear. These hens will al- 
ways be in the minority. You will always be able 
to find p enty of ...^ producing hens among yZ 
flock that have good heads, combs and fair color 
If you haven t many of these birds it is best to do 
away with vour w'holc flock at once and buy a-ain 
as (he birds yon ha^■e will never pay for the feed 
thev eat. 

T^ook over any farm that is specializing in eee 
production and count the birds that are nearest to 
the Standard in shape, size. length and breath of 



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^.j^^^'y^. f ^POUI/I'RY FANC! 




Page 87 




back. You can count them without trouble. In 
color they may not be up to the Standard but per- 
mit me to assure you that they do not consider this 
Item first in breeding for egg production. This 
lack is usually made up with the cock bird if pos- 



sible. Try this policy and if you do not get all show 
specimens you will at least have healthy egg pro- 
ducing fowls. You will also come closer to the 
Standard requirements than by any other method. 
Centerville, Pa. 




OW to 







a 



1 





The Importance of Giving This Matter Special At- 
tention. Where to Set, How to Make Nests, 
Size, Nesting Material and Care of Hen. 

By J. B. BARNARD 

AKE a nest box out of thin lumber 
1G inches square and 15 inches high 
with top covered ; cut the front of 
box down to 6 inches from the bottom, 
hang a door on the front that will 
swing up and fasten. When door is 
down it serves as a bridge for the hen to walk into 
the nest without breaking the eggs, bore a few 
holes in the sides near the top of the box for ven- 
tilation and it is ready for the nest. 

Put in 3 or 4 inches of moist earth and shape out 
a shallow^ nest, then put in a good supply of straw 
or hay cut fine and the nest is ready for the hen. 
Set the hen at night on china eggs and let her 
set until she wonted to the nest, and will come off 
and go back on the nest all right. 

Now dust the hen and nest thoroughly with Per- 
sian insect powder and put in the eggs for hatching, 
not over 14 to the largest hen ; if the eggs have been 
shipped very far they must be unpacked and let 
them rest 24 hours before setting, so thev will settle 
to their normal condition. 

The hen must be set in a building where none 
but setting hens are allowed. On the" floor in front 
of the nest should be placed corn and sometimes a 
little wheat, but corn should be the principal food. 
While the hen is setting always have fresh water 
and crystal grit close by the corn, and a box with 
road dust or hard coal ashes in it for the hen to dust 
in. 

Have a regular hour each day to open the door of 
the nest box and let the hen come oft* and not stay 
off to exceed 15 or 20 minutes at a time. She must 
be watched at first, and if she don't go back on the 
nest by that time, she must be put back and the 
door closed. Most hens will soon learn to come off 
the nest when the door is opened and go back at 
the proper time. 

Every day when the hen comes off the nest the 
eggs must be examined; if any should be broken 
all must be taken out of the nest and those that are 
fouled must be washed with warm w^ater and wiped 
dry with a cloth; the nest must be replaced with 
clean, fresh material and the eggs but back soon as 
possible. 

If the contents of a broken Qgg is allowed to re- 
main on the eggs they will not hatch but rot, as 
It closes the pores of the shell and germ dies. 

The eggs must be taken out of the nest occasion- 
ally and the nest filled up with the soft materia], 
so the nest will not get too deep and cause the eggs 
to roll together too close. The nest should at'Tll 



limes be so shallow that the eggs will roll away 
from the hen's foot when she steps into the nest; 
in such a shaped nest there will seldom be any eggs 
broken. 

In ten days from the time you set the hen, give 
her and the nest another dusting with the insect 
powder. This is to kill what lice, if any, that have 
hatched since she was dusted before. 

The hen should come off the nest every day to 
air the eggs up to including the 19th dav, then she 
must be shut in and not allowed off again until all 




V ^,,^.^P.'^?' ^^^l^^'^JL^ strain S. C. White Leghorn pullet, 
by Whitaker & McCune. Ashtabula. O. 



J 

Bred 



the eggs have hatched that will ; during this time 
give the hen a little corn and water while on the 
nest, being careful not to disturb her. 

While the chicks are hatching disturb the hen as 
little as possible, but occasionally run your hand 
under her to remove shells that none may become 
telescoped over those not hatched and smother the 
chicks. 

Have a nice coop to receive the brood when 
hatched; the coop must be roomy, with a storm- 
proof roof, tight board floor, with door to let down 
in front and shut up at night, rat proof with a 
slat door to let down on the inside to keep the hen 
in when the chicks are small. Pieces of boards 
must be fitted in the corners of the coop to make 
them octagon instead of a square corner. Square 




POULTRY FANCIER 




April, '10 



gtf v^?n^^■f,4.-..^^;^■^rs;^.i -^-^^ 





corners in a coop are death traps to the chicks when 
small, often being crowded in a corner and smoth- 
ered by the hen. 

This coop must be set on elects to keep it up from 
the ground at least two inches and a wire run at- 
tached the width of the coop, and 5 or 6 feet long 
which is cat proof. With such a coop, with the 
door closed every night, you wont be raising- chicks 
for rats and cats to eat. 

When the eggs are all hatched that will, take 
the hen and dust her again with insect powder, 
also dust the chicks; use none but Persian insect 
powder as it wont hurt the little chicks. Place the 
hen and chicks in the coop with plenty of dry chaff 
on the bottom. Shut the door to keep it dark so 
the hen will brood the chicks and not get uneasy; 
:Mj to 48 hours after the chicks are hatched place a 
shingle covered Avith fine sharp sand before the hen 
and sprinkle it with stale bread crumbs rolled in 
sand. This is the first feed for the chicks. 

From this time on fed nothing but dry feed, such 
as bread cruni])s, pin-head or steel cut oatmeal, 



Alillet seed, cracked wheat, etc., or what is better 
is some of the prepared chick food now on the 
market. 

Always have fresh water before them in little 
fountains so the chicks can drink but not get their 
feet wet. 

Faithfully follow these instructions in setting the 
hen — place the brood in a coop as above described — 
move the coop and wire run on to fresh ground 
every day, feed no wet food, everything dry and 
you will raise nice strong chicks that wall be a 
pleasure to you instead of a disappointment. 

The high state of perfection which incubators 
and brooders have attained in the last decade is 
wonderful, and the old setting hen sadly contem- 
plates the onward march of science and invention 
that is fast taking from her the greatest pleasure 
of her life, but the fact still remains that the brooder 
has yet to l)e invented that will supply the life- 
giving warmth and magnetism to the little chicks 
equal to the mouther hen. 
darrcttsville, O. 



S 




Mating and Hatch 




How to Get Fertile Eggs. Proper Feed and Care. 
Confining Birds in Small Yards. Caring for and 
Handling the Eggs. 

By J. GAYLORD BLAIR 

J I E hatching season is now here again 
and we must all be ready to welcome 
the "chirp" of the small chick. And 
for these chicks to be healthy and ro- 
bust, we must study the eg<^ that 
produces them. The writer does not 
propose to present an essay upon embryology, but 
it will be sufficient for our purpose to say that the egg 
must be fertile or, in other words, hatchable, and this 
l)rings us at once to the subject of fertilitv. I have 
given it a great deal of study in the last 'few vears 
and the more I study it the more interesting it be- 
comes. 

First let us consider the egg that produces the 
chick : of course the egg gets its fertility from the 
male bird, but the female must be in the very best 
of condition at the time the egg is laid, because'if she 
is not in the very best of health the germ will be very 
weak, and if it hatches at all the chick will not live 
very long. This has been demonstrated time and 
again in the writer's own experience. Hens that are 
suffering from disease or infested with vermin may 
lay a few eggs, but eggs from such hens rarelv hatch, 
and if they do, the chicks will not mature into 
healthy and vigorous birds. Hence, in order to se- 
cure eggs that have strong germs, the birds that pro- 
duce them must he in the pink of condition, fed on a 
variety of food and must have plcntv of exercise. 
])o not try to force your hens for eggs, for if you do 
the eggs will probably not hatch Veil. ( iive your 
hens a variety of food and they will lav plentv of eggs, 
because it is natural for them to do so. Do not fe'c'd 
corn day after dny and year after vear, for this will 
not help fertility along any, neither will it help the 
hen's egg record any. A mixed diet in the grain line. 



such as wheat, cracked corn, oats, l)arlev, rve, kaffir 
corn, suniiower seed, etc., will help fill the egg basket; 
also feed ca1>bage, turnips, beets, etc., and gr'een bone 
three times a week (one ounce per hen is a big ra- 
tion). Keep grit, oyster shell and charcoal before 
them at all times, also plentv of pure fresh water 
i hey must be kei)t free from lice and must have 
l)lenty of straw or litter to exercise in. Birds that 
have free range, need less attention than those that 
are kept in small yards, and their eggs are usually 
more fertile. We should give our birds all the vard 
room that we can possibly provide for them. 

Some people do not believe in mating their birds 
and keeping them in their small vards. This is the 
'wrong idea, as it is a necessitv for a breeder to mate 
us best birds so as to improve them along both ex- 
hibition and utility lines. Some disagree 'as to how 
many females should he mated with one male bird • 
some say ten and some three. I have alwavs had the 
))est success mating about eight females with' one male 
One should exercise some oversight as to the matin^r 
of his fowls and should regulate liis breeding pens 
accordingly. In the flock where there are three or 
.our females the male will so annov and worrv his 
inates or small flock that but few eggs will be' pro- 
duced and but few of that number xvill hatch. Resides 
this, the hens of the small flock will l)e jealous ner- 
vous, and (inarrclsome, and if vou will give this 'same 
male a large flock he will keep them contented and 
iiarmonious. J believe it is best to mate about eight 
and not more than ten females to one male If vou 
are so situated that you can alwavs mate a cock bird 
to i)ullets and a cockered to hens,' you will get good 
strong, healthy chicks that will thrive and grow ^rop- 

[iru .ri'iirr''"^ 'T/"' ^'^^''^'^^'^' ^nicard those 
that aie il shapen and that have ridges on the shell. 

liy o get all of them of the same size, color etc 
nud (h.canl eggs that are too small or too large' I et 

he selection he influenced bv the average i)roduct of 
the breed or hen. An egg of unusual length or one 
of unusual rotundity should not be placed in an in- 
cubator or under a hen. Most eggs of that kind are 



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^ April, '10 




infertile or will hatch a cripple. Freshness is a prime 
necessity ; fresh eggs will hatch earlier and the chicks 
will be much stronger than the ones hatched from 
eggs that are several weeks old. As a rule, eggs 
should not be set if they are over ten days old'; they 
should also be clean and free from dirt and filth, i^f 
they are not clean they should be washed in tepid 
water and carefully dried with a clean soft cloth. 
Washing does not injure the egg, but it should be 
done very carefully. As soon as the eggs are washed 
they should be covered with a layer of clean cloth or 
absorbed cotton to prevent them from becomin^>- 
chilled. "" 

Bear in mind that eggs set the same day they are 
laid will hatch several hours earlier than others that 
are a week older. In saving eggs for incubation they 
should be kept in a room with an average temperature 
of about 50 degrees F. ; they will stand a variation in 
temperature of about from 50 to 90 degrees, but this 
will tend to weaken the germs somewhat. They should 
not be exposed to currents of cold or hot ai'r, steam 




FANCIER 



or vapor. A very good way to turn eggs is to place 
them in a shoe box or something on that order, wrap 
each egg in paper and fill the box just full enough for 
the top to go on easily, tie with good string; now you 
have them so you can turn them all at once and as 
many times as you like by merely turning the box over 
but once a day is sufficient. Or still better, you can 
get an egg cabinet with special egg turning travs at a 
very small cost. Do not set eggs that are over a week 
old or ten days at the outside, if it can be avoided. 

In order to get fertile eggs that will hatch strong 
healthy chicks, there are three points that a breeder 
must keep in mind. First, the fowls that produce 
the eggs must be in the best of health. Second, they 
must be housed properly and have the right kind of 
exercise. Third, they must be fed upon an assorted 
or balanced ration. A little attention to these simple 
rules will make quite a difference in the possibilities 
of fertile eggs and will greatly help the chicks grow 
into large, robust birds. 

Carlisle, Ky. 



Pointers on Successful Advertisin 



CJ 




Advertising Is the One Absolute Necessity If a 
Breeder Expects to Attain Prominence and Make 
the Business a Financial Success. 

By WALTER E. LUND 

F ALL the important factors of success 
as a fancier, nothing is to be given 
more attention than advertising. No 
matter how good your stock may be, 
or how many prizes you may have won 
at the poultry exhibitions, it is all for 
naught if people do not know that you have such 
stock for sale. The only way you can let them know 
you have the birds they are looking for is to adver- 
tise. 

In advertising, do not expect returns from your 
ads ten days or so after your first ad appears. I well 
remember a little of my own experience along this 
line I had won six prizes on the first six birds I 
had ever shown. I advertised eggs for sale from 
these birds and the birds that produced them in a 
classified ad in a good poultry journal. Returns failed 
to come after I had advertised six months. I had re- 
ceived but two inquiries. I corresponded with the 
editor and asked him to explain why my ad didn't 
bring greater results. I discontinued the ads in his 
journal and heard no more about the matter till the 
following autumn, and then the results commenced 
to come in from my spring ads. My eggs didn't 
sell, but after I had raised tiie birds from these eggs 
I sold enough to many times pay for the advertis- 
ing. A great many people keep their poultry jour- 
nals for future reference, and when they wish to 
buy poultry or eggs they get out some old journals 
that in some cases may be several years old and 
v^rite to the advertisers. I have done the same 
thing in my early experience. 

In advertising as in most other things, it is the 
stayer who wins. 

There are some people who aspire to be success- 
ful fanciers who will pay $25 to $50 for a sino-le 



bird, but who will not spend $1 to advertise it. 
Then, they wonder why they don't get to the top. 
There is not a successful fancier in the field today 
who did not reach his position through advertisino- 
Don't forget that. =.- 

Raising the prize winners and making the busi- 
ness a financial success are two different proposi- 
tions and require different brands of ability. 

Another branch of advertising which is important 
IS your letter-heads, envelopes ^ and a good line of 
stationery and circulars. If you have received an 
inquiry from your ad in a poultry journal it is up to 
you to land the business. No matter how well your 
letter may be written, you will not have the advan- 
tage of your competitor who may not write quite so 
well, but who has neat, attractive stationery and cir- 
cular matter. Tell people abotit your fowls, matings, 
prizes, etc., in as brief a wav as possible and it will be 
more effective. 

Another method of advertising is to have neat and 
light packages to ship and also to have a neat 
placard or shipping card on every coop or egg pack- 
age containing your name and address and where the 
stock or eggs are going. Many a shipper sends a con- 
signment of fowls to a customer in any old box he 
can find. ^Hiese boxes are oftentimes so heavy that 
they incur extra express charges. This is a detriment 
to future trade. A neat package creates a good im- 
pression and some times causes a prospective cus- 
tomer to decide in your favor. 

When placing your order for stationerv and poultry 
printing, it is better to give the work to a firm mak- 
ing a specialty of this class of printing than to a local 
printer. These specialists are always prepared with 
excellent cuts of birds and other necessarv appliances 
for this class of work. Their ads can always be found 
in journals that you take and the editor of the paper 
always stands good for them and their work. In this 
way you are always sure to get something good. I 
hope that these few hints on advertising will be of 
some benefit to at least a few readers. 

Erie, Pa. 



^ ci*^JV^-.' ^\^-^:iiN;.)',^w^>rr:g 



'l"^** 



L. J5SIJ^it^} ^-P OU LT RY FANCIER 




April, '10 f 




EDITORIAL PAGE 



Poultry Fancier 

Published under the name Fancy Fowls for 10 years 
1897 to 1907. 



Entered ftg Second Class Matter, Sept. 28, 1907, at the 

Post Office at Chicago, 111., under 

Act of March 3, 1879. 



Published the 1 5 th of each month by 

POULTRY FANCIER PUBLISHING CO. 

FRANK HECK. President 

357 Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 



FRANK HECK, 



Editor 



Subscription price in United States and pos- 
sessions 25 cents per year. 

Subscription price in Chicago, Canada and 
foreign countries, 50 cents per year. 

All subscriptions are immediately discontinued 
when the time expires for which they have been 
paid. 

Requests for advertising rates will be given 
prompt attention. 

Changes of ads must be received by the 1st of 
the month. New ads must be received not later 
than the 1 0th of the month. 



The circulation of Poultry Fancier is national 
in character. It is the only poultry journal pub- 
lished solely in the interests of fanciers, the people 
who constitute practically the entire fraternity. 

The mission of Poultry Fancier is to teach 
breeders how to produce the beautiful and valu- 
able Standard bred birds which are the founda- 
don of all profit and pleasure in poultry raising. 



April, 1910 



Bii}- a Standard, not as an orna- 
ment for yonr library table, but as a 
! (Mjk of frequent reference. Make 
yourself so familiar with the ideal of 
your breed, througli constant study of 
Standard re(|uirements that you will 
:iot need to refer to the printed page. 

It doesn't pay to boost your prices 
sky high just because some other 
breeder can do it successful) v. If 
you have not the reputation and" show 
record to support the prices you will 
never get them. 

Try for the impossil)le. Aim at the 
sun. Though you will never hit tlie 
sun with your arrow, it will go higher 
than if you took a lower aim. 

The Standard describes tlie ideally 
perfect bird. Such a bird never wa*s 
and never will be. But this "counsel 
of perfection" teaches us what to 
strive to produce and enal)les us to 
produce something 1)etter than would 
have been possible with a lower 
Standard. 

It is not all in the egg. Rearing 
exerts a powerful influence in making 
tile possibilities of the eggs realities 
in the chickens. Good breeding must 
be supplemented bv good care and 
good feeding. 



A Few Reminders for Buyers 

and Sellers of Fggs for 

Hatching. 

In the midst of the season, when 
eggs for hatching are liberally bought 
and sold, the seller and the buyer 
should spend a little thought upon 
what their relations to each other 
should be; what ought the seller to 
give and the buyer to expect? 

The seller ought to "make good" 
on all of his representations. The 
eggs which he ships should be "true 
to name," that is, laid by fowls 
of the particular breed advertised; 
they should be reasonably fresh, so 
that a fair hatch can be "anticipated 
from them: they should be of good 
shape; that is, free from abnormali- 
ties, like ridges and bends; they 
>hould have a firm shell, neither too 
thick nor too thin; they should be, as 
nearly as possible, of the average size 
laid by the breed, the very small and 
the uimaturally large ones being re- 
jected: they should be of nearly uni- 
form color, though this is a point of 
minor importance; they should be 
from a pen mated long enough to 
make it reasonablv certain that the 
eggs are fertile, and it would be well 
if the breeder would test a few be- 
fore shipi)ing any: they should be 
properly packed in suitable boxes or 
baskets and shipped as promptly as 
cn-cumstances will permit: and the 
l)uyer should be notified promptly, if 
any unforeseen cause will necessitate 
a delay in the consignment. 

So much should the seller do and 
so much the buyer may expect. But 
the buyer cannot reasonably expect 
every egg to hatch. If he gets fifty 
per cent in chickens from the eggs, 
he has done well. If from thirteen 
t'Rgs he gets eight chickens he has 
reason to congratulate himself, while 
live ought not to cause him to com- 
plam. He must not expect that every 
chicken will be a prize bird. Matin<'- 
has not yet become such an exacl 
science that there are no culls. The 
best of breeders produce them. And 
It is a fact that the rearing often will 
make a chicken a cull or a ])rize bird 
according to whether it has been ill' 
or good. b:xpress comi)anies do not 
ahvays handle with care the eggs 
committed to their tender mercie<= 
and for what they do, the seller 
should not be held accountable. 

T.et both i)arties try to be reason- 
able and deal with each other honest- 
ly and nuich of the friction of the 
egg trade will disappear. 

Don't "Knock'' Other Breeds. 

A "knocker" is an undesirable citi- 
zen. He is a hindrance to progress. 
His pessimism negatives, to the ex- 
tent of his influence, the optimism of 
others. Tf the world jrenerally acted 
upon his advice, advancement would 
be impossible. 

Many poultrymen. without so in- 
tending to be. are "knockers." We 
receive many articles in the course 
of a year, extollinrr the merits of vari- 
ous breeds and varieties, claiming for 



them the whole round globe which 
we call the earth. Each breed sur- 
passes all others in prolificness and 
in table qualities, in beauty of color 
and grace of figure, in hardiness and 
economic feeding; in fact, in every de- 
sirable duality. And not content with 
setting forth the merits of the breed 
under consideration, the writers in- 
stitute comparisons with other 
breeds, greatly to their disadvantage. 
In other words these writers are un- 
conscious "knockers" of all breeds 
but their own. 

We are charitable enough to be- 
lieve that the enthusiasm of the writ- 
ers for their own favorites, and not 
an intentional hostility to other 
breeds, has obscured their sense of 
justice and blinded their eyes to the 
harm which they are doing, for such 
statements are unfair and harmful in 
many ways- This w^ould be true, 
even if their statements were always 
correct, but unfortunately blind zeal 
often leads to i)ositive misstatement 
of facts. It should never be forgot- 
ten that no one breed ever had, has 
now, or ever will have all the good 
features to be found in domestic 
poultry. In the nature of things this 
would be impossible. Some qualities 
are antagonistic. The greatest pro- 
lificacy and the greatest table quali- 
ties can never be combined in one 
fowl; they will no more mix that oil 
and Walter. While there are fowls 
that unite these qualities in a good, 
even in a high degree, as is the case 
with the best general purpose fowls, 
the fowls which are supreme in the 
realm of laying never can be supreme 
as table fowls, and vice versa. And it, 
too, should be remembered that all 
breeds have some good cpialities. 
There is no breed that does not have 
merits which make it valuable to some 
one, none which is not able to prove 
Its value as a profitable fowl. 

.\ poultry paper, as it stands for 
all. must be just to all. It can not 
pu])lish articles in which appear vin- 
dictive references to and odious com- 
parisons with other breeds. To do 
so would convert it into a partisan 
advocate of some single breed, and 
make it wage an "unholy" war 
against the welfare of breeders in 
general. Moreover such articles 
would be harmful to the uninformed 
reader, and lead him to accept error 
in the place of truth. Writers upon 
special breeds should stick to their 
text. They can tell what their breeds 
are and what they have done, without 
"knocking" others. And in general, 
writers should select more frec|uently 
topics of generab interest and helpful 
information, such as the proper mat- 
ing of breeding stock, the various 
factors that must be attended to in 
breeding, the necessarv conditions 
for successful rearing, and the like 
Such articles will be of interest to 
all. and assist all in the breeding of 
better specimens of their chosen 
l>ree(ls. We are glad to publish such 
articles, and it is our aim to help the 
breeders of all varieties in every legit- 
imate way. Not for ourselves but for 
others, not for one but for all, is the 
Diirpose of this publication. 



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gs^i^^^j'^ .'M'>v;^v^ff'jBr 



April, '10 

Pertinent Paragraphs 

By EASTERNER 

Here is a choice collection of ante- 
quated "trade pullers" which we no- 
tice are doing their full duty again 
this season. They are horriblv over- 
worked. 

In my flock of 100 hens there is 
less than twenty that lay over 800 
eggs a year and less than fifty that 
lay 250 in the same length of time. 

The male that heads pen 4 weighs 
something less than 13 pounds— he 
should sire size. 

Aly birds won 1, 2. 3 cocks; 1, 2, 3, 




Y FANCIER 







Page 91 



s:;^ ""■ Wt? 




4, .5 cockerel; 1, 2, 3, hen; 1, 2, 3, 4, 
5 pullets; 1, 2, 3, pens at the Small- 
ville show, with competition open to 
the world. This is the record win 
of the universe. (Eggs $1.00 per 15; 
$3.. 50 per 100). 

I did not show last season as had 
sold an enormous number of birds 
for exhibition purposes. It is not po- 
litic to compete with one's custom- 
ers. 

I do not show because the judges 
are not straight; but I furnish high 
class stock for exhibition purposes. 

T paid $200 to for the cock- 
erel that won at , have mated 

him to 10 hens of splendid quality. 



BARRED PLY. ROCKS, S. C. BLACK ORPLNGiONS 
COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES AND ?^'' ^ii;^^ ^°" "^^'"^ p"-^' 

n. ^ m. » *^«^*^^ « u X. 1, , ^-^A-^Jur than all our competitors at the 

R. C. R. I REDS ,Ba'-aboo Valley Show. Our breeding pens contain the grande.st 
t- ,r • r A'vm-im-rK./ j^^ Qf breeders we ever had. Eggs at $3 00 oer 1.5 reduced to 

half price after May 15th. Some grand breeders at reduced prices^ SatisfacUoSguarlnteed^ 

RAVEN ROCK POULTRY FARM 
GEO W. HACKETT, Proprietor BOX 111, NORTH FREEDOM, WIS. 



White WyandotteS. ^- C- Buff. R- C Brown and R. C. White 

I rr-lirvfUkTC Jn^r.^. o. ^ i • ^^ the recent Baraboo Valley show I won nine firsts, six 

LEGHORNS ™ r^ "^ several minor and special prizes including the Mediterranean class 
of all firsts in Wh^? ^tl^^^.^ ^''^^ Sweepstake all classes competing. I made a clean sweep 
mnJl?r^cl«H ^ Wyandottes including club specials. At Madison. January 1910, I entered 
C Sb Medafon w'w w°^ P['^f ' S" ^\'i^ Wyandottes and R. C. Brown I^eghorns including 
Club Medal on best W Wyandotte hen. My winners are in ray breeding pens mated to oroduce 
winners If you order eggs you will get the best without reserve at $2.00 peri5 Some choice °tock 
for sale. Satisfaction guaranteed. Highland Poultry Yard.. C. Cape„er!>r^op.. R.F.D I^I^abro.l^, 



Porter White WYANDOTTE YARDS 

send you our mating list. COCKERELS FOR SALE AT REASONABLE PRICES. P'^*'^"^ ^° 



Are vou a Fancier 
of White Wyan- 
dottes? If so, will 



CHAS. DAVIN & SON 



PORTER, MINN. 



a 



DON A n HF V'^ R F n^" ^^"'^ ^°" f°^ ^^^ second season in succes- 
M^K^k^I^KJUlMZs I >J MXELmU'O sion the R. I. Red Club Cup and the Ameri- 

' ,.. , , ' ' . ■ . . ^ ' " • " ' " can Cla.ss Cup. at the Baraboo Vallev Poul- 

try Show_ Also their share of first and .specials at other leading shows. Eggs for hatching as 
follows: first pen |3 00 per 1.5. second and third pens |2 00 per l.f utility stSf ha vine- excel len? 

u'lotro^.n^'-?' P"*" '5n "^^^^ .°^^^^^^ ^° '"f'f ^f 30 eggs wSl allow a d&ount of f^pe^r ce^t and 
in lots of 50 or larger 20 per cent discount will be allowed. Both single and rose comb. 

J. T. DONAGHEY - BOX 117. NORTH FREEDOM, WIS. 



zj 



PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTES 

"Mahogany" Strain ^^ "vt "^^H^anE^ "Ir a. ^IT^ 



Win eleven 
first s at 



they grow. Get them from the originator. 

THOS. OSBORN, - 309 IOWA AVENUE. 



good 
MUSCATINE. lA. 



Light Brahmas, Single Comb Brown Leghorns 
and Mammoth Bronze Turkeys ^^^^^^^^^u^?^ 

■ ..,£,, J a. large share of the ribbons. I 

have some grand stock for sale, and eggs at reasonable prices. If you deal with me vou can 
expect a square deal. Send for free catalogue. 

L. H. JOSTES & SON, . . R. F. D. NO. 2, MACON, ILLINOIS 



COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES 
AND LIGHT BRAHMAS 

-THE BES 1 IN THE NORTHWEST' 

5 firsts, 6 seconds and 3 thirds at the tSio Minneapolis show. 

GEO. A. KERSTEN 

119 West 52nd Street (Washburn Park) Minneapolis, Minn. 



This pen MUST produce winners. 
Have been breeding? this class of 
chickens for 30 years and know a 
.i?ood one when I see it. Note — Won- 
der why he doesn't raise the $200 
kind? 

The hone§t chicken men are all 
dead excepting myself and I am feel- 
ing sick. 

I conld not show last season as a 
chicken killing dog got^ into mv 
yards (or was it a skunk* or a hu- 
man biped, or hawks, or something?) 
and killed the good ones. 

My birds were overweight so lost 
out. Mv birds were hatched in July 
so were under weight. 

^ly early hatched birds were past 
their best. But for a black feather 
m my cock, hen. cockerel or pullet 
I would have had every first. 

Had no time for preparation so 
caught the birds the night before, 
etc., etc. 

Comb got hurt fighting — it wasn't 
a side sprig. 

"There is nothing new under the 
sun," says Uncle Isaac, ''might have 
been true when Solomon uttered it, 
but he evidently didn't foresee the 
breeds of fowls that would be in ex- 
istence in A. D. 1910." 

The poultry lore which one may 
find in the ordinary newspaper is not 
confined to the reading columns, as 
the following advertisements in one 
of the prominent dailies will prove: 
"For Sale — Five cocks and one roos- 
ter, Inquire, etc." What sex was the 
rooster? 

"Rooter" is informed that tlie 
goose eggs that the base ball reporter 
so frequently alludes to are not the 
kind laid by any of the standard 
breeds of domesticated geese; they 
are produced by healthy bats. It is 
well to remember that all "bats" do 
not produce goose eggs: some are 
said to produce cephalgia, excessive 
thirst, and tight hats on "the morn- 
ing after." , 

4f ^ 

Dear mother, may T go out and lay? 

Oh! yes, my darling daughter; 
Fly to the loft with its fragrant hay. 
For eggs are dropping in price each 
day. 

And drop an egg as you ought ter. 

S. Swaysgood and his critics 
seem to have lost sight of Uncle 
Rastus' system of raising poultry, 
lie, too, believed in the influence of 
the moon. "De right time to raise 
poultry," he tells us, "am in de dahk 
ob de moon. Folkses who attemp' to 
raise it at any odder time, am liable 
to hab bad luck. In de light ob de 
moon one kin shoot straighter dan 
in he dahk ob de moon. Yas, sah! 
I knos. 'Spehiunce am a good teach- 
ah." 

Mongrel fowls, in these enlighten- 
ed days, ought to be like the mule, 
without pride of ancestry or hope of 
posterity. 

As there is always the class of be- 
ginners, the poultrv journal needs to 
furnish elementary instruction as 
well as to discuss the more recondite 




L«j»»-i(«CM.«*y5i©KMa«jase4i,Mk:^c 



»«ai3e*«i*SMoi i<?iv*»i»-at9 



phases of the great industry. It is 
as important to publish the romance 
of settmg a hen as to expound the 
doctrines of heredity, and one may 
be as useful and interesting to some 
as the other is to others. 

The term "sage," Rusticus is in- 
formed, in such expressions as "the 
sage of Natick," "the sage of Po- 
dunkville," and the like, does not re- 
fer to the plant grown by our grand- 
mothers from which they concocted 
a useful medicinal drink. We are sur- 
prised at your suggestion. 

Now, for a little while, England 
will be able to boast of having an 
Englishman who can spring a joke 
and who knows one when he meets it 
in the road. Matt Baldwin of Sioux 
City sails for England May 15 on 
a pleasure trip. 

No matter what happens. Editor 
Robinson has told us it is coming. 

Having the A. P. A. meeting cinch- 
ed. St. Louis does not mind the slurs 
about its climate in August. 

One touch of early summer makes 
the sitting hen get busy. 

Speaking of universal favorites 
fanciers would elect the early sitting 
hen to anything it might go after. 

Really we should elect our A. P. 
A. officials this spring without taking 
too much into consideration the poli- 
tician's feelings. 

Uniform judging is still waiting for 
the judges to act. 

There are fewer old hens in the 
country now to enjoy the advent of 
spring than there would have been 
had chicken meat been cheaper. But 
this IS merely one of the trials of 
greatness. 

•5f -X- 

Make room now for the White 
Diarrhea microbe and the chick cem- 
etery. 

Let us hope that the faking ques- 
tion will soon be only a memory. 

The big daily papers and the gen- 
eral magazines are now running their 
usual spring articles giving a lot of 
misinformation about how to raise 
spring chickens. 

"If I were the editor"— ah! if you 
only were, what bright things you 

M l l lin'lll'inniHlinH'llMIIIMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim iiiiiMii.»,||n i„„,.ir»M. ■..■i i iiiinmim/im.rm; 

POULTRY FeNCFI 

STOCK STRONG— RUST PROOF 

Made of extra heavy double «:alvatiized wires 
^t. . ?^?. ^?P °^ bottom boards required 
Chick tigrht-bottom wires only l in apart. ,, 
COSTS NO MORE THAN NETTING y<4 
< yet will last five times as lonr y\/jL 
Send for catalog— we have ^ ■''^ 
leo stales and 
can save you 

money. 
Write today 



mm 



-J 



>VFPAYTHt, 







^ 



^ 



BROWN FENCE & WIRE CO. DEPT. t^4. CL[VHi\NDQ 



POULTRY FANCIER 



would say, and how you would boom 
the paper! It is so easy to do it. It 
is said that President Wayland was 
once told by a student that he didn't 
think the proverbs of Solomon were 
very wonderful, and the President of 
Brown University simply replied: 
"Make a few." If any of the readers 




April, '10 




of this journal are bursting with bril- 
liant things, let *em burst forth. The 
publisher is ready to be shown; he 
has paper and type. 

Would it be well to limit the time 
during which the officers of the Amer- 
ican Poultry Association can hold 



1900 EDELWEIS STRAIN 1910 

*,-cH^* "5^^"'''^ LEGHORNS \Zl "^^^M^^ 'i^SSl 

and Chicago. Write for our list of winnings, and mating list for 1910. 

WHITAKER AND McCUNC . ASHTABULA. OHIO 



HIGH CLASS S. C. R. I. REDS 



My winnings for 1909—1910 are as 
follows: Packwood, Iowa, Nov 17- 

1st 3rd pullet 1st pen. Richland. Iowa. Dec. U-17, 1909. Dagle. JuVe'^^t%"n?iy^^^^^ 'ndTrd'ith 
pu et, 1st. 2nd pen. West I^iberty, Iowa. Jan. 4-7, 1910. Rhodes JucTge; Is . 2nd cockerel lsr'>nd 4 h 
ghinl'l n''?"^^^". Cash special for highest scoring ten in clkss. Cedar Rapids Iowa Jan 17 22 
Shankhn. Judge; 2nd cockerel. 2nd pen. Write for mating list. Egg froni three special mated 
pens. Incubator eggs $3.00 per 50, $5.00 per 100. ^ om mree special mated 

FRANK CHALUPA. ^ , R. 2. PLEAS ANT PLAIN. IOWA 

HAKE BUFF WYANDOTTE* 

Aiiain winners of tHe bltx« at La Cross* and Baraboo 
Specialty sale this month breeding pens and trios. I have a number of 

«,iiir„of^ -.u T ! iiii^iiLH cockerels, scored by Roberts and vShellabarger which I 

fTr m^UnV; St PenVwIiVS''^^'^^ ^^^^^^'^'J^ '° ^^0 for the trios and $7 to $25 for the^pens Send 
bv Hale anH wir,^!^ f ^^f' again headed by my grand old prize winner "Elroy Boy.- scored 95^ 
pL all sconWQ^?/ L LT^^^^ Minneapolis in 1908. Si/pullets in thit 

pen all scoring 91^ to 94^. $3 00 per setting of eggs. W. S. HAKE, ELROY, WIS. 



Columbian Wyandottes "dLSss^AT 

/■n* 'L^ J ^.^ . ^ T ,a 7 ^ ity. large blocky 

( tVlCIlCiI*<lSOl\ Stt*A.il\^ birds, fine lacing in hackles and Wyandotte shape. 
> , ,. ,. T ^^ ■* breeding pens con.sisting of high scorine males and 

females- Kggs this season $1.50 and $2 00 per 1.5. 3 for $.5 00 Stock for .sale ''^oring maies ana 

Crystal White OroincftonsP^^^o^*^***''*'^'^** strain 

^^ ^ w>«.M« ▼» «a««,^ ^^« f AAA^B,VXBSK^rgs $2 00 and $3.00 per 15, $.5.00 for 30. 
L. M. JACOBS, BARA BOO, WIS. 

COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES 

TRUE IN TYPE AND COLOR ?" '1'' '■"" ^S°} 

L £ r . . 7 1 ^ 'wvF»jv/A% shows this season my birds 

have won fourteen first prizes including first prize hen at Madison Square 

harden in the hottest of competition. I shall breed ten matings of high class birds 
this year from which I off er eggs for hatching, same as I use for myself. Mating list 
cheerfully mailed for the asking. Dr. C. J. Andruss, Canandaigua N Y 



Silver Laced Wyandottes and Salmon 
Faverolles 

C. p. McANDREW 



Winnings for 1910 
at Minneapolis and 

!5^°."'^'V ^ }-}}^^^^> i" t^ie largest and best cla.sses ever shown in Uie 

^L 00 per 15. Stock for sale. Send for catalogue. 



Eggs 



ELLSWORTH, WIS. 



LONG'S ORPINGTONS T' ^'^t '"' w': 

^^ * 'v^A i»^ Have made a wonderful 
record in the past winter shows. Egg at LIVING PRICES from ten grand pens 

E. M. LONG, - BOX P. F, OSCEOLA, IND. 



S. C. R. L REDS ^f^Gs and day 

OLD CHICKS'^ ""'' 

??r^?re; mL^t^g'S ^^^^^'^ '''^' '^^ '^^' *^^ ^^ --'^' ^ '-ve them. Th'^frT^?!, too" Writ^ 



BUStMESS BIROS OF OUAUTYz 



Top Notch Poultry Farm, R. P. Guptlll, Prof^., Elcho, W/s. 



WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS 



^y.'""*" *t Milwaukee, January 
1910, 1st pullet, 3rd cock, 4th cock- 
won all firsts and Gold Special for best di.splav in AraerTcL rW^"V^^' ^*" ^^* *"*• Atkin.on. 
the egg trade headed by and including the?e winner^with nfW ^^^ ^"^^ grand pens mated for 
from the.se matings at 1.3 00 oer l-i withm,. ™V a f ^1^^*^ females of equal quality. Eggs 
Satisfaction guarfnfeed ^ without reserve. A few choice cockerels and pullets for sf le. 



QUALITY WHITE ROCK POULTRY YARDS. W. R. ABBOTT. Prop.. 



Ft. Atkinson. Wis. 



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office? There is much to be said on 
both sides of that question. Every 
member probably has his opinion 
upon what answer should be given 
to the question. In the meantime, 
however, the wise fancier will not 
neglect the hatching and rearing of 
prize winners. 

The publication committee need 
not be afraid of getting the new 
Standard out too early in the fall. 

Theodore has his axe ready and it 
is said he hews to the line. Has he 
tackled a job too big for him? is 
what some of the boys are asking. 

All men are useful, some more use- 
ful than others, but no man is indis- 
pensable. When it comes to men we 



R. C. R. I. REDS & BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS 

A few grand red cockerels for sale at reasonable 
prices. My birds have won manv prizes at the 
leading northern Indiana shows. " x5ggs now for 
|2 00 per 15 from pens mat edto produce high cla'^s 
exhibition stock. Harry Sower. Rome City, Ind. 

Prouty's Partridge Plymouth Rocks 

Good trio for $8 if taken at once, are worth more 
but I must have the room. Eggs |,3 per setting, 
express prepaid. O. 1,. PROUTY, 

Box 115, New L,othrop, Mich. 



S. C. BROWN 
LEGHORNS 



Choice cockerels 
for .sale. Bred in line 
for several years. Cock- 
erel bred females to spare 
Excellent layers. Prices reasonable. 
H. E. MARQUARDT, WAUSAU, WIS. 



WHITE WYANDOTTE EGGS 

for hatching. After March 1st. from hens and 
pullets rcoring from i»2 to 94'2, price $2.00 per 15. 
Eggs guaranteed. Elizabeth Dupons, 

Kenosha, Wis. 

W. THEO. WITTMAN 

ALLENTOWN. PA. 

General Judge all varieties Poultry. Careful 
and stTaightforwardly honest work in the show 
room. 30 years a poultryman. 




IDEAL ALUMINUM LEG BAND 

To Mark Chickens 
^ CHEAPEST AND BEST 

18 for 16c; 25— 2.5c; 50— 40C; 100—750, 
Saniplo nand MalJcd for 2c Stamp. 
Frank Myers Mfr. Box 68. FreBporf.MI, 



',/. 



f^^ Crown Bone Cutter 



Hens ft'rt cut fl^TWn l>oii.' hiy 
iiioro f'KKs. Get a Crown I{..u"e 
, <*iittiT. Siiiil to-d.av for catiilonue. 
Wilion KroR., Box N'i'i, £Mton, Pa. 



BEST A\ADE 

Lowest 
m Price 



F. L. POULTRY FARM 

Rhode Island REDS ^i-i^nl^g^h^e 's-Se 
in red hot competition at Hagerstown. Chi- 
cago. McKeesport. Butler and Pittsburg. Pa. 
Stock, eggs and baby chicks. Write for cir- 
cular and mating list. 
F. L. OBER. R. F D. NO. 1, VERONA, PA. 



LEGHORNS-HOUDANS- ROCKS 

Houdans to February 28th, 18. Total for 
year 947. Send for my 1909-10 show record. 

H E ROr.FRS 929 MISS. ST. 

11. L.. I\V/UE.I\J LA CROSSE. WIS. 



Silver Laced Wyandottes .T,l«»,«?, 
White Wyandottes duston s.r.i„ 

H n 11 rl a n c McAVOY-TAYLOR Strain 
11 U U U d nS Kggs $2 00 per 15. Poor 
liatches replaced at half price. 

~ H. BACON, R. F. D.. Elroy, Wi«. 



B 









AMCIEfR^ 





have only to settle the question which 
is the more useful — we can eliminate 
the idea of indispensability. 

Vote early and vote your own opin- 
ion. Hear what is to be said, but 
decide for yourself. 

•X- -K- 

Concerning the value of certain 
theories recently advanced, one says 
that it reminds him of the words of 



Page 93 

^'•''^^^'-"■■""■''■'-*' •*'-''-=^''--"-^ "''^''-' 

(Preacher says it some more.) 

Mob: "Are the>' barred to the 
skin?" 

''Have they red eyes?" 

"Are they yellow legged?" 

"What strain are they?" 

"What do they weigh?" 

"What did they cost?" 

(All these questions have to be 
asked at same time, same as any mob 
would do when Barred Rocks was the 
subject; any other questions may be 



r^"^ 



->•- 




A ROCK HILL FARM WHITE LEGHORN. 

best S. C Wliito Legliorn fVniah's shown last season. She. with 

F. W. Corey, Mgr., Ossining, N. Y. 



One of the 
many others, are in the yards at Rock Hill Farm 



"He had been eight 
project for extracting 



Dean Swift: 

years upon a 

sunbeams out of cucumbers, which 

were to be put in phials hermetically 

sealed, and let out to warm the air in 

raw, inclement summers." 

Scenario. 

Characters: Preacher (a 
be): Mob (which is looking 
truthful ])rcachcr). 

Mob: "What do you do to 
yourself outside of clerical duties?" 

Preacher (humbly): "T keep Barred 
Rock chickens." 

Afob: "What? ! ! !" 



would- 
for a 



added to the voice of the mob — it's 
all good business.) 

(7'he preacher gives the regular 
answers — which need not be given 
here, for we all know them — but then 
the chief elder rises.) 

Elder: "And what is the ej 
ord. brother?" 

Preacher (who is a 
of course, rising and 
l)reast franticallv') : " 



'^g rec- 



amuse nie! and still Ah me! 



truthful man, 

beating his 

■A h me ! Ah 

What can I 

will convince 



say. dear brother, that ....^v 

you that T would answer your ques- 
tion truthfully? If T sav that the 200 
hens average 100 per hen per year, 




mm^ mZj^itZ3 ^aiJvtK)r fancier^ 




""k* 



you will give me the horse laugh. If 
/^y -^^^ >'^" ^vill question as to 
whether I'm over or under-stating it. 
If I tell the truth!! and say 267 eggs 
per hen, mcluding in the count of 
hens all the roosters, you will refuse 
me the job. Ah me! Ah me!! Ah 
me.!! (Sobs in the audience.) 

Mob (falling on his knock delight- 
edly): "At last the truth! At last 



Rock is like, and as to how it should 
be judged. 

This also "ain't so." 

The sacred flock of geese is said 
to have saved the city of Rome; a 
t,^ander is just reported to have saved 
a child's life, but in the attempt lost 
Its own beneath the street car wheels. 
In true heroism the modern goose 



S. C. Black Minorcas IcUdai ' 

Kvrlii«ii/#»lv ^'>^l^. I"d. show one of 
i^Ji.l.iU91VCiy the best shows ever held 
in northern Indiana, Jan. 4-8, 1910, won silver 
cup for best display in Mediterranean class 
points to count. Eggs from birds scorini? 
92 to 95 $3.00 per 15. ^ 

G. A. GAGE LA GRANGE, IND. 




'^"i^'StlS '"" S. C. Brown Leghorns 

Kendallville, Ind., Jan. 4-8, Tucker, Judge- 2 
3 cock, 2 cockerel, 1, 2, 4 hen, 1, 2 pullet, l'. 2 
pen. 20 females average 92 1-5. Richmond, 
Ind Tan. 12-15. Zike. Judge;I won eight prizes 
with five birds entered: 1 cockerel, 1, 2 hen, 1, 
2 pullet, 1 pen, two specials. I breed my own 
winners. Write for mating list. 



IRA FORD 



LA GRANGE, IND. 



PARTRIDGE PLYMOUTH ROCK HEN 
iTiany rniz. ^vi'.mMs bred and owned at Rock Hill Farm. 



Core?"Mff/ Os^inine" k" v V?"","''ri-/,"f" ""^' owned at Rock Hill Farm F W 
this varYeTy." ^^'•^"""^' ^- ^- ^^^^'^ J^'" ^^«^nn i.. beadqnarters for liigluvstTualfty ?„ 



the truth!! You get the job at dou- 
ble the salary offered." 
Amen. Amen. Amen. 



•A- 



4f 



It is rumored that the A. P. A., 
which governs all our goings and 
comings and shortcomings, is going 
to give the status of an egg sold for 
hatching purposes. 

This is splendid news— but it ain't 
so. 

-X- 4f 

It is rumored that the American 
Plymouth Rock Club is ^oing to 
make a standarrl that will in some 
sense describe what a real Barred 



seems to have the better of the 
ancient. Who says that we are retro- 
grading? 

It is rumored that there's a real 
live judge who knows how to breed 
Rood chickens— but he isn't much of 
a judge. 

It i.s rumored that some Barred 
Rock breeders "allow" that the Cre- 
ator may have known what a Barred 
Rock should look like. So does Sew- 
el — but Sewcll has the advantage 
when It comes to knowing something 
about under-color. 



Barred Plymouith 

ROC MS "^"lloy's Ringlets are 

^S^f^^^^i^"?! P*" c^^c-ks at Nebraska State Fair 
1909. Write me for stock and eees Epp-s 
11.50 and |2..'iO for 15. ^^ ^^^ 

Cff AS. Mr. MULI.OY 
BOX lO. FRKMONT, NEBR. 



BROODER 



1 



CLOUGH'S 
CHICKEN 

Telescopic. Always one story. The best 
free literature. Address 

Clough's Lampless Brooders 

AURORA, ILL. 



S. C. White Leghorns 

The right type and color. Line bred 
for years. Winners at Yonngstown 
and Warren, O. Stock eggs for sale 

BERT COLE, ^^o«u'S({fs\J??N^^5: 







COLUMBIAN 
WYANDOTTES 



% Bred to win and lay. 



Won 
at 



^ H'}"|jnKton Ind.. 1910. 2nd cockerel, 2nd, 

«. 'JSm^V'/^'^^i- Won at Ft Wayne. Ind. 
& 1^10, 3rd cockerel, 1st. 2nd. 3rd pullet 

^ Send for Mating List. 

A. M. BENDER 

1231 Walton Ave. FT. WAYNE, IND. 



% 
% 




Oreider's Fine Catalogue 

ol2 K''^l^'"®lP°"'*''y for 19>" is bigger 
and better than ever, 200 pages, hand- 
somely illustrated, 150 engravings 
photos, .TO fine colored plates.T- 
scribes 65 leading varieties ot* land 
and water fowls. Gives low prices of 
stock and eggs, also Incubators, poultry 
supplies, etc Calendar for each month Tolls 
Th^ Lricro/Thr;i''7'.«'^'"« n.U detaTls?' 
Writl'fiMtfo-day. ^^^'^ '^ ""'^^ ^» ^^'"^^- ^ 
B. H. CREIOER. Box 101, Rhae,;^. p.. 




BROWN JLEGHORNS 

THE EMPIRE STRAIN 
ALWAYS WINS. 



. GEO. H. BURGOTT. 7 

CATALOGUE FREE LAWTONS, ERIE CO., / 




EXHIBITED AT 

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN 




i) • 



m 



c 




C 





L April , '10 ^ 




Y FAWCI 




Some More Thoughts on Faking 



By EASTERNER 




Can a great educational institution 
be a fakir, Was it faking when Cor- 
nell induced a hen to lay pink eggs 
from eating dye stuff? Was it faking 
Avhen the University of Chicago, by 
mingling dyes with corn meal, caused 
hens, not only to lay colored eggs 
iut to grow colored feathers? Is it 
any less faking to dye from the inside 
than It IS to dye from the outside? 

Wc respectfully call the attention 
of a certain eastern editor to the 
fact that these great educational insti- 
tions, through the public press of the 
•country, have been teaching that dye 
stuffs may be fed and that when fed 
they are able to change artificially 
the color of the plumage of the fowls. 
He might take this matter up before 
the American Poultry Association. 
Certainly this would be a good case 
for him. 

But can feeding be faking? Wheli 
I feed White Wyandottes white corn 
to keep them white, or when I give 
yellow corn to Buff Wyandottes to 
enrich their buff coloring; or when I 
add sulphate of iron or tincture of 
iron to the drinking water of Brown 
Leghorns to prevent or correct a ten- 
dency to white types, am I guilty of 
faking? If I am not a fakir in such 



instances, do I become one when I 
dabble in dyes, applied internally? 

Is faking a matter of degrees? May 
one feed stuff which has a tendency 
to affect color and remain an honor- 
able breeder, and feed something a 
little stronger and become a fakir? 
Is that what faking means? If it is, 




Just ahead of the best of them. Par- 
tridge Wyandotte cock, "Red Bov, Jr." 
hist at Davenport. St. Louis arid Des 
Moines. Score 94% bv Russell. Bred 
and owned by Thos. Osborn. Muscatine. 
Iowa. 

are not poultry breeders in a position 
similar to that of doctors, who may 
administer strychnine in minute doses 
as a tonic and be hailed as life pre- 
servers, but if they give a slightly 
larger dose be called murderers? Is 
it only a matter of degrees? 



ROSE COMB RHODE 



A choice lot of stock tor sale, bred hom 
the best winning and laying strain in 

America. They are red to the quill and possess the length 
of body and symmetry of form so desirable in a typical Red. 
Eggs for sale that will produce winners. Write us. 

LUMBERTON POULTRY CO., JAY B. DEUTSCH, Mgr., 



ISLAND REDS 



ANTIGO, WIS. 



R. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS. 



My Reds lead again at the big Missouri 
State Show. St. I,ouis, Dec. 1909. l.st, 2d 



Pullet; 1st. 3d Cockerel; 2d. r,th Hen; 4th, 5th Cock : 3d Pen in a class of 148 R. C. Rhode Island Reds. 
Also R. I. Red (State Cup) the fourth year in .succession. Cup for best Male and Female, special for 
best Cockerel. Some good stock to spare yet. 



VIRGIL BLAKEMORE. Fayette, Mo. 



Partridge Plymouth Rocks 

THE WOLVERINE BRED TO LAY STRAIN 

J. A. HAGEMAN, - - CHARLOTTE, MICH. 

President Partridge Plymouth Rock Club 



SINGLE COMB BROWN LEGHORNS 



Over 300 
prizes won at 
lars2e shows in 

CHAMPIONS of the West 20 years. Record unequalled. Right color and size 

^^ ^ with yellow legs. Eggs from $1.50 to $3.00 per 

15, both matings. Circular free. 

C. F. LANG - 1812 FRONT STREET - LA CROSSE, WIS. 




"MAJESTIC I •• 

5th Cockerel. Chicago Dec 08 



Rankin's Barred Rocks 

"BEST IN THE WEST" 

AND 

ADVANCING IN QUALITY EACH SEASON 

Bred from Chicago winners. Pens headed by win- 
ning males and specially mated to classy females for 
type, surface color, under color, yellow beaks and 
legs and head points. Which point do you lack.? 
Winnings Chicago, Dec, 1908, 5th cockerel. Blue 
Island, III.. 1909. 2d and 4th hens, 3d cockerel; 1910. 
1st and 3d cockerels, 1st hen. Eggs, both matings, 
$2.00, $2.50, $3.00 and $3.50. 

Ode L. Rankin. Maywood. 111. 



■r/^wr/j.'J i^j-HV: MA' y^ .'JKk^.^'ism 



Page 95 




^^^>^fy»? ^h.-^ >W;>::?y^\ k.7.:^vy^. 



If, as Professor Cscar F. Riddle 
of the University of Chicago is re- 
ported to have said, a dye called, 
"Alizarin," when fed to hens, will 
cause them to lay eggs with pink 
shells: and if other dye stuffs, when 
mixed with the hen's food, while the 
plumage is growing, will cause her to 
take on "to a degree the color of the 
dye"; and if an q^q, colored within 
through such feed, when hatched, will 
produce a chicken whose fat parts 
will be colored; if all these things 
are so, must we not revise Hamlet's 
question so as to read "To dye or not 
to dye?" 

The hen seems to be coming into 
her own of late in the public press. 
Not only are Cornell and the Univer- 
sity of Chicago furnishing copy for 
the newspapers, but the great city of 
Paris has gone wild over Rostand's 
drama, "Chanticler." If there should 
ever be an Americanized version of 
this play, one can imagine some trag- 
edian stalking across the stage with 
inde.x finger laid upon a white brow 
corrugated with intense thought, and 
uttering in a deep, sepulchral voice: 

"To dye or not to dye: that is the 

question; 
Whether 'tis nobler in the show to 

suffer 
Defeat and lose the longed-for pre- 
mier prize, 
To have one's birds, in short, disqual- 
ified. 
Or by judicious feeding stop all that 
.And wnn the honors. Ah! To feed; 

to dye: 
To dye; perchance to rudely be found 

out, 
And basely to be caught with the vile 

goods; 
Re caught and fakir named: aye, 

there's the rub. 
For in the terror of that awful name 
Defeat, dishonor, loss, are firmly 

joined, 
And thc}^ must give us pause." 

In all that has been said let no "vile 
caitiff" say or think that we favor 
faking. Wc do not. We condemn it, 
in season and out of season. But 
like many another seeker after truth, 
we are longing for a clear definition 
of the offense. Some things are 
clearly faking and some are not, but 
there is a misty borderland, of indefi- 
nite width, where it is difficult to say 
what is and what is not faking? 
Where is the Moses to lead us out of 
this Egypt? Who will give us a defi- 
nition so clear that it will banish the 
darkness which envelopes this sub- 
ject? We arc all attention. Hrcthren, 
don't all speak at once. 

After all, there is nothing new in 
the announcement that the coloring 
of birds can be affected by food. Dar- 
win and W^allace have pointed out 
striking instances of its effect. Cay- 
enne-fed canaries have been sold in 
the bird stores for many, many years. 
T\\Q fact, as a fact, has been long 
established. The facts which are not 
generally known are what foods will 
affect these changes. Even some of 
these foods are known; some are dis- 
puted; and many probably remain for 
future discovery. It was said of old 
"There is nothiu"- new under the 
sun," and certainly this saying seems 
to find support in the main fact that 
fond (joes affect color of plumage. 




KlV Page 9g 

,^^^ •■.* '.V^ I I II I I . 1 III I jr "w j J I ~ I J ■ I m i mi 




POULTRY FANCIER 





FROM READER 




This department is for the purpose of giving publicity to the views of our readers who 
would hke to express themselves briefly upon topics that are of interest. A hearty 
invitation is extended to all our readers to use the department freely. 



A CURE FOR RATTLING IN THE 
THROAT. 



I wish to relate my experience in 
regard to a cure for wheezing, or rat- 
tling, in tlie throats of our grown-up 
chickens. I do not know what to call 
the disease, but I will describe it as 
well as I can and then tell what cured 
mine in less tlian twenty-four hours. 
It seems like a bad case of asthma in 
a human being where it is difficult for 
the patient to breathe. My first case 
was that of a hen that was housed 
near a public walk and one evening 
as I was passing the house I heard 
a noise that fairly lifted me off my 
feet, metaphorically speaking. I en- 
tered the poultry house to find one of 
my best hens breathing as though she 
had the death rattle. My wife, who 
IS somewhat acquainted with the med- 
ical virtues of some of the leading 
drugs, suggested that we place a lit- 
tle sulphate of iron in powdered form 
down Its throat by dropping it from 
a little piece of paper. I held the 
bird s mouth open while my wife 
dropped in the powder. The next 
morning all signs of wheezing were 
gone. Last week one of my handsom- 
est pulets was affected in the same 
manner. The same remedy was ap- 
plied in the evening and it was the 
end of the rattling in the throat. It 
has done the work three times for me 
and I have come to the conclusion 
that It must be all right. 

^ ^ Jas. Lawrey. 

Carson, Iowa. 

COOPING THE CHICKS. 

In raising last year's flock, one 
should have learned several good 
points along the line of properlv coop- 
ing the growing chicks. One may 
have ever so good eggs from the 
very best yards and yet ruin his whole 
Hock by improper cooping. In looking 
at some fine Huff Orpingtons at our 
County Fair last fall a party said, "Mv 
Orpingtons don't look like that man's 
ami yet I got the eggs from him 
They are so long in legs." The trou- 

h.^ '^M i'^ ""'^^ "" "^^ beginner and 
had tailed to coop them rightly He 
IS wise who profits from his own or 
others failures. The trouble is we are 
ail loathe to give plenty of breathing 
room to our chicks, and room is one 
of the big elements of our success and 
yet the least recognized. It took me 
20 years to learn it. I^arrels and dry- 
goods boxes were used and I lost in 



any one year enough chicks from rats, 
skunks, etc., to have made me coops 
sufficient to have supplied me for the 
20 years. 

Out of the various designs of coops 
that have passed through my brain, 
the one that I have used for years is 
the best all round coop that I have 
seen or used. Anyone can make it. 
I use shiplap, smoothed on both sides. 
It IS 3x4 feet, 2 feet on back, nearly 
^rJ^^^ J" f'*o"t, with slanting roof. 
ihe bottom is made separate and the 
boards are nailed to 2x4 scantlings. 
This keeps the chicks up off the 
ground and thus dry. The coop itself 
fits neatly and extends down over the 
floor ] inch, thus conducting the rain 
from the floor. The little ^2 x 2 inch 
corner posts lack the inch of reaching 



to the bottom of the coop proper. 
This lets the posts rest on the floor. 
A long, narrow opening for ventila- 
tion up near the top in front is cut, 
over which is nailed screening. The 
door in front is 18x24 inches but I 
have an extra door made of a frame 
and screen to slip in during the hot 
summer nights. Here you have a coop 
large enough to keep a brood of 
chicks till fall and one in which you 
can teach your young stock how to 
roost. I place roosts in later in the 
season. It can be moved into your 
breeding yards and used for a small 
breeding pen, or for cooping your 
males after breeding season or during 
winter. In fact, there are more than 
a dozen uses they can be put to. Easy 
to clean out. Simply tip back or lift 



I 



V^HKTE fiOG/fS ^^''''^ i^Lf^t *^^* ^^" ^'» '" the show 

^^ W%^%##mKy room and fill the egg basket. Our birds 

WMF MM M'TMr mmmm^ m - « -^ ^^iii— ill^uL^^"*^^^' ^*'^"^ '" good 

WHITE WYANDOTTES ^^I^^r 

BERYfYN POULTRY YAnOS, - BOX pj flf^^ilrKW, ,tL 



at 



I 




.WHITE PLYMOUTH 
ROCKS 



Allen Tucker's 

WHITE ROCKS 

... , . again made good 

this season by winning every Bine competed for- 

also silver cup winners. Three grand pens com- 

eo0 tr;.dP A Um!fL ^'u ^^/ ^J'^^ winners mated for this season's 

Ksonable prkes ' "''"^^'^^' ""^ P""'*' '^^ ^^'^ 

ALLEN TUCKER . . MINERAL POINT. WIS. 



Don't Mistake the Hearse for 
the Bandwagon 



Popular taste NO COMB TO FREEZE 

i 11 poultry 



the styles iu women's hats. lu^telecting 'youf brlil^r 
^oose one that's • 'coming in ," not one that's 'Agoing out .' ' 

Hardy HoudanS "^^^^'^ ^ phrase to conjure 
I f > '"""**"* with. Houdans are Winter 

Layer, of large, white eggs, and lots of them; th^y are 
non..,tter.; their flesh is unrivaled for table use- tliev are 
tame contented, rugged, handsome and profitable Most 
popjilar pw in France and England. tL idea "Town 

THE HILLCREST ROOKERIES 




FRANK WICKIZER, Prop, 



ST. JOSEPH, MO. 





highest terms, 
raise winners. 



R.C and S.C. Rhode Island Red*; 

Hundreds of birds for sale at reasonable Drices Pvh.hif .u *^v:VI5> 

quality. Birds on approval. SalSon' r your mon y'b'k"" Ma^eH""? '''".•'' "' "'S"^^' 

Winner.; at rhi<-,„„ r- ? *P«.<:'?'ty- Catalogue Free. AMERICA'S LEADINC llin^ps'* P''"'''' '""* ^"d Pens 

Winners at Chicago, Cmcmnati, Indianapolis, Toledo, Detroit, Milwaukee GeV snm^^? recommend my birds in 

EDWIN R rORNIC;H ^Atc r, ■ "^''"''^^- ^'' ^"""^ ''««-^ fr-"" my be.st pens and 

CORNISH, 1426 Pontmc Street, ANN ARBOR, MICH. 



• 



# 




t 





r^ 'L:'dSArifira ^ -.ij;.;f>^ 



April, '10 




off from the bottom and you have 
access to every part of the coop. Try 
one or more of these coops. Make a 
few and see if they don't fill the bill 
perfectly. John II. Wolfe. 

Tecumseh, Nebraska. 

SENSE AND ENERGY VS. CASH 

AND THEORY — IN POUL- 

TRYDOM. 




While I do not set myself up as the 
only authority on poultry culture, may 
I have the floor for a few minutes to 
talk to those who are yet young in 
the mysteries of poultrydom? Surely 
there has been enough written in re- 
gard to the ways, whys, and where- 
fores of poultry breeding to make 
every one an expert, but there seems 
to be about as many failures yet as 
there are in any other business. 'What 
the poultry world is suffering for to- 
day is some good hard common sense 
beat right down into our brainpans, 
with a water-elm club, and I'll take 
my share with the rest. 

We have had enough of the 10x12 
houses, with ventilators up through 
the roof, feeding corn the year around 
and dozens of other senseless ideas. 
Do you expect a team to go out and 
work all day on one feed? Do you 
ieed your horse one thing the whole 
year around? Are you content to live 
on only one article for a meal and fol- 
low it up? Surely not. Then why 
ask it of your fowls and condemn 
them because they do not lay eggs 
two-thirds of the year, with their bod- 
ies covered with vermin, or with an 
old ramshackle of a board coop just 
large enough to crawl into to get out 
of the storm, and every crack and 
crevice filled with mites, — millions of 
them sucking the very heart blood out 
of every fowl,— and yet you say if 
they can't lay, you simply kill them 
<which is a humane act, but by acci- 
dent). Suppose, my friend, you just 
build a house for the fowls not less 
than 10 X 14 ft., for say 25 to 30 fowls, 
make it warm, with plenty of yard 
room, i)ut the roosts upon a platform 
Avith the nest boxes on another plat- 
form on the opposite side, with a good 
low stone jar for water, with gravel, 
oyster shells and charcoal in separate 
boxes, using the whole ground floor 
for the scratching shed, with plenty 
of straw and a little wheat thrown in 
it at least once a day, — except in mid- 
summer when they may have a good 
J?rass run. ivQi\' a variety twice 
daily. (I ])refer a mash in the morn- 
<ng) the wheat in the straw is not a 
feed, but a by-feed, simply to keep 
them at work, fight the lice and mites. 



POULTRY E 




and see if "Biddy" doesn't pay you for 
all you have done for her; in other 
words, use your own brains, and work 
with an energy, instead of the idea 
of paying out large sums of money on 
some novice's theory, and I'll wager 
my experience against your time that 
the poultry business will bring you 
a profit instead of a loss. 

D. L. Weaver. 
Fremont, Mich. 



THE TERM "THOROUGHBRED. 



»> 



A certain writer assures us that we 
are using language incorrectly when 
we speak of "thoroughbred fowls." 
He contends that this term applies 
only to the English race-horse and 
that other breeds have no right to 
Its use; that what we mistakenly call 
"thoroughbreds" are, correctly speak- 
ing, "pure breds"; and that clearness 
of thought requires us to drop the 
term with reference to everything 
but the race-horse. 

Customary use, within certain lim- 
its, fixes the meaning of technical 
terms, but the use must be by those 
who are familiar with the subject to 
which the term applies. Common 
u.sage may tend to fix the meaning 
of common words, but technical 
usage is necessary to fix that of tech- 
nical terms. It is possible that, 
among horsemen, the term "thor- 
oughbred" ought to be restricted to 
the running horse, because this breed 
of horses, for many generations, has 
been so called. When one speaks of 
a "thoroughbred" horse, the English 
race-horse is at once associated with 
the name; no one thinks of the 
Percheron, Belgian, Orloff or other 
breed of horses. In the sphere of 
horse breeding this term, through 
customary usage, has acquired a spe- 
cial significance. 

But such a train of reasoning does 
not apply to our domesticated fowls. 
No single breed among them has 
monopolized the name "thorough- 
bred." When one speaks of a thor- 
oughbred fowl, the term calls up the 
mental usage of no particular breed; 
a Langshan is as likely to be sug- 
gested as a Leghorn, a Cochin as a 
Hamburg. Had Dr. H. P. Clarke 
succeeded in securing the admission 
of the Pit Game to the standard un- 
der the name of "Thoroughbred 
Game," in time the necessity of aban- 
doning the term "thoroughbred," as 
ai)plied to other fowls, might have 
arisen. But, happily, this' attempt 
failed. These words are applied not 
to the admission of the Pit Game to 
the Standard, but to its admission 
under the proposed name. I will 



Bogardus' Orpingtons 



i^= 



S. C. BUFF AND BLACK 

All for sale. A rare chance to 
secure high class stock at a low 
price, 22 Buff Cockerels, $3 to |]0, all have sound wings, good eyes, fine shape and 
color. 2 Buff cocks $S each, 26 Huff hens and pullets $2 to H each, 8 Black cocks 
and cockerels f ] to |10 each, 18 Black hens and pullets $2 to IG each. Every bird 
on the place must go at less than half price. They have won for me at Chicago, 
Hagerstown, Jamestown Kxposiiton and other large shows. Write me your wants. 
O. A. BOGARDUS, - . BOX A, WARSAW, KENTUCKY 



grant, without argument, that if any 
breed deserves the distinction ot that 
name, it is the Pit Game. It is one 
of the oldest of our breeds; it most 
nearly resembles in type, and, in une 
variety, in color, the wild original 
from which all domesticated races of 
fowls have descended; its type is a 
happy combination of beautv and 
utility, in my opinion, one of the 
most desirable types among poultry; 
and I should have heartily welcomed 
its admission to the Standard under 
some other name. The term "Pit" 
is objectionable, because cock-fight- 
ing, rightly or wrongly, is under the 
ban of the law^ I suggested long ago 
as a suitable name for this breed, 
the "Bankivan Fowl," a name sug- 
gestive of its early origin and its dis- 
tinctive type. But I object to the 
term "Thoroughbred Game." because 
It clearly implies that the Exhibition 
Game is not a thoroughbred, and 
more or less distinctly suggests that 
no other breed is entitled to be so 
regarded. Good as the Pit Game un- 
questionably is, it is not good enough 
to monopolize this term; no breed is. 
I am glad, therefore, that this at- 
tempt failed. And as it did, and as 
the term has been so long used in 
poultry nomenclature as to have 
among breeders a fixed and well un- 
derstood meaning, there seems to be 
no sufficient reason Avhy "pure-bred" 
should be substituted for "thorough- 
bred," as applied to fowls. a 

In what has been said no reference 
has been made to the definition of 
this term by lexicographers. Permit 
one brief reference. From one of 
the standard dictionaries we take this 
definition: "Thoroughbred, bred from 
the best or purest blood or stock." 
Such a definition anolies to all kinds 
of live stock, from a draught horse 
to a canary bird. As has been said, 
the usage of horsemen seems to have 
modified or restricted the meaning of 
this term with reference to horses. 
But among breeders of other kinds of 
live stock, and particularly among 
breeders of poultry, where' can one 
lind customary usage which would 
limit or restrict the meaning of this 
word? 

The tendency has been rather to 
enlarge than diminish its meaning. 
"And" should be substituted for "or'* 
in the quoted definition, so that it 
would read "Bred from the best and 
purest blood and stock. " The term 
thus defined means more than "pure- 
bred"; that means bred within the 
blood lines of the given breed, but 
"thoroughbred" means all that and, 
in addition, the breeding from care- 
fully selected and judiciously mated 
stock. Not only must the blood be 
kept pure, but the stock must be of 
the best. 

The term is convenient and neces- 
sary, its use creates no confusion of 
ideas, and I believe that poult rymen 
will, as T think that they ought to, 
continue to use it in preference to the 
proposed substitute, "pure-bred." It 
will take more than one writer's dic- 
tum to displace this term from the 
poultryman's vocabulary and secure 
the substitution of another of sim- 
ilar but more circumscribed meaning. 

H. S. Babcock. 

East Providence. R. 1. 



tmrsfa 




Page 98 



h7?niV^>,' :-"■>' ■^.>V^,^s.<i>t^v/Tay'rf 




POULTRY FANCIER-^ 



A Talk to Breeders of Buffs 



(^■l':iK/i^r-',^--'M^t.o'.j/.^;£ 



April, '10 







It William Cook could take three 
different breeds and in ten years pro- 
duce a fowl that would come true to 
his ideal, isn't it a shame that we as 
breeders of Standard bred fowls go 
on year after year with only one breed 
making scarcely no improvement and 
some of us none at all? I hear you 
say if we continue to improve each 
year vve would get to perfection. Well, 
don t be afraid of this, dear breeder. 
But I will tell you what we can do. 
By being patient and observing, and 
by proper mating, we can have a flock 
of Standard bred fowls that will pro- 
duce a greater per cent of good ex- 
hibition quality. 

The trouble with some of us is that 
we have no ideal, but each year we 
use a type and color, or shade of color 
that suits our fancy. And some breed- 



BUFFALO PREPARING FOR ANOTHER 
BIG SHOW. 




BARRED ROCK PULLET. 
1909''^R?iif^«E']"^^ at Michigan State Fair 

ers in five or six years' breeding have 
used as many different types and 
color fancies. How can you ever ex- 
pect to produce a flock of Standard 
bred fowls that will give you any 
great number of good exhibition birds 
by breeding in this manner? You can 
never do it. You will never be able 
to produce more than a chance good 
specimen, and it will be practically 
worthless as a breeder. Why? Be- 
cause It has in its make-up a half 
dozen of your fancies with very little 
more disposition to transmit its ao- 
^'%Y/"^u'^,V^''ty than its hidden ones 
We believe that the main reason 
tor this manner of breeding is that 
this class of breeders want prize-win- 
ners and they want them quick— im^ 
mediately, ,f not sooner. But you had 
just as well come back and %^t in 
line, if you want a flock of birds that 
will be a profit to you and a benefit 
o your customers. You can gain 
time by buying a breeding pen of 
really fine birds that have been bred 
o highest excellence, step by step, and 
have their fine qualities so firmly fixed 
m their breeding that they will have 
^hZ^ %u"^ disposition to reproduce 
them. Otherwise you will have to be 
content to start at the bottom and 
come up, step by step, year after year 



breeding out the defects, and fixing 
tirmly 111 your Hock the disposition to 
ti-cinsmit Its desirable qualities to its 
offspring. 

. One of the most important things 
in breeding a flock of fowls to a high 
standard is to have an ideal. For in- 
stance, if the standard of your breed 
calls for breast full, you can easily 
hx this type of a bird in your mind 
as an ideal, and then breed for it. 
Don't expect to get it by using full 
breasted birds this year and hollow 
breasted ones next year. But by using 
only birds of fine breast shape, you 
can in three or four years have a flock 
of fine shaped birds in this respect. 
Use the same shade of color each 
year, and use only birds that breed 
true to It. By following this method 
you can have a flock coming remark- 
ably true to your ideal color in five or 
SIX years. Most every year we have 
in our flock of youngsters a fine bird 
that IS entirely different from the gen- 
eral flock both in type and color. We 
just can't imagine where he came 
trom. He looks pleasing and more so 
because he is so different from our 
main flock. He looks so good we are 
tempted to use him as a breeder, but 
don t do It Stick to your ideal. We 
call these fellows misleaders. To use 
hmi would be practically to ruin our 
efforts m the past. But each year if 
we will use only birds that are our 
Klea in the main, and are especially 
good in some one section (or more 
If possible), we very much desire to 
improve, we can in time have a flock 
of bird.s that will be coming our way 
and will give us a world of pleasure 
and considerable profit. i^'^'^^^^e 

T7t u ^r J- T. Rice. 

Elsberry, Mo. 



At the stockholders' meetine- of th<^ 
Buffalo .PouItr.v. Pigeon and Pet Stock 
Association, G. M. Soverhill, the presi- 
dent gave an intere.sting report on the 
great international show held in January 
which was a grand success. Vincent 
nni • } R ti^>asurer gave a detailed re- 
port ot the financial condition of the a^- 
l??n^nn''"Vr^''''"^^ handled during the year 
h. T^, Q \^'\/";T^°'''^ ^"^PO^'t was read 
b^ Dr. S. A. Merkley and gave the stock- 
holders an insight in the great work ac 
complished during the yea?. Thly ad?S-" 
cated the opening of the sale of the stock 
selling enough to carry out greater plans 
for holding on the week of"^ January 15 
1911, the greatest show ever held in 
America. The stock was then opened 
and several liundred dollars worth wli 
subscribed for in ten minutes. It was 
the most enthusiastic meeting of fan- 
ciers ever held, all seem of one accord 
UonafT7.n/° ^^^'P ."^^^e the interna - 
f^^^ I", ,^^11 '^ great success. 
The following officers were elected b\- 
the unanimous vote of all the stockhold- 
ers present: »i.ui.Kiioia- 

Hoiiorary president from United States 
H. p Kirkover. Jr.. Buffalo- honoVArv' 

TonJnt'o ' %T- ^^""^^^- \' «'• ^^"^;^n. 
ioionio^ Oni.; president, j Thoma^i 

vS^^k-^^'ft"'^^'^^ Z''^ bresident TSd- 
Msoi>), j. p. Knox, Buffalo- secon.i \inc^ 

president Tadvisor.y). Wilham TlcNe 1 

vfsS?y)' w'-'r*'^^^^' iT^^^ president (aci: 
\isor.\). \\ . R. Graham, Guelph Onf- - 

tary'^n;-' ^'T^'l'r R?^'^ BuS? sSfre- 
tai>. 1)1. S. A. Merklev. Buffalo- a^si<^t 

ant secretary, C. E. Rilev. Buffalo Di" 

rectors G.M Soverhill. Peter Ales rSr' 

knov m"w'^'.H- ^- I^>Ithousen. J p 
S ,? • ^V. ^- ^^^' Vincent Roth G T 

Ph h'"t^-/,- ^""''^- Howard J 'Y?ung' 
PJnlhj) I.andel, all of Buffalo -^'JunS- 

ncr.s at Madison S<iiiare Gardon New 
^ork and otlier big shows He I, ,,„ 
■Uiestronably in position to satlsfv ,hl 

bre«, !?e"'^.a„^/jl^;^i', '^•Lt'^-;„rt"ma'^ 




PETERSON^STiOUDANS 

Send for 80-page book on Th«. HnnHo,, r>n ...,. .. . * ^"^ 



--^^ ^^M^^tr^K^^ ^^^ tTndefeated Champion 

Send for 80-page book on The Houdan ^ f,.n , , . ^^ Strain of America. 

Mating gr Exhibition. ManageSenfand"^^^^^^ ^i„„ers. Houdan Standard 

Rev. C. E. Pete r,en. Presiden t Americai. HoudL?CIub,7Kol90^ ^^ ' ^o^^age 20 cents ' 

"■ Bridirton, Maine 



60 Years *' '^^r' I K. Felch &lon 

and judged all breeds in nearly every Statp in ,k- • l 

Every PATRON has been LtlX^ ,1, .L ""'.°", '^"''°"' ^ Pf°'«f- 

WHY SHOULD THEY NOT ^1 ^' t!°^^ '°' '^' ""^"^^ P^'d- 
.o 96 points find place in their bSin^pTn ?"" Whl"h "'"""^"' '° '^°" ^^ 

,k V J . L^'^ ^^^ BREED ON 

for pC '^^iie'^nfele'd fcnf 41° '^ '">-'^i= ^' ^ $^0 
for females: $4 to $15 for n^ale? F f u ^Y^"''"""' ^2-50 to $8 

for 45. and $15 for 105 eg^rFroW::"?/' f '^ '5. $7 for 30, $9 

moulting sold at 40 per cent off of caTat T '' "" r^'"'"«' ''-'ore 

particular, address catalogue pnces. For catalogue and other 

iJ^^E^CH & SON. Boxjre^TICK. MASS. 



c • 



• 





• 





■'^C:.^S.^3^POULTRY FAN 



i;* |Xi 







Li ;'Wri*«.«'^'jte*f«f.ifeafer,^t^» 



M E m^ s or 



POULTRY SHOWS <Sh 
SPECIALTY CLUBS 

Notices sent to us by secretaries will be pub- 
lished in this department without charge 




TRI-STATE SHOW, MEMPHIS. 

We have just received a copv of direc- 
tory of the Tri-State Poultry Association 
of Memphis, Tenn. It is very JastHy got- 
ten up and shows that the Memphis boys 
are hustlers and that the Tri-State PoS! 
try Association is one of the largest and 
strongest poultry organizations in the 
country. 

voU^^^ J^^^ ^ ^^'^^' ^^«t fall that was a 
record breaker and everybody is hustling 
for a much larger and better show this 
fall, which will be held during the Tri- 
State Fair, Sept. 27th to Oct 4th 1910 

NOTICE TO BLACK ORPINGTON 
BREEDERS. 




rluiV'^^^ ^^®- ^'^^'^ ^°"^^ Buff Leghorn 
Clul) of America one of the best. 

R,,f?"r' f"^ ^^^^ ^"^ better Rose Comb 

for H. ^'^f''!'"^^^"'^ a large membership 
tor the club. Fraternally. 

Howard J. Fisk, 

Falconer. N. Y ^^^^^^ary-Treasurer. 

NATIONAL BANTAM ASSN. YEAR 
BOOK. 



The great two year Australian Agri- 
cultural Government laying contest re- 
turns for the first twent'y-one months 

iM«H ?n '?iJ ^''k'"'"^ i'^^ B'^ck Orpingtons 
lead all other breeds with a record of 
2.088 eggs for the first twenty-one 
!iyi">^^' r'^'^ defeating the summer lay- 
mg breeds in total number of eggs laid 
o .say nothing of the greater value of 
their winter laid eggs. 

in order to get at once a large num- 
Ho'^^fi"'"'^ ''^"^' members all who men- 
oi?,K ^IV"", P^?®^ '''*" ^et the new 1910 
club catalog for one stamp postage 

Qfo T ^. ¥"<^0" W. Frown, Sec'y. 
Sta. L., Cincinnati, O. 

NATIONAL WHITE WYANDOTTE 
CLUB CATALOGUE. 

Whif^^A^r^^^^'",' secretary of the National 
u , 1. ny^'^"'^""n <^^"^' Youngstown, O 

.lo" . fo^nu ^^"""^.-^ ''''^^ «f the club cat- 
i \Vhifo Av' f^TV^^ ^^'^o ^''^ interested 

n White Wyandottes and who will send 

Vtamn"''M^n^"^.^?,^"^'"? ^^^'^ ^ two-cent 
wn-VJo;. c?'""^-^' °/- ^''^ P^"^ members have 
Z\u t^ ^""^^ articles for the book and it 

of the bried. "^^'^ ^"^^'^"' ^'^ ^" '^^'«^^ 

TO ALL BREEDERS AND ADMIRERS 
OF ROSE COMB BUFF LEG- 
HORNS. 



RnnJSJ^l^ ^^""l'- B^o^ o^ the National 
Bantam Association is ready for mailing. 
It contains much information that wHl 
be of interest to Bantam breeders and in- 
cludes a list of the winnings of members 
fhJT'^x.''^ the leading shows. A copy of 
pint, f?^.?"^^ ^® obtained by sendiAg 10 
cents to the secretary of the association, 
Geo^ ].. Young. 349 11th St.. Brooklyn! 

AMERICAN S. C. BROWN LEGHORN 
CLUB CATALOGUE. 



n 



'^fiL^^^^T^'^^f'^^"^ "^ the American S. 
Brown Leghorn Club is being mailed 



...m*"!^'^^^"^ that there is nothing which 
nil ^"""iZ '•"?. holp make a breed i^^pular 
ike a specialty club, a few of our prom- 
^£"J. ^^^^e*^ers have joined hands in form- 
Amovi'lo^''''® ^""'^' B"ff Leghorn Club of 

We are^ ^oing to ask all breeders of 
Buff Leghorns to help us in this work. 

h»% ^'Jfur. ""^ ."'^ ^r^^^ »^ today that has 
^o«,^ booming of any kind that has as 
many admirers and has become so verv 
popular as the Rose Comb Buff Leghorns. 
nromnf2^^r^J" forming this club is to 
SrS^H H«^^'' breeding and welfare of this 
grana towl; in so doing every breeder 

t'TecVnh''^"^"'^^' ^"t in order•^o make 
:11S*}*^ ^ success we must have the co- 
Pr«hii*'"p of every breeder. The mem- 
nershJp fee for one year will be $1.00 
^^4 "^^"ibership will be $5.00 with no 

We earnestly request as many as pos- 
sible to take out Life Membership so 
that the club will have no draw-backs 
hnancially the first few years, which are 
always the hardest. 

As soon as we get a sufflcicnt member- 
Irh? ^^'' f,^/^u" ^^t out a club catalogue in 
wnicii will be articles from our members 
K^Ji"v .. <?xP«^rience in raising and 
^ w'^'"^: Hose Comb Buff Leghorns 

r^wfiL ''^u" ''^^^^ "ff<^^ premiums at the 
winter shows which shall be competed 
for by members in good standing onlv. 
fr. ,^"*' 'y^ ^'""'' membership at once arid 
'ei me place .vou among the first to help 




Pag e 99 





P«^V.Ac,-^°S,^^^^' «ecy.-Treas. American 
Partridge Plymouth Rock Club. North 
Manchester. Ind. i>"ilii 

w^o?^ ^}^^^'^^ to all applicants, by E 
W. Staebler. Sec'y.. West Park. O. This 
club deserves the hearty support of all 

^reb"tn ?.^V??v, ^''^eders as it has done 
much to hold the popularitv of the breed 
and advance the interests of breeders 

WHITE ROCK CLUB REPORT. 

The special meeting of the White Plv- 
mouth Rock Club, was held at Madison 
Square Garden, N. Y. City. Wednesdav 
Dec. 29. 1909. at 3 o'clock ni.^ric?VIce^: 
Presdent Fred. Huyler in the chair. 

After a few informal remarks the sec- 
retary reported that, in replv to* a special 
notice, published in severif papers caM- 
Ing for payment of dues and vo'te on 
meeting place, about 300 members had 
responded with payment of dues 

Fred Huyler was elected president for 
the present year, and Chas H Ward 
secretary-treasurer. v^.ira, 



Nominations for members at lar^e of 

fion "o7 V^"'^*^^^' ^'^^"^ted In th.'^ele?- 
tion of F. H. Davey, Yonkers, N Y 
J. D. Koons, Trelchler Pa ChaV h' 
Ring. Decatur, Mich. ' ^''' "• 

The executive committee was emnow- 
ered to use their judgment in isl ng a 
catalogue or a quarterly bulletin fnd 

hrc"lu\''a1id^ft^ r'r' advantageous'^to. 
-^i ^^ and Its tuture progress 
The treasurer's report for the year oast 
showed receipts for the year $i4o^^ 
tllT^O t'^^H-^^^^ents. $283.3r Liabiiuies: 
$135 50, leaving a cash balance of $21 96 
The eastern division raised $25 cash 

onds?'$roo-on''thlrds" "'"'"■ *'■'' °» ^«<=- 

Next year it Is hoped tliat a lar^e 

special may be raised tor each of the 

large shows and members in the°r re- 

to" ^-o^ef^t'l.^ ^"^ '"^•'^'o- "- -'-^tld 
Bethel, conn. Se^r^ftl, "irS^S^er. 

ANNUAL REPORT AMERICAN CORN- 
ISH CLUB. 

«.??tQ^^'^Tff • balance on hand. Dee 15 1908 
li^fi 0^ ^,f,^"^bership dues to Jan 24 1910 
$136.00. Total receipts, $160 83 ' 

Expenditures: Club Ribl>ons Postal*. 
Circulars etc $ii4 iff td'/, ' ^osiage^ 

Jan. 24. i910?- $46 67 ""^'"^^ °" '^"^' 

19?Jf?8f '''''' ^^^•'^^' ^^''' 115; Jan. 24, 
The following officers were elected for 
the ensuing year: President. R. D ReidS 
1st vice-president. C. S. Brenf 2n? vieJ' 
president, Chas. T Cornman ' q^^ •^^' 
oresidenf n^rw w\t7-Sl\- ^"' ^^^ vice- 
mesMe^t, Geo.^W^ Webb: secretary treas^- 

If you want your name in our new cata 
log It will only cost you $1.00. 

Eureki Til c. ^* ^- Hayes, 

ii^ureKa. III. Secretary-treasurer. 

•^ '■'■ 
THE BUFF ROCK CLUB. 

Bjfpfy"n';o"Slh'"l^a°tfb*i^as^S'=^at 

elected offliers for thi"ensuinT'?e*ar"''^ 
„ Executive Committee.-Joln w polev 
president. Royersford, Pa.: Wm A Stolta' 

Dfeati?? in' p't"- ■,>■''"'? ^- Waddell, 
jjecatur. III., C. L. Pensyl. Bloomsburg, 

frn^-T^.r- §.^"i!fi^oir' s^^-'-i^^oS'^F 

Southern, Thos. a' Ffuii?.'- G^e'enville'^V 
^•i,N*;w England, M. J. Corev Smine-' 
ufl?A ¥f^^7 Northwestern. I.' M H- 
bjeld. Alcester. S. D. : Pacific Coast n 
J. Beinhart. Kennewick. Wash ' ^• 

tion ^'?«,jl«c;?ed to continue the publica- 
tnn ^f*^® Quarterly for the dissemina- 
tion of special Information about Buff 
Rocks as heretofore. 

William A. Stolts, Secretary. 

Februarv%^"i"cnn^';'^ ^1 Indianapolis. Ind.. 
Plymouth %nni%}^^^ American Partridge 
J-ij mouth Rock Club was organized with 

in^i'TDl^^^^^''^' ^^ President. W. T Bu 

Tretsuflr^''"'= ^' ^- ^^^tzger. Secretaiy- 

Tl7o'^| Tn^r^e^sV^^^^in^^ir ^gr^^^d^ t^l 'IZ 
IdVes^sT A^ A"oftV°"^ thr^Vu^b^^onct 



S. C. Rhode Island Reds 

Some fine cockerels $S each. Eees 
from birds scoring 90 to 93, |1.50 per 
]o One cock and 6 hens. Partridge 
Wyandottes for sale cheap. 

D. E. MILLER, ROME CITY, IND. 



PILLING, £ 



c:A.Tnri-.c: 

STRUMENTS 



.!«><1 



PiUiiigMiik r»K.r ill. lilt fur »ir «r«mlmi.nt fponmrnfT.! 
hy U. 8. Aifrioiilrtirkl Dept.. price $.( (H). Silver Milk 
, TubM 60c: Te»t BUtoury $1.60; T»t Op«n«r Kh-. < »«(1, 
Ttoo»rf.ir Bl<«t V.M; C»pon TooU, Poultry iB.trumont*. 
■^^ Uorts and C««tle 8yr)n|r*i. All PUllnjt InstrM- 
uiinu %T» of fine quality— none batter. FuU 
dlreotlon*. Write t<'<lay for free Kok, 
• (Jow Trcml-lM " 

a. p. PILLING A SON CO.. 
?73?l dreli SI . Phibrtrlphi*. Pi 








April, '10 




%? 




Answers to Questions 



Readers are invited to use this department freely. Write to the 
editor for any information desired. There is no charge for the service 



^■%,-^' 



Question. — I am raising Black Orping- 
tons and got my start from two of the 
largest breeders in this country. The 
progeny of the stock from both breeders 
show plenty of purple, and now my young 
birds are coming the same way again 
this spring. What I want to ask is, can 
you tell me something to eliminate this 
purple? There are Blacks that don't have 
it and lots of them. Now is there some 
thing in the feed, or is there something 
I can give them that will keep out the 
black while they are growing? Can you 
give me any light on this subject? If it 
is something I give them, or something 1 
don't give them that causes more of it to 
come than in other people's black chick- 
ens I would like to find it out. 

Answer. — There is practically no way 
to eliminate purple from black plumage 
other than to breed from birds which do 
not show it. We never saw a flock of 
black fowhs where every specimen was en' 
tirely free from purple. Purple in black 
birds is a natm-al defect, just as is brassi- 
ness in white birds, and it nmst be over- 
come in the same way, namely, through 
proper mating and breeding. 

It is sometimes claimed that i)rolonged 
exposure to the hot summer sun has a 
tendency to aid in bringing out purple 
barring, and it is also claimed that when 
chicks receive occasional set backs in 
growth, either through illness, neglect, 
improper feeding, etc., that the periods 
of retarded growth in the plumage are 
represented by purple barring. 

Question.— Will you kindlv tell me if 
there is any remedy for a flock of chick- 
ens eating their eggs? Does any one 
make a nest that will remove the effc as 
soon as it is laid? 

An.swer.— There is no nest that 
know of such as described by you 

A good method of overcoming the 
eating habit is to trim the beaks of 
chickens down to a point where they 
almost ready to bleed. The beak is then 
very tender and the bird will not make 
more than two or three attempts to break 
the shell of an eg^. It would be well at 
the same time to scatter a few china nest 
eggs around on the floor of the ciiicken 
house and in the nests. 

These are old-fashioned remedies but 

^fff '^^'^cP^^^r. ^^^^'^ of »">' that were 
better. Sometimes it is impossible to 
break birds of this habit, and the only 
thing to do IS to dispose of them 

Question. — Please answer the following 
questions in the next issue of P F 
What is inbreeding? What is outcross- 
ing and line breeding? How can line 
breeding be carried on successfully with- 
out introducing new blood? Which is 
cheaper, line breeding or the opposite? 
Can l)etter exhibition fowls be gotten 
from line breeding than by constantly 
adding new blood? Can J)etter exhihitioii 
R. C. Rhf)de Island Reds be produced by 
inbreeding than by outcro.ssing? How 
old should a R. C. Rhode Island Red be 
when exhiliited as a cockfi*]. As a i)Ullet" 
How .soon can cockerels and pullets 
hatched in June be exhibited with suc- 
cess? In raising exhibition and breeding 
stock should the cockerols be separated 
from the pullets as .soon as they can be 
distinguished? Which is the best way of 
feeding when you are raising oxhibi'tion 
and breeding stock, hojjpc,- or litter feed- 
ing? 

Answer.— To answer all these questions 
fully and in detail would rp<iulre an ar- 
ticle of several pages, and we therefore 
reply briefly in the order in which the 
questions are asked. Inbreeding as the 
term is generally used, means tllo indis- 
criminate mating of related fowls as a 
sire to his daughters or a male bird to 
his dam or the mating of sisters and 
brothers. Outcrossing means biinging 
into a flork a bird of another strain of 
the same breed. Line biecding is ju- 
dicious inJn-eeding. or the mating of re- 





lated birds, but not to the extent of close 
inbreeding which would cause deteriora- 
tion in health, vigor, prolificacy and the 
power to strongly transmit desirable fea- 
tures in tne ofl-spring. J.ine breeding 
may be carried on successfully if these 
points are observed. Line breeding is, 
of course, cheaper than introducing new 
Dlood each season. Better exhibition 



the cockerels from the pullets as soon 
as the sex can be distinguished, but it 
is not necessary at so early an age Both 
hopper and litter feeding " are good but 
a combination of both is perhaps best 

Question.— I have a Black Langshan 
pullet in which three feathers in each 
wing are tipped with about one-eighth of 
an inch of white, and two of the tall 
feathers have about three-eighths of an 
inch ot wliite. Would this disqualify the 
bird? It not. would such a bird fairly 
good in other sections score from 93 to 
95 points.' AVould you advise using such 
bird!^^ ^" ^ breeding yard to produce show 

ont^h.TIfiTjH''^ Standard provides that 
^.^; ^i .'."^^ .'''' "^"''® ot white in any 
P.fJf.SH^''? plumage, except in foot or 
wSn !''''"^', f '^^'^ disqualify. Your bird, 
tieietort'. could not be disqualified but 

I muc^h^'mo'^'''"'"^"^^ '"lathers constitute 
a much more serious defect than would 
one feather with a half-inch of white in 
It. We might under some circumstances 



• • 



• 



we 

egg 
the 
are 




A BUFF ROCK BEAUTY. 

.'' P^oi^t^r^ SdS' i^oT'p'* De'arbo^il^'M?"/' ^S"^"r ''\ «• '^- ^-P'--- 
sMe IS a rare specimen, true to type, a^nd'^in ''even^^so" t buff Vrom 'tip fo^tfp" ^'"'"^ ^'^"^ 
fowls 



First i)rize 
I'rop.. Dearborn 



fi,n« y^^^ secured through line breeding 
than by constantly bringing new blood 

nir t^h«\f f *•'' ^"^^ ^^ '^''^'^^ ^'y J*»e breed- 
ing than by frequent outcrossing but 
not by in.)unous inbreeding R f Rfwi 

•ulv"'!!^]:" '''%\ "."'^^'^''^ \V^>' '>^' *'xhibi{ed a 
•in> af,e i h.-ir condition in regard to 
sze. weight, maturity and condition of 
I'lnmage should g<.ye,n. Ti.e ,"erage 
HKo ,s S to 10 months. .June ha c ed 
bird.s require special care, f.-ed etc 1 

shows^"tf '") ^^"^^t^"" fo'' the January 
■shows. It is a good idea to separate 



l)reed from an excellent line bred bird 
from a good flock, even though one-half 
nch of white appeared in one feJthe • 
but the bird you describe should not be 
placed in a breeding pen at all We doubt 

sco'Ie" i^ V-f ''"-^^^ n^^ -i^^^e Who wouW 
•scoie It 93 points. It is cnstomnT^r f^ 

judges to cut birds of this ki?Tso sp 

verely in the defective sec fons that theC- 

Th"e ou^fn ""• • ^'^''"^^•' whatever^to win 
iM^o.^^ for wn.gs in this instance should 
l>e at least three points, and for tVi Itvvn 
points Other color and sha e cits wouTd 
l>Mng the score down to ab< ut 90 oi less 



S. C. BUFF LEGHORNS ^o„ «ii j„.. «„<. .pecuu ,. 

1>J> per IX $3 per 30. Sat ^fachon^ aranteed. F. W. CAT LIN, BARABOO, WIS. 

S. C. BLACK ORPI NGTONS ^ii— °;.'^a;^nyi^n^?^i't-: 

' »-«____. Haraboo Valley Show. January 1910 

As cockerel last sea-oi, lu- won 1st al l,a Crosse and 1st at th^^w u. '• ^y '^t^ockat above show." 
The females in my yardsare full of qualUv bred tro^^^^ -^^^^^ A.s.sociatiou Show 

my customers with e«gs from t^^selitnol!^t''rlti%Ti ^^^^^^ \ will supply 

I AC %M.r>tJA^r * h"^' Ji». ♦•} per ,5u. 1 aey will produce winners 



JAS. McGUAN, 



BARABOO, WIS, 



# 



• 








April, '10 




POULTRY FANCIER 



'**(e.«si«!.'«j.«iw.s«np*i»*a*'.-«ii»>i 



Page 101 



:^^^vy;^?r:^,^u'-^v;^r?«rt,;>- 




10 




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CLASSIFIED 

Numbers and initials count the same as words. 

30 words or less one month, $1. For more than 30 word* 
add two cents for each additional word. 

30 words or less, three months, $2. For more than 30 word$ 
add 3 cents per word. 

For any time longer than three months the rate is two cents 
per word per month, but no ad will be accepted for less than 50 i 
cents per month and the ad must appear each successive month. 

A discount of 10 per cent ^iven on ads running for 12 months. 





SFMFN 



V5 



All classified advertising is payable in advance. Positively no 
exceptions to this rule. The rates are so low that we cannot 
afford to take the time and trouble and incur the expense neces- 
sary to keep book accounts with these ads. 

Send money order, currency, draft or registered letter. Stamps 
accepted fc" amounts less than one dollar. 

Poultry Fancier is published the 15th of each month. All 
ads must reach us not later than the 5th. Advertisers receive 
the paper free each month that their ad appears. 




■^WWiSB"* 



€ 



Mmttmm*Mm^\m^gMjlgj/l'^'»'^l^^*'^''^'>^■ 



/•>!«'*mmmii^lfglg0im»mmmmiixmmmmmmKmmt2 



BREEDEES' SEVERAL VARIETIES. 

1— — ^ 

SENECA LAKE FARM, HIMROD, N. Y., 
breeds beauty, utility, White Wyandottes,' 
R. C. W, Leghorns and Lakenvelders, the 
beautiful and prolific new breed. Eggs $2 
setting; $8 per 100. Orders given prompt 
and careful attention. 3.3 



KELLERSTRASS STRAIN S. C. SNOW 

White Orpingtons; also beautiful Golden 

Wyandottes. Eggs 10 cents each. Schuyl- 

kill Poultry Yar ds, Pine Grove, Pa. 3-3 

TWO 2-YEAR-OLD COLUMBIAN WYAN- 
.dotte cocks for sale at $5 each. Columbian 
Wyandotte and Barred Rock eggs $2 per 
13 from Al stock. Frederick PfafT, Box 
638. Anadarko. Okla. 7-9-12 



YOUNG STOCK OF QUALITY FOR SALE. 
4 firsts on 7 entries at Greenfield. 111.. Nov. 
15-20, 1909; 8 firsts, 5 seconds and 2 thirds 
on 16 entries at Pittsfield, 111., Dec. 15-18, 
1909. S. C. W. Leghorns, B. P. Rocks and 
White Holland Turkeys. Write your wants 
to Thos. M. Stubblefleld, R. 6, Jacksonville, 
111- 6-9-12 

BOURBON RED TURKEYS AND R. C. 
Brown Leghorns our specialty. We also 
raise White Wyandottes, Indian Runner 
Ducks and Pearl Guineas. Eggs for hatch- 
ing at right prices. Mr. and Mrs. G. W. 
Price. Belmont. O. 2-3 




BEFORE PLACING YOUR ORDER GET 
my prices on eggs and stock. S. C. Buff 
Orpingtons. Barred Rocks, Mammoth Bronze 
Turkeys and Indian Runner Ducks. Birds 
have farm range and are strong and healthy. 
Mr.s. Higgs. R. 1. Henry. III. 2-4 

EGGS ?2 PER 13, 3 SETTINGS $5 FROM 
KellerstrasR Yhlte Orpingtons and Brown 
& Coleman's Black Orpingtons. Black 
Minorca eggs 10 cents each, any quantity. 
Alson Indian Runner Ducks of finest quality. 
Berry & Sawyer strain. J. A. Dickson. 42 
Divisio n St.. Ashtabula, O. 2-4 

CLAY HILL POULTRY FARM. FULTON. 
Iowa.. Jay Breeden, Prop. Breeder of Black 
Langshans. White and Silver Laced Wyan- 
dottes. Eggs from pens scoring ninety-five. 
♦ 3 per 15; pens scoring ninety. $2. Cock- 
erels for sale cheap. My birds are prize 
winners. 2-4 

FINE BOI'RBON RED TI^RKEY EGGS, $3 
per ten. Rhode Island Red eggs. $1 per 
Ifi; $5 per hundred. Orders given prompt 
attention. Send me yours. Mrs. A. G. Frlesz, 
KeytesvlIIe, Mo. 2-4 

TTOT^DAN EGGS FROM WINNERS AT 
Madison and Dodgeville, also Barred Rocks. 
Hinglet strain. Eggs. $2 per 15. Stock 
tor sale . EInior .lolin.snn. Argyle. Wis. 4-3 

(*.\L\IN R. GROSS. EXHIBITOR AND 
Breeder of Barred Plymouth Rocks and S. 
C. Brown Leghorns. Eggs, $2 per 15. 
Square Deal Yard."?, Box SI, Baraga. 
Mich. 4.3 

TIIOROITOHBRED STOCK AND EGGS FOR 
sale from prize winners. Indian Games, 
Brahmas. Cochins. Reds, Rocks. T^eghorns 
and White Wyandottes. Eggs, $1 per 13. 
$2 per 40, $5 por 1(»0. For quick sale, prize 
winning pen of Partridge Cochins. Get 
price. Mrs. Clara Reichenbach. Coopers- 
biirc. Pn ^_-\ 

BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 



"PEERLESS" BARRED ROCKS. BREED- 
ing Barred Rocks our exclusive business. 
Our manager a poultry expert. Breed only 
line bred stock. Announcement 1910 sent 
free. Fifty-cent booklet. "Incubation and 
Brooding," sent for 20 cents during Febru- 
ary, March and April to all who mention 
this "ad." Our show record almost clean 
sweep In hot competition. We can please 
you. Peerless Poultry Plant, Inc., Clinton, 
Wig. J.4 







THE FAMOUS ORCHARD STRAIN BAR- 
red Plymouth Rocks, bred for vitality and 
productiveness. Eggs, $2 per 15. Send for 
booklet, "Starting with Poultry." Orchard 
Poultry Farms, Doylestown. Pa. (Hatching 
Department.) 2-4 

RINGLET BARRED ROCKS. E. B. THOMP- 
SON strain. Nicely barred, good yellow 
legs, fine layers. 13 eggs $1, 26 for $1.50. 
Honorable dealing. Orders promptly filled 
E. H. Hard en. North East, Pa. 2-3 

SPECIAL BARRED ROCK SALE. ON Ac- 
count of lack of time I will dispose of 2 
very good dark cocks, one pullet breeding 
cock. 25 cockerel bred hens and pullets and 
15 cockerels. Get prices now. Dr. F. A. 
Shuffelton, Saint Marys, O. 

BARRED ROCKS, KNOXDALE STRAIN. 
Well barred and very strong In vitality 
good size and splendid layers. Stock pro- 
duced from careful mating with the double 
mating system. Eggs, $2 per setting; $S 
per hundred. Orders given prompt atten- 
tion. C. W. Coleman, 200 Jeffras Ave., Find- 
• ay. O. 2-4 



WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 



WHITE ROCKS— -STOCK FOR SALE THAT 
will win in the show room and fill the egg 
basket. Our birds are big, white beauties, 
strong in all good points. Eggs from our 
choicest matings at living prices. Berwyn 
Poultry Yards, Box P. Berwyn, 111. 12-4 

WHITE ROCKS. HEAVY WINTER LAY- 
ers. Pullets from this stock laying at 5 V2 
months this season without forcing. Not 
one dissatisfied customer last season. Book- 
ing eg^ orders, $2 per 15. S. P. Evans, 3838 
E. TSth Street, Cleveland. O. 

WHITE ROCKS EXCLUSIVELY, "FISHEL 
Strain." Eggs from large, snow white, farm 
raised birds, 15 $1.50, 30 $2.50, 100 $6. 
Special pen of high scoring exhibition birds. 
TRussell, .ludge,) $2.50 per 15. Jesse C. 
Brabazon, Route 4, Box E. Delavan. Wis. 2-4 

WHITE ROCKS. FISHEL STRAIN, CHALK 
white, grand shape. My birds are as good 
as the best. Eggs only $2 per 15. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. W. R. Greer, Auburn, 
Ind. 2-4 



WALKER'S WHITE ROCKS AT NEW 
Castle won in a class of 63, 1st cock. 1st 
cockerel; 1st. 2d. 3d hen; 1st. 2d. 4th pullet; 
1st, 2d hen. Eggs $3 and $5 per 15. Bob 
Walker, 233 Porter St.. New Castle. Pa. 2-2 

WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS, WINNERS 
at Peoria, Ottawa, Galesburg, etc. Three 
yards, headed by exhibition and prize win- 
ning males. Eggs, $2 per 15. From good 
utility stock on range. $1 per 15, $3 ner 60. 
Wm. C. Goodwin. Chllllcothe, 111. 2-4 



WHITE ROCKS— EGGS FROM PEN HEAD- 
ed by prize winning cock at Chicago show 
$2.50 per 15; from other prize stock $2. 
Address Gaberk Hennery, 1316 Michigan 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 3-3 

BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 



BUFB' COCKS. ORDER EGGS FROM 
quality birds. Eggs from pen headed bv 
New York and St. Louis winners. $5 per 15; 
others. $1, $2 and $3. John D. Wllklns. 
Pocahontas, 111. 2-4 

GOLDEN BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 
Large, golden, glittering buflfs. Heavy layers 
of big. brown eggs. First prize winners at 
Chicago and other big shows. Eggs from 
prize winners. $3 per setting. Catalog free. 
P. C. Jungels. Box 1. Lemont. 111. 2-2 

GOLD lil'FF ROCKS. THE GREATEST 
winning strain in the West. Pens headed 
1)V district prize- winning males. Great lay- 
ers. Eggs. $7. $5 and $1.50 i)er 15. Guar- 
anteed hatch. Circular free. J. Elliott. 
Moorhead, la, 3.3 



COLUMBIAN PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 



COLUMBIAN ROCKS — THE UTILITY 
Beauty breed. My own strain. Correct in 
shape, with grand color markings. Eggs 
from my Chicago winners $10 per 15; other 
pens $5 per 15. Mrs. R. A. Judy, Decatur. 
IH; 3-4 

PARTRIDGE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. 

WHY TAKE CHANCES? SEND ME YOUR 
order for Partridge Plymouth Rocks and 
you are sure of the best. Don't take my 
word for it. Look at my show record at 
Chicago, Detroit and other strong shows, 
consider the competition and you will see 
who has the quality. Some choice breeders 
at reduced prices and young stock that will 
please. Paul LaFromboise, Mt. Pleasant, 
Mich. 4-9-12 



WHITE WYANDOTTES. 

SUTTON'S WHITE WYANDOTTES WIN 
again. On an entry of sixteen birds I won 
1st cock. 3rd cockerel, 2nd hen, 1st, 3rd 
pens, 1st, 2nd pullets, silver cup, best dis- 
play, best cock hen, cockerel, pullet and 
pen. More prizes, than all competitors. 
Eggs $10 and $5 per 15. F. D. Sutton. 68 
St. Louis Ave., Youngstown. Ohio. 2 4 

WHITE WYANDOTTES— EGGS FOR SALE 
from choice matings. Strong, vigorous stock, 
pure white and good shape. Write for circu- 
lar containing prices and description Men- 
tion this paper. Richard Bloom. Fulton. 
Mo. 2-4 

EGGS FROM MORROW'S PRIZE WINNING 
White Wyandotes. At Montezuma. la., I 
won 1st pen, first, second sweepstakes. Eggs 
from exhibition matings. $3 per 15; other 
grand mating.s, $2 per 15. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. Address Frank Morrow. Barnes 
City, Iowa. 2-4 

AVH ITIO W V.\ .\ I X )TTES— EGGS FROM 

pen of 8 hen.«. 1 cock picked from 284 
Iiirds. $2 per 15, $3 per 30. farm range $4 
per 100. Rev. G. C. Strueblng. Freeburg. 
111. 4.3 



BUFF WYANDOTTES. 

BUFF WYANDOTTES. HAVE BRED THEM 
since 1895. making me the oldest breeder 
of this variety In Ohio. Young stock from 
my Chicago and Cleveland winners. Eggs 
from the best matings I ever had. $3 per 15 
V. Crabtree, Tiffin. Ohio, 2-4 

THIMSEN. BUFF WYANDOTTE SPECIAL- 
l«t. Eggs from Buff Wyandottes that win In 
the strongest competition. Eggs from pen. 
1. $3 per 15; pen 2 and 3. $2 per 15. If 
you are In the market for stock or egga I 
can please you. F. p. Thimsen, Blooming 
Prairie, Minn. 5-9-l'> 



SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES. 



SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES, A SPEC- 
lalty. My pens are line-bred and prize win- 
ners, scoring 91 to 93 ^. They are bred to 
lay, weigh and win. Eggs for hatching $2 
per 15, or $3 per 30, Try a setting. I 
guarantee satisfaction. Peter J. Becker 
Geneseo, 111. 2-4 

NELLIS* SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES. 
Prize winners wherever shown. Score at the 
big show of The Western Connecticut Poul- 
try As.soclatlon held at WInsted. Conn., 1907- 
1909: 91%, 92, 92. 92i^, 94%; pen. 184%. 
First and third pullet, third cock. Eggs 
for setting. f3 for 13. Orders booked now 
E. A. Nellis. Winsted. Conn. 2-3 



SILVER LACED WYANDOTTE EGGS 
from first cock, third cockerel, fourth pul- 
let. Chicago and Detroit and Grand Rapids 
winners; females that score to 95; $3 per 
15. Clare Hoffman, Allegan, Mich. 3.3 




COLUMBIAN WYANDOTTES. 



POULTRY FANCIER^^^CIS^ 




^i?plv V ^ WYANDOTTES, EXCLU- 
w.-n^y* You need our free circular giving 
inS ^fn.if"^ description of matings. ^Eggf 
tnfpprf M. ^^f «°»able. Satisfaction gul?! 
utZina "lJfr^il-"g,,e^;-"^^-^ ^^'''' ^'^ 3^^ 

frlos "^^ r'^fn'"'^''^'''' ^3 per setting ^ ^n^ 

mowoc'.'w'is'''- ""■ ^- ^^^^'^ ^^'^ F.^Ocono! 
- 5-9-12 



RHODE ISLAND WHITES. 



wiu/.V'' Thi'"n ^^T^'^^ lillODE ISi.AND 
,1,, f "*^^^' ^»"^'*^^^ cxcells in egg pro- 

S in''vo„."'^'"''"^ qualities. Intfocfuce 
Plea"e \nu^ I 'V'^^'' '^^'^^ '''^•'^"It will 

ii 7^^ • ^'"'V.^ ^'''' catalogue and mating 
din;, ]f\^''''''' Poultry Farm. ]?ox 50. Boro- 

4-1 



LANGSHANS. 



ORPINGTONS. 



d^J^fr. *^^ ORPINGTONS! SEND 10c TO- 
day for club book! Tells why Blacks are 

brled'uPe'^^tlfrfp""" • T^^^ favoriL of all%"ho 
Austra «n o. varieties together. Tells of 
Australian Government proof of lavlne- su 

flr^.^r'' "'^'^ '•^P^^'y manuring fowr 
largest per cent of white meat; largest and 

B,^nwn ^^^"t^f"' of Orpingtoni ^ MiASn 
gincrAatt'o^^"^'"' ^^^""^ ^°"'''->' ^-£ 

S. C. BLACK ORPINGTONS. EVERY ONE 
^ «]l«^v, l^ird. winners in the leadfng slum? 
Of Northern New York. Cockerels^$5 an! 

per 15 Day old chicks. 25 cts each 
Brook View Stock Farms. Rte. 3. Pulaski! 

-: : 12-4 

FOR THE BEST ORPINGTONS. ANY OF 
the varieties, you must send to their orici 
sTx'clnts^o' "^\"?".>'' have the best sL^nd 
V^^ ^^ f ^°^ catalog, history of Orpingtons 
and hints on Poultry keeping. William Cook 
& Sons. Box C. Scotch Plains. N j 

* 1-10-12 

CLEAN "sweep ON S. C. BUFF ORPTNp" 
tons at Omaha and LincolrT Neb wfnn^ng 
1st cockerel. 1st pullet and 1st pen at each 
show, beside.s other prizes and sp^c^als plac^ 
ing our Buffs unquestionably in advance of 
oompeti ion in the middle west Ask foJ 

On.?wl.^^wr^^"^ ''^'- ^--^"- ^- ^ 

^- ^- WHITE, BLACK. BUFF ANn t^ta" 
mond Jubilee Orpington eg£s to f.. \-^' 
chicks three weeks old 40c fach-%n ^^ ' 
^teea. Hamilton & Kauf'^aTTw^^Rf^e^;: 

— : ^___ 2-.'", 

''^^ ^'^. BVFF ORPINGTONS FROM (^HTP\ 

have but In"" ^"^ Canadian wiS^.rs':"wm 
have but one very choice pen of rich, even 

in hackle and saddle. 



THE QUALITY OF MY BLACK LANr 

don^' /,\P'-°r^ ^^ 'h^''- show record '?ou 
order ^^^e chances when you send me your 

your flock w?th^'^''^ ^°V '■^^^^ "'^ J'^Prove 
now hnJi f ^ ^"""^^ °f *he grand birds I 
now have for sale. Scores to q'iiA in 
show room Pricp<5 rirrv,f ir , •'^ /2 in 
Writo T>Vr TiV ^ usht. Eggs in season. 
W^ite me. Mrs Frank Camerer. Gazette. 

— : _^^__ 1-6 

BlaJk^tL^ t ^^EEDER OF THE BEST 
de? ^eadfnl ?,fr- "^^^ ^ ^^^'^ ^^cord un- 
bi-eedl? Mn^"'^!*^^""*^^"^'^^^ t.y any other 
uieeuer. Male birds each season score to 
'01/2, females 06 V^. Buy where you know 
li^Lr^nZ ^'^^^ ^^' *he highest quality a^ 

a^d cScL^erers'^fo ^^''^ "°"^^ ^' ^"^ ^^-^s 
f^Qf;i/ , ^ **^ spare, scoring from 94 
to 951/2; also some extra choice hens Made 

?how''^'! i '^''''^^P ^* th« Eastern Wisconsin 
show this .season and won silver cup for 
best pen in the show three years all breeds 
competing, score 191 y„ A Strn'nfkl^ 
Eastcn Wis. Poultry t P.^.Tssr&hmon^.' 

— : , 11-9-1 2 

SJLn"';.^™?, BLACK AND WHITE 
_x^. -tierner. R.3. Columbia City. Ind. 2-4 



vvn'^ V '''^^^^^ WHITE LEGHORNS. THE 
\ or Id s record for best layers. Have bVed 
.eghorns for ninc>teen years. Get the best^ 

••I'h.llip.s Strain." Eggs $3 per I.5! sTock 

p;!nftl'v''n^^'x.^ ^r catalogue. Rockv Riv^or 
Joultry CO.. No. GG "The Oaks," Doerfiold! 

S. C. BRO WN LEGHORNS. 

INVINCIBLE S. C. BROWN LEGHORNS 

o'T 'Z\J'''A '"'''''r- ''''■ Cock scoHnI 
Jo-^. pullets 94. pen 186%. Eetrs S2 tr, «■? 

Mating list ready soon. Harrff Tra°nl?' 
Carpenter. Ohio. trainer, 

?ha£- ^^fOWN LEGHORNS BRED FOR 
chfrPu; «7n°'' ^"il, laying qualities. Baby 
chicks $10 per 100. Eggs by the setting 
Circular free. H. M. Moyer. R. 2. Bechtelf--, 
viiie. ±-a. 1 1-9-12 

S. r. lUlnWS LECHloliNS. EXHlJilTlON 
and utility birds. Get prices on stork ^^n^ 

Bnf.l. T'- T^ •'''^" ^^'^^^'^ ^'«"- Ralph N 
Batcholor. Fairview, Mass. 4.3 



t 



• 



R. C. BROWN LEGHORNS. 



R- C. BROWN LEGHORN r'>4'> Fm 
strain), female line, eggs and stock for s2l1 
reasonable, according to quality, i won the 

M?. 's?v^''"T",'^" all that I entered a? 

ic'ited w""''"'!^' Z^'"'"'- Correspondence 
Hcited. Wm. Gaffey. South Worcester. 



the 
so- 

N. 
2-4 



BUFF LEGHORNS. 



I AM 

]{ird.s 

from each of 

Eir.st premium 

in the west R 

ford. 111. 



line as silk. Eggs for setting, 3 

live pens at $2 per scttine 

winners at the largest show 

S. Messner. C. No. 18. Rock- 

2-3 



WHITE 

ed with 

first and second hen. 

Second pen $1.50 for 

irom imported stock 

Hooking orders now 

J-.<»n(]on, O 



HANGSHANS. FliLST PEN HEAD 

cockerel which won first prize aSi 

Esgs $1.50 for 15. 

30. Anconas bred 

Eggs $1.50 for 15 

Geo. McCague. New 

3-3 



S. C. BUFF LEGHORNS— SOME FTTMTT- 
cockerels for sale. They are be?i?Pes ft "^2^ 
$.{ and 5 each, sired by a son of first cock 
Madison Square Garden. 1908. Eggs $2 ne; 
I'- F. D. Kemp. Sparta. Wis. ^" ^ ' ^\^tl 

SINGLE COMB BUFF LEGHORNS. EGGS 
from premium birds, line bred, as fine as 
ever wore feathers. ^3 per 15. Eggs ?rom 

'iar'%^"\^'''^^ ^'"'^^ on the farm^^|4 pS 
100. S. M. K.ltner. Anderson. I nd. 3-3 

BLACK MINORCAS. 



— _ „„^ W...C yay <jll 

colored birds. Sound 
Eggs $5 per 15. Few 
V. Crabtree. Tifiin. O. 



cockerels to 



spare. 
^_^_^ 2-4 

^le'^'" wt^l^'f ORPINGTON EGGS FOR 
rn^t'ed o extra^'fin^^"!^ ''r' ^"^ P^'l^ts 
Eggs ri 05 npr ir^,-^'«^ ^o"^d cockerels. 

H?ft. ^Ciarks';n,e''fa ^"^ ""''' '''■ "^''"l^" 
— 3-3 

OKPINGTOXS— OIK BOOK IS 

you nunti-.n this paper. It tells 
bes layers; where to get best 

I'auns. Cineinnati, Ohio. 



FI{|-]|-: 11-' 

of wuihTs 

eggs lur 

Cheviot 

4-3 



RHODE ISLAND REDS. 



third 
from 
$2.50 
HI. 



iicH'^sivelv^^^'^'v. ''"P?^ ISLAND REDS 

r-mEItAl, POUI.TItV YAUD siNi-l 1,- 

?°n'"\/^|;°tr 'f'r" ""-S'- ESR-. Flr."^ 
pen. ?_..,o per 15; second pen. $2 per 1=5- 

pen. $1.50 per 15. Incubator eggs 
other pens. $4 per 100; farm rin^^ 
per 100. C. I. w. Adkisson.'^Gllatll: 

1-4 

H.VVE YOU DECIDED WHERE YOTT AuT 
liolng to place your orde, for s c it 1' 
To U 's°"a "i 7*^-^- " "«'• ^''Jte a postal 
fScii- St^og^-^fj%I^^.--er^;^£^^o^ 

. . ^ 2-4 

HOSE COMB RHODE ISLAND 1777^7 
Persi.stent layers The riSi^f 1, ked.S. 
^lor. Eggs\rom 1 to'lV ptr^^sUthl^^ 
Write for particulars and m.ntfon Pou t, v 
I'^ancier. Septimus Mawer, Grand Rapids. 
■ 3_3 

TO BREEDERS OF S. C. R I REDS T 

have a limited number of eggs to sell Trom 

Fldrfdl'e" J'"^"'"^ T?""- Nonl,"^ better'" F C 
EldHdge & Son. Bourn e. Mass. 9-9-12 

ROSE COMB REDS. AFTER FIVE YEARS^ 
careful mating for etrtrs shnT... o^.i , 

our Reds jay "like ^.eJl^f/rnsfXl \"r^ow'"k'e 
Plymouth Rocks, with female plumage that 

?rn^ ?rP ^''*^- ^"-^t tl^e to offtr eggs 
from these grand Reds. Prize winners tn 
every pen. Eggs $2 per 15; $3 per 30 Sam 

BOX 21, Lancaster, O. 3.3 



ARE YOU LOOKING FOR SOAIF Kivi^ 
Hlaek and White Lang.shan eggs at Vi r';; 
per seftinir'? t-p ,.^ ""u cg^b at $1.50 

Si'l^lr E'^-?"jr'!,er"f^ Z"r^ DIAMOND 

I.NVEOST IN A SKTTIX,; , ,|.- My ill uT- 
Langshan (-tiirs- it i.jii ■ ' •>! 1 i'i..\Llv 

times: $2 p,;,' s-ettinL'"'-V'"/* Hundred 
•-ckerel.s for .Ule Pn-d , S'P"/^- ^^^'-'o"- 
iilu,-^. N. V. • '^aehman. Rom- 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS . 

BUFF COCHINS FOR SALE. HENS PUT ' 
lets or trios My stock is first clal?" Wnr,' 
27 Drize«5 in lono c?„ ^ . "'•^'^ ciass. won 

(■•>r <.sS wir- =.,ii^ ? '" >"'"'■ "'•''«'• now 

Pui7o.?;g;.J ^-J^^ lo^[i'„r-wT"kit 

Burnside. Conn Blake, 
"• 2-10-13 

H A RG A I NS IN S. C. WHITE I l.^r-wr.uxT 
cockerels $1 and $2 each"tVr^andv'"bi'rd? 

?n$o "«"''' /^"'^ «^^^ y^"'- Dick Eggs $1 
'<nd $2 per lo. according to aualifv t^i.v, 

Su"ai^nfe'e"l"'' T"^^ "x^^" ^^'-ona^ble ^ha'eh 
^hor^'^w!,- '^''"'"" Keegan. R. 1. pox 72 
1- 2- 4 

rhat;;:-^'%.~v^'-^ 

R. C. WHITE LE GHORNS. 

i'n'?r'(?Whi?e''T'^'?'' HIGHEST QUALITY 
eggs and mv nH;!«"''""' •^''*" '" ^^^^^^'^ ^^'^^ 
ch5ice^"tl2^^fo?" 'Zl '^'•|g^.?ro"m''^my "^^.^ 

.-onipetition with the be.?t [n t he west Mr" 
W. Jones Williams, The Maples." May wS 

2-4 

iV.. y- ^y'l''i'H LEGHORNS, ELEPIIWT 
Strain. Seattle. 1st coeluMx-l; lou'l s,a,'. • 
firsts. 2 seconds, 2 thirds ti. i «t..f ' " 
Eggs, utility 5 cents eaS iia^e % cenii" 

H?n,." T^' ^^1^'" ^*^h- CatalogSe. Rogers 
Hanch. Box il. Pleasanton, la? 3.3 



S. C. BLACK MlXoiiCAS. WON TEN 
1910. (Five at state show. Detroit ) Lartre 

cuTaV S"'^x^ ^"""T.'. *^P'^^' «^"P«- C'r! 
.lack'sonr Mic'T- ^^ ^''"'"' '^''^ Williams St.. 

•w^ O ~o 



I ^I'fEED FOli QIIALITV AND SIZE. S. 

for in e ^;"^'/,t- ""^^""'Jr P^'" ^^^^ Cockerels 
ro' sale. I. Allison. Florence. Neb. I-4 



ROSE COMB BLACK MINORCAS. WIN- 
ners of 7 first and 3 eups at Allantown 
^^dL'eTT^T n"^ S-'-^nton this season! 
Ou^mv .hnw ''^''*^'^' *" '••^Portlng Scranton's 
Quality show, says: '.Mr. Tobey has on 

r?^.'^'l'T, ^" """^^^•' '^f specimen's of sucS 
remarkable quality as to call for the high- 
est praise: anyone who can rear Black Min- 
orcas and show them in such beautiful con- 
dition, has the right to claim the honor of 
being an expert with poultrv." C E Tobev 
Seranton. Pa . • y^. t^. J^obey 
- 2-3 

GLEN OAK MINORCA YARDS ROSF 

Comb Black Minoreas exelusfvely. ^ean 
s^yeep at Peoria with one single excentlon 
which resulted in a tie Sfnr'il o r.^ "^ ' 
.'uaranteed. $2.50 ner ''l5: ^^ er ^fo- Ifo 
y;;r lOO. Charles White. Route' 36. Peoria 

— : ■ 2-4 






CORNISH 



Piompt attention. Circular free R n 
Hr-i'ler. Middle! own. Pa. ^'- ^^ 



# 



POLISH. 




:^^V'>^^"^- 




L..i£Si^^ POULTRY FANCIRRHT" 



GOLDEN SEABRIGHT BANTAMS FOR 
sale. Buds scoring 93 to 95% Won nt 
Newton. 111.. In lively competition; first ?oci 
first and second cockerel, first, second and 
third pullet. Eggs after March 1 $3 oer 
setting. Dale Arnold. Newton, lil. 1.4 

BLACK BREASTED RED GAME B \N 
tams. On ten entries, seven scored q^iA 
two 96. one 96 V3. Write for Wor'd's Egt 
Challenge. Eggs $2 per 15. J. F Kale I 
Sons, Warren, O. 3-2 

SEND VOIR oIJUKli.s f,,,. HEALTHY 
pnze-winnmg G.dden Sebright I?antams to 
L. D. Karker. R. 1, Cobleskill, N. Y Stock 
at right prices. Eggs for hatching" $1 p^r 
settmg. ' ^ '^_^ 



DOMINIQUE S. 



DAVENPORT'S AMERICAN DOMINIQUES 
won at New York 1908 every first prize of 
fered; 1909 six of the ten firsts and siconSs. 
Write for circulars and prices. W H Dav- 
enport. Coleraine. Mass 5^9-12 

PHEASANTS. 




HOUDANS. 



HOUDANS— MY BREEDERS ARE TRAP- 
nested and bred for eggs; also have some 
fine show birds. Won all firsts and 2 sec- 
onds at Oshkosh, Wis., on 6 entries Eggs 
pen 1 $2 per 15; per 2 $1.50 per 15;' guar- 
antee 10 f.rtilo or replace setting free. John 
C. Meyer, li 9. Oconto Falls, Wis 2-4 



PHEASANT BREEDING PAYS 800 PER 
cent better than chicken raising. A pair of 
pheasants are worth from $25.00 to $150 00 
to a breeder yearly. Read the Reliable 
Pheasant Standard, the recognized authority 
?^i pheasant breeding, and learn all about 

i™ "'i' ^'^?"^][P- '^^ *=®"^« a copy by mail 
from A. V. Meersch, Poughkeepsle. New 

5°^^- 9-08-tf 

TURKEYS. 



IT IS A RECOGNIZED FACT THAT "Q & 
B." Houdans are "the best." If you start 
with "the best" you will save time, money 
and annoyance. , If you want a flock of prize 
winners and record layers, demand "Q & 
B." Houdans. Write for our beautiful de- 
scriptive catalog; it is free. Egg.s. $2 50 



.MAMMOTH BRONZE TURKEYS SCOR- 
ing 94 1^ up with blood from World's Fair 
and Kansas state fair firsts. Eggs $2 to $3 
per 9 Jas. Gladish (Pres. Leahy Mfg. Co.) 
Higginsville, Mo. 33 



$5 and $10 per 15 
hatch. Quimby 
Ipswich, Mass. 



. ten chicks guaranteed to 
& Brown, 109-U High St.. 

2-4 



LARGE CRESTED, HEAVY LAYING HOU- 
dans. Eggs from four grand pen.s. Ten 
years a breeder. Guarantee good hatch My 
first year with Orpingtons. Whites and 
IMaeks. Hnttie P. Franks. Worth, 111. 5-9-12 

HOIDANS EXi'LCSIVELY. COCKERELS 
lor sale also, one and two-year-old stock 
All well-l)red birds and will please. Egg.s 
shipped promptly. Send in vour order now 
Price right. R. F. Dolan. Fiilda. Minn. 4-3 



LAKENVELDERS. 



l-OR SALE MAMMOTH BRONZE TUR- 
keys. A fine strain of good layers, large 
bone and frame, and nicely marked; bred 
from prize winning stock from Madison 
Square Garden. Order early. Prices rea- 
sonable considering quality. Mrs. Mary 
Schoonmaker, R. 1. M eshoppen. Pa. 1-4 

BRONZE TURKEY EGGS, $2 PER 10, AND 
genuine Wild Mallard Duck eggs, $1.50 
per 10. Order early. Will ship when 
wanted. H. W. Fairall, Iowa City, Iowa. 

1-4 



MAMlVloril WHITE HOLLAND TIRKEVS. 
All large birds and first prize winners 
wherever shown, scoring from 94 to 98 
Eggs $3 p(«r setting of 10. W. A Smith 
Burnt I'rairie, 111. 4.3 

^ 

PIGEONS. 



LAKENVELDER'S. FOUND AT LAST 

what this paper is dedicated to: "The 
most beautiful in fowls." Exhibition stock. 
Eggs in season. Anson van Voorhees. Mar- 
shall, Mich. 2-4 



DORKINGS 



SILVER GRAY DORKINGS. BEST TABLE 
fowls. Splendid layers year around; New 
York and Boston winners. Finest yards in 
America. See Campine advertisement. 

Cherry Grove Farm. M. R. Jacobus. Prop.. 
Ridgefield, N. J. 2-6 



1 OFFER GUARANTEED MATED HOMERS 
in any quantity, at $1.00 a pair, and chal- 
lenge squab companies or dealers to produce 
better stock at twice this price. Beautiful 
White Homers. $1.50 a pair. Get my prices 
on Runts. Carneaux and Maltese Hens, and 
save dollars. Charles K. Gilbert. 1563 East 
Montgomery Ave .. Philadelphia. Pa. 8-9-12 

WANTED— 5,000 COMMON OR HOMER 
Pigeons. Pay at least 25c pair. Highest 
prices paid for Guinea Fowls, Live Rabbits 
and Guinea Pigs. S. Gilbert. 1128 Palmer 
St.. Philadelp hia. Pa. i2-5 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



SILVER CAMPINES. 



5sIL\ ER CAMPINES. ORIGINAL INTRO- 
tiucer improved strain Belgiums. Great egg 
pi-oducer.s. Largest white eggs. First prize. 
Whitest dozen eggs in show. Boston. 1910. 
Cherry Grove Farm, M. R. Jacobus. Prop.. 
Hidgefield, N. J. 2-6 



A FINE 160- ACRE P^ARM IN THE WHEAT 
belt of Kansas. 19 miles from Abilene, 
county seat Dickinson county. Four miles 
from R. R. Now being used for pasture, 
good wire fence, good water the year round. 
Will sell below the market on reasonable 
terms. Non-resident widow owns It and 
has no use for it. Some improvements. 
Addre.ss K. F.. care Poultry Fancier. 357 
Dearborn St.. Chicago, 111. 



>.^.Vi''-^7-Vt^'^..'J.^fW 



Page 103 







t\vI':l\i-: months \\'(jrk in the poul- 

try yard by Judge Wittman. Tells what to 
do <a(h mf.nth of the year. Free to yearly 
sub.seribers of our journal. Will run Special 
lireed Numbers until November; 35 cents 
per year. National Poultry Journal Co 
Box 114. Kittanning, Pa. 4.1 

POULTRY SUPPLIES. 



POULTRY FEED— PRICE PER 100 LBS. 
Beef .scraps $2.75, meat and bone $2 25 
ground bone $2.25, hen scratching grains 
$1.8.'), chick scratching grains $2, poultry 
mash $1.80. pigeon grain $2.25, alfalfa 
clover meal $1.50, crushed oyster shells 
65c, crushed clam shells 60c, mica crystal 
grit 65c, pearl grit 60c, medicated charcoal 
$1.50. The meat and bone, shells, grit 
and charcoal in both hen and chick size 
Give us a trial order. J. G. Hermann & 
Co.. Indianapolis. Ind. jj.g 

PRINTING. 



PRINTING— POULTRY, GENERAL, NOTE- 
heads. envelopes, postcards, labels, cards, 
tags, 100 either, 40c; 250, 75c; 500, $1.2B 
postpaid. Circulars, everything. Finest en- 
gravings. Beautiful samples for stamp 
Model Printing Co.. Manchester. la. 10-9 

STANDARD ALUMINUM 
LEG BANDS 




lPiiiii;';ilii|;illlliiii;;ilHliii';;;;i||l|lllni^ 



Price 12 bands 15c, 25-20c, 50- 
35c, 100 60c. Send for catalog 
of trap nest, egg shipping boxes 
drinking fountains, feed hop- 
pLirs and other supplies. 

GEO. STIRDIVANT 

sh'=:boygan falls, wis. 




WATCHEMOKET 
POULTRY YARDS 

SEASON OF 1909. 
EGGS FOR HATCHING 

Argonauts : : : $5.ro per dozen 
Phoenix Fow^ls : : 3.00 per dozen 
Only a strictly limited number of eggs will 
be sold. The Argonaut is a pea combed bird, 
buff colored, yellow shanked, general pur- 
pose fowl. The Phoenix is the unique long- 
tailed breed produced by the "Yankees of 
the Orient", the wonderful little Japanese. 
Cash in advance with all orders. 

H. S. BABCOCK 
77 Summit St., - East Providence. R. I. 



d 



WHITE CRESTED BLACK POX ISH t t^T^ 
bred for 25 years. Winners at wi?M'8F^f 
New York and Boston. Remember J hntciol' 

ZnXT "^t"'^" ^''"•^^ bre^Jd^r'^Sf 'A'^^'erlcl" 
Stock for sale: egga in season. Chas L leew' 
Pres. Am. Polish Club. Afton. N Y ' 5 9-/2 



BANTAMS. 



# i9 



HARIO BARGAINS. GOLDEN AND SIT VWM, 
5^'bright. Buff and Black Cochin iV^oTyi^ 
Plack and Blaek Red Game Baniams ' gij^'' 
est honors New York. 800 bi^Ss Prober & 
» o . St^hoharjp N. Y roper & 

u<m ]:{■{ iii<5fR in-j \,.^ , ^ lime I have 

" j.^.s nisis. 10.3 seconds, gfi fhlrrl«j iin 

sp.'cials. 10 silver cunvi t«.i !! in'riis, no 

A8s„.. and National ira„tam-Aaa'J"""'"°rj 



BARRED ROCKS 
S.C.&R.C.R.I.REDS 

— — ^^™— — — — — ■ ■ 

BUFF TURKEYS 

™^— — — ^— — 

of orders. Our strains possess both fancy 
pleased with results. 

DAY-OLD-CHICKS FROM BEST STOCK 
Our incubator house contains 20 large machines in constant operation and we can fill your wants 
promptly and satisfactorily. Don't fail to write us for prices on stock, eggs and chicks. 

WM. OSBURN, GOOSE LAKE FARM, BOX P. MORRIS, ILL. 



We have a grand lot of stock, males and females to offer 
our customers at prices ranging from $1 .50 to $25.00 each. 
Write us describing what you want and asking for our 
catalogue which will be sent free of charge. We guaran- 
tee everything as represented and all orders are shipped 
subject to approval. 

EGGS FROM CHOICEST MATINGS 
at reasonable prices and shipped immediately on receipt 
and utility points in the highest degree. You will be well 



. 




^£i£A::j:^S»^.^l:iJ'?.'g gP?S?5?r 



C^^^J^POULTRY FANCIER 




.k i^u ^' i*»« inserted in this department under the followine conrl:t:»».. Tl,« • 
•hall be uniform, each ad occupying three-ouarter. of «!? ;.I!!k *=?"°'*'0"f •* The size 
advertiser to use the same soace ear K .^^^*K a j *"l** "'."^'^ column Each 

month, if desired No\Ts w1!I\\^n7erte^; ^^less^li^n"?^ Vk"^ **^^"* 

$10 per year. Payment strictly in advaSce^oexceSio^s to th?.^^^^^ ^l,*"^ *^°** " 
made exceptionally low on this account. exceptions to this rule. The price i. 



the {h„^?^'*» '"«* '^ C. White Leghorns 

the kind the new standard calls for Of l * 

tliT% C^°'l '' ^'^^^ ^"d ^ seconds.' Pens 
pfc/f^ ^y lt^«^ 8^^^"d ^°^ks and cockerels 

fv«nf« '^^t'-'^fa^^^o" guaranteed. Write your 



Rose Comb Brown Leghorn Eggs 

from special mated pens, Madison 
fcjquare, Chicago and Boston winners 
circulars. JAMES CRAWFORD. 

Cameron Mills, N. Y. 



Dr Holmes' Trap-Nested. Standardbred. 

^'o^iSb Rhode Island REDS 

Bred for vigor, .sizp, shape, color. Stock and 
eggs II) seaso'i PVee catalog 

w . J^^^c,^^^^ POULTRY PENS 
West Mam Street, - EVANSTON, ILL 



Buff Cochins That Win 

special for best 10. I can help you win too If 
you send me your order for stock or egg" G?knd 

J. C. MITCHEM. : Marshalltown, Iowa 



DON'T OVERLOOK THIS^ 

other people would read your ad if it Vere > 




• • f-- ^ • ^"^ jyjuL «iu II 11 were / 

««I 'o^^^^li^^ ^^^^ *^ yo" ^^^ reading this > 
?fi- J the rates and conditions at the head ) 

[twill ) 

ICIER, ;> 

Chicago, III. / 



of this department and send in an ad. It will > 
bring you good returns. POULTRY FANCIER, > 
357 Dearborn Strett, ^ 




R. C. & S. C. Rhode Island 



Red^ ^°"^ better. 40 first and second 
rr*, i/o P"''!f 5^ ^^ Sedalia and Kansas 
*>ity 150 grand birds at special prices to 
quick buyers Place eRs^ orders now 

I>. J. HMS'i;. Tarthasre, Mo. 



AnCOnas exclusively, l^eaderstor 12 
iniicuiiad years. Hundreds of prizes in 
hot competition won bv us and our customers 
Young and old stock $1.50 and up. Prices low 
for quality. Our stock and eggs will put vou 
upamong the leaders^ W. H. Br.nthoover" 
61 15 Station St., East End. Pittsburg. Pa 
^;5^^^^^AnconaClub of America 



Houdans and Buff cVukiitT*^ wlnnlr" 
Wyandottes l^^^So^l^^ 't.ll 

andaigua. making nearly clean sweeps Hou- 
dan eggs $.1 Wyandotte eggs $2 Circulars. ' 
Mrs. R Y. Bowden, Clifton Springs. N. Y. 



5 LINE BRED FOR 20 YEARS I 

I Get prices on eggs and .stock before buying 5 
i elsewhere. Illustrated circular free. > 

?E^M. BUECHLY. Box 10, Greenville. Ohio I 




BARRED ROCKS pickerel mating of 
P.,n . 1- ,.^^**^'^ the very brst strain. 

Pullet ine is direct descendants or -Louis- 

J?rf^F^'V-'y fl«ck headed by prize winners 

?1 .>0 for 1;) eggs Catalogjie free 

S. R. Patterson, Dept. P. F., Centerville. Iowa 



s7n^iectm\Red Cockcrels ^^"^^ 

Special cockerel of Decatur. 111. in a class ir,. 
Also Rose Comb Reds. Beck strain direct 

p''r?ce^s|2 w'^u r"'''^^'^ ^^^^"^ November 27th.' 
FERD. W. loERTEL. BRIGHTON. ILL 



w^w — ^^'^^^^ COMB 

BUFF ORPINGTONS 

Eggs from exhibition and utility .stock Send 
for Mating I,ist. A fe 
for sale. H BRE 



breedi 
VOORl ZABRISKTE 



Img cockerels 



17 F.lni St.. Wob 



urn, Mass. 



^S»-^i^>^^^\ 



Cornish Indians. Superb Matings. 

Best imported and domestic blood. Kees for 
hatchiTig. Have bred Corni.sh IS ^^r,rc 



ggs 
Corni.sh 18 years 
Can help you. 

T. D. Moore, Box 92, Hopkinsville, Ky. 



hatchiTig. Have 
Cockerels for sale. 



St prize win- 
rs at Metidan. 



Rose Comb Brown f,l\ 

LEGHORNS !^''^f°'-^^- Worcester and 
^vaiAvri%il.j Hoston. A few good cock- 
erels for sale from the 1st Boston cock. Fees 
for hatching -^-sks 

C^FLCLARK. BOX F. COBALT. CONN. 



White Plume Farm p"^^' J"^*^ft»»e fovv 

up your flock All ™^^:^^s''' ^^ 
r,^!"f'^l\,?°i^AWhite_ African Guineas 



WATSON'S CELEBRATED STRAIN OF 

5,,^fn ^°"?*' .^.'?<?.'^^ '^'""^ '*«d« Golden 
PiiMCfs.s laid 291 eggs ,n a year; .50 hens 

averaged 240 in a year; eggs and cockerels 
trom this great .strain for sale; a recipe for 
.sure cure for lice, 10c ^ 

IRA WATSON, - FREDONIA. N. Y. 



EGGS FOR HATCHING 

from S. C Brown Leghorns. S. C. Black and 
White Minorcas. White Wyandottes. Barred 
Rocks and R. C. Rhode Island Reds. 

C. Jackson, Buchtel, Ohio, L. Box M- 



Kl'.w?^H*'V* )Vyandotf,.s, Whit.- C rested 
i$la<k Polish ami ISarred J'lymouth 
li«>ekM. Direct desceiidantH from Madlsou square 
and Chicago winners. Won tweuty elKhc reKuiar 
?o^*'^!J''? '"^"^ dlplomaH at Oelweln. Iowa. Jan. 
• ,.^' '", "trong competlon. Choice stock for 
sale. Circular free. Cascade roultry Yards 
Win. Neiers. Prop., L. lj.4r,, Casrade. la! 



IVCCU O K. c. RHODE LSLANI) REDS 

Winners of first at Chicago, Kewanee, Prince- 
ton and Illinois State Shows. (;et my descrip- 
tive circular of six grand matings for the ese 
'''"""^" DR. F. M. REED. 

Wvanet. Ill 



.season. 




'10 




Light Brahmas. Felch Strain Direct 

hggs trom high-scoring prize winning stock 
12 00 per 15. On 11 entries at New Castle Pa 
'09, won 11 prizes and $10 gold special for best 
display 111 Asiatics Pens headed bv 93 and 94 
pt. males. Females score from 92K to 95. 
3d prize ck. score 92^ and ckls. for sale. 
Mrs.Rd Rirtlett 16914 0.qk <5t Newcastle Pa 



CRYSTAL WHITE ORPINGTONS 

vVe head the Kellerstrass strain and hav. 
defeated the strongest competition at leading 
shows. You don't take chances when you 
send us an order for stock or eges Both for 
^^'^"oj^. Write us D, A WEDGE. 
215 Galena Street Aurora, III 



S. C. R. I. REDS AND BARRED 
PLYMOUTH ROCKS '^s*" f^"- '""" 

„, .. r "^^ *** »*>-'v**vuc u p winners. 
Write for our 1910 mating list which gives a 
complete li.st of our winnings 
E. H. DOWNS. RTE, 20, IDAVILLE. IND. 



PRIZE WINNING 

WHITE PLYMOUTH 2".^ '§L°^i\7 
ROCKS -^- ^1^^^" ^"^^^ ^'"•'' y^^^- Prices 

OSCAR E. 



right. 
WOOD 



UNION. IOWA 



S.C. and R.C.RHODE ISLAND REDS 

vn.?-^ h ""''"^^'^ i^!''''''^ descendants from New 

Cloud. Rose comb descendants of O. E Miles 

oh?iKir'T'''''/^'''f'*' ""« *•«•"•'«• Be«t stock 
ohtalnahle. l-or stock and eggs write 

Dr.E. B. CRAMHLIT, AMES, IOWA 



BUFF ROCKS and BUFF 
WYANDOTTES r^'^'l'"' ^ ' 

Ivyons, Delevan and Waterford." Fges^^rom 
select matings that will produce wfnnerT 
W rite for prices. L. C. VOGT, Lyo^ WU.' 



Walker's White Rocks Aiway.^win. 

^""^^'o'l^'? ^^°.'^ t^'^y won all firsts, 3 s^e^ 
ond, 2 thirds. 1 fourth and all specials What 

$5pe"]r"' ^^"^^ *^^° ^^'^^ Eggs $3 and 
^BOBWALKER. Porter St., New Ca.tle, Pa. 



COCHINS HOME. Headquarters for Amer- 
ica s greatest Cochins and Brahmas. First prlzo 
and sliver cup winners aiJWlnnepeg, Can.. Seattle 
A.i.P Minn., 111., and S. Dak. State Fairs Man- 
kato, Minneapolis and Madison Square Garden 

mi«Htv R«Hrf P'"m®^ ^^^''''^ y*'" ^"y birds of 
quality Satisfaction guaranteed. 

C. M. Atvvood, Box Z. ,35, Dundee, Minn 



BUFF ROCKS 

sired by a 95 point male. AI 
Special prices for short time. 



o u n 



o c 



g 



Y 
S I 
so yearlings. 

L. Fawcett, Box 8, New Albany, Pa. 



At Indianapolis, Ind. State Show my 

Barred P. Rocks i^""" ^"^ ^'"^^*^^ -^^d 

1 . * • *^"^IV5 hen; li»U9 again thev 
<;i'" ^'L^'!,'^ -'^ ^'""^^- 3d and 4th h?n in 1910 
Springfield, O., 1st and 2nd hen. 1st pen 2iid 

u ^^^if L^;^ P"^^^»' 1910 a»«o Si ver Cup 

24 R?I^ n RM "• ^- BARNETT ^ 
,24m»hnelLBId8L.. . Springfield, 



hirain.) Hiack-rallcd .Japanese and IJutT Cochin 
Hantams. Marred liocks. A few choke cockerels 
of each variety for sale. Let me book vo, ? 
onlcr early for e^Ks from my chok^st maHn^i 
at #: .(H. per 1.5. i.^.tM) ,,er ;5(.. Bantam eKK8°Jft2^^ 
per I.'), !|4.(Mi per :50 "i."m okkb at 94,^ 

K. R. KOKEKTS CANASTOTA, N. Y. 




Mas ih,. Nice.Mt Ue.ln here In HrlKhton whv- He 
'Husemy strain comes from Renneft'^ f^«, 
P'ze winners scoring from SS to S4 Reclreri'.' 

V P 7Rmn^^?^ Satisfaction Kauranteed. 

. i.ampert. Hrf^jhton. ill. 



«:• 




• 






Columbian Wyandottes ?^*=^ ?i f^. p. rocks & s. c. w. leghorns 



Strain are prize winners. They win for me 
they win for ray customers. Tfiey wiU win 
for you. Old and young stock for sale prkes 
reasonable, write your wants. Jacob Heck 
Leeaeville, Mich. Station 23, Detroit, Mich* 



Egg orders booked now from my 200-eirff 
strains. Trap nests used. I know Jusrwhatl am 
i2^''^\ K^l'".'^^*^?'*'"^ ^1 ^ ^ ^'tt> a famous etS 
size. Write me for a square deal. 

H. O. SWIFT.-F. Castlewood, So. Dak. 



?^^'!l»* |;??-"d°b™<PspY4'?'fS^ Golden Wyandottes ^Z.^'''j^? 

Louis Dec 6-11, 1809. (54 in class, won 2d cock 
3d cockerel, 4th pullet, with 5 birds ' 

J. S. Penninffton, Box F. Plainfield, lU. 



Rr* n , A"^-""'*'","**^"- special strains 

Y*/^^" Safe arrival guaranteed. Send 
Babies u\ circular today. Servo.. 
Hatchery. Box 220, Edbon. 



111. 



America's Foremost Strains " f I'Jf^ 
Direct r°w\?u ^t' p';!^^'' °° ®- ^- ^^^^^ s 

p-," ^- ^i*^ Leghorns. Duck wing and 

Pit Gaines BuflF Cochin Bantams. Write for 
show record and prices. Egg orders booked 
before February 15th, .5 eggs free. 

»nf«M. Box Z. Bethleb* 



)a. 



'lei 



PHILLIPS' S. C. BLACK MINORCAS 

Noted for shape, size and color, bred from 
the best blood obtainable and winners at the 
leading shows. Write for prices and full 
particulars. 

THOSH PHILLIPS State Vice Pre.ident. 
^. C a. Minorca. Club, Dover, N. J. 




Cups at Mo. and Kas. State shows. "08 First 
pen Mo. State Fair Oct. m First pen G 
straight years at Sedalia .shows. Sweepstake 
pen Dec. '09. over all breeds. Males 953/ 
females to 9(5. Be«:t eggs $2 50 per ] 'i 
S- GJ^V^IPRECHT. Box H, ^ iVdalia. Mo. 



LIGHT BRAHMAS 

Size, fine markings, good leg and toe feather- 
ing etc. Kggs $2.00 per 15. Please send orders 
early. 

JNO. F. WOODS. UTILITY FARM, R. 19, 

Owensville, Ind. 




S. C White Leghorn Eggs for sale. 

Also from Chinese and Toulouse Gee.se 
Indian Runner Ducks and Black Langshans' 
Can plea.se you. Write for prices 
W. M SAWYER. Box F. Lanca.ter. Mo. 



PFILE'S CATALOGUE gives 
prices of all the leading varieties of 
land and water fowls. Farm raised 
stock for sale and egprs In season 
Send 2 cents for my Poultry Book, 

HENRY PFII.E 
Freport, 111, Dept. A 




Quality Strain BARKED KDCKs bavo 
heen Ine l.red for K. years from foremost wln^ 
ners In America. Winners at leadli^ "h™ 
Cocks hens, corkerels nn,l pullets both matCg 
for sale, from these winners or bred In 11m ^ 

C. O. DRAKE & SON, 
I oek R«»x '4:i'4, I,a Harpe, 111. 



At INDIANAPOLIS February V.m. my 

Barred Rocks ^.?"i^t cockerel. 2d cock. 

«^u«ivu **"^«Vd Silver Cup: Feb 1Q08 1st 

?sTn;i'' Tk^"'!,'U^^P^- ^^ f^t and 3dTock; 
nnlK I b^<?f<i Ro.e Comb Red.. Indiana^ 
polls winners too stoc k with quality for 
'^ale W. W. ZIKE, MORRISTOWN IND 



H«fm In 'h ^'^ )^ «"."r''- He mak..H no «uch 
wlJnlrL It r. ^,***M.""*'"" ^Vyatidottew were 
winners at Klmlra I'ouliry Show. .Ian. I'.uo, first 

inl^'f r*JJ 1. ""T*" coikerelH. first an.i third pullotH 

"ottfriK (KeaMnKN (;hftll(!nKe Strain.) 

l.oi.iK AV>Htfall. R. :i, WaverlF, N. Y. 



Langshan -Hills Poultry Farm. 
Home of Barnos' Black Lang. 

Snans, winners whenever shown. Wnte 
your wants; Cockerels and Pullets $2 50 each 
Hens $L50. Napoleon J. Ba»«s 
R. D. 7, Box 15. Winche.ter, Ky. 



SingleComM^S^^ 
Legh 



lOrnc Noted for size (4>^ to 7 lb. hens) 
iwiua color, typical shape, deep bay 

eyes, great vigor and greate.t po.ssible eej 

producers. Kggs $1.50 per 15; |<J.00 per m 

Honesty ffuaranteed. 

R^S. MOSELEYXambndgj;. N^Y. ..Poultry Judg^- 



I.AKE SHORE POtl^TRY FARM 

Breeders of 
Hisrji Class Silver Laced Wyandottes 
Exclusively. Stuck for sale at all times. Ekc 
odrers booked now. 

l^- Kl^fi^^'^^^^- P'"^"- HENRY MAU. Mgr. 
bx.nth ChlcaKO, Ills. K.F.D. No 34, Kenosha, Wis 



BUFF WYANDOTTES Cxcl«i. 
sively. Ideal shape, solid buff color, 
(niaranteed to please you. Eggs and Baby 
chicks. Write me today. 



GLENN 
EDEN CENTER. 



H. BURGOTT, 



N. Y 



• « 



Fat»ltl«»s»'» Ho«iLcians, 287 
KeS strain. Five carefully mated pens 
ol large, crested, dark colored birds, de- 
.scended from the greatest prize winners in 
America. Book your orders now for Spring. 
A few males at low prices. Circular free. 
Wm. C. Snider. Box 105. Kan.a., III. 



Rini^let Barred Ply-tnotitH 
RocUs won all firsts at Oshkosh, 1909 two 
Sliver cups, clean sweep. Cockerels $1 .50 up 
Eggs, best matings ^3..50per 15 $5 per 30 gen- 
eral stock $1.50. LAKK View Poultry Farm. 
T. W. Critchette, ^larkesan. Wis. 



Babv Chicks Eggs for hatching. White 
vT.uV^ . Orpington, Barred Rock, 

White Wyandotte, Mammoth Bronze Turkey. 
All prize winning stock and grand birds. 
Shipped with .safety anywhere. Book your 
orders now. MISS CLARA L. SMITH 
Landon Poultry Yard*. Croxton, Va. 



f 1P*iS*h"^^*^ *■*«* WHlte Minor. 

?ioH^o«H fo'",s'^e and egg production. 
Stock and eggs for .sale in season. All cor- 
respondence answered promptly. 

O. B. SmitH (Sb Son. 

Rox 454 North Haiti more, O. 




R. C WHITE LEGHORNS ^^.'^I'l 

Great Milwaukee Show. 1910. Eggs and 

birds tor sale. Send for circular. Eggs from 

prize winning S. C. WHITE and BROWN 

LEGHORN.*; 

Di.t. Atty. Philip Lehner, Princeton, Wi., 




o « . ^' .V^^*"^« ''""ed from New Vork 
on^lt'tl''^ Hochester winners, 5 firsts Tseconda 
on , entries at Rochester show, Dec \m) Ciu-k 
erels «3 to tio, pullets 12 to $6, THob •: to $15 
fcKgs $8 per 15. r, per .30. Free setting from best 
pen with eacli tio orcler. Stoc-k K-mra'SiSeed. 
*. A. C AMPHKM,. UONKOYK, N. Y. 



_- C. BLACK ^°" «" fi'^st prizes 
^Uj^I.JtlJlX'C^y^ ^t Columbus show 

ORPINGTONS 1909«J«o«everalatOcon- 
f I / o ,°'"°^<^ and silver cup 

for best pen. Several choice cockerels for sale 
Eggs from pen No. 1 $', per 15 : pen No. 2 |2 
per 15. Dora Jame. Pick Fall River. Wi.. 



CLASS Single Comb Rhode Island 

Reds ^V/-^ Winners. Eggs from 1st pen, 
»^cu» setting 15 eggs $2.50. Eggs from 2nd 

t%T*€v tK ^tfv^ «-«•#-. dM> nr^ r^_ - * - - 



pen, setting 15 eggs $2.00 

orders of 100 or more. 

faction. William Kenney, Sparland, lU. 



Special prices on 
Guaranteed .satis- 



RHODE ISLAND BKD8 WlnJ;^; Jt' the 
blK Centervllie Iowa, and St.Louls shows. Wrltl 
for catalogue describing the largest pure bred 
Poultry Farm In North Mo. Fancy and utility 
matings a specialty Egg orders booked. Guar 

JOHN KKARSE, R. 1, C oafsville. Mo. 



WHITE PLYMOUTH ^J-ff-/^, -^ 

w^ ^'\.^'<»mw 1 ■ ,.. , p 11 I i e I s tor 

ROCK ^**^l- ^S^^l« score from 94X to iw; 
^s^^w^m. ajj(j ^jjj improve your flock 

W. R. GEIER REMINGTON, IND. 



BARRED ROCK EGGS gl^'^^ 

bator eggs $4 per 100. M. B. Turkey eggs $6 

per 10. Won leading prizes at Shelbyville 

and Indianapolis shows. Geo O. Anderson 

R 5, Box 0022, Rushville. Ind. 



FOR SALE. M. BRONZE 
TURKEYS ^:7^ |Tp',S^i\^ 

Tom. Finest stock to be found. Also S I 

Wyandottes. c. J. KAPPHAHN 

R. 8 ALEXANDRIA, MINN. 



WYANOOTTE8 AND LANOSHANS. 

v\ Inner* at ht. Louis Show. l%9. also two r^5 (»<i 
silver cups at big Perry county 19(»9 show lu hot- 
test class of Wyandottes ever shown. Partridge 
and BufT Wyandottes 42 per l."). H setting for «5 
Black Langshans l.fW) per ir,. HulTs BrM t)y H B 
8c.hlndl«>r. Partridge and Langwhans bred by .John 
Allen. Allen & .Schindler FerryvJll*^, Mo 



LIGHT EXCLUSIVELY 12 years a breed- 
DD A Lim'iia o^' ''"'^*''' excellent, high 
BRAHMAS scoring great layers. 
«^«^^-a.a AiVA^^kj ^ J pj jj ■! 

particular. Flock of 200 to .seTect from. Pn?es 
HAPoi?f "k A V/jL*" «^"<"8^sor incubator lots. 
HAROLD DAVIS SLEEPY EYE, MINN 



o../'r 1 y^ V^u- '^»*>*x>n Winner. at Defiance 
and Toledo, Ohio, 1910. Kggs from irrand 
mating that will produce winners $2 00 per 
15. Illustrated circular free 
Four Si.ter. Poultry Farm, Will P. Yetter. 
Prop.. R. No. 3. Box A. New Bavaria. Ohio 



EGGS ^ BARRED^ J^^LYMOUTH EGGS 

FOR HATCHING 

both pullet and cockerel lines. Catalogue 
giving winning, mating and prices free. 

Cha.. F. SCHLUETER, Box K. Reynold.. III. 




^m 






'"^~~^^. 




POULTRY FANCIER 



...4JmiiiinmiutunB<ji 





SPECIAL DISPLAY AI>S 

Ads will be inserted in this department under the folIowin<7 ^««J.»- tl 

•hall be uniform, each ad occuoyine thre*. r,n«r/-l-«f ^ u *=?"a't«on»: The size 
advertiser to use the samrspace lach monftT A%1 "" *"u^ *\"»'« column Each 
months if desired. No aTs wIR be in^er^eH^J Uss^lfan^^ie?^^^ "t\"^^ *^^"-* 

$10 per year. Payment strictly in advance No excepL^tr^^^^ T^^ "•'* ?' 

made exceptionally low on this account. exceptions to this rule. The price is 



lYe k!,K??h'^' *"^ '^ F White Leghorns 

ine kind the new staiuhtrd calls for ot k; 

f/i^n"':; k''"'.^ '• ^'""^^ '-^"^J ^ seconds; Pens 
kU. f -'' !u*'''^ ^""^"^^ ^"^^•'^ '-^"fl cockerels 

dred Satisfaction prnarantted. Write vour 
''''"^' Js>JiRd£ll^»Virdin.ni 



Rose Comb Brown Leghorn Egg; 

from special iiialed pens, Madisoi 
Square, Chicago and Hoston winners 
circulars. JAMES CRAWFORD. 

Cameron Mills, N. Y. 




Dr. Holmes' Trap-Nested. Standard-bred, 

coiSb Rhode Island REDS 



Hred for viiror. siz<-. slinpc, color. Stock and 
eggs in seaso'i Free ci talojr 

«/ . ^I^^^c.^^^^ POULTRY PENS 
West Mam Street, - EVANSTON. ILL. 



Buff Cochins That Win 

On ten birds at Cedar Kapids. I svon all flrHts •m.l 
Bpeclal for best lu. i can belp you win too 
you send me your order for stock or eggs, (irand 

J. C. MITCHEM. Marshalltown. Iowa 



S DON'T OVERLOOK THIS 

J other people would read your ad if it wei 
\ tiere, just the same as you are reading this > 
/ °?f^- o t"« rates and conditions at the head > 
V ot this department and send in an ad. It will > 
J 5^'"gyo" Rood returns. POULTRY FANCIER. > 
l^ Dearborn Street, Chicago. III. ) 




R. C. & S. C. Rhode Island 

Red^ ^'""^ better. 40 6rst and second 
rif T'\ ^''^■''I .""^ ^^ Sedalia and Kan.sas 
City loO grand birds at special prices to 
quick buyers Place egg orders now 
I). J. 



I8MSS. Cartbnjr*-, M<». 



AnCOnaS exclusively. Lea'lerstor 12 
r&ucuiia5 y^ars. Hundreds of prizes m 
hotconipetition won bv us and our customers 
Voung and old stock fL.'iO and up. Prices low 
for quality. Our stock and eggs will put vou 

lip among the leaders W H R*. n. 
«:iiec* I- el i- ^^ "' *'r«nthoover, 

61 15 Station St East End. Pittsburg. P« 

^^i^^Ti^ljIJliAncpna Club of America 



Houdans and Buff ;;:^;;,r^ wl,,,;;: I 

Wyandottes ll^.'.'^lT^'oJirjr a';,',', l^lHl: 

andaigna. making nearly clean sweeijs Uuu- 
dan v^K>J^ \Vva„<lolte e^^- $2 Circulars. ' 
Mrs R Y. Bowden, Clifton Springs. N. Y 



<^-ifjgmm 



LINE BRED FOR 20 YF >.; } 

Oct prices on eggs and stock before buying > 
^elsewhere. Illiistratt-d circular free. > 

} E. M. BUECHLY. Box 10, Greenville. Ohio l 
i ^ _ J^ 




Light Brahmas. Felch Strain Direct 

IsKUs tr(.m high-scoring prize winning stock 
II* 00 i)er \^. On 11 entries at New Castle. Pa. 
'OH. won 11 prizes and JIO gold special for best 
<iisplay in Asiatics Pens headed bv <)3 and 94 
pt. males. Females score from 92^4 to 95. 
Hd prize ck. .score 92\f and ckl.s. for sale 
Mrs.Kd Rqttlett ]>]()K Onk «?t NewCactlp Pn 



CRYSTAL WHITE ORPINGTONS 

vve head the Kellerstrass strain an<l haw 
defeated the strongest competition at leading 
shows. You don't take chances when vou 
se'id us an order for stock or eges Hoth'for 
sale now. Write us. D. A WEDGE. 
2 l.S Galena Street Aurora, 111. 





BARRED ROCKS ^,«ckeiel matng of 
,. ,, .. ^"-^ the verv bi-st strain. 



Pullet line is direct descendants or' -Louis- 
ana, i/jt- Worlds Fair hen. K«gs $3 to $', for 
L liniy flock ht-aded bv prize winners 



IT) 



51 .'Ofor 15 eggs Catalogue free. 

S. R. Patterson, Dept. P. F.. Centerville.Iowa 



S. C. R. 1. REDS AND BARRED 
PLYMOUTH ROCKS *^^^«" ''°"> '' " 

„, ., „ -^^ » »» *%vv*t».»jc u p winners. 
U rite for oiu IHlO mating list which gives a 
complete list of our winnings 
E. H. DOWNS, RTE, 20, IDAVILLE. IND. 




Single Comb Rcd Cockcrels Fi^i^lnd 
Special cockerel of Decatur. 111. in a cla.ss 75 
Al.so Ko.se Comb Red.s. Beck strain direct 
Pr?cesJ2oo'^i .'"""''^''^^^ after November 27th.' 
FERD. W. OERTEL. BRIGHTON. ILL 



PRIZE WINNING 

WHITE PLYMOUTH .':^tr '?^^:tz 

ROCKS ^^^ ^^^" ^^'^'' ^^"'' y^^^- P''i^«^s 

OSCAR E. WOOD UNION. IOWA 



SINGLE, COMK 




BUFF ORPINGTONS 

hggs from exhibition and lUilitv stock Send 
for .Mating List. A few breeding cockerels 
for sale. H BRRVOORT ZABRISKTR 

17 rin, .St.. U'ohnrn. Ma'ss. 




S.C.aiulR.C. KHODi: ISLAM) RKDS 

Slnf.de coml.N duvet .lc.s,-en.i.-mlN from New 

?Mmw.^ T'"""- *"«/'/••■ -'"'l <;io'y' nnd -IJed 
Cloud. I'ONc comb (lesceiidantHof (). K Miles 
lirst pen. Hiiperlor color, line comhs. Best stock 
ol.tafnnhle. iv.r .stock Mnd e^-^-s write 
Dr. i:. 15. rUAMULIT, A M KS, TOWA